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Android Leftovers

Server: QUIC, Supercomputers, CloudLinux Dashboard and Cloud Native Computing Foundation

  • Daniel Stenberg: QUIC and missing APIs
    I trust you’ve heard by now that HTTP/3 is coming. It is the next destined HTTP version, targeted to get published as an RFC in July 2019. Not very far off. HTTP/3 will not be done over TCP. It will only be performed over QUIC, which is a transport protocol replacement for TCP that always is done encrypted. There’s no clear-text version of QUIC.
  • Huge Supercomputers Still Exist. Here’s What They’re Being Used for Today
    The term “Supercomputer” implies one gigantic computer many times more powerful than your simple laptop, but that couldn’t be farther from the case. Supercomputers are made up of thousands of smaller computers, all hooked up together to perform one task. Each CPU core in a datacenter probably runs slower than your desktop computer. It’s the combination of all of them that makes computing so efficient. There’s a lot of networking and special hardware involved in computers of this scale, and it isn’t as simple as just plugging each rack into the network, but you can envision them this way, and you wouldn’t be far off the mark. Not every task can be parallelized so easily, so you won’t be using a supercomputer to run your games at a million frames per second. Parallel computing is usually good at speeding up very calculation-oriented computing. Supercomputers are measured in FLOPS, or Floating Point Operations Per Second, which is essentially a measure of how quickly it can do math. The fastest one currently is IBM’s Summit, which can reach over 200 PetaFLOPS, a million times faster than “Giga” most people are used to.
  • CloudLinux Dashboard — Now in Production
    The CloudLinux OS Team is excited to announce the CloudLinux Dashboard Production release for our valued server and hosting panel administrators. We believe that this product will firmly integrate into your workflow and greatly improve your performance when managing servers.
  • Google dominates code contributions across Cloud Native Computing Foundation projects
    Even without counting Kubernetes, Google is far and away the largest code contributor to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) open source group. Google accounts for 53% of all code commits to the Linux Foundation's CNCF and has seven times more contributions than Red Hat, which only accounted for 7.4% of the contributed code. The analysis of code contributions was done by Stackalytics, which is an open source code analysis framework that is hosted by the OpenStack Foundation and sponsored by Mirantis.

OpenSUSE/SUSE: SLES for SAP and Christian Boltz Introduced

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications support update
    SUSE has announced effective December 1, 2018, two changes to its SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for SAP Applications product. SLES for SAP Applications now includes support for a given service pack for 4.5 years with the regular subscription while the basic codestream is general available and itself fully maintained. This change reflects the request from clients to align OS upgrades with hardware life cycles. To explain this a bit further, this change affects SLES for SAP Applications 12 and 15 code streams. SLES for SAP Applications 11 is at the end of the general availability already, therefore SLES for SAP Applications 11 SP4 is the last service pack. If clients choose to stay on SLES for SAP Applications 11, then they will need to purchase LTSS to ensure ongoing support. This is especially true for clients that run SAP HANA 1 workloads on IBM Power Systems servers in Big Endian mode.
  • 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet incumbent Christian Boltz
    With two weeks to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

ArchLabs Refresh Release, 2019.01.20

Gidday ArchLabbers, Happy New Year. With the new year comes an ISO refresh. All changes are listed at the change-log. If you encounter any issues, please post them at the forum. Also, ArchLabs related bugs need to be raised at BitBucket. Read more