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Server: Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols on Docker and SMACK, Sean Michael Kerner on OpenPower

  • What is Docker and why is it so darn popular?
    Five years ago, Solomon Hykes helped found a business, Docker, which sought to make containers easy to use. With the release of Docker 1.0 in June 2014, the buzz became a roar. And, over the years, it's only got louder. All the noise is happening because companies are adopting Docker at a remarkable rate. In July 2014 at OSCon, I ran into numerous businesses that had already moved their server applications from virtual machines (VM) to containers.
  • Understanding the SMACK stack for big data
    Just as the LAMP stack revolutionized servers and web hosting, the SMACK stack has made big data applications viable and easier to develop. Want to come up to speed? Here are the basics.
  • OpenPower Foundation Aims to Power Server Acceleration Beyond Moore's Law
    When IBM first created the OpenPower Foundation in 2013, there were vendors that thought they would get into the silicon business and build their own chips, but as it turns out, that's not quite what happened. At the OpenPower Summit 2018 event, Brad McCredie, IBM fellow and VP, outlined how OpenPower has progressed over the last five years and what members are actually building. [...] An offshoot of the OpenPower Foundation is OpenCAPI, which is an effort to build an Open Coherent Accelerator Processor Interface that is supported by AMD, Google, Mellanox and Micron among the group's founding members.

Stable kernels 4.15.12 and 4.14.29

Android Leftovers

Configure an amateur radio gateway with a Raspberry Pi

The APRS (Automatic Packet Reporting System) is a worldwide digital communications network for amateur radio, providing a single national channel where people can monitor what is happening in the surrounding area. APRS uses packet radio (AX.25), which Tom Karpiniec described in his excellent article "Packet radio lives on through open source software," as the transport layer. The basic idea of APRS is to communicate information in the context of the location of an amateur radio operator, such as other stations' position information (whether mobile or fixed), repeater systems, weather information, or events. Amateur radio operators can, in addition, send direct messages to other amateurs via the network. As packets are sent, they include location information that can be displayed on a map. This provides an immediate view of activity in an area. Read more