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HowTos

All about Linux swap space

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HowTos

linux.com: When your computer needs to run programs that are bigger than your available physical memory, most modern operating systems use a technique called swapping, in which chunks of memory are temporarily stored on the hard disk while other data is moved into physical memory space. Here are some techniques that may help you better manage swapping on Linux systems and get the best performance from the Linux swapping subsystem.

Back Up Your Files With Pybackpack On Fedora 8

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HowTos

This document describes how to set up, configure and use Pybackpack on Fedora 8.

How to recursively go through all local or remote directories

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HowTos

nixcraft: You can use find command or recursdir command to recurse through local or remote directories to command/find files or create tar files.

Nautilus Tip: Gnome File Manager in Browser Mode

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HowTos

linuxlove.org: Several distributions such as Fedora are shipping Gnome with Nautilus configured in spatial mode. This means that there’s no toolbar, no address bar and worst of all, each folder opens in a new window. A file manager in spatial mode is nothing more than a relic.

Using KVM On Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon)

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Ubuntu
HowTos

How to: simple security with Easy Crypt

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HowTos

ubuntuguru.wordpress: Add some secret ninja power to your Ubuntu system today with Easy Crypt. With only a right click you can open or close a ‘top secret’ file, protected by military grade encryption (AES 512-bit Whirlpool). Easy Crypt is a cute little menu which brings the power of TrueCrypt to your system tray. No terminal commands necessary.

few howtos:

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HowTos
  • Backup Ubuntu using rdiff-backup

  • HowTo: Rename multiple files recursively
  • HowTo: Determine RedHat and Fedora release version

Powerful Multimedia Command-Line Tools, Part I - SoX

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HowTos

Linux Journal: SoX is a power-packed command-line tool for various types of audio processing. It's very useful as an audio format converter, and it can be used for resampling audio files, converting between endianness, audio encoding and modifying other attributes of common audio file formats.

Linux tip guide: Using scrot

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HowTos

Raiden's Realm: For those who like to do a lot of work on the command line, or for those wanting a much simpler approach to taking desktop screenshots, there's scrot. Scrot is short for "screen shot" and is a command line tool for doing exactly that.

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Mozilla Wants to Save the Open Web, but is it Too Late?

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Open source is starting to make a dent in proprietary software fortunes

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