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HowTos

few howtos:

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HowTos
  • Create exciting desktop movies with recordMyDesktop

  • Open Movie Editor - a simple non-linear video editor
  • Workaround to get sound on HP mini with Jaunty
  • How to schedule tasks on Linux using the ‘at’ command
  • OOo: Delete Key Deletes Immediately
  • Firewall on Debian Lenny

Store passwords with pwsafe

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Software
HowTos

blogs.techrepublic.com: Secure password storage is a big thing these days, particularly with the (good!) advice of not re-using passwords in more than one place. The thinking behind that is that if someone figures out a password for one service or Web site, they will not be able to re-use that password on other sites and further obtain access to your credentials and services.

Creating A Fully Encrypted Para-Virtualised Xen Guest System Using Debian Lenny

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HowTos

This document explains how to set up a fully encrypted para-virtualized XEN instance. In this howto, the host system is running Debian Etch, while the guest system to be installed will be using Debian Lenny.

today's leftovers & howtos:

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News
HowTos
  • KDE 4.2.2 still has a few problems

  • Gnot Invented Here
  • Migrating my home Ubuntu Server toward a linutop
  • GNU sed goes GPL3
  • Sometimes I Hate Gentoo
  • How Well Does Computer Humor Age?
  • FLOSS Weekly 67: Xen
  • QuakeLive Linux SITREP
  • Notification Changes For Karmic Koala
  • Using Mew as a Mail Client
  • How to set the date in Linux
  • Translate Your Documentation
  • Ubuntu Tip:Linking Music Across Operating Systems
  • How to securely clean up data on a hard disk on Linux
  • Installing Ubuntu without external media
  • How to Block AIM’s Annoying ‘AOL System Msg’ in Pidgin
  • The Best Virtual Drive For Linux
  • Insert the Last Argument of the Last Command
  • How to get Chromium daily builds in Ubuntu

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Installing VICE 2.1 on Ubuntu 9.04

  • More Karmic plans
  • Gmail Notifier Highly Integrates with Ubuntu 9.04
  • Reconfigure automatic login in ubuntu 9.04 jaunty jackalope
  • Replacing text in multiple files
  • Red Hat: Building $600 Million Partner Channel?
  • Microsoft Admits Windows 7 Is Not Really Suitable For Netbooks
  • NetBSD, Mandriva get shiny new releases
  • Command Line vs. GUI Reality Check
  • How to upgrade from Mandriva 2009 to the new Mandriva 2009 Spring
  • The GNOME Foundation Needs Your Help
  • Palm's Pré: the $170 phone
  • Quickly edit your images with IrfanView
  • Customize your Ubuntu GNOME theme
  • ntop installation/configuration on OpenSuSe
  • Sound Converter
  • Are configuration management tools still needed in the cloud?
  • A brief introduction to mod_perl - Part 1

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • The Tiny Linux Shell Crash Course For Beginners

  • CLI Magic: geek one-liners
  • A command guide to APT-GET and DPKG
  • Use Aliases to have an address book in mutt
  • Geotagging with Linux
  • Check for root kits with rkhunter
  • Quick Tip: Clear Out GNOME Tracker Indexes
  • Migrate MySQL Database to a new Server
  • Mini HOWTO: Tiny Core Linux 1.4 LiveUSB home web server
  • Jaunty Video Performance
  • Finding the Time
  • How to create DVD movies in Linux with DeVeDe

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to create DVD movies in Linux with DeVeDe

  • 5 Popular Tricks to Customize Nano
  • Fix for flash not working after Jaunty Upgrade (64bit)
  • Pretending IceWeasel to be Firefox in Debian Linux
  • quickly adding new baddies to iptables
  • PyMOTW: multiprocessing, part 2
  • Install Ubuntu Linux in 5 Minutes
  • PIDA - A Python IDE
  • /dev/null and /dev/zero What's the diff
  • Postfix Backup MX eMail Server Anti-Spam Configuration
  • Run Windows Apps Seamlessly Inside Linux
  • How to set up a mail server on a GNU / Linux system
  • Connect Remotely to Your Linux Machine Graphically
  • Commandline 101: Free!
  • Adding a simple progress bar to dd
  • Close shell keeping all subprocess running
  • Easily Configure QEMU to Run Bootable ISO Images

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to rip DVD movies in Linux with Handbrake

  • How to make a podcast
  • Linux Firewall Part 4: Installation
  • Making OpenSolaris and Ubuntu Coexist: Grub Config
  • How to install fonts on Ubuntu 9.04
  • LVM made easy
  • Remove The Shutdown/Restart Countdown
  • Creating an invoicing system with OpenOffice.org

How-To: Compile and Install K3b 1.65.0 Alpha from Source in Ubuntu Jaunty Jackalope

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HowTos

Over time K3b got its reputation as one of the most powerful burning applications not only for KDE, but for Linux in general. This short guide will list several easy steps you need to follow in order to compile and install K3b from source.

