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HowTos

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Adding a widescreen monitor in Linux
  • Perform Files/Folders Comparision With Meld In Ubuntu Linux
  • Searching and replacing special characters in OOo
  • Create a Local Ubuntu Repository using Apt-Mirror and Apt-Cacher
  • HOWTO: Resolving more udev issues on Debian
  • How to re-enable backspace as back key in Firefox 3.5
  • Bash, in Color
  • A week of bash scripts – Crush
  • Tutorial: Install and Use of Cairo dock
  • Gnu Screen display number of updates for Arch linux

Boot On BTRFS With Debian

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HowTos

This tutorial will explain you how to boot from a BTRFS filesystem with kernel 2.6.31-RC4 and BTRFS 0.19. BTRFS is a new filesystem with some really interesting features like online defragmenting and snapshots. BTRFS is an experimental filesystem, use at your own risk. The kernel used is also experimental.

Choosing the right Linux File System Layout using a Top-Bottom Process

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HowTos

linuxconfig.org: As you may probably know, Linux supports various filesystems such as ext2, ext3, ext4, xfs, reiserfs, jfs among others. Few users really consider this part of a system, selecting default options of their distribution's installer. In this article, I will give some reasons for a better consideration of the file-system and of its layout.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Get back the ctrl-alt-backspace behavior in Ubuntu

  • Basic Commands: Symbolic Links
  • Use Feh to browse images and set wallpaper
  • Godaddy.com’s Relay Mail Server with Postfix on Ubuntu Server
  • Copy Text and Files to the X Clipboard from the Command Line
  • Create an autostartup script for Debian and Ubuntu systems
  • Famous Perl One-Liners Explained, Part II: Line Numbering
  • Small openSUSE Build Service Tips
  • Install AntiX 8.2 Final on External Flash Drive

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Quick Tip: Auto Shutdown Your Linux Machine

  • Howto Make Link to Filesystem on desktop or panel
  • Firefox 3.5.x Branding Fix for Ubuntu Jaunty
  • A new application background in OOo
  • OpenSolaris: GRUB and the Boot Environment
  • HOWTO: Linux on the Intel iMac - Triple booting
  • Configuring the appearance of the Compiz Cube
  • Some cool Draw tips
  • How To Connect To A WPA Wifi Using Command Lines On Debian
  • A nice weather “plasmoid” in 4 easy steps
  • Play Classic Super Nintendo (SNES) Games on Ubuntu Linux
  • Capturing Video (How I Did It)
  • Accidental blanking and gnome-power-manager
  • Find details about your ISO images from the Linux command line
  • How to manage hosts in Ubuntu
  • Troubleshooting SSH Connections
  • How to play YouTube Video in Ubuntu 9.04?

Setting Up ProFTPd + TLS On Debian Lenny

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HowTos

FTP is a very insecure protocol because all passwords and all data are transferred in clear text. By using TLS, the whole communication can be encrypted, thus making FTP much more secure. This article explains how to set up ProFTPd with TLS on a Debian Lenny server.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Changing visudo to use nano

  • Linux, what nice… passwords you have… and your prompts are incredible…
  • How to install VLC 1 (Goldeneye) in Ubuntu
  • change compression algorithm of KDE4 ark dolphin context menu
  • pkill things when killall isn't enough
  • BIND 9 Dynamic Update
  • Using Oxygen Icons Without KDE
  • TIP: Resolving udev startup error messages on Debian
  • How to Encrypt Your File System
  • No page number on first page in OOo
  • Create your own distro with Product Creator

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • The Mystical Magical Secure Shell, Part 1

  • Configure GRUB2 options and background
  • Keeping Time In Linux
  • System monitoring with Conky
  • How to Layout a Book with OpenOffice.org: Part 3
  • Postfix not delivering to Maildir
  • Synchronize Tomboy Notes with Ubuntu One
  • How to run OpenSuse Mono 2.4.2.1 vmx imgae in vmware 1.0.9
  • The Backslash: helping Linux users ignore things
  • Creating Your Own SuperKaramba Themes
  • howto compile kernel in Debian 5.0
  • How to build a textbox URL shortener with PyGTK+
  • Recover your lost root password in Linux
  • Open and edit PDF files in OpenOffice
  • How to Install Ubuntu in Windows
  • How to Speed up Your Linux PC

Installing Apache2 With PHP5 And MySQL Support On Ubuntu 9.04 (LAMP)

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Ubuntu
HowTos

LAMP is short for Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP. This tutorial shows how you can install an Apache2 webserver on an Ubuntu 9.04 server with PHP5 support (mod_php) and MySQL support.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Install Gejengel {A Simple audio player} on Ubuntu

  • Define the path that an object takes in OOo
  • How to install Drupal on yahoo server
  • How to Add Linux to Your Windows Computer
  • How Do I View My Computer Name In Ubuntu Linux?
  • System Identification with uname
  • Some Useful Vim Options
  • Awesome Addressbook for Netbook Remix
  • How to move print jobs from one printer queue to another
  • Enabling .htaccess in opensuse 11.1
  • Compiling Blender on Gentoo
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

