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HowTos

5 Bash Tips, Part II

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HowTos

This article is a continuation to my other Bash-related post, 6 Bash Productivity Tips. Since that article gathered many useful comments and I bumped over several more over the net, here are 5 more tips and tricks.

Using iSCSI On Ubuntu 9.04 (Initiator And Target)

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Ubuntu
HowTos

This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Ubuntu 9.04. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • How to Record Skype Calls in Linux

  • Create your own yum repository
  • Run a program on one CPU core in Linux
  • Disable Boot Splash in Ubuntu
  • Sending Mail Through Gmail with Perl
  • Get Google Gears Up and Running in Firefox 3.5
  • Asynchronous Mirroring in Unix
  • Getting Loopy with Bash: using for loops

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Disable Location-Aware Browsing in Firefox 3.5

  • Shrink DVD images in Linux
  • How to install OpenTyrian in Ubuntu Jaunty
  • Apt-p2p for peer-to-peer Debian package downloads
  • Add Ubuntu 9.04 to Windows XP boot manager
  • Install MS fonts in openSUSE 11.1
  • Sound Muted After Restart in Ubuntu (Gnome) Fix
  • Ubuntu Bug with Samba Shares Unmounting
  • Debian Lenny Desktop Install with XFCE 4.6
  • nVidia and Debian Lenny 64bit
  • fix a broken bootloader configuration after a Fedora upgrade
  • PhpPgAdmin for Gentoo
  • Booting ‘Debian Lenny’ into widescreen framebuffer
  • Connecting to Ubuntu from Windows
  • Using Tomboy as a Blogging Client

A second order virtual machine with Falcon

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HowTos

In this article I’ll document some unique features of Falcon that allow users to build easily what I define as a “second order virtual machine”. Read the full article at Free Software Magazine.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • How-To: Install KDE 4.3 RC1 in Kubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope

  • How To Fix Full-Screen Flash Videos in Linux & Firefox
  • Postgresql: show tables, show databases, show columns
  • Stream Music with the Last.fm Client on Ubuntu
  • LMMS - Linux MultiMedia Studio
  • Tutorial : Easily multibooot Windows 7 with Linux
  • Enabling Accent Marks on a U.S. Keyboard in Ubuntu
  • Force Firefox To Open Links In Same Tab
  • Thunderbird localmail Spool
  • How to Set Up a TiVo Media Server on Ubuntu Linux

Squid Proxy Server On Ubuntu 9.04 Server With DansGuardian, ClamAV, And WPAD

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Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial will demonstrate how to set up a Squid Proxy server on Ubuntu 9.04 Server with DansGuardian (for content filtering) and ClamAV (for Virus scanning); in addition, we will set up Web Proxy AutoDetection (WPAD) through DHCP (in this case, th

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Sending Email Alerts Through Cron

  • Prevent Software Containing Mono Getting Installed in Ubuntu
  • 2 Useful SSH Tricks to Improve Your System Security
  • Easy FTP management with Nautilus and more
  • Bourne Identity on Linux
  • Using Firewall Object in Firewall Builder
  • The care and feeding of embedded Linux running on MIPS CPUs
  • Howto install Cherokee web server with MySQL, PHP support on Jaunty
  • Installing Themes in Linux
  • A Non-fatal Boot Error in Mandriva 2009.1 and its Fix
  • How _not_ to fix GCC 4.4 bugs
  • How to write a KWin effect
  • Tech Tip: Color man Pages

Installing Adobe AIR 1.5.1 For Linux On Ubuntu 9.04 (i386)

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Ubuntu
HowTos

Adobe AIR is a technology that lets you run Internet applications on the desktop. With AIR you do not need a browser to run such desktop applications. This tutorial explains how you can install Adobe AIR 1.5.1 for Linux on an Ubuntu 9.04 desktop and how you can install AIR applications.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • howto enable graphical login manager in Slackware

  • howto make Fluxbox feel like home
  • Firefox 3.5 hangs on fullscreen flash
  • HOWTO : Logwatch on Ubuntu 9.04 Server
  • Improving Battery Life on Linx Mint by 50%
  • Building the GNOME Desktop from Source
  • How-To: Install FrostWire 4.18.0 in Debian Lenny
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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Woes and Fedora 29 Plans

  • Shares of open-source giant Red Hat pounded on weaker outlook
  • Fedora 29 Aims To Offer Up Modules For Everyone
    The latest Fedora 29 feature proposal is about offering "modules for everyone" across all Fedora editions. The "modules for everyone" proposal would make it where all Fedora installations have modular repositories enabled by default. Up to now the modular functionality was just enabled by default in Fedora Server 28. The modular functionality allows Fedora users to choose alternate versions of popular software, such as different versions of Node.js and other server software components where you might want to stick to a particular version.

