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HowTos

today's howtos and programming bits

Filed under
Development
HowTos

today's howtos and programming bits

Filed under
Development
HowTos
  • How to fix trailing underscores at the end of URLs in Chrome
  • How to Install Ubuntu Alongside With Windows 10 or 8 in Dual-Boot
  • Beginner’s guide on how to git stash :- A GIT Tutorial
  • Handy snapcraft features: Remote build
  • How to build a lightweight system container cluster
  • Start a new Cryptocurrency project with Python
  • [Mozilla] Celery without a Results Backend
  • Mucking about with microframeworks

    Python does not lack for web frameworks, from all-encompassing frameworks like Django to "nanoframeworks" such as WebCore. A recent "spare time" project caused me to look into options in the middle of this range of choices, which is where the Python "microframeworks" live. In particular, I tried out the Bottle and Flask microframeworks—and learned a lot in the process.

    I have some experience working with Python for the web, starting with the Quixote framework that we use here at LWN. I have also done some playing with Django along the way. Neither of those seemed quite right for this latest toy web application. Plus I had heard some good things about Bottle and Flask at various PyCons over the last few years, so it seemed worth an investigation.

    Web applications have lots of different parts: form handling, HTML template processing, session management, database access, authentication, internationalization, and so on. Frameworks provide solutions for some or all of those parts. The nano-to-micro-to-full-blown spectrum is defined (loosely, at least) based on how much of this functionality a given framework provides or has opinions about. Most frameworks at any level will allow plugging in different parts, based on the needs of the application and its developers, but nanoframeworks provide little beyond request and response handling, while full-blown frameworks provide an entire stack by default. That stack handles most or all of what a web application requires.

    The list of web frameworks on the Python wiki is rather eye-opening. It gives a good idea of the diversity of frameworks, what they provide, what other packages they connect to or use, as well as some idea of how full-blown (or "full-stack" on the wiki page) they are. It seems clear that there is something for everyone out there—and that's just for Python. Other languages undoubtedly have their own sets of frameworks (e.g. Ruby on Rails).

Concept of Hard Links in Linux Explained

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HowTos

Learn the concept of hard links in Linux and its association with inodes in this tutorial.
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today's howtos and programming bits

Filed under
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HowTos
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