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HowTos

Umit, the graphical network scanner

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Software
HowTos

linux.com: Umit is a user-friendly graphical interface to Nmap that lets you perform network port scanning. The utility's most useful features are its stored scan profiles and the ability to search and compare saved network scans.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Reset Your Forgotten Ubuntu Password in 2 Minutes or Less

  • Installing Real Player and Configuring Mozilla Plugin
  • Virtualization As An Alternative To Dual Booting Part 2
  • Basic APT commands
  • Install VirtualBox 2 Guest Additions in Ubuntu
  • Charting your boot processes with bootchart
  • How To: Increase Battery Life in Ubuntu or Debian Linux
  • Running CrossOver Chromium aka "Google Chrome" under Ubuntu
  • Changing what time a process thinks it is with libfaketime

Howto: Pimp your kickstart, Part one

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HowTos

liquidat.wordpress: In Fedora and Red Hat/CentOS unattended installations are done via kickstart. It is also the tool of your choice if you want to set up several systems in the exact same way. With some simple tricks it can become even more useful.

Benchmark: Apache2 vs. Lighttpd (Static HTML Files)

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HowTos

This benchmark shows how Apache2 (version 2.2.3) and lighttpd (version 1.4.13) perform compared to each other when delivering a static HTML file (about 50KB in size).

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Throw Your Cube into an Aquarium

  • Ubuntu’s Uncomplicated Firewall (UFW)
  • Synaptics Touchpad and X configuration on Gentoo
  • Recovering Ubuntu or Fedora Linux after installing windows
  • Pimp your Blackberry with the Ubuntu Theme!
  • Workbench on Linux
  • Enabling NFS in Ubuntu

few more howtos:

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HowTos
  • Change Crontab Email Settings ( MAILTO )

  • Ubuntu Rdesktop vulnerability - pretty easy fix
  • Setting up TV tuner card in GNU/Linux
  • Forwarding local mail to Gmail using postfix
  • change grub timeout
  • Minimizing PCLinuxOS 2008 MiniME for Speed
  • Spam prevention with Exim and greylistd - Part 2 - management and stats
  • The Ultimate Ubuntu / PulseAudio Guide

How to catch Linux system intruders

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HowTos

techradar.com: There's no doubt that Linux is a secure operating system. However, nothing is perfect. Millions of lines of code are churned through the kernel every second and it only takes a single programming mistake to open a door into the operating system. If that line of code happens to face the Internet, that's a backdoor to your server.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Short Tip: htop, a top alternative

  • Video - Installing and Uninstalling Adobe AIR and Applications
  • DPKG and APT-GET commands for packages
  • How to view Routing Table and Change your default Gateway
  • How to make Opera 9.5 look native in KDE 4
  • How to add metadata to digital pictures from the command line
  • Virtualization As An Alternative To Dual Booting Part 1
  • How to Properly Setup Samba

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • How to restore GRUB with an Ubuntu Live CD

  • How to make your application appear in the Add/Remove tool
  • Tar remote dir over SSH
  • Using wine to run windows application on openSUSE 11
  • Nokia E71 as a USB or Bluetooth 3G Data Modem on Linux
  • Mailman and Exim4
  • Combinations Vs. Permutations On Linux and Unix
  • How to View .Chm files in Linux
  • How to Achieve Nice Font Rendering in Ubuntu Hardy

Getting the Ugly out of Ubuntu

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Ubuntu
HowTos

techwarelabs.com: Canonical's Ubuntu has brought a new definition of “ease of use” to the Linux community. For those readers that have made the jump: you may have noticed that the default color theme and window decorations are somewhat... ugly. This article will give you a crash course in how to improve your Ubuntu.

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An introduction to Joplin, an open source Evernote alternative

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KDE Applications 17.12 Lands with Dolphin Enhancements, HiDPI Support for Okular

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