GNU Make, FSFE Newsletter, and FSF's BLAG Removal

  • Linux Fu: The Great Power of Make
    Over the years, Linux (well, the operating system that is commonly known as Linux which is the Linux kernel and the GNU tools) has become much more complicated than its Unix roots. That’s inevitable, of course. However, it means old-timers get to slowly grow into new features while new people have to learn all in one gulp. A good example of this is how software is typically built on a Linux system. Fundamentally, most projects use make — a program that tries to be smart about running compiles. This was especially important when your 100 MHz CPU connected to a very slow disk drive would take a day to build a significant piece of software. On the face of it, make is pretty simple. But today, looking at a typical makefile will give you a headache, and many projects use an abstraction over make that further obscures things.
  • FSFE Newsletter June 2018
  • About BLAG's removal from our list of endorsed distributions
    We recently updated our list of free GNU/Linux distributions to add a "Historical" section. BLAG Linux and GNU, based on Fedora, joined the list many years ago. But the maintainers no longer believe they can keep things running at this time. As such, they requested that they be removed from our list. The list helps users to find operating systems that come with only free software and documentation, and that do not promote any nonfree software. Being added to the list means that a distribution has gone through a rigorous screening process, and is dedicated to diligently fixing any freedom issues that may arise.

Servers: Kubernetes, Oracle's Cloudwashing and Embrace of ARM

  • Bloomberg Eschews Vendors For Direct Kubernetes Involvement
    Rather than use a managed Kubernetes service or employ an outsourced provider, Bloomberg has chosen to invest in deep Kubernetes expertise and keep the skills in-house. Like many enterprise organizations, Bloomberg originally went looking for an off-the-shelf approach before settling on the decision to get involved more deeply with the open source project directly. "We started looking at Kubernetes a little over two years ago," said Steven Bower, Data and Infrastructure Lead at Bloomberg. ... "It's a great execution environment for data science," says Bower. "The real Aha! moment for us was when we realized that not only does it have all these great base primitives like pods and replica sets, but you can also define your own primitives and custom controllers that use them."
  • Oracle is changing how it reports cloud revenues, what's it hiding? [iophk: "probably Microsoft doing this too" (cloudwashing)]
     

    In short: Oracle no longer reports specific revenue for cloud PaaS, IaaS and SaaS, instead bundling them all into one reporting line which it calls 'cloud services and licence support'. This line pulled in 60% of total revenue for the quarter at $6.8 billion, up 8% year-on-year, for what it's worth.

  • Announcing the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 for ARM
    Oracle is pleased to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 for the ARM architecture.
  • Oracle Linux 7 Now Ready For ARM Servers
    While Red Hat officially launched RHEL7 for ARM servers last November, on Friday Oracle finally announced the general availability of their RHEL7-derived Oracle Linux 7 for ARM. Oracle Linux 7 Update 5 is available for ARM 64-bit (ARMv8 / AArch64), including with their new Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 5 based on Linux 4.14.

Graphics: XWayland, Ozone-GBM, Freedreno, X.Org, RadeonSI

  • The Latest Batch Of XWayland / EGLStream Improvements Merged
    While the initial EGLStreams-based support for using the NVIDIA proprietary driver with XWayland was merged for the recent X.Org Server 1.20 release, the next xorg-server release will feature more improvements.
  • Making Use Of Chrome's Ozone-GBM Intel Graphics Support On The Linux Desktop
    Intel open-source developer Joone Hur has provided a guide about using the Chrome OS graphics stack on Intel-based Linux desktop systems. In particular, using the Chrome OS graphics stack on the Linux desktop is primarily about using the Ozone-GBM back-end to Ozone that allows for direct interaction with Intel DRM/KMS support and evdev for input.
  • Freedreno Reaches OpenGL ES 3.1 Support, Not Far From OpenGL 3.3
    The Freedreno Gallium3D driver now supports all extensions required by OpenGL ES 3.1 and is also quite close to supporting desktop OpenGL 3.3.
  • X.Org Is Looking For A North American Host For XDC2019
    If software development isn't your forte but are looking to help out a leading open-source project while logistics and hospitality are where you excel, the X.Org Foundation is soliciting bids for the XDC2019 conference. The X.Org Foundation is looking for proposals where in North America that the annual X.Org Developers' Conference should be hosted in 2019. This year it's being hosted in Spain and with the usual rotation it means that in 2019 they will jump back over the pond.
  • RadeonSI Compatibility Profile Is Close To OpenGL 4.4 Support
    It was just a few days ago that the OpenGL compatibility profile support in Mesa reached OpenGL 3.3 compliance for RadeonSI while now thanks to the latest batch of patches from one of the Valve Linux developers, it's soon going to hit OpenGL 4.4. Legendary open-source graphics driver contributor Timothy Arceri at Valve has posted 11 more patches for advancing RadeonSI's OpenGL compatibility profile support, the alternative context to the OpenGL core profile that allows mixing in deprecated OpenGL functionality. The GL compatibility profile mode is generally used by long-standing workstation software and also a small subset of Linux games.