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HowTos

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • How to Configure Apache as a Forward / Reverse Proxy
  • Use iptables to block access using mac address
  • How to Setup Transparent Squid Proxy Server in Ubuntu
  • One key to Quick Setup fresh installed Ubuntu with Ailurus
  • Hidden Linux : NetHogs
  • Slidy : How to create an HTML Slideshow
  • Restart USB in Ubuntu Jaunty/Karmic
  • Catfish - file search tool that support several different engines
  • Easy Linux backup software with Time Machine like functionality
  • Auto shutdown your computer in Linux
  • GNU/Linux: rdesktop - Working on a Windows Based PC Remotely

Linux command line tips

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HowTos

ghacks.net: I thought it would be useful to break away from all the GUI-goodness and offer up a few command line tips and tricks. Why? No matter how powerful, user-friendly, and modern the Linux desktop becomes, there may come a time when you want to step up your game and get down and dirty with the command line interface.

today's howtos & leftovers:

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News
HowTos
  • Linux Disk Space Lost? Use Tune2fs , or use xfs
  • Home print server using CUPS (using X11 or console based only)
  • Graphical Monitor for the Power Consumption of a Laptop in Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala
  • How to set up the Canon Pixma MX860 with Fedora
  • Eclipse on Stellarium
  • Remote searching with Beagle
  • XMonad on Ubuntu
  • Blacklisting e-mail addresses using MailScanner
  • Why embedded OS's are like mammals
  • Install Guest additions and run fullscreen mode on VirtualBox Guest OS | Linux
  • How To Customize The Boot Splash Screen & Logo
  • Convert audio files recursively
  • Urgent: Help Shawn Powers & Family
  • DtO: Linux Tech Support - Day 6

Installing Apache2 With PHP5 And MySQL Support On Fedora 12 (LAMP)

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HowTos

LAMP is short for Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP. This tutorial shows how you can install an Apache2 webserver on a Fedora 12 server with PHP5 support (mod_php) and MySQL support.

today's howtos & stuff:

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News
HowTos
  • Get your beat on with the Hydrogen drum machine
  • Labels with PostScript::MailLabels Getting Started
  • How to Add a Custom New Service under xinetd
  • 3 Ways to Quickly Find the Tab You Need (FireFox)
  • Tuning the Linux Kernel’s Completely Fair Scheduler
  • openSUSE – Get the HTTP Proxy setting in Shell
  • xdg-open — opens a file or URL in the user’s preferred application
  • Qt Programming Tip
  • Install Banshee Latest Version in Ubuntu Karmic
  • How to Edit Videos With Avidemux
  • whohas
  • Why Desktop Linux (Still) Sucks to be at Linux Fest Northwest
  • Gource: Open Source visualization of Open Source
  • Open Xange 2010, Released
  • Gentoo LOL

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Download YouTube Videos from the Linux Terminal
  • Screen in Ubuntu Karmic
  • Multiple wallpapers in Compiz
  • Print Beautiful Custom Calendars in Linux With Photo Calendar
  • Howto: Linux and Windows virtualization with KVM and Qemu
  • openSUSE – Create your own Software Repository @ 2
  • Burn a ISO image to CD via Command Line Linux – openSUSE Ubuntu Fedora
  • Simple Tip To Keep Your Ubuntu System Clean
  • How to solve " su: Authentication failure "
  • Tech Tip: Dereference Variable Names Inside Bash Functions
  • Tip: Using KWallet or GNOME Keyring with Subversion
  • Software RAID on Debian Linux
  • Dual Boot Your Pre-Installed Windows 7 Computer with Ubuntu
  • Disable MySQL History – Clear ~/.mysql_history and MYSQL_HISTFILE
  • Free Gimp tutorial PDFs
  • Crash Course on Mixing C and Assembly on Linux/x86
  • Vim Cheat Sheet and Config

Flexible for a Fluxbox? – Lightweight X Window Manager

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Fluxbox
HowTos

thegeekstuff.com: One of the many great things about using UNIX or a UNIX-like operating system is the ability to tailor your environment to your liking. If you want something less resource intensive that offers a greater degree of control then Fluxbox Window Manager is what you’re looking for.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Install Minimal Ubuntu and Fluxbox
  • Enabling ssh in OpenSuse
  • Uninstalling KDE or Gnome from Gentoo
  • Configure the graphical firewall client on Linux Mint 8
  • Improving Metadata Performance with Ext4 Journal Sizing
  • Start a Kiosk Style Machine Running a Single X11 Application
  • Remove a PDF File Password
  • How to install DirectX in Linux using Wine
  • DStat: Real-Time Resource Monitoring Utility
  • Robots.txt Tips For Deailing With Bots
  • Collectd – Linux System Statistics Collection Daemon
  • Installing BackTrack Linux 4 – Security Distribution
  • Top 10 Recent Cinema Releases As Your Wallpaper

