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HowTos

Preventing Brute Force Attacks With Fail2ban On Debian Etch

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HowTos

In this article I will show how to install and configure fail2ban on a Debian Etch system. Fail2ban is a tool that observes login attempts to various services, e.g. SSH, FTP, SMTP, Apache, etc., and if it finds failed login attempts again and again from the same IP address or host, fail2ban stops further login attempts from that IP address/host by blocking it with an iptables firewall rule.

Encrypted home partition in Linux

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HowTos

Have you ever wondered what would have happened if all the important data has been stolen from your mobile PC? For example the information about the confidential project of your company you have been working on for the last 2 years… A horrifying vision, isn’t it? Well, if you don’t want to let it come true, please consider encrypting your home drive. Here is how to do this.

How To Install VMware Server On Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn)

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Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to install the free VMware Server on an Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn) system. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems (virtual machines) such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system.

Mounting file-systems by label rather than device name

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HowTos

When you're dealing with multiple drives, both fixed and removable, it can get hard to remember which is which. Remembering to mount /dev/sda1 in one place and /dev/sdc5 in another. The solution to this problem is to use labels instead of partition names when referring to them, and here we'll show how that can be done.

There are two things you need to do to start using labels:

How To pwn Your Text Files With Vim

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HowTos

Recently I did a lecture on the magical world of vim. Despite having used it for quite a long time I realize there is still far more that I could know about it, but there is also more that I haven’t published on this blog. Some of you might remember some of my earlier posts on vim [here], [here].

Assign Custom Shortcut Keys on Ubuntu Linux

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HowTos

Ubuntu includes a very limited shortcut key configuration utility which doesn’t allow you to assign hotkeys to your own applications or scripts. To get around this limitation, we can use the built-in gconf-editor utility to assign them ourselves.

First you’ll want to load up gconf-editor by typing it into the Alt+F2 Run dialog.

SSL and IPsec - An Overview

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HowTos

SSL requires applications to be modified as it operates above the TCP layer and this happens in user space in linux and other OSes. Whereas IPsec works seamlessly no matter what application and what protocol the application uses. ICMP traffic, UDP traffic and TCP all are protected by IPsec without the user or application developer worrying about it.

Introducing Ubuntu’s Add/Remove Packages

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HowTos

Last week, my fellow FOSSwire blogger Jacob introduced you to APT, the powerful package management system that is underneath Ubuntu.

The command line interface is the most powerful way to manipulate the software installed on your system, but to users who aren’t familiar with a command line interface, it can be a bit daunting.

DNS server Setup using bind

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HowTos

DNS Stands for Domain Name Service.On the Internet, the Domain Name Service (DNS) stores and associates many types of information with domain names; most importantly, it translates domain names (computer hostnames) to IP addresses. It also lists mail exchange servers accepting e-mail for each domain.

Setup Your Linux Box as an NTP Server

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HowTos

I believe that every organization should have a NTP/time server if they have more than one computer on site. Having an NTP server will allow you to keep the times on all of your computers in sync. This helps when comparing the logs from various servers to trace through various events that happened.

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