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HowTos

A brief introduction to xen-tools

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HowTos

Debian Administration: It is no secret that I'm a big fan of the open source Xen virtual machine hypervisor, and I've written several tools to make using it under Debian GNU/Linux more straightforward. Here we'll take a quick look at using xen-tools to easily create new Xen guest domains.

Quick Tip: Turn on/off Firefox Go Button

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HowTos

the how-to-geek: The "Go" button in Firefox is rarely used and takes up space on the screen, although not all that much. If you want, you can easily disable it to give your address bar more room.

Add Linux Repositories for Point-and-Click Updates

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HowTos

Maximum PC: Ubuntu isn't the only Linux distribution offering easy automatic updates. It just does the best job of making them accessible. But if you take a few moments to add third-party repositories to your existing Linux install, you can get the same access to software, codecs, and OS updates, even if they're not part of your OS's default configuration. Here's how.

Linux Filesystems and Tools

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HowTos

lxpages blog: The Linux filesystem is a complex and the first thing that most new users shifting from Windows will find confusing is navigating the Linux filesystem. The second thing is that not too many people are familiar with how the filesystem works or know how to troubleshoot if any problems arise.

Converting All Your MS Outlook PST Files To Maildir Format

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Linux
Microsoft
HowTos

There are several non-commercial methods to achieve roughly the same goal, and in this tutorial we use IMAP (more specifically, courier-imap) to convert all our emails from PST to the Maildir format.

Controlling your Linux system processes

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HowTos

linux.com: All modern operating systems are able to run many programs at the same time. For example, a typical Linux server might include a Web server, an email server, and probably a database service. Each of these programs runs as a separate process. What do you do if one of your services stops working? Here are some handy command-line tools for managing processes.

How To Compile A Kernel - Debian Etch

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Linux
HowTos

Each distribution has some specific tools to build a custom kernel from the sources. This article is about compiling a kernel on a Debian Etch system.

Protect Your Stuff With Encrypted Linux Partitions

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HowTos

enterprisenetworkingplanet: We see the headlines all the time: "Company X Loses 30,000,000 Customer Social Security Numbers and Other Intimately Personal and Financial Data! Haha, Boy Are Our Faces Red!" How come they never quite know what data is missing, and if it was encrypted or protected in any way?

Getting started with GRUB

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HowTos

linux.com: When you power on your computer, the first software that runs is a bootloader that invokes the computer's operating system. GRUB, the GRand Unified Bootloader, is an integral part of many Linux systems. It starts the Linux kernel. Here's some background on GRUB, and some tips on installing and configuring the software.

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