Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Login

Enter your Tux Machines username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 178
    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 178.
  • WinWorld – A Large Collection Of Defunct OSs, Software And Games
    The other day, I was testing Dosbox which is used to run MS-DOS games and programs in Linux. While searching for some classic programs like Turbo C++, I stumbled upon a website named WinWorld. I went through a few links in this site and quite surprised. WinWorld has a plenty of good-old and classic OSs, software, applications, development tools, games and a lot of other miscellaneous utilities which are abandoned by the developers a long time ago. It is an online museum run by community members, volunteers and is dedicated to the preservation and sharing of vintage, abandoned, and pre-release software. WinWorld was started back in 2003 and its founder claims that the idea to start this site inspired by Yahoo briefcases. The primary purpose of this site is to preserve and share old software. Over the years, many people volunteered to improve this site in numerous ways and the collection of old software in WinWorld has grown exponentially. The entire WinWorld library is free, open and available to everyone.
  • How to Encrypt USB Drive on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS
  • The excellent 2D action RPG 'CrossCode' is now officially out
    CrossCode from Radical Fish Games is a rather great 2D action RPG and today it was officially released across multiple stores. It's a fun idea, having you play as a character who is actually in an MMO set in the far future, where your avatar has a physical form. It's 2018 after all, we have films like Ready Player One that follow a guy running around in VR… Inspired by some of the classic JRPGs, CrossCode has a lot of familiar RPG elements and anyone who has played an action-RPG will feel right at home. I've been waiting so long for this to be finished and it's absolutely worth the wait.
  • Transhuman Design has removed the Linux version of BUTCHER due to issues in favour of Steam Play
    It seems Transhuman Design have removed the Linux version of BUTCHER after users reported issues, opting instead to ask Steam to add it as an approved Steam Play title. [...] After digging into the Steam forum, I came across this forum topic started in August, where four users mentioned trouble starting the game. That doesn't seem like a lot of people to make such a big decision, but it's understandable that with a tiny team and little time they're trying to make it so Linux gamers still have a good experience. Probably a good case for Valve to allow people to have a choice between native and Steam Play's Proton.
  • Tumbleweed Gets New Versions of KDE Plasma, Applications
    A total of four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were delivered to users of the rolling release this past week and the snapshot brought new versions of KDE Plasma and KDE Applications. The most recent snapshot 20180917 updated three packages. The GNOME package dconf-editor was updated to 3.30.0. Users of the ext2 filesystem will notice the utility package e2fsprogs 1.44.4 will fix the debugs ncheck command to work for files with multiple hard links; the updated package also has new debugfs commands for dumping xattr blocks and i_blocks array. Another GNOME package was updated with the iagno 3.30.0 package for the game reversi, which shows that GNOME 3.30 packages are starting to be integrated into Tumbleweed snapshots. Another three packages were updated in the 20180916 snapshot. The GNU Project debugger, gdb 8.2, added several patches and support access to new POWER8 registers. A fix was made for a GNU Compiler Collection 8.1 warning with the perl-DBD-mysql 4.047 updated, which also added options needed for public key based security. The other package that was updated in the snapshot was perl-Glib 1.327.
  • Slim signage player features Radeon E8860 GPU and six HDMI ports
    Ibase’s high-end “SI-626” signage player runs Windows or Linux on 7th or 6th Gen Intel Core CPUs with Radeon E8860 graphics, and offers 6x HDMI 1.4b ports, EDID remote management, and a 30mm profile. Ibase’s new SI-626 digital signage and video wall player combines high-end functionality with a slim 30mm height — 1.5mm thinner than its AMD Ryzen V1000 based SI-324 player. Like the SI-324, the SI-626 features hardware based EDID remote management with software setting mode to prevent display issues due to cable disconnection or display identification failures.
  • 15 Best “Lite” Android Go Apps To Save Battery And Storage In 2018
  • Hide your real name in Open Source
    If you’re thinking about contributing to Open Source, please take a moment to think of the negative impact it could have on your career…
  • Thermal Microconference Accepted into 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference
    As the energy density of computer systems has increased, thermal issues have become an increasingly hot topic across the spectrum from hand-held systems to internet datacenters. Because the need for thermal management is relatively new, there is a wide variety of hardware and firmware mechanisms, to say nothing of a wide variety of independently developed software to interact with these mechanisms. This in turn results in complex and almost-duplicate code to manage and control thermal excursions. This microconference will therefore look to see if it is possible to consolidate or at least to better align the Linux kernel’s thermal subsystems. This microconference will therefore discuss better handling of low ambient temperatures, userspace thermal control, improvements to thermal zone mode, better support for indirect (virtual) temperature measurement, sensor hierarchy, scheduler interactions with thermal management, and improvements to idle injection as a way to cool a core.
  • Debian: DSA-4298-1: hylafax security update

