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Leftovers: Software

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Software
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  • How Docker changes application monitoring

    As operations, IT, and engineering organizations coalesce around the value and importance of containers, they often ask the seemingly logical question: “How do I monitor Docker in my production environment?” As it turns out, this question has it backward. Monitoring the Docker daemon, the Kubernetes master, or the Mesos scheduler isn’t especially complicated, and there are, in fact, solutions for each of these.

    Running your applications in Docker containers only changes how the applications are packaged, scheduled, and orchestrated, not how they actually run. The question, properly rephrased, becomes, “How does Docker change how I monitor my applications?” As you might imagine, the answer to this question: “It depends.”

    The answer will be dictated by the dependencies of your environment and your use cases and objectives. The orchestration technology you use, the Docker image philosophy you follow, and the level of observability your containerized application provides, among other considerations, will all factor into how you monitor your applications.

    To begin to understand how a microservices regimen and a Dockerized environment will affect your monitoring strategy, ask yourself the following four simple questions. Note that the answers may differ for different applications, and your approach to monitoring should reflect these differences.

  • New libvirt website design
  • Spotify Windows, Mac, Linux desktop app: Update now to stop it trashing your SSD

    Music-streaming service Spotify has released an important update that stops its desktop client tearing into storage drives with massive and unnecessary write rates.

  • Alexa – Making that First Application Run
  • Shaggy Dogs and SpiderMonkey Unwinders
  • OVN Logical Flows and ovn-trace
  • Agile development w/ CI/CD – Automated cloud building & deployment (from scratch)

An Everyday Linux User Guide To The Nautilus File Manager

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Nautilus is a very popular file manager so if it isn't installed for your particular distribution you should be able to find it in the graphical package manager.

Nautilus is the default file manager within Ubuntu Linux.

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Canonical Releases Snapcraft 2.23 Snap Creator for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and 16.10

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