Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Login

Enter your Tux Machines username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.

More in Tux Machines

Hardware Targeting GNU/Linux

  • Kontron unveils Tiger Lake Type 6 module and SBCs

    Kontron announced a Linux-friendly “COMe-cTL6” COM Express Compact Type 6 module and “VX3060” VPX blade with Intel’s 11th Gen Tiger Lake CPUs. A 3.5-inch SBC is in the works.

  •  
  • No cost, license- and royalty-free graphics toolkit for Linux GUI design

    GUI toolkit for Linux from Microchip Technology enhances 32bit microprocessor capabilities for low- and mid-range- resolution graphical displays Graphical user interfaces (GUIs) and interactive touchscreen displays provide intuitive user experiences in applications from robotic and machine controls to medical user interfaces, automotive instrumentation and home and building automation systems.

  •  
  • Vizy AI camera runs Tensorflow, OpenCV, PyTorch on Raspberry Pi 4 (Crowdfunding)

    We previously covered Charmed Labs PIXY2 computer vision camera based on an NXP LPC4330 microcontrollers that worked with Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and other development boards. The company is now back with a fully integrated more powerful solution with Vizy AI camera featuring a Raspberry Pi 4 SBC with up to 8GB RAM.

  •   
  • SIOT-50 industrial IoT device Integrates ASUS Tinker Board S in rugged enclosure

    Stealth is a Canadian company that specializes in rugged displays, computers, and other ruggedized electronics for the industrial, defense, and marine markets. The company published a press release for a new rugged fanless mini PC equipped with a dedicated NVIDIA GeForce graphics card, and older Intel  6th and 7th Generation Core i5, i7 & Xeon processors.

  •  
  • IAR Systems facilitates building and testing of automotive applications in Linux-based environments for Renesas RH850 MCUs

    The growing complexity in embedded systems has accelerated the need for scalability and flexibility in today’s software development environments. This is especially true for the development of automotive embedded systems, where the Renesas RH850 MCUs are used. IAR Systems’ build tools for Linux streamlines the building and testing processes, making it possible for organizations to optimize resources when it comes to the time developers spend in their projects, as well as to manage and utilize licenses and servers in an optimal way. With the integrated static analysis tool C-STAT, developers can ensure code quality throughout the development and testing process. C-STAT proves code alignment with industry standards like MISRA C:2012, MISRA C++:2008 and MISRA C:2004, and also detects defects, bugs, and security vulnerabilities as defined by CERT C and the Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE).

  •  
  • Supporting a misbehaving NAND ECC engine

    Over the years, Bootlin has grown a significant expertise in U-Boot and Linux support for flash memory devices. Thanks to this expertise, we have recently been in charge of rewriting and upstreaming a driver for the Arasan NAND controller, which is used in a number of Xilinx Zynq SoCs. It turned out that supporting this NAND controller had some interesting challenges to handle its ECC engine peculiarities. In this blog post, we would like to give some background about ECC issues with NAND flash devices, and then dive into the specific issues that we encountered with the Arasan NAND controller, and how we solved them.

Python Programming

  • Multiple Selections in Wing Python IDE

    In this issue of Wing Tips we revisit how to use multiple concurrent selections in Wing's editor. These can be used to replace all occurrences of some text or to apply the same edits to any number of selections, for example surround them all with quotes or remove common surrounding characters. Multiple selections can be created from the keyboard, from the mouse, or by using commands that select all occurrences of some text found within a selected code.

  • Python 3.9 is around the corner

    Python 3.9.0rc2 was released on September 17, with the final version scheduled for October 5, roughly a year after the release of Python 3.8. Python 3.9 will come with new operators for dictionary unions, a new parser, two string operations meant to eliminate some longstanding confusion, as well as improved time-zone handling and type hinting. Developers may need to do some porting for code coming from Python 3.8 or earlier, as the new release has removed several previously-deprecated features still lingering from Python 2.7. Python 3.9 marks the start of a new release cadence. Up until now, Python has done releases on an 18-month cycle. Starting with Python 3.9, the language has shifted to an annual release cycle as defined by PEP 602 ("Annual Release Cycle for Python"). A table provided by the project shows how Python performance has changed in a number of areas since Python 3.4. It is interesting to note that Python 3.9 is worse than 3.8 on almost every benchmark in that table, though it does perform generally better than 3.7. That said, it is claimed that several Python constructs such as range, tuple, list, and dict will see improved performance in Python 3.9, though no specific performance benchmarks are given. The boost is credited to the language making more use of a fast-calling protocol for CPython that is described in PEP 590 ("Vectorcall: a fast calling protocol for CPython").

  • Tryton News: Newsletter October 2020

    We are now on the home straight leading up to the 5.8 release. However, there will be some more changes over the next few weeks.

  • Check Web App Security With Bandit - Building SaaS #74

    In this episode, I integrated the bandit static analysis tool to do automated security checking of my code before each commit. We talked about pre-commit and how to add in a new hook. After finishing that tool addition, we got deep into Django while removing some messages inserted by django-allauth on sign up. We began by talking about what the bandit tool does and how it works. Once I explained bandit, I focused on the bandit documentation to see how to add the tool. We found the pre-commit config hook in the bandit README docs.

