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HowTos

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • alias
  • How do I join a Linux machine to a Windows Domain?
  • How to get Windows and Linux to cooperate on the network
  • Recover wasted disk space in Ubuntu
  • small screen Ubuntu windows customizations
  • Get Genie Effect in Compiz
  • How to unlock the Gnome keyring at login (and get "almost-hibernation")
  • Fedora GIT package update (fedpkg) step by step
  • Lookup Words from the Command Line Using a Simple Bash Script
  • Fedora 13 btrfs installation guide
  • KDE 4.5 RC3 available for Mandriva 2010 Spring
  • Using the Opera browser as a widget engine in Linux
  • 15 Useful Bash Shell Built-in Commands (With Examples)
  • Disk Information Utility - di
  • User switching in the Linux desktop
  • Introducing CsoundAC: Algorithmic Composition With Csound And Python

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Get to know Linux: Grub2
  • How to set static or fixed IP address using DHCP
  • Conky Colors Makes Your Conky Beautiful In Seconds
  • Compile VLC 1.1.2 on Fedora 13
  • Changing screen resolution at the command line
  • Puppet – server management made easy
  • Load Balancing using the CUPS Print Queues
  • Dual Boot Ubuntu 10.04 and Fedora 13 Goddard with Shared /home
  • Christine - Small media player based on Gstreamer
  • New Ubuntu (10.10) Font For (almost) Everyone
  • Dial-up Internet Access With A USB Modem in Ubuntu
  • Debian and Plymouth
  • Use Single Monitor, Keyboard and Mouse To Access Multiple Computers
  • How to convert MP3 to OGG using VLC
  • Solving the Freeze Problem with APT-GET / Synaptic
  • Load Multiple Desktops on One Linux Distribution
  • useful uses of OpenSSH
  • Get all the required Process Information and Statistics - Psinfo
  • create a free audio link over the Internet using an old PC
  • Creating UI Mockups in Inkscape Video Tutorial
  • Protect Linux Against Overflow Exploits
  • Using Checkinstall To Build Packages From Source

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • “Indicator Applet Complete” has quit unexpectedly
  • Clone your Linux disk with ddrescue
  • How to enable the btrfs Anaconda option on Fedora 13
  • Hair-Saving Tip: MySQL import/export permissions
  • Some things to do after an openSUSE installation
  • How To Change The Mouse Cursor Theme In Ubuntu With Compiz
  • Encrypt files with GnuPG
  • Disable screensaver and make Display never sleep in Ubuntu 10.04
  • How to make a Globe/Planet photo manipulation in GIMP
  • Shell trick: CRLF to LF
  • screen-message prompt for Awesome

Installing Lighttpd With PHP5 And MySQL Support On Fedora 13

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HowTos

Lighttpd is a secure, fast, standards-compliant web server designed for speed-critical environments. This tutorial shows how you can install Lighttpd on a Fedora 13 server with PHP5 support (through FastCGI) and MySQL support.

today's leftovers & howtos:

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News
HowTos
  • Pinguy OS (Remastered Ubuntu)
  • Install KDE on Fedora 13
  • Things to do after installing openSUSE
  • TeXworks with Sweave
  • Skipping fsck checks during boot with CTRL-C
  • How to upgrade Firefox on openSUSE
  • GCC 4.5.1 Released; GCC 4.5.2 Is Up Next
  • Move your logs and temp files to RAM and watch your portable fly
  • Mind Mapping Plugin for KOffice
  • Arch Linux Promising, Disappointing

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Fluxbox on openSUSE 11.3
  • How to install Eclipse SDK 4.0 on Linux (Slackware 13.1)
  • Scripts – User Activity, View Processes, Display Memory
  • Collaborate and manage projects with Todoyu
  • How To setup Dmenu with Ubuntu?
  • Ubuntu: Fixing the Blank Screen on Installation Bug
  • Creating self-signed certificates with gnoMINT

Banish Flash cookies forever under Linux

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HowTos

theinquirer.net: LINUX USERS can banish forever Adobe's Flash Player cookies, which can be a good idea because, for one thing, as a plugin Flash doesn't observe web browsers' Private Browsing modes.