  • Hyper Is a Terminal Emulator Built Using Web Technologies
    A lot of us use the terminal on Ubuntu, typically from an app like GNOME Terminal, Xterm or an app like Guake. But did you know that there’s an JS/HTML/CSS Terminal? It’s called Hyper (formerly/also known as HyperTerm, though it has no relation to the Windows terminal of the same/similar name) and, usefulness aside, it’s certainl a novel proof-of-concept. “The goal of the project,” according to the official website, “is to create a beautiful and extensible experience for command-line interface users, built on open web standards.”
  • Little Kids Having Fun With “Terminal Train” In Ubuntu Linux
    Linux is often stereotyped as the operating system for tech savvy users and developers. However, there are some fun Linux commands that one can use in spare time. A small utility named sl can be installed in Linux to play with the Terminal Train.
  • This Cool 8-Bit Desktop Wallpaper Changes Throughout The Day
    Do you want a dynamic desktop wallpaper that changes throughout the day and looks like the sort of environment you’d be able to catchPokemon in? If so, check out Bit Day wallpapers. Created by Redditor user ~BloodyMarvelous, Bit Day is a collection of 12 high-resolution pixel art wallpapers.
  • This Script Sets Wallpapers from Imgur As Your Desktop Background
    Pyckground is a simple python script that can fetch a new desktop background on the Cinnamon desktop from any Imgur gallery you want. I came across it while doing a bit of background on the Bit Day wallpaper pack, and though it was nifty enough to be of use to some of you. So how does it work?
  • Productivity++
    In keeping with tradition of LTS aftermaths, the upcoming Plasma 5.9 release – the next feature release after our first Long Term Support Edition – will be packed with lots of goodies to help you get even more productive with Plasma!
  • Core Apps Hackfest 2016: report
    I spent last weekend at the Core Apps Hackfest in Berlin. The agenda was to work on GNOME’s core applications: Documents, Files, Music, Photos, Videos, Usage, etc.; to raise their overall standard and to make them push beyond the limits of the framework. There were 19 of us and among us we covered a wide range of modules and areas of expertise. I spent most of my time on the plumbing necessary for Documents and Photos to use GtkFlowBox and GtkListBox. The innards of Photos had already been overhauled to reduce its dependency on GtkTreeModel. Going into the hackfest we were sorely lacking a widget that had all the bells and whistles we need — the idiomatic GNOME 3 selection mode, and seamlessly switching between a list and grid view. So, this is where I decided to focus my energy. As a result, we now have a work-in-progress GdMainBox widget in libgd to replace the old GtkIconView/GtkTreeView-based GdMainView.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Did Amazon Just Kill Open Source?
    Back in the days, we used to focus on creating modular architectures. We had standard wire protocols like NFS, RPC, etc. and standard API layers like BSD, POSIX, etc. Those were fun days. You could buy products from different vendors, they actually worked well together and were interchangeable. There were always open source implementations of the standard, but people could also build commercial variations to extend functionality or durability. The most successful open source project is Linux. We tend to forget it has very strict APIs and layers. New kernel implementations must often be backed by official standards (USB, SCSI…). Open source and commercial implementations live happily side by side in Linux. If we contrast Linux with the state of open source today, we see so many implementations which overlap. Take the big data eco-systems as an example: in most cases there are no standard APIs, or layers, not to mention standard wire protocols. Projects are not interchangeable, causing a much worse lock-in than when using commercial products which conform to a common standard.
  • Firebird 3 by default in LibreOffice 5.4 (Base)
    Lots of missing features & big bugs were fixed recently . All of the blockers that were initially mentioned on tracking bug are now fixed.
  • Linux & Open Source News Of The Week — Comma.ai, Patches For Firefox and Tor, And OSS-Fuzz
  • Open Source Malaria helps students with proof of concept toxoplasmosis pill
    A team of Australian student researchers at Sydney Grammar School has managed to recreate the formula for Daraprim, the drug made (in)famous by the actions of Turing Pharmaceuticals last year when it increased the price substantially per pill. According to Futurism, the undertaking was helped along by an, “online research-sharing platform called Open Source Malaria [OSM], which aims to use publicly available drugs and medical techniques to treat malaria.” The students’ pill passed a battery of tests for purity, and ultimately cost $2 using different, more readily available components. It shows the potential of the platform, which has said elsewhere there is, “enormous potential to crowdsource new potential medicines efficiently.” Although Daraprim is already around, that it could be synthesized relatively easily without the same materials as usual is a good sign for OSM.
  • Growing the Duke University eNable chapter
    We started the Duke University eNable chapter with the simple mission of providing amputees in the Durham area of North Carolina with alternative prostheses, free of cost. Our chapter is a completely student-run organization that aims to connect amputees with 3D printed prosthetic devices. We are partnered with the Enable Community Foundation (ECF), a non-profit prosthetics organization that works with prosthetists to design and fit 3D printed prosthetic devices on amputees who are in underserved communities. As an official ECF University Chapter, we represent the organization in recipient outreach, and utilize their open sourced designs for prosthetic devices.

today's howtos