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HowTos

Installing Xen 3.3 With Kernel 2.6.27 On Ubuntu 8.10 (x86_64)

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Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can install Xen 3.3 on an Ubuntu 8.10 host (dom0). Xen 3.3 is available from the Ubuntu 8.10 repositories, but the Ubuntu 8.10 kernels (2.6.27-x) are domU kernels, i.e., they work for Xen guests (domU), but not for the host (dom0).

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • HOWTO use Inkscape filter effects to style text

  • Migrating from Outlook to Mozilla Thunderbird in Linux (part 2)
  • Installing A "Full" Linux Distro On A USB Stick [How-To]
  • [HOW TO] Get the new Notifications on Intrepid
  • Set up a bluetooth keyboard and mouse in Fedora 10
  • Tutorial: Mounting UDF DVD's in Linux
  • Stupid Geek Tricks: Watch Movies in Your Linux Terminal Window
  • How-To: Upgrade to Ubuntu 9.04 and ext4

Build a faster and more secure UNIX file system

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HowTos

UNIX's method of handling file systems and volumes provides you with an opportunity to improve your systems' security and performance. This article addresses the issue of why you should split up your disk data into multiple volumes for optimized performance and security.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • HOWTO : VirtualBox 2.1.4 on Ubuntu 8.10

  • Update Gimp in Ubuntu Hardy 8.04 - The Fast Way
  • Non-Ubuntu Installation of conkyForecast
  • Power Tools: Piles of Files
  • Using DNSSEC Today
  • Email Notification of Available Updates: Ubuntu/Debian Server
  • How To Password Protect GRUB Entries (Linux)

The Perfect Desktop - Debian Lenny

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HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a Debian Lenny desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Compare two files in Linux and find the differences

  • How to convert the search field into a button in the Opera Search panel?
  • How to finding out which directory is the largest on your device
  • Get Awesome
  • How to tether AT&T's Fuze phone to Ubuntu Linux
  • quick and dirty distcc
  • How to: Install R on Debian from the CRAN repositories
  • Getting your scanner to work with Ubuntu (gt68xx)
  • Merging Mkdir and Cd

xrandr and the X Window System

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Software
HowTos

blog.hydrasystemsllc: For those of us who have traveled outside of the world of Microsoft Windows and into UNIX-like operating systems, we should already be somewhat familiar with the X Window System. Some of us even understand its full potential. Over the years, I have grown really fond of one specific command line utility and that is xrandr.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • A free, open-source Linux multimedia streamer

  • How to Join the Ubuntu Community
  • Creating an adhoc host with Ubuntu
  • Taming the Wild Eee PC: Replacing the Operating System, Part 1
  • The Detail Guide To Perform A Debian 5.0 Network Install
  • 10 iptables rules to help secure your Linux box
  • Aligning filesystems to an SSD’s erase block size
  • Use netstat to See Internet Connections
  • Using ntfs partitions from GNU/Linux
  • Make Firefox flag secure web pages in Ubuntu and Mint
  • Retheaming Ubuntu - Part 2
  • Building OpenJDK under Ubuntu

Connecting to Windows servers from GNU/Linux using pyNeighborhood

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HowTos

Need to connect to a Windows server from a computer running GNU/Linux? pyNeighborhood gives you an easy and graphical way to do just that.

Read the full tutorial at Freesoftware Magazine.

The Perfect Server - Debian Lenny (Debian 5.0) [ISPConfig 2]

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HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a Debian Lenny (Debian 5.0) server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Courier POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.

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today's leftovers

  • Why leading DevOps may get you a promotion
    Gene Kim, author of The Phoenix Project and leading DevOps proponent, seems to think so. In a recent interview with TechBeacon's Mike Perrow, Kim notes that of "the nearly 100 speakers at DevOps Enterprise Summits over the last two years, about one in three have been promoted."
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    SWORDY is a rather fun looking local party brawler that has just released on Steam in Early Access. It could see a Linux release too, if Microsoft allow it.
  • System Shock remake has blasted past the Linux stretch goal, officially coming to Linux
    The Linux stretch goal was $1.1 million and it's pleasing to see it hit the goal, so we won't miss out now. I am hoping they don't let anyone down, as they have shown they can do it already by providing the demo. There should be no reason to see a delay with Linux now.
  • GammaRay 2.5 release
    GammaRay 2.5 has been released, the biggest feature release yet of our Qt introspection tool. Besides support for Qt 5.7 and in particular the newly added Qt 3D module a slew of new features awaits you, such as access to QML context property chains and type information, object instance statistics, support for inspecting networking and SSL classes, and runtime switchable logging categories.
  • GammaRay 2.5 Released For Qt Introspection
    KDAB has announced the release of GammaRay 2.5, what they say is their "biggest feature release yet", the popular introspection tool for Qt developers.
  • The new Keyboard panel
    After implementing the new redesigned Shell of GNOME Control Center, it’s now time to move the panels to a bright new future. And the Keyboard panel just walked this step.
  • Debian on Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS
    The majority of NAS devices supported in Debian are based on Debian's Kirkwood platform. This platform is quite dated now and can only run Debian's armel port. Debian now supports the Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS devices. They are based on Marvell's Armada 370, a platform which can run Debian's armhf port. Unfortunately, even the Armada 370 is a bit dated now, so I would not recommend these devices for new purchases. If you have one already, however, you now have the option to run native Debian.

OSS Leftovers

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Leftovers: Software