The Perfect Server - Ubuntu Jaunty Jackalope

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up an Ubuntu Jaunty Jackalope (Ubuntu 9.04) server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Courier POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.

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More in Tux Machines

Canonical Patches Eight Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Just a few minutes ago, Canonical published multiple security advisories to inform the Ubuntu Linux community about the availability of new kernel updates for all of its supported Ubuntu OSes, including Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus). Read more

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Free Hadoop and Spark Training Options Spread Out
    In the tech job market race these days, hardly any trend is drawing more attention than Big Data. And, when talking Big Data, the subject of Hadoop inevitably comes up, but Spark is becoming an increasingly popular topic. IBM and other companies have made huge commitments to Spark, and workers who have both Hadoop and Spark skills are much in demand. With that in mind MapR Technologies and other providers are offering free Hadoop and Spark training. In many cases, the training is available online and on-demand, so you can learn at your own pace.
  • Git hooks, a cloud by the numbers, and more OpenStack news
    Are you interested in keeping track of what is happening in the open source cloud? Opensource.com is your source for news in OpenStack, the open source cloud infrastructure project.
  • Improving phpMyAdmin Docker container
    Since I've created the phpMyAdmin container for Docker I've always felt strange about using PHP's built in web server there. It really made it poor choice for any production setup and probably was causing lot of problems users saw with this container. During the weekend, I've changed it to use more complex setup with Supervisor, nginx and PHP FPM. As building this container is one of my first experiences with Docker (together with Weblate container), it was not as straightforward as I'd hope for, but in the end is seems to be working just fine. While touching the code, I've also improved testing of the Docker container to tests all supported setups and to better report in case of test fails.
  • Support open source motion comic
    There is an ongoing campaign for motion comic. It will be done entirely with FLOSS tools (Blender, Krita, GNU/Linux) and besides that, it really looks great (and no, it is not only for the kids!). Please support this effort if you can because it also shows the power of Free software tools. All will be released Creative Commons Atribution-ShareAlike license together with all sources.
  • GNU APL 1.6 released
    I am happy to announce that GNU APL 1.6 has been released.
  • Italian guide on government websites to be updated
    The source of the document is now available on GitHub, a cloud-based source code management system.
  • Ethiopia’s Lucy is Now Open Source: Famous Bones’ 3D Scans Released
    The world’s most famous fossil is now open source. 3D scans of Lucy — a 3.18-million-year-old hominin found in Ethiopia — were released on 29 August, allowing anyone to examine her arm, shoulder and knee bones and even make their own 3D-printed copies.s
  • How to use open source information to investigate stories online
    Myself and others at First Draft frequently receive emails from a whole range of people asking how they can start doing the sort of online open source investigation and verification that they’ve seen us doing. The skills and methodologies used are all something that can be learnt through a little persistence, but here are a few pieces of advice to get you started.
  • Microsoft relies on Wikipedia and loses Melbourne
    Microsoft’s Bing made the grave mistake on relying on data collected by Wikipedia for its mapping software and lost Melbourne. While Melbourne might not be the nicest it place to live, there were a fair few who felt that Bing Maps moving it to the wrong hemisphere was not exactly fair dinkum. Apparently Vole made the mistake when it collected the data. Ricky Brundritt, a senior program manager at Bing Maps, said that the outfit does not normally rely that much on Wackypedia, but sometimes it uses it.
  • Free education resources from Curriki and Sankoré wikis
    From the days of Gutenberg, technology has been linked to education. Curriki and Sankoré use open source to bring high-quality education to people who need it, and otherwise cannot access it.
  • You don't need a green thumb with this farming robot
    FarmBot is a robotic open hardware system that assists anyone with a small plot of land and a desire to grow food with planting, watering, soil testing, and weeding. It uses a Raspberry Pi, Arduino, and other awesome components, including weather-resistant materials.

Avidemux 2.6.13 Open-Source Video Editor Gets AAC/ADTS Import and Export

The developers of the Avidemux open-source and cross-platform video editor software have announced a new maintenance update in the 2.6 series, bringing multiple improvements, bug fixes, and a handful of new features. Read more

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more