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Nvidia unveils cheaper 4GB version of its Jetson TX2 and begins shipping its next-gen Xavier module

Nvidia announced a lower-cost 4GB version of its Linux-driven Jetson TX2 module with half the RAM and eMMC and has begun shipping its next-gen Jetson AGX Xavier. Nvidia will soon have three variants of its hexa-core Arm Jetson TX2 module: the original Jetson TX2, the more embedded, industrial temperature Jetson TX2i , and now a new Jetson TX2 4GB model. The chip designer also announced availability of its next-gen, robotics focused Jetson AGX Xavier module (see farther below). Read more

Server: Arista, Red Hat, Istio and More (Mostly KubeCon + CloudNativeCon)

  • Arista Extends Its Reach Into Containers
    Networking in containerized environments is really hard to do with a traditional network stack. Virtual machines seem complex, according to many engineers I know, but as the Canadian rock band Bachman-Turner Overdrive used to sing "B-b-b-baby, you ain't seen n-n-nothin yet," as containers take complexity to the next level. Containers are unlike anything network professionals have dealt with before. They are highly dynamic, are spun up and down very quickly and often run for just a few seconds. Traditional networking can be used for VMs and physical workloads, which aren't very agile and take a long time to boot. But the dynamic nature of containers makes visibility, connectivity and security much more difficult, as services need to be invoked as soon as the container is spun up and then turned off when the container is shut down. If a live container loses connectivity, bad things happen, so ensuring the network is there and rock solid is critical.
  • Arista Networks Showcases Any Cloud Networking at KubeCon NA 2018
  • KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Videos Now Online
    This week's KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2018 in Seattle was the biggest ever! This sold-out event featured four days of information on Kubernetes, Prometheus, Envoy, OpenTracing, Fluentd, gRPC, containerd, and rkt, along with many other exciting projects and topics.
  • How Epic Games Uses Kubernetes to Power Fortnite Application Servers
    "This is my first time in the gaming industry, I didn't know what to expect when I joined, but it turns out that scaling a video game is just like scaling any other successful product," Sharpe said. "Modern game development is actually a whole lot of microservices and other types of technology that are used outside of the gaming industry." Sharpe said that Epic Games is already heavily invested in AWS (Amazon Web Services) and has been using Docker containers. He added that moving to Kubernetes is a natural evolution of Epic Games' work, which is all about trying to improve developers lives.
  • DevOps lessons: 4 aspects of healthy experiments
    Fast iteration is all the rage. And it’s not just DevOps and software. It’s even made its way into distilling bourbon. When Bryan Davis of Lost Spirits distillery talked about accelerated bourbon aging in a recent Gastropod podcast, I expected the win would be about reducing costs; it’s expensive to keep bourbon aging for a decade or more! But no. It’s more about tweaking variables over the course of days, rather than years. “I would never have been able to build up the business to the point where I could take all the failed batches and throw them away. And so what the technology really did for me was make it possible for me to compete,” Davis says.
  • 6 best practices for highly available Kubernetes clusters
    Everyone running a Kubernetes cluster in production wants it to be reliable. Many administrators implement a multi-master setup, but often this isn't enough to consider a cluster highly available. A highly available microservice requires that the system gracefully handle the failures of its components. If one part of the system fails in any way, the system can recover without significant downtime. So how exactly can you achieve a highly available, highly reliable, and multi-master Kubernetes cluster? One way is to run a regional Kubernetes cluster on the Google Kubernetes Engine, a managed version of Kubernetes hosted on the Google Cloud Platform.
  • Tigera Looks To Improve Cloud-Native Kubernetes Networking
    The new funding was led by Insight Venture Partners, with participation from existing investors Madrona, NEA, and Wing. Total funding to date for Tigera stands at $53 million. The new fund raise is the second such event for the company in 2018, with a $10 million raise announced back in January. EnterpriseNetworkingPlanethas been following Tigera since the company was first announced in May 2016 at the CoreOS Fest event in Berlin, Germany. "Kubernetes is gaining momentum within every progressive enterprise," Ratan Tipirneni president and CEO of Tigera, stated in a media advisory. "These businesses cannot get their applications to production without strong security controls and the ability to prove compliance." "As a result, we are being pulled into several hundred projects and will use this funding to meet that demand," Tipirneni added.
  • Changes to OpenShift Online Starter Tier
