Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

HowTos

Moreutils – A Collection Of More Useful Unix Utilities

Filed under
GNU
Software
HowTos

We all know about GNU core utilities that comes pre-installed with all Unix-like operating systems. These are the basic file, shell and text manipulation utilities of the GNU operating system. The GNU core utilities contains the commands, such as cat, ls, rm, mkdir, rmdir, touch, tail, wc and many more, for performing the day-to-day operations. Among these utilities, there are also some other useful collection of Unix utilities which are not included by default in the Unix-like operating systems. Meet moreutilis, a growing collection of more useful Unix utilities. The moreutils can be installed on GNU/Linux, and various Unix flavours such as FreeBSD, openBSD and Mac OS.

Read more

today's leftovers and howtos

Filed under
Misc
HowTos
  • Project curl governance

    Over time, we've slowly been adjusting the curl project and its documentation so that we might at some point actually qualify to the CII open source Best Practices at silver level.

    We qualified at the base level a while ago as one of the first projects which did that.

    Recently, one of those issues we fixed was documenting the governance of the curl project. How exactly the curl project is run, what the key roles are and how decisions are made. That document is now in our git repo.

  • How to install OwnCloud 10 on CentOS 7 and RHEL 7
  • How to Get Google Camera Port for Asus ZenFone Max Pro M1
  • How to check your CentOS Version
  • 5 Practical Examples of chgrp command in Linux
  • Trinity Desktop R14.0.5 Brings Modern Compiler Support and Security Fixes

    Trinity Desktop, the Linux desktop environment which is forked from KDE 3, has just released an update bringing Trinity Desktop to version R14.0.5.

    Because Trinity Desktop is a “traditional desktop” based on KDE 3 and focuses on function rather than a lot of special effects, its benefits are typically things like increased battery life on laptops, and just overall efficiency for the user.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 32

    I’m back from Akademy, and I can’t wait to share some of the cool stuff that happened there over the past week. I’m going to post the video of my talk as soon as it’s up. But first, I know what you’re all really waiting for: this week’s Usability & Productivity update. Though we were all quite busy, somehow everyone managed to accomplish an enormous amount of work, too!

  • Reminder: Shotwell Facebook publishing no longer working

    As announced earlier, since August 1st, 2018 Shotwell cannot publish to Facebook any more. The API that Shotwell used for that was removed and it is currently not clear to me how developers that do not use Android, iOS or Facebook’s web SDKs should provide similar functionality.

  • Gentoo on Integricloud

    Integricloud gave me access to their infrastructure to track some issues on ppc64 and ppc64le.

    Since some of the issues are related to the compilers, I obviously installed Gentoo on it and in the process I started to fix some issues with catalyst to get a working install media, but that’s for another blogpost.

    Today I’m just giving a walk-through on how to get a ppc64le (and ppc64 soon) VM up and running.

  • Industrial Mini-ITX board pumps up with Coffee Lake

    Commell’s “LV-67X” Mini-ITX board runs on 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” processors, with up to 32GB DDR4, 3x SATA, triple 4K displays, USB 3.1, and PCIe x16 and mini-PCIe expansion.

    The LV-67X, which shares some of the layout and feature set of its Intel Apollo Lake based LV-67U board, is the first industrial Mini-ITX board we’ve seen with Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake CPUs. (Going forward, we’ll likely use the caffeinated nickname rather than “8th Gen” because Intel also applies the 8th Gen tag to the transitional and similarly 14nm Kaby Lake-G chips as well as the new, 10nm Cannon Lake processors.)

  • Unofficial OpenGApps for Android Pie 9.0 Released for ARM and ARM64 Platforms

Linux Kernel 4.18 Now Available for Linux Lite Users, Here's How to Install It

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Available for the Linux Lite 4.x "Diamond," Linux Lite 3.x "Citrine," and Linux Lite 2.x "Beryl" operating system series, the Linux 4.18 kernel was released last weekend on August 12, 2018, by Linus Torvalds and brings lots of new features, new and updated drivers, as well as various performance improvements.

Users of the Ubuntu-based Linux Lite operating systems are usually among the first to install the most recent and advanced Linux kernel series, in this case, Linux kernel 4.18, which is now ready for mass deployments and will soon land in the stable software repositories of numerous popular GNU/Linux distributions.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux firewalls: What you need to know about iptables and firewalld

A firewall is a set of rules. When a data packet moves into or out of a protected network space, its contents (in particular, information about its origin, target, and the protocol it plans to use) are tested against the firewall rules to see if it should be allowed through. Here’s a simple example... Read more

Mozilla: Firefox GCC/LLVM Clang Dilemma, September 2018 CA Communication and CfP

  • Fedora Firefox – GCC/CLANG dilemma
    After reading Mike’s blog post about official Mozilla Firefox switch to LLVM Clang, I was wondering if we should also use that setup for official Fedora Firefox binaries. The numbers look strong but as Honza Hubicka mentioned, Mozilla uses pretty ancient GCC6 to create binaries and it’s not very fair to compare it with up-to date LLVM Clang 6. Also if I’m reading the mozilla bug correctly the PGO/LTO is not yet enabled for Linux, only plain optimized builds are used for now…which means the transition at Mozilla is not so far than I expected.
  • September 2018 CA Communication
    Mozilla has sent a CA Communication to inform Certification Authorities (CAs) who have root certificates included in Mozilla’s program about current events relevant to their membership in our program and to remind them of upcoming deadlines. This CA Communication has been emailed to the Primary Point of Contact (POC) and an email alias for each CA in Mozilla’s program, and they have been asked to respond to the following 7 action items:
  • Emily Dunham: CFP tricks 1
    Some strategies I’ve recommended in the past for dealing with this include looking at the conference’s marketing materials to imagine who they would interest, and examining the abstracts of past years’ talks.

today's howtos

Security: Quantum Computing and Cryptography, Time to Rebuild Alpine Linux Docker Container

  • Quantum Computing and Cryptography
    Quantum computing is a new way of computing -- one that could allow humankind to perform computations that are simply impossible using today's computing technologies. It allows for very fast searching, something that would break some of the encryption algorithms we use today. And it allows us to easily factor large numbers, something that would break the RSA cryptosystem for any key length. This is why cryptographers are hard at work designing and analyzing "quantum-resistant" public-key algorithms. Currently, quantum computing is too nascent for cryptographers to be sure of what is secure and what isn't. But even assuming aliens have developed the technology to its full potential, quantum computing doesn't spell the end of the world for cryptography. Symmetric cryptography is easy to make quantum-resistant, and we're working on quantum-resistant public-key algorithms. If public-key cryptography ends up being a temporary anomaly based on our mathematical knowledge and computational ability, we'll still survive. And if some inconceivable alien technology can break all of cryptography, we still can have secrecy based on information theory -- albeit with significant loss of capability. At its core, cryptography relies on the mathematical quirk that some things are easier to do than to undo. Just as it's easier to smash a plate than to glue all the pieces back together, it's much easier to multiply two prime numbers together to obtain one large number than it is to factor that large number back into two prime numbers. Asymmetries of this kind -- one-way functions and trap-door one-way functions -- underlie all of cryptography.
  • This New CSS Attack Restarts iPhones & Freezes Macs
  • Time to Rebuild Alpine Linux Docker Containers After Package Manager Patch
  • GrrCon 2018 Augusta15 Automation and Open Source Turning the Tide on Attackers John Grigg