Databases and Python Programming

  • NoSQL Books
    One of the most basic choices to make when developing an application is whether to use a SQL or NoSQL database to store the data. “NoSQL” simply means non-relational and not SQL. It’s sometimes referred to as unstructured storage. Like any type of database, NoSQL systems are used for storing and retrieving data. But NoSQL systems store and manage data in ways that allow for high operational speed and great flexibility which is extremely useful for big data databases and cloud databases.
  • Canonical Announces Extended Security Maintenance for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, Mozilla to Discuss the Future of Advertising at ICDPPC, Newegg Attacked, MetaCase Launches MetaEdit+ 5.5 and MariaDB Acquires Clustrix
    MariaDB has acquired Clustrix, the "pioneer in distributed database technology". According to the press release, this acquisition gives "MariaDB's open source database the scalability and high-availability that rivals or exceeds Oracle and Amazon while foregoing the need for expensive computing platforms or high licensing fees."
  • Python 3.7 beginner's cheat sheet
    The Python programming language is known for its large community and diverse extension menu, but much is packed into the language itself. This cheat sheet rounds up a few built-in pieces to get new Python programmers started.
  • 8 Python packages that will simplify your life with Django
    Django developers, we're devoting this month's Python column to packages that will help you. These are our favorite Django libraries for saving time, cutting down on boilerplate code, and generally simplifying our lives. We've got six packages for Django apps and two for Django's REST Framework, and we're not kidding when we say these packages show up in almost every project we work on. But first, see our tips for making the Django Admin more secure and an article on 5 favorite open source Django packages.

California’s First Open Source Election System: Maybe not!

OSI Affiliate Member, California Association of Voting Officials (CAVO), has expressed concerns that a recent announcement by Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk (Dean Logan) and the State of California's Secretary of State (Alex Padilla) was not accurate in their descriptions of a newly certified elections tally system, "Voting System For All People" (VSAP), as using "open source technology." Both the Los Angeles County and California Secretary of State announcements stated the elections system was, "the first publicly-owned, open-source election tally system certified under the California voting systems standards" [emphasis added]. Read more

Mozilla: WebVR, Firefox 63 Beta 10 Testday, End of Buildbot, Themes and Workshops

  • Performance-Tuning a WebVR Game
    For the past couple of weeks, I have been working on a VR version of one of my favorite puzzle games, the Nonogram, also known as Picross or Griddlers. These are puzzles where you must figure out which cells in a grid are colored in by using column and row counts. I thought this would be perfect for a nice, relaxing VR game. I call it Lava Flow. [...] There is a weird glitch where the whole scene pauses when rebuilding the game board. I need to figure out what’s going on there. To help debug the problems, I need to see the frames per second inside of VR Immersive mode. The standard stats.js module that most three.js apps use actually works by overlaying a DOM element on top of the WebGL canvas. That’s fine most of the time but won’t work when we are in immersive mode. To address this, I created a little class called JStats which draws stats to a small square anchored to the top of the VR view. This way you can see it all the time inside of immersive mode, no matter what direction you are looking.
  • Firefox 63 Beta 10 Testday, September 28th
    We are happy to let you know that Friday, September 28th, we are organizing Firefox 63 Beta 10 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on: Firefox Customize, Font UI, Tracking protection.
  • So long Buildbot, and thanks for all the fish
    Last week, without a lot of fanfare, we shut off the last of the Buildbot infrastructure here at Mozilla.
  • The future of themes is here!
    Themes have always been an integral part of the add-ons ecosystem and addons.mozilla.org (AMO). The current generation of themes – also known as lightweight themes and previously known as Personas (long story) – were introduced to AMO in 2009. There are now over 400 thousand of them available on AMO. Today we’re announcing the AMO launch of the next major step in the evolution of Firefox themes.
  • 8 tips for hosting your first participatory workshop
    “Why not give it a try?” Ricky, our senior user researcher said. “Design with people in my parents age without any design backgrounds? In-ter-est-ing……!” I couldn’t believe that he just threw such a crazy idea in our design planning meeting. Before we go through the whole story, let me give you more context about it. Mozilla Taipei UX team is currently working on a new product exploration for improving the online experience of people between the age of 55~65 in Taiwan. From 2 month, 4 rounds of in-depth interviews we conducted with 34 participants, we understood our target users holistically from their internet behaviors, unmet needs, to their lifestyles. After hosting a 2-day condense version of design sprint in Taipei office for generating brilliant product concepts (more stories, stay tuned :)), we were about to reach the stage of validation.