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HowTos

Network Diagnostic Tool (NDT) On Ubuntu 7.10 Server

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Ubuntu
HowTos

This guide will walk you through the setup process for implementing NDT running under Ubuntu 7.10 Server. For those unfamiliar with NDT, it is a network performance testing application.

more howtos & tips:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Your voice, forever etched in electrons. (Cooking with Linux)

  • Howto install gOS on Ubuntu/Kubuntu/Xubuntu
  • Tomboy: Bulk import files with the D-Bus interface and Python
  • Laptop with Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon Linux, Nokia N70 Modem and AIS EDGE Wireless
  • How to run IE in openSUSE 10.3
  • Getting around pesky account limitations on a linux box
  • Linux locking techiniques
  • No audio on Dell laptops with ubuntu gutsy 7.10

few more howtos:

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HowTos
  • Terminator: A multi-view terminal

  • Static ip address with Debain (and possibly Ubuntu)
  • Mounting A Network Drive On Startup Using Linux Ubuntu 7.10 On A Macbook Pro
  • How to run Turbo C on Ubuntu

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Online videos, to a VCD, via Linux

  • Ubuntu: Encoding video files
  • Window Placement In Ubuntu with Compiz
  • Preventing fork bombs in Ubuntu
  • HowTo: Do Awk with Loop

howtos:

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HowTos
  • How to dual boot Vista with Ubuntu

  • Extension for cropping in OpenOffice Draw
  • How to Setup a Wireless Ubuntu Router
  • Optimizing Apache Server Performance
  • Do I Need an AntiVirus Program on Linux?
  • Cheap mobile broadband for Linux
  • Short Tip: Mount directories via SSH
  • Manage your Movie Collection with Griffith

Time-lapse photography with dvd-slideshow

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HowTos

linux.com: Over the last few years I have been experimenting with time-lapse photography. One easy way to compile a time-lapse video is to use dvd-slideshow, a tool for creating video slideshows from digital photos, and more.

Get rid of stowaway packages with GNU Stow

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HowTos

linux.com: The installation instructions in most free software reviews aren't enough. If you decide a package sucks, how do you get rid of it? If a package rocks, how do you upgrade it? GNU Stow, a package manager for packages you compile and install yourself, provides an easy answer to both questions.

Simple Firefox Tips and Tricks (Some of Which You Might Not Know…)

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HowTos

maketecheasier.com: I have used Firefox browser for a long time and I always think that I know all the features inside out. When I was told of the following seemingly simple but useful tricks, I know I was wrong.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Network Tip No.3: Global Configuration Mode

  • Network Tip No. 4: exit Command
  • to HUP or nohup?
  • Automatic tab title in gnome-terminal
  • How to install Nvidia drivers in Ubuntu Feisty or later versions
  • colordiff — a tool to colorize diff output
  • How To: Run Call of Duty 4 (COD4): Modern Combat in Linux
  • Boot Speed Ubuntu
  • Restore the Master Boot Record
  • How to install Grub from a live Ubuntu cd
  • Boot CD for Ubuntu usb flash

Keep track of file name completions with Viewglob

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Software
HowTos

linux.com: The Viewglob command-line utility lets you see the files available for your shell command completions in a separate window, leaving your regular terminal window uncluttered.

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Ten Years as Desktop Linux User: My Open Source World, Then and Now

I've been a regular desktop Linux user for just about a decade now. What has changed in that time? Keep reading for a look back at all the ways that desktop Linux has become easier to use -- and those in which it has become more difficult -- over the past ten years. I installed Linux to my laptop for the first time in the summer of 2006. I started with SUSE, then moved onto Mandriva and finally settled on Fedora Core. By early 2007 I was using Fedora full time. There was no more Windows partition on my laptop. When I ran into problems or incompatibilities with Linux, my options were to sink or swim. There was no Windows to revert back to. Read more