Distributed Storage Across Four Storage Nodes With GlusterFS On Ubuntu 9.10

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Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to combine four single storage servers (running Ubuntu 9.10) to one large storage server (distributed storage) with GlusterFS. The client system (Ubuntu 9.10 as well) will be able to access the storage as if it was a local filesystem. GlusterFS is a clustered file-system capable of scaling to several peta-bytes. It aggregates various storage bricks over Infiniband RDMA or TCP/IP interconnect into one large parallel network file system. Storage bricks can be made of any commodity hardware such as x86_64 servers with SATA-II RAID and Infiniband HBA.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat: British Army Deal, Hyperconverged Infrastructure, OpenShift, Soaring Share Price, and Fedora

today's howtos

Servers: Infrakit & LinuxKit, CMTL, ServiceMaster, Synology, Ubuntu, and NeuVector

  • Why Infrakit & LinuxKit are better together for Building Immutable Infrastructure?
    Let us accept the fact – “Managing Docker on different Infrastructure is still difficult and not portable”. While working on Docker for Mac, AWS, GCP & Azure, Docker Team realized the need for a standard way to create and manage infrastructure state that was portable across any type of infrastructure, from different cloud providers to on-prem. One serious challenge is that each vendor has differentiated IP invested in how they handle certain aspects of their cloud infrastructure. It is not enough to just provision n-number of servers;what IT ops teams need is a simple and consistent way to declare the number of servers, what size they should be, and what sort of base software configuration is required. Also, in the case of server failures (especially unplanned), that sudden change needs to be reconciled against the desired state to ensure that any required servers are re-provisioned with the necessary configuration. Docker Team introduced and open sourced “InfraKit” last year to solve these problems and to provide the ability to create a self healing infrastructure for distributed systems.
  • CMTL Testing First Linux Based Intel® Server Board
    The board is designed for HPC workload environments requiring parallel computing processing performance. Up to 72 cores for optional support and 100Gb/s node interconnect. Six slots for DDR4, 2400Mhz registered ECC DIMMS to achieve a capacity of 384G.
  • [Older] DNS Infrastructure at GitHub
    At GitHub we recently revamped how we do DNS from the ground up. This included both how we interact with external DNS providers and how we serve records internally to our hosts. To do this, we had to design and build a new DNS infrastructure that could scale with GitHub’s growth and across many data centers.
  • ServiceMaster polishes DevOps process for Linux container security
    ServiceMaster Global Holdings Inc., which owns consumer brands such as Terminix, Merry Maids, Furniture Medic and ServiceMaster Clean and Restore, deploys 75,000 service trucks to residential driveways each day. Five years ago, the company was taken private by an equity firm, and new leadership, including a new CIO, was brought in to modernize its operations. When it returned to the public market in 2014, the company had completely overhauled its approach to IT.
  • My Love Affair with Synology
    In my "Hodge Podge" article in the October 2016 issue, I mentioned how much I love the Synology NAS I have in my server closet (Figure 1). I got quite a few email messages from people—some wanting more information, some scolding me for not rolling my own NAS, and some asking me what on earth I need with that much storage. Oddly, the Linux-running Synology NAS has become one of my main server machines, and it does far more than just store data. Because so many people wanted more information, I figured I'd share some of the cool things I do with my Synology.
  • Certified Ubuntu Cloud Guest – The best of Ubuntu on the best clouds
    Ubuntu has a long history in the cloud. It is the number one guest operating system on AWS, Azure and Google Cloud Platform. In fact there are more Ubuntu images running in the public cloud than all other operating systems combined. Ubuntu is a free operating system which means anyone can download an image, whenever they want. So why should cloud providers offer certified Ubuntu images to their customers?
  • Cloud Foundry and Kubernetes: Different Tools
    It’s difficult to compare programming languages and platforms, of course, but this was the analogy that most frequently came to mind last week. Cloud Foundry is unlikely to be as popular as it was shortly after it launched, when it was the only open source PaaS platform available. But this says little about Cloud Foundry, and more about the platform market which – like every other infrastructure market – is exploding with choice to the point of being problematic. It also ignores the ability for the Cloud Foundry foundation to actively embrace this choice via the addition of Kubo.
  • Ubuntu OpenStack Pike Milestone 2
    The Ubuntu OpenStack team is pleased to announce the general availability of the OpenStack Pike b2 milestone in Ubuntu 17.10 and for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS via the Ubuntu Cloud Archive.
  • NeuVector Releases Open Source Tools to Help Enterprises Evaluate Kubernetes 1.6 Deployments for CIS Benchmark Compliance

Chromebook Dual Boot How-to: Ubuntu 17.04 GNOME and Chrome OS

Last year when I got my Acer Chromebook 11 (C740), I wrote a tutorial to teach you guys how to remove Google Chrome OS and install a GNU/Linux distribution of your choice, but things got boring. Read more