The Perfect Desktop - OpenSUSE 11.3 (GNOME)

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SUSE
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up an OpenSUSE 11.3 desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops. The advantages are clear: you get a secure system without DRM restrictions that works even on old hardware, and the best thing is: all software comes free of charge.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Recover an application that was removed due to update Ubuntu/Debian
  • Mount usb device in Linux command line
  • Log Effectively Using Custom Perl Logger Module
  • How To Extract data from .deb file in Linux
  • View bash shell history and Change bash history file size in Ubuntu
  • Build / Install VirtualBox (vbox) Guest Additions
  • Fix Compiz Slowness For Proprietary ATI Drivers In Ubuntu
  • A requested Linux theming tutorial
  • Battery may be broken
  • Writing your own traceroute in 8 easy steps
  • Change Login window theme in Ubuntu 9.10/10.04 and higher

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Using ALSA to Control Linux Audio
  • Install Flashget and configure Firefox plugin
  • LPI 101 - Linux certification practice exam
  • Terminator and CDargs: Two Great Command Line Tools
  • Investigate GNU/Linux box for io latency and network clogs
  • Python development masterclass
  • Emacs Macro Tutorial: How to Record and Play
  • Going fast with DWM
  • Converting Images with ImageMagick
  • Compress / Uncompress files using bzip2
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More in Tux Machines

Command Line Heroes Launched

  • Red Hat launches new podcast series, Command Line Heroes
    Technology has become so integrated into our daily lives that it can be easy to take it for granted. But we’ve only gotten to where we are today because of the command line heroes that shaped the industry - and continue to do so. Command line hero. What does that really mean? To us it’s the developers, programmers, hackers, geeks and open source rebels - the people who are on the front line, transforming technology from the command line up. The biggest technology advancements and innovations didn’t happen by accident. They were made possible through the passion, creativity and persistence of technologists around the world.
  • Command Line Heroes
    I’ve been looking forward to this for quite a while, ever since it was announced: today, the first two episodes of Command Line Heroes were published. Command Line Heroes, or CLH for short, is a series of podcasts that tells the stories of open source. It’s hosted by Saron Yitbarek, of CodeNewbie fame, and sponsored by Red Hat.

NethServer, Red Hat, and Fedora

  • Why building a community is worth the extra effort
    Building the NethServer community was risky. But we've learned so much about the power of working with passionate people.
  • Risk Malaise Alert in Option Market: Red Hat Inc Implied Price Swing Hits A Deteriorated Level
  • Red Hat (NYSE:RHT) Receives “Neutral” Rating from Credit Suisse Group
  • Sit Investment Associates Inc. Takes $1.22 Million Position in Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Fixing flatpak startup times
    A lot of people have noticed that flatpak apps sometimes start very slowly. Upon closer inspection you notice this only happens the first time you run the application. Still, it gives a very poor first time impression. So, what is causing this, and can we fix it? The short answer to this is font-cache generation, and yes, I landed a fix today. For the longer version we have to take a detour into how flatpak and fontconfig works.
  • Fedora 28 wallpaper contest now open -- submit your image to the Linux distro!
    One of the first things I do after installing a new Linux distribution is set a different wallpaper. Why? Desktop pictures really inspire me -- my mood can be positively altered by a beautiful image. The default wallpaper is often boring. For the most part, I prefer images of nature with bright colors. After all, if I am stuck indoors working on my computer, a wallpaper of the beach, mountains, or a colorful bird, for instance, can transport me to the outdoors -- in my mind. Sadly, not every distro has beautiful high-quality images. Fedora, however, often does -- thanks to its "supplemental" wallpapers. What is particularly cool  about that operating system, is that it regularly accepts wallpaper submissions from the community as part of a contest. In other words, anybody can potentially contribute to a new version of the distro by simply uploading a photo, drawing, or other picture. Fedora 28 is the upcoming version of the OS, and the developers are now calling for wallpaper submissions for it. Will you submit an entry to the contest?

