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HowTos

Which Linux File System Should You Choose?

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HowTos

howtogeek.com: File systems are one of the layers beneath your operating system that you don’t think about—unless you’re faced with the plethora of options in Linux. Here’s how to make an educated decision on which file system to use.

Enabling Compiz Fusion On A Fedora 14 GNOME Desktop (NVIDIA GeForce 8100)

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HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can enable Compiz Fusion on a Fedora 14 GNOME desktop (the system must have a 3D-capable graphics card - I'm using an NVIDIA GeForce 8100 here). With Compiz Fusion you can use beautiful 3D effects like wobbly windows or a desktop cube on your desktop. I will use the free nouveau driver in this tutorial instead of the proprietary NVIDIA driver. nouveau is an accelerated Open Source driver for NVIDIA cards that comes with experimental 3D support on Fedora 14 - on my test system 3D support was working without any problems.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Create a GTK+ application on Linux with Objective-C
  • Using Variables That are Read Only
  • How to Compile Banshee 1.9.0 on Ubuntu
  • How to upgrade SLAX
  • change DNS without downtime
  • install openshot in ubuntu
  • 'Directory Cleaner And Files Organizer' Updated With Command Line Version

The Web on the Console

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Software
HowTos

linuxjournal.com: The console isn't the wasteland it might seem. Lots of utilities are available for surfing the Web and also for downloading or uploading content.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • How to take Screenshot on Linux
  • Get alert about LAMP stack
  • SSH And SCP With PHP
  • Performing Searches with grep
  • Cross platform file encryption utility using blowfish - Bcrypt
  • drupal: nid in $form_state
  • Advanced Linux Server Troubleshooting (part 2)
  • Linux crontab, cronjob Syntax, How to and tips
  • Easy Record Ubuntu desktop, speaker output and microphone using Tibesti
  • Fixing Dropbox startup issues in Ubuntu
  • How to Create an Explosion in Blender
  • How to install Linux Kernel headers on Debian or Ubuntu
  • 40+ Best GIMP Tutorials of 2010
  • SSH Sessions Timing Out?
  • convert VirtualBox VDI to VMware VMDK disks
  • Linux Games: Gridwars

7 Ways to Beautify Your KDE 4 Desktop

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KDE
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: Like any good desktop environment, you are by no means stuck with the default look. In fact, KDE offers more easily customizable features than any other. What follows are 7 ways to get the desktop look you dreamed about when you were a child.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Wedding Photo Enhancement using The GIMP
  • How to find which process is eating RAM memory in Linux
  • Minitube - YouTube Desktop Application for Ubuntu
  • The Beginner’s Guide to Managing Users and Groups
  • Customizing KDE in Mandriva 2010.x
  • GMusicBrowser - Music Player and Manager
  • KernelCheck - Linux Kernel Compilation made easy
  • share files and printers with samba Linux for Windows
  • How to install www.nvidia.com drivers in Fedora 14
  • install YouAmp Music player in ubuntu using PPA
  • Crontab Scheduling Syntax and Script Example
  • Configure ufw firewall in Ubuntu using Gufw (GUI)
  • Blocking a Website with a iptables
  • Add a user-configurable menu to your Linux desktop with 9menu
  • 6 mv Command Examples to Move or Rename Linux File and Directory

Installing Cherokee With PHP5 And MySQL Support On Ubuntu 10.10

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Ubuntu
HowTos

Cherokee is a very fast, flexible and easy to configure Web Server. It supports the widespread technologies nowadays: FastCGI, SCGI, PHP, CGI, TLS and SSL encrypted connections, virtual hosts, authentication, on the fly encoding, load balancing, Apache compatible log files, and much more. This tutorial shows how you can install Cherokee on an Ubuntu 10.10 server with PHP5 support (through FastCGI) and MySQL support.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Enable “Mark All Upgrades” in Synaptic in Mint
  • Script of the Week: Backup Types in Bash
  • Collection of basic Linux Firewall iptables rules
  • Text Frames in Scribus
  • How to block, lock, or deny access to a user into Linux
  • How To Setup Email Alerts on Linux Using Gmail or SMTP
  • Tips for Securely Using Temporary Files in Linux Scripts
  • Linux Command Sequences in Bash
  • Opensuse Building VirtualBox Guest Additions kernel modules
  • How to join together several Flash video (flv) files

yesterday's odds & ends:

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News
HowTos
  • Ubuntu Unity launcher won’t be ‘moveable’
  • Use free Calibre to Manage E-book library in Ubuntu
  • X.Org Server 1.9.3 May Come Next Week
  • Meet the GIMP Episode 152: too much Light
  • install Call of Duty Black Ops w/ PlayOnLinux
  • Myth Busted #5: Ubuntu is linux, linux is all commandline
  • HOWTO: Enable Compiz under Bodhi (Enlightenment)
  • How to handle files with strange names
  • 7 Practical uses of Openssl
  • SSH Known Hosts Fingerprints and Hostnames
  • how to install kde 4.6b1 on Kubuntu
  • Hide / Show Desktop Icons In GNOME Using A Simple Script
  • Add SSL to CentOS web server
  • Fuduntu gets Adobe Flash and Fluendo MP3
  • LibreOffice 3.3. RC 1 Available
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Automatically Change Wallpapers in Linux with Little Simple Wallpaper Changer

