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Plasma 5.13 – Amazing Tux, How Sweet Plasma

Plasma 5.13 is (going to be) a very nice release. It builds on the solid foundation that is the LTS edition, and adds cool, smart touches. The emphasis is on seamless integration of elements, which is what separates professionals from amateurs. It’s all around how the WHOLE desktop behaves, and not individual programs in isolation. And Plasma is making great strides, offering a polished version of an already mature and handsome product, with extra focus on fonts, media and browser connectivity and good performance. There are some rough patches. Apart from the obvious beta issues, those goes without saying, KDE Connect ought to be a true multi-phone product, the network stack really needs to be spotless, and that means full Microsoft Windows inter-operability, Spectacle should allow for configurable shadows and alpha channel, and I want to see if the decorative backend has been cleaned up, i.e. can you search and install new themes and icons without encountering useless errors and inconsistencies. But all in all, I’m quite impressed. The changes are big and noticeable, and above all, meaningful. You don’t just get features for the sake of it, you get things that improve the quality and consistency of the desktop, that maximize fun and productivity, and there’s deep thought in orchestrating it all together. It ain’t just a random bunch of options that happen to work. I like seeing patterns in things, and I’m happy when there’s functional harmony. This spring season of distro testing hasn’t been fun, and Plasma 5.13 is balm for my weary wrists, so hurting from all that angry typing. More than worth a spin, and highly recommended. Full steam on, Tuxers. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 20

Sad News! Development Stopped for Korora and BackSlash Linux

It seems more and more small distributions are facing a had time. Recently we saw the crisis at Void Linux. Now we have two more small Linux distributions calling it quit, albeit temporarily. Read more

Android Leftovers

OpenSUSE Community Forks Red Hat's Spacewalk, Now Calls It Uyuni

In addition to the release of openSUSE Leap 15, also making the rounds at this weekend's openSUSE conference in Prague is word of the openSUSE community forking the Spacewalk system management software into a new project they are calling Uyuni. For those of you not familiar with Spacewalk, it's a Linux systems management software and the upstream for Red Hat Satellite 5. Spacewalk allows keeping an inventory of systems, updating/installing software on systems, provisioning systems, deploying configurations to systems, setting up virtual guests, controlling services, distributing content, and other systems management/administration tasks. Spacewalk is a project of Red Hat and is hosted on GitHub. Read more Also: Uyuni: Forking Spacewalk with Salt and Containers