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Leftovers: Debian

  • He who forgets history...
    Hi all, I just looked back on the Halloween Documents, specifically http://www.catb.org/esr/halloween/halloween1.html . Here are two quotes I find both interesting and timely: * Linux can win as long as services / protocols are commodities. * OSS projects have been able to gain a foothold in many server applications because of the wide utility of highly commoditized, simple protocols. By extending these protocols and developing new protocols, we can deny OSS projects entry into the market. So next time one of the new breed calls you a neckbeard for helping build a distro with simple protocols and services, show him http://www.catb.org/esr/halloween/halloween1.html . And try not to laugh when the whole thing goes right over his head.
  • My Free Software Activities in July 2015
    This month I have been paid to work 15 hours on Debian LTS.
  • Linaro VLANd v0.3
    VLANd is a python program intended to make it easy to manage port-based VLAN setups across multiple switches in a network. It is designed to be vendor-agnostic, with a clean pluggable driver API to allow for a wide range of different switches to be controlled together.

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers

  • Friday's security updates
  • These Researchers Just Hacked an Air-Gapped Computer Using a Simple Cellphone
    The most sensitive work environments, like nuclear power plants, demand the strictest security. Usually this is achieved by air-gapping computers from the Internet and preventing workers from inserting USB sticks into computers. When the work is classified or involves sensitive trade secrets, companies often also institute strict rules against bringing smartphones into the workspace, as these could easily be turned into unwitting listening devices.
  • Fake Address Round Trip Time: 13 days
    Regular readers will have noticed that I've been running a small scale experiment over the last few months, feeding one spammer byproduct back to them via a reasonably accessible web page. The hope was that I would learn a few things about spammer behavior in the process.