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HowTos

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • HowTo install memcached from sources on Linux

  • Set up wireless broadband access with YaST
  • Stop Ubuntu / Debian Linux From Deleting /tmp Files on Boot
  • Don’t Let GNOME’s Text Editor Leave Hidden Files
  • How To Redesign Your GNOME Desktop The ‘WOW’ Way
  • Securing OpenSSH Server [Part 1]
  • How to Recover from a Linux Hang

some howtos & such

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HowTos
  • How To Increase The Speed Of Your Firefox Browser

  • Ubuntu Howto: How To Bypass The Trash And Delete A File Completely
  • Monitor a MySQL Server with mytop
  • How to make Jabber calls using Jabbin
  • GPRS in Debian GNU/Linux with mobile phone Siemens ME45
  • Using GNU screen's multiuser feature for remote support
  • Using Shred to Wipe Hard Drives - DoD Uses It - You Should Too!
  • Simple Linux and Unix Password Cracker Shell Script
  • Use virtual keyboards to support international Linux systems

How to Check the Health of a Unix/Linux Server

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HowTos

eWeek: Everybody knows that regular automobile maintenance improves a car's reliability, improves mileage and extends the life of the vehicle. Neal Nelson, president of Neal Nelson & Associates explains that the same is true of computer systems.

howtos & such

Filed under
HowTos
  • Working Productively in Bash’s Vi Command Line Editing Mode

  • python user define sorting with callback
  • Theming Firefox 2 For GTK-Like Tabs
  • bash and time calculation
  • Installing IE6 on Ubuntu Gutsy (7.10)
  • Avoid Detection with nmap Port Scan Decoys
  • How to keep your keyboard layout with HAL 0.5.10 / Xorg server 1.4 / evdev input driver
  • keymap mess up on gentoo
  • Rescue Mode
  • My Linux froze and I am hot under the collar
  • Make OS2008 for N800/N810 Look Beautiful
  • Safely Remove Old Linux Kernel from a Linux Server

CLI Magic: Viewing system information

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HowTos

linux.com: GNU/Linux is bursting with information about the system on which it runs. The system's hardware and memory, its Internet link and current processes, the latest activity of each user -- all this information and more is available.

more howtos:

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HowTos
  • Exploring /bin - Part 1 - Cat through Expr

  • create a clustered virtual service for my Xen guest using system-config-cluster
  • Use OpenNTPD for time synchronization
  • Sync your iPhone with Ubuntu Linux
  • Getting 800×480 on the EeePC
  • Toggle Desktop Effects with Compiz-Switch
  • Filelight - a KDE disk usage tool
  • Fix the Boot and Shut Down Screens on Ubuntu

some howtos

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HowTos
  • Xbox media centre on a linux PC

  • Turn Your WRT54GL Into a Wireless Gaming Adapter
  • Installing Drupal Themes
  • Deleted file recovery on unix
  • Startup Manager: configuring grub and usplash
  • Installing Ubuntu on an External Hard Drive

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • HowTo Beautifulize the Boot Screen with Grub-GFXBoot

  • sysvconfig - utility for configuring init script links
  • How to install Postal 2 Fudge pack on Debian/Ubuntu
  • Listen Internet Shoutcast and Icecast Radio With BMPx Media Player
  • How to connect to Reliance Internet in Linux using RIM LG / Nokia / Samsung CDMA mobile phone and USB data card/stick ?
  • PyTube: Download and Convert YouTube Videos to Various Formats

KDE 4 preview on Ubuntu

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KDE
HowTos

tectonic: If you’re eagerly awaiting the release of KDE 4.0 on January 11 and you’re running Ubuntu then get a taste of the next big thing by installing KDE 4.0 release candidate 2 in three easy steps.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Video: Mark Cox, episode 3. Tips for a secure system

  • Setting up Compiz/Fusion on Ubuntu Linux
  • Secure Our Server Part 1: Firewalls
  • How to run Safari in Linux using Wine
  • Make Debian/Ubuntu look like Windows
  • Linux Optimize Directories ( File Access Time ) in ext3 Filesystem
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