OSS Leftovers

  • Google's Kelsey Hightower talks Kubernetes and community
    Google developer advocate Kelsey Hightower says that he always figured that the (now wildly successful) Kubernetes container orchestration platform "would get big on its own at some point." He shared some of the reasons he sees for Kubernetes' success in a podcast recorded in December at CloudNativeCon in Austin. The first is that Kubernetes is an effective platform on which to do other things. It provides "better primitives than I had before" as Hightower puts it. At the same time, he says that this is something people misunderstand about Kubernetes. "It's not the end game," he says. Rather, at some point, it increasingly becomes "the new platform for building other platforms."
  • A FOSS Year Resolution
    It’s that time of year again. The time when some people are taking a long hard look at their lives and trying to decide what they want to change about themselves over the course of the next year. Some of us want to lose weight, or exercise more, or spend more time with our kids. The trouble is only about 9% of these resolutions actually happen.
  • Do not limit yourself
    The motto of Learn yourself, teach others is still very strong among us. We try to break any such stupid limits others try to force on our lives. We dream, we try to enjoying talking about that book someone just finished. We discuss about our favorite food. I will end this post saying one thing again. Do not bound yourself in some non existing limits. Always remember, What a great teacher, failure is (I hope I quoted Master Yoda properly). Not everything we will try in life will be a super successful thing, but we can always try to learn from those incidents. You don’t have to bow down in front of anyone, you can do things you love in your life without asking for others’ permissions.
  • Benjamin Mako Hill: OpenSym 2017 Program Postmortem
    The International Symposium on Open Collaboration (OpenSym, formerly WikiSym) is the premier academic venue exclusively focused on scholarly research into open collaboration. OpenSym is an ACM conference which means that, like conferences in computer science, it’s really more like a journal that gets published once a year than it is like most social science conferences. The “journal”, in iithis case, is called the Proceedings of the International Symposium on Open Collaboration and it consists of final copies of papers which are typically also presented at the conference. Like journal articles, papers that are published in the proceedings are not typically published elsewhere.
  • NVDA and Firefox 58 – The team is regaining strength
    A week before the Firefox 57 “Quantum” release in November, I published an Article detailing some bits to be aware of when using Firefox and the NVDA screen reader together. In Firefox 58, due on January 23, 2018, the reliable team is regaining strength in playing well together and offering you good and fast web accessibility. After the Firefox 57 release, due to many changes under the hood, NVDA and Firefox temporarily lapsed in performance. Statistics quickly showed that about two thirds of the NVDA user base stayed with us despite of this. So to all of you who stuck with us on this difficult release: Thank you! Many of the others moved to the extended support release of Firefox 52. Thank you to those of you as well, you decided to stick with Firefox! Also, statistics show that barely any of those of you who stuck with 57 decided to turn off multi-process Firefox, but instead used the new technology, and some of you even reported problems to us.
  • Retpoline-enabled GCC
    There will be upstream backports at least to GCC 7, but probably pretty far back (I've seen people talk about all the way to 4.3). So you won't have to run my crappy home-grown build for very long—it's a temporary measure. :-) Oh, and it made Stockfish 3% faster than with GCC 6.3! Hooray.
  • Payara Services to Embed Secure, Stable Open Source Java Runtime from Azul SystemsPayara Server 2018 Update Includes Azul Zulu Enterprise Builds of OpenJDK
  • Eclipse Che – A Next-Generation Cloud IDE and Workspace Server
    We have a couple of posts on developer workspaces and cloud IDEs but in my opinion, none of them has the combined features of beauty, flexibility, and efficiency while being free. That is why it is with great pleasure that I introduce to you the (arguably) best cloud-based IDE you will ever need, Eclipse Che. Eclipse Che is a beautiful and customizable open-source developer workspace and cloud Integrated Development Environment.

Security: Hospital With Windows, Reproducible Builds, Intel, Transmission and More

  • Hospital [sic] sent offline as hackers infect systems with ransomware, demand payment [iophk: "Windows"]
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #142
  • Spectre and Meltdown patches causing trouble as realistic attacks get closer
    Applications, operating systems, and firmware all need to be updated to defeat Meltdown and protect against Spectre, two attacks that exploit features of high-performance processors to leak information and undermine system security. The computing industry has been scrambling to respond after news of the problem broke early a few days into the new year. But that patching is proving problematic. The Meltdown protection is revealing bugs or otherwise undesirable behavior in various drivers, and Intel is currently recommending that people cease installing a microcode update it issued to help tackle the Spectre problem. This comes as researchers are digging into the papers describing the issues and getting closer to weaponizing the research to turn it into a practical attack. With the bad guys sure to be doing the same, real-world attacks using this research are sure to follow soon.
  • Finnish firm detects new Intel security flaw
    new security flaw has been found in Intel hardware which could enable hackers to access corporate laptops remotely, Finnish cybersecurity specialist F-Secure said on Friday. F-Secure said in a statement that the flaw had nothing to do with the "Spectre" and "Meltdown" vulnerabilities recently found in the micro-chips that are used in almost all computers, tablets and smartphones today. Rather, it was an issue within Intel Active Management Technology (AMT), "which is commonly found in most corporate laptops, (and) allows an attacker to take complete control over a user's device in a matter of seconds," the cybersecurity firm said.
  • What is RubyMiner? New malware found targeting Windows and Linux servers to mine cryptocurrency
  • BitTorrent flaw could let hackers take control of Windows, Linux PCs
    According to Project Zero, the client is vulnerable to a DNS re-binding attack that effectively tricks the PC into accepting requests via port 9091 from malicious websites that it would (and should) ordinarily ignore.
  • BitTorrent critical flaw allows hackers to remotely control users' computers
    A critical flaw in the popular Transmission BitTorrent app could allow hackers to remotely control users' computers. The flaw, uncovered by Google Project Zero security researchers, allows websites to execute malicious code on users' devices. Researchers also warned that BitTorrent clients could be susceptible to attacks as well if the flaw is leveraged.