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HowTos

today's howtos and programming bits

Filed under
Development
HowTos

today's howtos and programming bits

Filed under
Development
HowTos
  • How to fix trailing underscores at the end of URLs in Chrome
  • How to Install Ubuntu Alongside With Windows 10 or 8 in Dual-Boot
  • Beginner’s guide on how to git stash :- A GIT Tutorial
  • Handy snapcraft features: Remote build
  • How to build a lightweight system container cluster
  • Start a new Cryptocurrency project with Python
  • [Mozilla] Celery without a Results Backend
  • Mucking about with microframeworks

    Python does not lack for web frameworks, from all-encompassing frameworks like Django to "nanoframeworks" such as WebCore. A recent "spare time" project caused me to look into options in the middle of this range of choices, which is where the Python "microframeworks" live. In particular, I tried out the Bottle and Flask microframeworks—and learned a lot in the process.

    I have some experience working with Python for the web, starting with the Quixote framework that we use here at LWN. I have also done some playing with Django along the way. Neither of those seemed quite right for this latest toy web application. Plus I had heard some good things about Bottle and Flask at various PyCons over the last few years, so it seemed worth an investigation.

    Web applications have lots of different parts: form handling, HTML template processing, session management, database access, authentication, internationalization, and so on. Frameworks provide solutions for some or all of those parts. The nano-to-micro-to-full-blown spectrum is defined (loosely, at least) based on how much of this functionality a given framework provides or has opinions about. Most frameworks at any level will allow plugging in different parts, based on the needs of the application and its developers, but nanoframeworks provide little beyond request and response handling, while full-blown frameworks provide an entire stack by default. That stack handles most or all of what a web application requires.

    The list of web frameworks on the Python wiki is rather eye-opening. It gives a good idea of the diversity of frameworks, what they provide, what other packages they connect to or use, as well as some idea of how full-blown (or "full-stack" on the wiki page) they are. It seems clear that there is something for everyone out there—and that's just for Python. Other languages undoubtedly have their own sets of frameworks (e.g. Ruby on Rails).

Concept of Hard Links in Linux Explained

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HowTos

Learn the concept of hard links in Linux and its association with inodes in this tutorial.
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today's howtos and programming bits

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics and Games: DXVK, Overload and Songs of Syx

  • Lima Gallium3D Gets A Reworked Scheduler

    Landing this week in Mesa 19.2 for the Lima Gallium3D driver for Arm Mali 400/450 series hardware is a reworked GPIR regiaster scheduler. The change to their existing scheduler is that the scheduling is now done at value register allocation time and other improvements made in the process.

  • DXVK 1.3.1 Brings Logging Improvements, GPU Load Monitoring In The HUD

    Just one week after releasing DXVK 1.3, lead developer Philip Rebohle has released DXVK 1.3.1 with a few more features plus a number of bug fixes -- including performance work. The two principal new features of DXVK 1.3.1 are logging improvements and GPU load monitoring support in the DXVK HUD. The GPU load monitoring are estimates based on Vulkan timing information within DXVK as opposed to using driver-specific queries; Philip acknowledges that the number may be inaccurate when CPU load is very high. Those wanting to try out that GPU load monitoring in the heads-up display can do so via the DXVK_HUD=gpuload environment variable.

  • The six-degree-of-freedom shooter "Overload" has a new Community Level Pack offering a fresh challenge

    Overload is possibly the best six-degree-of-freedom shooter I've played in the past few years, sadly it has been overlooked by a lot of gamers. It's limping on though, with a new Community Level Pack available for around £3.99. This includes nine single player levels, stitched together to form an entirely new mission. It includes progression, unlocks and a secret level. There's also twelve new challenge mode levels and online leaderboard support.

  • Songs of Syx, a city-builder with empire management, tactical battles and RPG elements

    Here's a fun recent discovery, Songs of Syx an in-development title from Swedish developer Jakob de Laval. It's a city-builder with empire management, tactical battles and rpg-elements and it's looking good. With an interesting pixel-art top-down view, Songs of Syx reminds me a little of Rise to Ruins, another great pixel-art builder. It's been in development since 2014, with an Early Access release due sometime in March next year with support for Linux, Mac and Windows.

Mutter 3.33.4

About mutter
============

Mutter is a window and compositing manager that displays and manages
your desktop via OpenGL. Mutter combines a sophisticated display
engine using the Clutter toolkit with solid window-management logic
inherited from the Metacity window manager.

While Mutter can be used stand-alone, it is primarily intended to be
used as the display core of a larger system such as GNOME Shell. For
this reason, Mutter is very extensible via plugins, which are used
both to add fancy visual effects and to rework the window management
behaviors to meet the needs of the environment.

News
====

* Discard page flip retries on hotplug [Jonas; !630]
* Add xdg-output v2 support [Olivier; #645]
* Restore DRM format fallbacks [Jonas; !662]
* Don't emit ::size-changed when only position changed [Daniel; !568]
* Expose workspace layout properties [Florian; !618]
* Don't use grab modifiers when shortcuts are inhibited [Olivier; #642]
* Fix stuttering due to unchanged power save mode notifications [Georges; !674]
* Add API to reorder workspaces [Adam; !670]
* Make picking a new focus window more reliable [Marco; !669]
* Defer actor allocation till shown [Carlos; !677]
* Try to use primary GPU for copy instead of glReadPixels [Pekka; !615]
* Unset pointer focus when the cursor is hidden [Jonas D.; !448]
* Fix modifier-drag on wayland subsurfaces [Robert; !604]
* Fix background corruption on Nvidia after resuming from suspend [Daniel; !600]
* Only grab the locate-pointer key when necessary [Olivier; !685, #647]
* Misc. bug fixes and cleanups [Florian, Jonas, Daniel, Robert, Olivier,
  Georges, Marco, Carlos, Emmanuele; !648, !650, !647, !656, !658, !637,
  !663, !660, !659, !665, !666, !668, !667, #667, !676, !678, #672, !680,
  !683, !688, !689, !687]

Contributors:
  Jonas Ådahl, Emmanuele Bassi, Adam Bieńkowski, Piotr Drąg, Jonas Dreßler,
  Olivier Fourdan, Carlos Garnacho, Robert Mader, Florian Müllner,
  Georges Basile Stavracas Neto, Pekka Paalanen, Marco Trevisan (Treviño),
  Daniel van Vugt

Translators:
  Fabio Tomat [fur], Kukuh Syafaat [id]
Read more Also: GNOME Shell + Mutter 3.33.4 Released

KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 80

Somehow we’ve gone through 80 weeks of progress reports for KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative! Does that seem like a lot to you? Because it seems like a lot to me. Speaking of a lot, features are now pouring in for KDE’s Plasma 5.17 release, as well as Applications 19.08. Even more is lined up for Applications 19.12 too, which promises to be quite a release. Read more

Android Leftovers