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HowTos

Set your Linux alternative programs.

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HowTos

There are many things you can do in Linux and there are many ways to do them. You can have several different programs all able to do the same task and all installed at the same time. So how do you choose which one is the default program?

The Perfect Desktop - Ubuntu Studio 8.10

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Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up an Ubuntu Studio 8.10 desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Gitting going with git: creating your first repository

  • python: writing binary file
  • make your BIOS love security
  • How the Linux Kernel Manages Virtual Memory
  • USB Hard drive spindown fix on Linux
  • An Executive Guide to Open Source
  • Parallels Desktop 4: Installing Parallels Tools with Ubuntu as Guest
  • A graphical way to MySQL mastery
  • Problem installing PECL PHP extensions while /tmp is secured
  • Customizing Firefox for Netbooks

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Netgear WG111T working with Debian

  • Complete Backup and Restore Using “tar” Command
  • Plain English Explanation Of An Awk Statement
  • How To Add a New Hard Drive in Ubuntu
  • FTP port forwarding using Linux router
  • Data encryption and Ubuntu, Part I
  • Misguided link and --as-needed
  • Thinkpad X30 freeze if the Lid is closed Gnome
  • Automount NTFS drives in Linux
  • Using external commands in Nagios
  • How to change Duplex and/or Auto-Negotiation NIC settings in Linux?

Speed up your Internet access using Squid's refresh patterns

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Software
HowTos

linux.com: Bandwidth limitation is still a problem for a lot of people who connect to the Internet. You can improve your available bandwidth by installing Squid caching proxy server on your network with configuration parameters that will increase your byte hit rate, giving you about 30-60% more bandwidth.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Tip: Fixing e2fsprogs block on Gentoo

  • Make Linux Look like Windows XP with XPGnome
  • Doing a diff without touching the command line
  • Split lossless audio
  • OpenOffice.org Tip - Automatically Number Headings
  • Building an OpenBSD Gateway - Part 1
  • Manage your music with ID3 tag editors
  • Relationship between --as-needed and --no-undefined
  • sdparm: a utility for SCSI device

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • How to create automated Linux/Unix backups

  • How To Run Gnome Panel Applets in XFCE
  • Who's On Your Linux Box
  • Small tip, how to recreate fluxbox menu
  • A Guide to System Backup and Restore in Ubuntu
  • SATA: /dev/hda Instead Of /dev/sda?
  • Use Dovecot for POP3/IMAP services
  • sK1 vector in on good illustrations
  • Treat your C code like scripts with C Cod

Setting Up ProFTPd + TLS On Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex)

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Ubuntu
HowTos

FTP is a very insecure protocol because all passwords and all data are transferred in clear text. By using TLS, the whole communication can be encrypted, thus making FTP much more secure. This article explains how to set up ProFTPd with TLS on an Ubuntu 8.10 server.

How to use OpenOffice.org as a Two Pane Outliner

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HowTos

So, although OpenOffice.org does not act as a one pane outliner, we can set it up as a two pane outliner. This can be very useful for structuring long documents, or keeping scraps of disparate information in one handy file.

To do this requires two things: the use of the Navigator, and the use of headline styles when structuring your document. Let’s start up OpenOffice.org Writer and see how this works.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Getting Gnome Volume Manager to Play Nice

  • Crafting offers and invoice documents with Kraft
  • Find all SSH Hosts
  • Setting Up Parental Controls in Ubuntu
  • Easier file renaming with renameutils
  • Improve Your Intelligence with Brain Workshop
  • Add windows codecs to Ubuntu Intrepid 8.10
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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

'Turbo Boost Max 3.0' and Mesa 17.2.4

  • Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Skylake Fixed With Linux 4.15
    The platform-drivers-x86 updates have been sent in for Linux 4.15 and include a range of improvements for Intel hardware support. One of the bigger items is support for Skylake CPUs with Turbo Boost Max 3.0.
  • Mesa 17.2.4 Graphics Stack Lands for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 Gamers
    Canonical's Timo Aaltonen reports on the availability of the Mesa 17.2.4 open-source graphics drivers stack on the X-SWAT updates PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 systems. Ubuntu systems have always lagged behind the development of the Mesa 3D Graphics Library, the Linux graphics stack containing open-source drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia GPUs, but they usually catch up with it through a specially crafted PPA (Personal Package Archive) repository that can be easily installed by users.

OSS Leftovers

  • The Future of Marketing Technology Is Headed for an Open-Source Revolution
  • Edging Closer – ODS Sydney
    Despite the fact that OpenStack’s mission statement has not fundamentally changed since the inception of the project in 2010, we have found many different interpretations of the technology through the years. One of them was that OpenStack would be an all-inclusive anything-as-a-service, in a striking parallel to the many different definitions the “cloud” assumed at the time. At the OpenStack Developer Summit in Sydney, we found a project that is returning to its roots: scalable Infrastructure-as-a-Service. It turns out, that resonates well with its user base.
  • Firefox Quantum Now Available on openSUSE Tumbleweed, Linux 4.14 Coming Soon
    Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system can now update their computers to the latest and greatest Firefox Quantum web browser.
  • Short Delay with WordPress 4.9
    You may have heard WordPress 4.9 is out. While this seems a good improvement over 4.8, it has a new editor that uses codemirror.  So what’s the problem? Well, inside codemirror is jshint and this has that idiotic no evil license. I think this was added in by WordPress, not codemirror itself. So basically WordPress 4.9 has a file, or actually a tiny part of a file that is non-free.  I’ll now have to delay the update of WordPress to hack that piece out, which probably means removing the javascript linter. Not ideal but that’s the way things go.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers