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HowTos

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • HOWTO : VirtualBox 2.1.4 on Ubuntu 8.10

  • Update Gimp in Ubuntu Hardy 8.04 - The Fast Way
  • Non-Ubuntu Installation of conkyForecast
  • Power Tools: Piles of Files
  • Using DNSSEC Today
  • Email Notification of Available Updates: Ubuntu/Debian Server
  • How To Password Protect GRUB Entries (Linux)

The Perfect Desktop - Debian Lenny

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HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a Debian Lenny desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Compare two files in Linux and find the differences

  • How to convert the search field into a button in the Opera Search panel?
  • How to finding out which directory is the largest on your device
  • Get Awesome
  • How to tether AT&T's Fuze phone to Ubuntu Linux
  • quick and dirty distcc
  • How to: Install R on Debian from the CRAN repositories
  • Getting your scanner to work with Ubuntu (gt68xx)
  • Merging Mkdir and Cd

xrandr and the X Window System

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Software
HowTos

blog.hydrasystemsllc: For those of us who have traveled outside of the world of Microsoft Windows and into UNIX-like operating systems, we should already be somewhat familiar with the X Window System. Some of us even understand its full potential. Over the years, I have grown really fond of one specific command line utility and that is xrandr.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • A free, open-source Linux multimedia streamer

  • How to Join the Ubuntu Community
  • Creating an adhoc host with Ubuntu
  • Taming the Wild Eee PC: Replacing the Operating System, Part 1
  • The Detail Guide To Perform A Debian 5.0 Network Install
  • 10 iptables rules to help secure your Linux box
  • Aligning filesystems to an SSD’s erase block size
  • Use netstat to See Internet Connections
  • Using ntfs partitions from GNU/Linux
  • Make Firefox flag secure web pages in Ubuntu and Mint
  • Retheaming Ubuntu - Part 2
  • Building OpenJDK under Ubuntu

Connecting to Windows servers from GNU/Linux using pyNeighborhood

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HowTos

Need to connect to a Windows server from a computer running GNU/Linux? pyNeighborhood gives you an easy and graphical way to do just that.

Read the full tutorial at Freesoftware Magazine.

The Perfect Server - Debian Lenny (Debian 5.0) [ISPConfig 2]

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HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a Debian Lenny (Debian 5.0) server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Courier POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Per-Process Namespaces

  • Duplicate your Ubuntu Installation....
  • Fast access to frequently used directories
  • How Linux Shuts Down
  • bash completion: /dev/fd/62: No such file or directory
  • Adding Custom Shortcuts to Gnome
  • How to resolve the ‘/bin/rm: Argument list too long’ error
  • Extract the MP3 Audio Portion of a Video

How To: Turn Your Linux Rig into a Streaming Media Center

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HowTos

maximumpc.com: These days, most people have at least one computer and a large collection of media files. The conventional practice for most people has always been to have redundant copies of their media collection on their various computers. While this system technically works, it is highly inefficient.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Linux Shell Tricks To Save You A Few Gray Hairs

  • Run a command when not busy
  • How to know which drivers you may need when configuring your Kernel
  • Migrating from Outlook to Mozilla Thunderbird in Linux (part 1)
  • Periodic Table of the Operators
  • How to upgrade Debian Lenny to Squeeze
  • Benchmark Your Computer with Debian 5 Lenny
  • Upgrading a C# Mono Application on Gentoo Linux, Pt 3
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More in Tux Machines

Google beefs Linux up kernel defenses in Android

Future versions of Android will be more resilient to exploits thanks to developers' efforts to integrate the latest Linux kernel defenses into the operating system. Android's security model relies heavily on the Linux kernel that sits at its core. As such, Android developers have always been interested in adding new security features that are intended to prevent potentially malicious code from reaching the kernel, which is the most privileged area of the operating system. Read more

Fork YOU! Sure, take the code. Then what?

There's an old adage in the open source world – if you don't like it, fork it. This advice, often given in a flippant manner, makes it seem like forking a piece of software is not a big deal. Indeed, forking a small project you find on GitHub is not a big deal. There's even a handy button to make it easy to fork it. Unlike many things in programming though, that interaction model, that simplicity of forking, does not scale. There is no button next to Debian that says Fork it! Thinking that all you need to do to make a project yours is to fork it is a fundamental misunderstanding of what large free/open source projects are – at their hearts, they are communities. One does not simply walk into Debian and fork it. One can, on the other hand, walk out of a project, bring all the other core developers along, and essentially leave the original an empty husk. This is what happened when LibreOffice forked away from the once-mighty OpenOffice; it's what happened when MariaDB split from MySQL; and it's what happened more recently when the core developers behind ownCloud left the company and forked the code to start their own project, Nextcloud. They also, thankfully, dropped the silly lowercase first letter thing. Nextcloud consists of the core developers who built ownCloud, but who were not, and, judging by the very public way this happened, had not been, in control of the direction of the product for some time. Read more

Proprietary and Microsoft Software

Pithos 1.2

  • New Version of Linux Pandora Client ‘Pithos’ Released
    A new release of open-source Linux Pandora client Pithos is now available for download.
  • Pithos 1.2 Improves The Open-Source/Linux Pandora Desktop Experience
    Chances are if you've ever dealt with Pandora music streaming from the Linux desktop you've encountered Pithos as the main open-source solution that works out quite well. Released today was Pithos 1.2 and it ships with numerous enhancements for this GPLv3-licensed Pandora desktop client. Pithos 1.2 adds a number of new keyboard shortcuts for the main window, initial support for translations, an explicit content filter option, reduced CPU usage with Ubuntu's default theme, redesigned dialogs and other UI elements, and more.