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HowTos

Automate Linux installation and recovery with SystemImager

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HowTos

Installing and recovering systems is one of the most time-consuming tasks for any IT department. Imaging software, commercial and open source, creates compressed images of a client's hard drive data and stores them on a central server. These images can then be used to restore systems or roll out new ones. One useful open source imaging applications is SystemImager.

vi survival guide

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HowTos

If you are trying to work at a command line in pretty much any Operating System, no matter if it is a GNU/Linux brand such as Ubuntu or Fedora Core, another UNIX-like system like Mac OS X or FreeBSD or even Microsoft Windows, you will most definately need a text editor sooner or later. If you are using a UNIX-like system, like GNU/Linux variants, there are many text editors that may or may not be installed. Luckily there is one de-facto standard:
vi.

How Shellcodes Work

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It's not an easy task to find a vulnerable service and find an exploit for it. It's also not easy to defend against users who might want to exploit your system, if you are a system administrator. However, writing an exploit by yourself, to convert a news line from bug tracker into a working lockpick, is much more difficult.

Pam lockout options

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I’ve recently had the pleasure (ha ha) of configuring some machines to comply with government requirements, one of which is locking users out after a specified number of authentication failures. This is really easy on windows, but on Linux it’s not as flexible out of the box. Once again, PAM saves the day.

Fresh From the Linux Kill

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Imagine yourself dutifully wading through the documentation for whatever gnarly Linux application you're rassling into submission. You're running commands and editing configuration files; things are working and life is good. Until -- yes, you knew the good times weren't going to last -- until you hit the dreaded "send the process a SIGHUP" instruction.

Kickstart Fedora workstations and servers

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In this article, we walk you through the process of constructing a special set of bootable media called a kickstart, designed to help you rebuild systems when and as needed with minimal time and effort.

Faster remote desktop connections with FreeNX

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HowTos

Virtual Network Computing (VNC) is a useful tool for accessing and controlling remote machines, but its responsiveness leaves much to be desired -- especially when you're accessing remote machines via a slow network connection. FreeNX also allows remote administration, but is much more responsive and works over a secure connection, and is free software to boot. FreeNX is also easy to set up, and I'll show you how.

How to setup the default web browser in Kubuntu

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since Kubuntu is KDE based; it comes with its own web browser called “Konqueror”. The problem that I ran into was that all our KDE applications were still using Konqueror as their browser. Here is my trial/error approach to try to figure out what setting to change.

Vim tips: Moving around using marks and jumps

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HowTos

Editing in Vim can be a breeze, if you know how to make use of its more advanced features. Moving around files can feel like a slog if you're stuck with the basic movement keys, but editing is effortless when you have command of marks and jumps.

Preventing DDoS attacks

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HowTos

In this article, I will try to explain what DDoS is, and how it can be prevented or mitigated. Many of the servers in datacenters these days are Linux-based; hence, I'm going to discuss DDoS attack prevention and mitigation for Linux servers.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Tests Of The QNINE M.2 NVMe SSD Enclosure To USB-C Adapter

In the past few months a number of M.2 NVMe SSD to USB adapters have been appearing on the market. Curious about the performance potential on Linux of an NVMe SSD drive attached to a USB 3.1 connection, I recently picked up a QNINE NVMe solid-state drive enclosure for benchmarking. The QNINE NVMe SSD enclosure is an M.2 NVMe to USB-C/USB-3.1 adapter that retails for about $40 USD from the likes of Amazon. Only Windows and macOS support is mentioned, but the drive was detected just fine and working under Linux. This QNINE adapter is just one of many M.2 NVMe to USB-C adapters on the market and most in the $40~60 USD price range. Read more

Sailfish OS Oulanka is now available

The new software release, Sailfish OS Oulanka is now available! This time, the name for Sailfish OS 3.0.2 update was inspired by one of our sailor’s favorite locations: Oulanka National Park. Oulanka is a national park in Lapland and Northern Ostrobothnia regions of Finland, covering 270 km². This park is known in Finland by adventurers due to it is famous trekking route, Karhunkierros, a four day – eighty kilometer route – located in Oulanka and accessible all year round. Oulanka was the first of the two Finnish national parks to become part of World Wide Fund for Nature’s PAN Parks. Read more

Games: Google Stadia, Forge and Fight, Relic Hunters Legend, Port Valley

  • Google Stadia Gaming Platform Needs Min 25Mb/s Internet Speed
    Google has released the specifications of its upcoming game streaming platform known as Google Stadia. The game streaming platform from the tech giant will use custom made processor and an ultra-fast graphics card in its forthcoming console. While the CPU will be a 2.7GHz x86 custom-made chip with hyper-threading and 9.5 MB L2+L2 cache, AMD will handle the graphical duties with a 10.7 Teraflops GPU with 56 compute units and HMB2 memory. Stadia machine will have 16GB of RAM along with 484GB/s of high transfer speed. Additionally, an SSD will be used for maximum performance to increase the load-time.
  • Forge and Fight might be the most hilarious prototype I've played recently
    Always keen to see what new types of experiences developers are looking to offer, I often try out game prototypes. Forge and Fight is one where you make your own weapon and it's pretty amusing. Since it's a prototype, it's obviously quite basic. However the promise with this one is very clear! Pick a handle and then basically stick anything on it and swing it around at your enemies! How about a fancy looking sword? Sure you could do that—or you could swing around multiple Scythes attached by a chain link with a flamethrower, a couple of spike balls and a boxing glove because why the hell not.
  • The shoot and loot RPG 'Relic Hunters Legend' is looking good in the latest trailer
    ...it's coming to Linux and certainly still seems to be that way as the trailer even has the Linux "tux" logo included and the current FAQ clearly mentions Linux as a platform...
  • Port Valley, a "not so classic" point & click adventure now has a Linux demo
    From developer WrongPixel, Port Valley is an in development point & click adventure that's "not so" classic apparently. Honestly, I had never heard of this before or at least I don't remember hearing about it at all. Turns out a few days ago it gained a Linux demo and it does seem to work quite nicely. Seems like a very interesting point and click game, one the developer said is only aiming to borrow some mechanics from the past while showing the genre "still has a lot to say".

7 Great XFCE Themes for Linux

Gnome might be the de-facto default desktop for many Linux distributions, but that doesn’t mean it’s everyone’s favorite. For many Linux users that distinction goes to XFCE. While it’s not as lightweight as it used to be, XFCE remains a favorite among users who want their desktop environment to stay out of their way. Just because you want a relatively minimal desktop doesn’t mean you want it to be ugly. Looking to spice up the look of your XFCE installation? You have plenty of options. Read more