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Debian: Sparky Linux, Mailman vs DKIM and Some Reports

  • Sparky news 2020/09

    The 9th monthly Sparky project and donate report of 2020: • Linux kernel updated up to version 5.8.12 & 5.9-rc5 • added to repos: Browsh, Ciano, Brackets, Cherrytree • Sparky 2020.09 of the rolling line released

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  • Ian Jackson: Mailman vs DKIM - a novel solution

    Do not configure Mailman to replace the mail domains in From: headers. Instead, try out my small new program which can make your Mailman transparent, so that DKIM signatures survive. [...] DKIM is a new anti-spoofing mechanism for Internet email, intended to help fight spam. DKIM, paired with the DMARC policy system, has been remarkably successful at stemming the flood of joe-job spams. As usually deployed, DKIM works like this: When a message is originally sent, the author's MUA sends it to the MTA for their From: domain for outward delivery. The From: domain mailserver calculates a cryptographic signature of the message, and puts the signature in the headers of the message. Obviously not the whole message can be signed, since at the very least additional headers need to be added in transit, and sometimes headers need to be modified too. The signing MTA gets to decide what parts of the message are covered by the signature: they nominate the header fields that are covered by the signature, and specify how to handle the body. A recipient MTA looks up the public key for the From: domain in the DNS, and checks the signature. If the signature doesn't match, depending on policy (originator's policy, in the DNS, and recipient's policy of course), typically the message will be treated as spam.

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  • Sylvain Beucler: Debian LTS and ELTS - September 2020

    Here is my transparent report for my work on the Debian Long Term Support (LTS) and Debian Extended Long Term Support (ELTS), which extend the security support for past Debian releases, as a paid contributor. In September, the monthly sponsored hours were split evenly among contributors depending on their max availability - I was assigned 19.75h for LTS (out of my 30 max; all done) and 20h for ELTS (out of my 20 max; all done).

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  • Molly de Blanc: Free Software Activities – September 2020

    I’m attempting to step down from the Outreach team, which is more work than I thought it would be. I had a very complicated relationship with the Outreach team. When no one else was there to take on making sure we did GSoC and Outreachy, I stepped up. It wasn’t really what I wanted to be doing, but it’s important. I’m glad to have more time to focus on other things that feel more aligned with what I’m trying to work on right now.

Audiocasts/Shows: GamingOnLinux, The Linux Experiment and Coc Explorer

today's howtos

Hardware Targeting GNU/Linux

  • Kontron unveils Tiger Lake Type 6 module and SBCs

    Kontron announced a Linux-friendly “COMe-cTL6” COM Express Compact Type 6 module and “VX3060” VPX blade with Intel’s 11th Gen Tiger Lake CPUs. A 3.5-inch SBC is in the works.

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  • No cost, license- and royalty-free graphics toolkit for Linux GUI design

    GUI toolkit for Linux from Microchip Technology enhances 32bit microprocessor capabilities for low- and mid-range- resolution graphical displays Graphical user interfaces (GUIs) and interactive touchscreen displays provide intuitive user experiences in applications from robotic and machine controls to medical user interfaces, automotive instrumentation and home and building automation systems.

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  • Vizy AI camera runs Tensorflow, OpenCV, PyTorch on Raspberry Pi 4 (Crowdfunding)

    We previously covered Charmed Labs PIXY2 computer vision camera based on an NXP LPC4330 microcontrollers that worked with Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and other development boards. The company is now back with a fully integrated more powerful solution with Vizy AI camera featuring a Raspberry Pi 4 SBC with up to 8GB RAM.

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  • SIOT-50 industrial IoT device Integrates ASUS Tinker Board S in rugged enclosure

    Stealth is a Canadian company that specializes in rugged displays, computers, and other ruggedized electronics for the industrial, defense, and marine markets. The company published a press release for a new rugged fanless mini PC equipped with a dedicated NVIDIA GeForce graphics card, and older Intel  6th and 7th Generation Core i5, i7 & Xeon processors.

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  • IAR Systems facilitates building and testing of automotive applications in Linux-based environments for Renesas RH850 MCUs

    The growing complexity in embedded systems has accelerated the need for scalability and flexibility in today’s software development environments. This is especially true for the development of automotive embedded systems, where the Renesas RH850 MCUs are used. IAR Systems’ build tools for Linux streamlines the building and testing processes, making it possible for organizations to optimize resources when it comes to the time developers spend in their projects, as well as to manage and utilize licenses and servers in an optimal way. With the integrated static analysis tool C-STAT, developers can ensure code quality throughout the development and testing process. C-STAT proves code alignment with industry standards like MISRA C:2012, MISRA C++:2008 and MISRA C:2004, and also detects defects, bugs, and security vulnerabilities as defined by CERT C and the Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE).

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  • Supporting a misbehaving NAND ECC engine

    Over the years, Bootlin has grown a significant expertise in U-Boot and Linux support for flash memory devices. Thanks to this expertise, we have recently been in charge of rewriting and upstreaming a driver for the Arasan NAND controller, which is used in a number of Xilinx Zynq SoCs. It turned out that supporting this NAND controller had some interesting challenges to handle its ECC engine peculiarities. In this blog post, we would like to give some background about ECC issues with NAND flash devices, and then dive into the specific issues that we encountered with the Arasan NAND controller, and how we solved them.