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HowTos

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Fine-grain Access Control on Linux File Systems
  • Digital Blending – Dynamic Range – GIMP
  • Web Application Security (hacking) with DVWA
  • Backup your MySQL databases automatically using Automysqlbackup
  • User and Group Management 101
  • How To Customize The Firefox Layout
  • Install Redmine on CentOS
  • Burn your newly purchased Ubuntu One Music Store Music
  • Sync Your Pidgin Profile Across Multiple PCs with Dropbox

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • KVM setup with bridged networking
  • stat
  • Create a Persistent Bootable Ubuntu USB Flash Drive
  • Working and Manage directories in Linux with command line
  • Convert Ext3 filesystem to Ext4 Filesystem without Reinstalling
  • md5sum: Remove duplicate files
  • Joining Ubuntu Lucid to Active Directory
  • Access webmails from desktop
  • ninja - Monitor Linux System for Unauthorized root access
  • sysadmin tip: reboot more often
  • Backup Directories and Subdirectories Preserving File Structure

Chrooting Apache2 With mod_chroot On Debian Lenny

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HowTos

This guide explains how to set up mod_chroot with Apache2 on a Debian Lenny system. With mod_chroot, you can run Apache2 in a secure chroot environment and make your server less vulnerable to break-in attempts that try to exploit vulnerabilities in Apache2 or your installed web applications.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • libextractor - Extracting Metadata from any types of file
  • How to Install GNOME 3 (GNOME-Shell) in ubuntu
  • Unix How-To: File Updates in Linux
  • Gentoo: Avoid building (some) static libraries
  • Ncat: The Network Swiss Army Knife
  • Kdump on CentOS 5.4
  • Using Tar
  • Quick Compiling Kate in a stable KDE Environment
  • Bash Alias Tutorial

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Easy DNS wildcard setup for local domains using dnsmasq
  • Exploiting a kernel NULL dereference
  • Monitor system Status with saidar in ubuntu / debian Linux
  • Shared Library Issues In Linux
  • How to Convert FLV (YouTube/Flash Videos) to MPEG in Linux
  • Bash HISTCONTROL, control bash history command
  • Gprof for Benchmarking C and C++ code
  • PDF Export in OpenOffice.org
  • tshark: perform filters to rip out a pcap from a large pcap
  • Diffuse - Graphical tool for comparing and merging text files
  • Qmail per domain concurrency
  • Containers vs. Hypervisors: Choosing the Best Virtualization Technology
  • Make scp command work with cronjob
  • How to get required BIOS information from Linux
  • Alien Arena on netbook

Linux backup made easy

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Software
HowTos
  • Luckybackup: Linux backup made easy
  • Using rsnapshot to back up and retain snapshots

How To Set Up A USB-Over-IP Server And Client With Mandriva 2010.0

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MDV
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a USB-over-IP server with Mandriva 2010.0 as well as a USB-over-IP client (also running Mandriva 2010.0). The USB/IP Project aims to develop a general USB device sharing system over IP network. To share USB devices between computers with their full functionality, USB/IP encapsulates "USB I/O messages" into TCP/IP payloads and transmits them between computers. USB-over-IP can be useful for virtual machines, for example, that don't have access to the host system's hardware - USB-over-IP allows virtual machines to use remote USB devices.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to encrypt and decrypt files, password protected
  • Adding a watermark using ImageMagick
  • Installing VirtualBox on openSUSE 11.2
  • New-line search & replace in OpenOffice.org Writer
  • 10 Vim Tutorials to Jumpstart Your Editor Skills
  • How to build debian package from source
  • How to Make GTK Apps Look like KDE
  • Booting Linux with U-Boot on QEMU ARM
  • Shiny, Happy Linux OS Terminals With Bashish
  • Your mail merging options with Thunderbird
  • Turn TonidoPlug into a LAMP Server in a Jiffy

today's leftovers & howtos:

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News
HowTos
  • Labour trumpets open-source success
  • jobs command: running processes
  • Feature Plans For Xen 4.1 Come About
  • Image Magick Toy - A Dada Album Cover Creator
  • Monocaffe Connections Manager
  • How to insert a file at a specific line and column
  • Installing Linux on a Thecus n8800Pro
  • Creating your header.inc.php for eGroupware
  • GIMP Tutorial: Super Glowy Rainbow Text Effect
  • Do your own awesome vector posters with Inkscape
  • Get Wacom Bamboo Pen Working in Ubuntu
  • Getting iPhone Internet Tethering Working in Linux
  • GNOME Do – a nifty productivity tool for your Linux desktop
  • Making a Tie-Dye Design With Gimp
  • The Linux Action Show! s11e07: The Future of Software Development
  • Going Linux: Apr 10: #098 - Listener Feedback

Server Monitoring With munin And monit On Mandriva 2010.0

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MDV
HowTos

In this article I will describe how you can monitor your Mandriva 2010.0 server with munin and monit. munin produces nifty little graphics about nearly every aspect of your server (load average, memory usage, CPU usage, MySQL throughput, eth0 traffic, etc.) without much configuration, whereas monit checks the availability of services like Apache, MySQL, Postfix and takes the appropriate action such as a restart if it finds a service is not behaving as expected. The combination of the two gives you full monitoring: graphics that lets you recognize current or upcoming problems, and a watchdog that ensures the availability of the monitored services.