Here is a tiny script that automatically changes wallpaper at regular intervals in your Linux desktop. Read more

EU Law Threatens Free/Open Source Software

  • EU votes on copyright law that could kill memes and open source software
    The European Union has passed an initial vote in favour of the Copyright Directive, a legislation experts say "threatens the internet". As reported by Wired, the mandate is designed to update internet copyright law but contains two controversial clauses. Ultimately, it could force prominent online platforms to censor their users' content before it's posted—which could impact everyone from meme creators to open source software designers and livestreamers. Despite passing a vote yesterday—held by the EU's Legal Affairs Committee (JURI)—the directive needs parliamentary approval before becoming law.
  • The EU Parliament Legal Affairs Committee Vote on Directive on Copyright, David Clark Cause and IBM's Call for Code, Equus' New WHITEBOX OPEN Server Platform and More
    Yesterday the European Parliament Legal Affairs Committee voted in favor of "the most harmful provisions of the proposed Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market", Creative Commons reports. The provisions include the Article 11 "link tax", which requires "anyone using snippets of journalistic content to first get a license or pay a fee to the publisher for its use online." The committee also voted in favor of Article 13, which "requires online platforms to monitor their users' uploads and try to prevent copyright infringement through automated filtering." There are still several steps to get through before the Directive is completely adopted. See EDRi for more information.
  • GitHub: Changes to EU copyright law could derail open source distribution
  • The E.U. votes to make memes essentially illegal
    On Wednesday, European Parliament’s Committee on Legal Affairs voted to essentially make memes illegal. The decision came as part of the approval process for the innocuously named “Article 13,” which would require larger sites to scan all user uploads using content recognition technology in an attempt to flag any and all remotely copyrighted material in photos, text, music, videos, and more. Meaning memes using stills from copyrighted films could be auto-blocked, along with remixes of viral videos, and basically anything that’s popular on live-streaming sites like Twitch.
  • Europe takes step towards 'censorship machines' for internet uploads
    A key committee at the European Parliament has voted for a new provision in a legislative act that forces tech giants and other online platforms to share revenues with publishers. It is known as Article 13, and is part of an updating of the Copyright Directive. Article 13 proposes that large websites use “content recognition technologies” to scan for copyrighted materials, though it doesn’t explain how this works in practice. This means texts, sounds and even code which get uploaded have to go through an automated filtering system, potentially threatening the creation of memes and open-source software developers.

The EC’s Expected Decision Against Android Is an Unfortunate Attack on Open Source Software

The European Commission (“EC”) is preparing to release its decision against Android, and its framing of the issues makes clear that successful open source software will have a hard time in Europe. In its Statement of Objections, the Commission signaled that Apple’s iOS, Android’s fiercest rival, would be excluded from the market definition because it is closed source and not available to other hardware makers. The decision is expected to declare unlawful strategies to monetize a free product, provide a consistent user experience to customers expecting the Google brand, and to maintain code consistency to minimize problems for developers using the platform. The decision is not expected to contain any indication on how open source platform developers can solve these problems that are fundamental to their success. Read more

Google, IBM and Microsoft

  • Five Common Chromebook Myths Debunked
    When Chromebooks first came out in 2011, they were basically just low-spec laptops that could access web apps – fine for students maybe, but not to be regarded as serious computers. While they’ve become more popular (the low cost, simplicity, and dependability appeal to businesses and education systems), as of 2018 Chromebooks still haven’t managed to become widely accepted as a Windows/Apple/Linux alternative. That may be about to change. The humble Chromebook has gotten a lot of upgrades, so let’s get ourselves up to speed on some things that just aren’t true anymore. [...] The 2011 Chrome OS was pretty bare-bones, but it’s gone to the opposite extreme since then. Not only is it steadily blurring the line between Chrome and Android, it can now install and run some Windows programs as well, at the same time as a Chrome and an Android app, if you like. And hey, while you’re at it, why not open a Linux app as well? You can already install Linux on a Chromebook if you want, but one of the next versions of Chrome OS is going to include a Linux virtual machine accessible right from your desktop (which is already possible, just not built-in and user-friendly). In sum, Chrome OS has gone from barely being an operating system to one that can run apps from four other OSes at the same time.
  • Like “IBM’s Work During the Holocaust”: Inside Microsoft, Growing Outrage Over a Contract with ICE
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E15 – Fifteen Minutes - Ubuntu Podcast
    ...Microsoft getting into hot water over their work with US Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Plus we round up the community news.