    For some time now, we have offered our OpenShift Online service in a few service tiers. This hosted service has been available since 2011, and to date, well over 4 million applications have been launched on OpenShift Online. One of the key features of this hosted form of Red Hat OpenShift has been our Starter tier, where we have provided free access to our award-winning platform for learning and experimenting. This service has helped many users kick the tires on OpenShift, and to build their own proof of concepts, or to port a single application to measure the experience. We’re happy that we have been able to enable so many newcomers to our platform with this free service. We have listened to our users, and we’re happy to announce that we will be increasing the resources of this free service by double. Due to the popularity of our platform, we will be introducing time limits on the Starter platform to allow more users to take advantage of this useful resource.
  • VMware Paid $550M for Heptio to Boost Its Kubernetes Portfolio
    VMware paid $550 million for its recently closed acquisition of 2-year-old Kubernetes-focused startup Heptio. That amount was a substantial premium over what Heptio had raised from investors and other similar deals in the Kubernetes space.
  • KubeCon 2018 Bits
    This week KubeCon took place in Seattle, offering over 8,000 attendees (2,000 on the waiting list didn’t make it) an updated vision on Kubernetes as well as the projects under development and consideration. Thus far three projects have graduated (Kubernetes, Prometheus and Envoy) a dozen or so are incubating and many more are hopeful within the Sandbox. Over 125 event sponsors wanted to be sure the attendees understood their view and involvement in these projects, most of them going way beyond simply offering Kubernetes distributions. Security was a hot topic as well as management and deployment of these projects.
  • The co-founder of $725 million cloud startup Mesosphere is stepping aside as CEO to make way for a Symantec veteran
    Earlier this year, cloud startup Mesosphere raised $125 million, bringing its total funding to just shy of $250 million. That deal valued Mesosphere at $725 million, according to Bloomberg, up from $600 million in 2016. Now, Mesosphere co-founder Florian Leibert is following through on his previously-announced intention to step aside as CEO, to take a new role focused on strategy and working with customers. Replacing him will be Mike Fey, most recently president and COO of Symantec, in a move that the company says will help it achieve the next stage of growth by going after larger customers.
  • Kubernetes vendors target container security, operations and management
    If you were kicking the tires on Kubernetes and other cloud/container services, you found may have found nirvana at this week’s KubeCon + CloudNativeCon 2018 where all manner of new operational software and support from VMware, Arista and others were on display. To access the growing popularity of cloud, Kubernetes and containers, the Cloud Foundry Foundation released the results of a new survey that found among other things that 45 percent of companies are doing at least some cloud-native app development, and 40 percent are doing some re-architecting/refactoring of their legacy apps.
  • Istio service mesh tradeoffs prompt caution among IT pros
    Some Kubernetes proponents said they believe Istio service mesh is as important to cloud-native infrastructure as container orchestration, but most enterprise IT shops aren't ready to dive in just yet. Service mesh, a term coined by the makers of Linkerd in 2016, refers to a microservices networking architecture that consists of a centralized control plane and a pool of sidecar containers deployed in each container cluster pod. The sidecars' proximity to microservices workloads creates detailed visibility into application performance and intricate segmentation of networks for container security. Istio is also backed by IBM and Google, and therefore has the attention of the Kubernetes community, especially since the project reached version 1.0 in July 2018. Google and IBM subsidiary Red Hat promoted Istio management products and services at KubeCon here this week, while the project generated buzz in the halls among conference attendees. In the right hands, service mesh can be a vital tool for microservices management, but it comes with daunting complexity for IT pros already challenged to learn container orchestration.
  • ​What is the Kubernetes hybrid cloud and why it matters
    Over 8,000 people are at KubeCon in Seattle. Every major tech company and businesses I've never even heard of are here and trumpeting their Kubenetes distros -- about 80 of them. IBM recently bought Red Hat for a cool $34-billion. I, and others, think they did it to get Red Hat's Kubernetes expertise. Why? To answer this question we need to look into the hybrid-cloud model.

Uber brings Horovod project for distributed deep learning to Linux Foundation

Uber today brought Horovod, a framework for distributed training across multiple machines, to open source initiative LF Deep Learning Foundation. Uber has used Horovod to support self-driving vehicles, fraud detection, and trip forecasting. Contributors to the project include Amazon, IBM, Intel, and Nvidia. In addition to Uber, Alibaba, Amazon, and Nvidia also use Horovod. The Horovod project can be used with popular frameworks like TensorFlow, Keras, and PyTorch. Read more Also: LF Deep Learning Welcomes Horovod Distributed Training Framework as Newest Project

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