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Games: AI War 2, Total War: WARHAMMER II and More

  • Grand strategy game AI War 2 is now available in Early Access
    AI War 2 from Arcen Games has finally entered Early Access today after being funded on Kickstarter back at the end of 2016. Thankfully, they've lived up to their promise of Linux support as it's available right away.
  • Play It Now - PixelJunk Shooter
    Welcome to the another review in the PIN (Play It NOW) series, where we highlight under-rated games that didn’t get the praise and attention they deserved on release and still don’t to this day. Until now! This time, we’ll take a look at PixelJunk Shooter by Q-Games Ltd.
  • The deep monster taming RPG 'Siralim 3' has now officially launched with Linux support
    For those after their next RPG fix, the monster taming game Siralim 3 [Official Site] is now officially out with Linux support as it has left Early Access. While not the most graphically pleasing, the Siralim series do always have a really good amount of depth in them allowing you a ridiculous amount of fun.
  • Feral show off Total War: WARHAMMER II on Linux, along with confirming more Linux ports and a Vulkan teaser
    Feral Interactive just put up a YouTube video to show off Total War: WARHAMMER II running on Linux, it's looking good and they confirmed again their future Linux plans. What's interesting, is that in this video they did confirm a few interesting bits of extra information. Firstly, they confirmed that Total War: WARHAMMER II is using Vulkan (which we knew already) but the more interesting thing is what they said after. They said "By the way, we do have more sweet sweet Vulkan plans up our sleeves, but they're secret.". It's going to be interesting to find out what they mean by that, since they wouldn't say such a thing if it just meant future ports will use Vulkan, since we already know that as they've said it multiple times before.
  • Eternum EX, a retro-inspired action platformer comes to Linux this month
    Inspired by ’80s arcade cabinet games, Eternum EX aims to be a challenging retro action platformer that's releasing this month. The developer said they were inspired by games like Bomb Jack (Tehkan, 1984), Ghosts’n Goblins (Capcom, 1985), Baluba-louk no Densetsu (Able, 1986) and Psychic 5 (Jaleco, 1987).
  • Smith and Winston, a metroidvania-styled twin-stick shooter in a voxel world has Linux support
    For those who love a good twin-stick shooter, Smith and Winston certainly looks quite interesting and it has some pretty sweet design.
  • Today, Linux game porter Ethan Lee begins officially working on Steam Play's Proton
    A small update for those interested in keeping up with the news surrounding Steam Play and Proton development. In September, we spoke to Linux game porter Ethan Lee where he went on to mention how he would like to officially work on Steam Play's Proton. Not long after our article went up, he ended up speaking to Valve so things started moving pretty quickly. All was quiet, then, at the start of this month he wrote a post on Google+ to mention that he was working out some sort of contract to officially begin working on it.

Ubuntu: Eurotech, LogMeIn Snap and Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 549

  • Canonical collaborates with Eurotech on edge computing solutions
    Coinciding with IoT World Solutions Congress in Barcelona this week, Canonical is pleased to announce a dual-pronged technological partnership with Eurotech to help organisations advance their internet of things enablement. Eurotech is a long time leader in embedded computing hardware as well as providing software solutions to aid enterprises to deliver their IoT projects either end to end or by providing intervening building blocks. As part of the partnership, Canonical has published a Snap for the Eclipse Kura project – the popular, open-source Java-based IoT edge framework. Having Kura available as a Snap – the universal Linux application packaging format – will enable a wider availability of Linux users across multiple distributions to take advantage of the framework and ensure it is supported on more hardware. Snap support will also extend on Eurotech’s commercially supported version; the Everywhere Software Framework (ESF). By installing Kura as a Snap on a device, users will benefit with automatic updates to ensure they are always working from the latest version while with the reassurance of a secure, confined environment.
  • Self-containing dependencies LogMeIn to publish their first Snap
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 549
    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 549 for the week of October 7 – 13, 2018.

today's howtos

Fedora: Flock, Flatpaks, Fedora/RISC-V and More

  • CommOps takeaways from Flock 2018
    The annual Fedora contributor conference, Flock, took place from August 8-11, 2018. Several members of the Community Operations (CommOps) team were present for the conference. We also held a half-day team sprint for team members and interested people to participate and share feedback with the team.
  • Flatpaks, sandboxes and security
    Last week the Flatpak community woke to the “news” that we are making the world a less secure place and we need to rethink what we’re doing. Personally, I’m not sure this is a fair assessment of the situation. The “tl;dr” summary is: Flatpak confers many benefits besides the sandboxing, and even looking just at the sandboxing, improving app security is a huge problem space and so is a work in progress across multiple upstream projects. Much of what has been achieved so far already delivers incremental improvements in security, and we’re making solid progress on the wider app distribution and portability problem space. Sandboxing, like security in general, isn’t a binary thing – you can’t just say because you have a sandbox, you have 100% security. Like having two locks on your front door, two front doors, or locks on your windows too, sensible security is about defense in depth. Each barrier that you implement precludes some invalid or possibly malicious behaviour. You hope that in total, all of these barriers would prevent anything bad, but you can never really guarantee this – it’s about multiplying together probabilities to get a smaller number. A computer which is switched off, in a locked faraday cage, with no connectivity, is perfectly secure – but it’s also perfectly useless because you cannot actually use it. Sandboxing is very much the same – whilst you could easily take systemd-nspawn, Docker or any other container technology of choice and 100% lock down a desktop app, you wouldn’t be able to interact with it at all.
  • Fedora/RISC-V now mirrored as a Fedora “alternative” architecture
  • PSA: System update fails when trying to remove rtkit-0.11-19.fc29