  • Simple in-memory ChEMBL similarity search

    In the previous two essays I showed how to search chembl_27.fps to find records with similar fingerprints to a query fingerprint, then how to implement a nearest-neighbor search and replace Tanimoto similarity with cosine similarity. The final program took about 5 seconds. In this essay I'll show how to increase the search performance by shifting more of the work to a load step. This sort of precomputation can be useful if the load step is done once, with the extra overhead shared over multiple searches.

Today in Techrights

Mozilla: OpenPGP in Thunderbird, Firefox Extension Workshop, Add-ons and Marketing

  • OpenPGP in Thunderbird

    It is a pretty rare event to see a nearly 21-year-old bug be addressed—many projects are nowhere near that old for one thing—but that is just what has occurred for the Mozilla Thunderbird email application. An enhancement request filed at the end of 1999 asked for a plugin to support email encryption, but it has mostly languished since. The Enigmail plugin did come along to fill the gap by providing OpenPGP support using GNU Privacy Guard (GnuPG or GPG), but was never part of Thunderbird. As part of Thunderbird 78, though, OpenPGP is now fully supported within the mail user agent (MUA). The enhancement request actually asked for Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) support; PGP is, of course, the progenitor of OpenPGP. The standards effort that resulted in OpenPGP started in 1997. Back in 1999, PGP was the only real choice for email encryption, though the initial version of GnuPG had been released a few months before the request. Early on, the main concerns expressed in the bug tracker were about the legality of shipping cryptographic code. The US government's attempts to restrict the export of cryptographic systems, known as the "crypto wars", were still fresh in the minds of many. It was not entirely clear that adding "munitions-grade crypto" to a MUA like Thunderbird was legal or wise. Early in 2000, the US revised its export-control regulations, which removed that particular concern. There was work done toward adding support for OpenPGP and Secure/Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (S/MIME), which is another email encryption standard, over 2000 and 2001, but the code never actually landed. Thunderbird (called "mailnews" in those days) was in fire-fighting mode; fixing bugs and getting basic functionality working took precedence over new features like encryption. There was also a need to design a reasonable plugin mechanism. Eventually, Enigmail showed up, which took some of the pressure off the Mozilla developers. Enigmail could be used on all of the supported platforms for Thunderbird to encrypt and decrypt PGP-style email (either inline or PGP/MIME) using GnuPG. Its initial maintainer, Ramalingam Saravanan, updated the bug with new information about Enigmail several times. In the bug, multiple people suggested that Enigmail be incorporated into Thunderbird and the Enigmail developers were not opposed. In 2003, Patrick Brunschwig, who was a new maintainer for the plugin, said that doing so would help in getting rid of some of the "hacks" that were done to make Enigmail work with Thunderbird. But nothing like that ever happened.

  • To Eleventy and Beyond

    In 2018, we launched Firefox Extension Workshop, a site for Firefox-specific extension development documentation. The site was originally built using the Ruby-based static site generator Jekyll. We had initially selected Jekyll for this project because we wanted to make it easy for editors to update the site using Markdown, a lightweight markup language. Once the site had been created and more documentation was added, the build times started to grow. Every time we made a change to the site and wanted to test it locally, it would take ten minutes or longer for the site to build. The builds took so long that we needed to increase the default time limit for CircleCI, our continuous integration and continuous delivery service, because builds were failing when they ran past ten minutes with no output.

  • Mozilla Addons Blog: Add-ons interns: developing software and careers

    For the last several years, Mozilla has participated in the Google Summer of Code and Outreachy internship programs. Both programs offer paid three-month internship opportunities to students or other industry newcomers to work on a programming project with an open source organization. This year, we were joined by Lisa Chan and Atique Ahmed Ziad, from Outreachy and Google Summer of Code, respectively. With mentorship from addons.mozilla.org (AMO) engineers Bob Silverberg and Andrew Williamson, Lisa built a Homepage Curation Tool to help our editorial staff easily make changes to the AMO homepage. Atique was mentored by Firefox engineers Luca Greco and Rob Wu, and senior add-on admin reviewer Andreas Wagner, and he developed a privileged extension for Firefox that monitors the activity of other installed extensions. This prototype is the starting point of a new feature that will help extension developers, add-on developers, and Firefox engineers investigate bugs in extensions or in the browser’s WebExtensions APIs.

  • The internet needs our love

    It’s noisy out there. We are inundated with sensational headlines every minute, of every day. You almost could make a full-time job of sorting the fun, interesting or useful memes, feeds and reels from those that should be trashed. It’s hard to know what to pay attention to, and where to put your energy. With so much noise, chaos and division, it seems that one of the only things we all have in common is relying on the internet to help us navigate everything that’s happening in the world, and in our lives. [...] You probably don’t know the name Mozilla. You might know Firefox. But we’ve been here, fighting for a better internet, for almost twenty years. We’re a non-profit backed organization that exists for the sole purpose of protecting the internet. Our products, like the Firefox browser, are designed with your privacy in mind. We’re here to prove that you can have an ethical tech business that works to make the internet a better place for all of us. We stand for people, not profit. But we can’t fight this fight alone. Big tech has gotten too big. We need you. We need people who understand what it is to be part of something larger than themselves. People who love the internet and appreciate its magic. People who are looking for a company they can support because we are all on the same side.