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Pitivi 1.0 Release Candidate

  • Pitivi 1.0 Release Candidate — “Ocean Big Chair”
    We’re proud to release the first Pitivi 1.0 release candidate “Ocean Big Chair” (0.99). This release has many bug fixes and performance improvements, and is a release candidate for 1.0. Our test suite grew considerably, from 164 to 191 meaningful unit tests. You can install it right away using Flatpak.
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    The Pitivi open-source non-linear video editor has been in development for thirteen years while its v1.0 release is finally near. Coming out this morning as a surprise is the Pitivi 1.0 release candidate, marked as Pitivi v0.99. The Pitivi 1.0 RC is primarily comprised of many bug fixes and performance improvements, thanks in part to more unit testing.

Graphics: RADV Vulkan vs. RadeonSI OpenGL, Open-Source OpenCL, VIA Graphics & Other Vintage GPUs

  • RADV Vulkan vs. RadeonSI OpenGL Performance With Linux 4.13 + Mesa 17.3-dev
    It's been a few weeks since last delivering any large RADV/RadeonSI open-source AMD Linux graphics benchmark results due to being busy with testing other hardware as well as battling some regressions / stability problems within the AMDGPU DRM code and Mesa Git. But with Linux 4.13 stable and the newest Mesa 17.3-dev code, things are playing well so here are some fresh OpenGL vs. Vulkan benchmarks on three Radeon graphics cards.
  • Open-Source OpenCL Adoption Is Sadly An Issue In 2017
    While most of the talks that take place at the annual X.Org Developers' Conference are around the exciting progress being made across the Linux graphics landscape, at XDC2017 taking place this week at Google, the open-source GPGPU / compute talk is rather the let down due to the less than desirable state of the open-source OpenCL ecosystem. Tom Stellard who formerly worked for AMD on their LLVM compiler stack and compute initiatives who recently joined Red Hat provided a "Current state of Open Source GPGPU" talk. It's not too much of a surprise if you are up-to-date in your daily Phoronix reading and our close coverage of all things Linux GPU. But if you're not a devoted reader or looking for an hour synopsis, check out his presentation embedded in this article.
  • VIA Graphics & Other Vintage GPUs Still Interest At Least One Developer In 2017
    Kevin Brace, the sole active developer left working on the OpenChrome driver stack for VIA x86 graphics, presented yesterday at XDC2017 about his work on this driver and how in the years to come he still hopes to work on other vintage GPU support. Brace's work mostly covered his personal motivations, a brief history of Via Unichrome and the Linux driver options, and then his recent work on trying to get the OpenChrome DDX and DRM drivers into shape.

Security: Antipatterns in IoT Security, Signing Programs for Linux, and Guide to Two-Factor Authentication

  • Antipatterns in IoT security
    Security for Internet of Things (IoT) devices is something of a hot topic over the last year or more. Marti Bolivar presented an overview of some of the antipatterns that are leading to the lack of security for these devices at a session at the 2017 Open Source Summit North America in Los Angeles. He also had some specific recommendations for IoT developers on how to think about these problems and where to turn for help in making security a part of the normal development process. A big portion of the talk was about antipatterns that he has seen—and even fallen prey to—in security engineering, he said. It was intended to help engineers develop more secure products on a schedule. It was not meant to be a detailed look at security technologies like cryptography, nor even a guide to what technical solutions to use. Instead, it targeted how to think about security with regard to developing IoT products.
  • Signing programs for Linux
    At his 2017 Open Source Summit North America talk, Matthew Garrett looked at the state of cryptographic signing and verification of programs for Linux. Allowing policies that would restrict Linux from executing programs that are not signed would provide a measure of security for those systems, but there is work to be done to get there. Garrett started by talking about "binaries", but programs come in other forms (e.g. scripts) so any solution must look beyond simply binary executables. There are a few different reasons to sign programs. The first is to provide an indication of the provenance of a program; whoever controls the key actually did sign it at some point. So if something is signed by a Debian or Red Hat key, it is strong evidence that it came from those organizations (assuming the keys have been securely handled). A signed program might be given different privileges based on the trust you place in a particular organization, as well.
  • A Guide to Common Types of Two-Factor Authentication on the Web
    Two-factor authentication (or 2FA) is one of the biggest-bang-for-your-buck ways to improve the security of your online accounts. Luckily, it's becoming much more common across the web. With often just a few clicks in a given account's settings, 2FA adds an extra layer of security to your online accounts on top of your password. In addition to requesting something you know to log in (in this case, your password), an account protected with 2FA will also request information from something you have (usually your phone or a special USB security key). Once you put in your password, you'll grab a code from a text or app on your phone or plug in your security key before you are allowed to log in. Some platforms call 2FA different things—Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA), Two Step Verification (2SV), or Login Approvals—but no matter the name, the idea is the same: Even if someone gets your password, they won't be able to access your accounts unless they also have your phone or security key. There are four main types of 2FA in common use by consumer websites, and it's useful to know the differences. Some sites offer only one option; other sites offer a few different options. We recommend checking twofactorauth.org to find out which sites support 2FA and how, and turning on 2FA for as many of your online accounts as possible. For more visual learners, this infographic from Access Now offers additional information. Finally, the extra layer of protection from 2FA doesn't mean you should use a weak password. Always make unique, strong passwords for each of your accounts, and then put 2FA on top of those for even better log-in security.