Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

HowTos

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • [HOWTO] setup a local rsync server

  • Bluetooth, GPRS mobile phone with Debian GNU/Linux
  • Setup NFS server on Gentoo
  • Install Your Own Ringtones with Ubuntu and BitPim
  • Commandline 101: Using top
  • OOo: How to make text wrap inside an object
  • When did I start work today
  • Installing Parallels Desktop 4 Tools on PCLOS 2009 Guest
  • Ubuntu Package Management from Command line using apt
  • Configuring Printers Via the CUPS Web Interface
  • My gentoo update guide
  • Switching Keyboard Layout in the Command Line

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Print until no match

  • Mounting an NTFS drive in Debian
  • KDE 4.2, Web Shortcuts (gg:) not working in KRunner?
  • Screen Cheatsheet
  • Howto enable tab completion with sudo in Gentoo
  • wicd error: cannot connect to dbus
  • Lenny domU Xencons
  • encrypted root file system on LVM
  • iptables geoip match on debian lenny
  • Getting Started With CFEngine's cfagent.conf On Linux
  • Configure Bacula for Open Source Backups
  • Laptop Multimedia Keys And PCLinuxOS 2009
  • How To Upgrade PCLinuxOS 2007 or Minime 2008
  • Releasing And Renewing Your IP Address In Ubuntu

On Configuring The Linux Kernel For Debugging

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

linux-foundation.org/weblogs: In this blog let’s look at something simple, yet apparently, not used nearly enough. Let’s look at configuring the Linux kernel with various options for debugging.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Software Tip: Using Unetbootin

  • Change file extension revisited
  • Apt-get Update GPG Key Errors and Fix
  • Linux Printing Tips
  • PLAIN Smtpd Auth with Postfix (faster than light)
  • The fastest way to disable PC speaker
  • Access the X Window Clipboard from Command Line with xclip
  • The Perfect Desktop - PCLinuxOS 2009.1
  • Quick Fix for the ‘Size Mismatch’ When Updating Ubuntu Linux
  • HowTo get a small sample dataset from a mysql database
  • Avoid Gentoo emerge steal all your CPU cycles
  • Setting Up Gmail With Evolution In Ubuntu

Virtualization With KVM On A Debian Lenny Server

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Debian Lenny server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM).

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • FFMPEG-0.5 Compile for Mandriva 2009.0

  • last and history
  • Bash Shell Temporarily Disable an Alias
  • Easy Linux Log Viewing with Log Viewer
  • Really rapid C++ development with KDevelop4
  • Remove columns from text
  • Delete Files from my Linux Trashbin- Solution
  • Jaunty: Apt is broken? Move to another country
  • Linux basics: Learn common commands
  • Enigmail Makes Encrypting Email Easy
  • VMware arrow keys issues
  • Install Android Fonts (ttf-droid) on Arch Linux
  • Quick Fix: Black Desktop Background and Lost Icons

Compile source code - and solve problems

Filed under
HowTos

tuxradar.com: Building software from source - that's a bit old-school, isn't it? Who wants to wrestle with the command line, hunting down dependencies and coaxing the GCC compiler into running properly?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • bugs in ext4

  • How To Be Part Of A Supercomputer With BOINC
  • Migrating from Trac to Redmine
  • Ubuntu 8.10 Kernel Update Has Broken Wired Connection
  • Open Multiple Terminals in Single Windows using Terminator
  • How to Moonlight
  • Repair Corrupt RPM databases
  • Sexy server administration
  • How can I avoid running a python script multiple times?
  • Find The Fastest Arch Linux Reposity Mirror(s) With Rankmirror

  • polyglot: bash me harder
  • Setting up NTP in Gentoo

Using iSCSI On Debian Lenny (Initiator And Target)

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Debian Lenny. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Feral Interactive Ports Life Is Strange to Linux and Mac, Episode 1 Is Now Free

Feral Interactive has recently announced that they have managed to successfully port the popular, award-winning Life Is Strange game to GNU/Linux and Mac OS X operating systems. Read more

Introduction to Modularity

Modularity is an exciting, new initiative aimed at resolving the issue of diverging (and occasionally conflicting) lifecycles of different “components” within Fedora. A great example of a diverging and conflicting lifecycle is the Ruby on Rails (RoR) lifecycle, whereby Fedora stipulates that itself can only have one version of RoR at any point in time – but that doesn’t mean Fedora’s version of RoR won’t conflict with another version of RoR used in an application. Therefore, we want to avoid having “components”, like RoR, conflict with other existing components within Fedora. Read more

Our First Look at Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon

Now that I’ve had about a week to play around in Mint 18, I find a lot to like and have no major complaints. While Cinnamon probably isn’t destined to become my desktop of choice, I don’t dislike it and find it, hands down, the best of the GNOME based desktops I’ve tried so far. Anybody looking for a powerful, all purpose distro that’s designed to work smoothly and which can be mastered with ease would be hard pressed to find anything better. Read more

The subtle art of the Desktop

The history of the Gnome and KDE desktops go a long way back and their competition, for the lack of a better term, is almost as famous in some circles as the religious divide between Emacs and Vi. But is that competition stil relevant in 2016? Are there notable differences between Gnome and KDE that would position each other on a specific segment of users? Having both desktops running on my systems (workstation + laptop) but using really only one of them at all times, I wanted to find out by myself. My workstation and laptop both run ArchLinux, which means I tend to run the latest stable versions of pretty much any desktop software. I will thus be considering the latest stable versions from Gnome and KDE in this post. Historically, the two environments stem from different technical platforms: Gnome relies on the GTK framework while KDE, or more exactly the Plasma desktop environment, relies on Qt. For a long time, that is until well into the development of the Gnome 3.x platform, the major difference was not just technical, it was one of style and experience. KDE used to offer a desktop experience that was built along the lines of Windows, with a start center on the bottom left, a customizable side bar, and desktop widgets. Gnome had its two bars on the top and bottom of the screen, and was seemingly used as the basis for the first design of Mac OS X, with the top bar offering features that were later found in the Apple operating system. Read more