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HowTos

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Assign Custom Shortcut Keys on Ubuntu 9.10
  • Create a simple Grunge-Stamp in GIMP
  • Gain Back Space By Removing a GNOME Panel
  • Sync application preferences with Dropbox
  • Add uptime and/or a daily fortune to your email signature
  • How to Hide Secret Data in image and audio files Ubuntu / Debian: Steghide

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Synchronize a local directory with a remote directory using rsync in ubuntu
  • Custom MOTD for your linux machine
  • How to Get Missing PPA GPG Keys Automatically
  • Verify the Destinations of Shortened URLs the Easy Way
  • Searching and Filtering Photos in digiKam — Part 1
  • Custom Transitioning Backgrounds In KDE3
  • HowTo: Create sar Graphs With kSar
  • Fix for vmware-hostd crash on ubuntu 9.10 with vmware server 2.x
  • Learn to use extended file attributes in Linux to boost security
  • UJS Manager for Opera Unite (Opera 10.10 Browser) installs User Scripts as Extensions
  • CIFS VFS Shutdown Error When Using SMBFS
  • Configuring Strong Wi-Fi (802.1X) Authentication in Linux, Part II

Paravirtualization With Xen On CentOS 5.4 (x86_64)

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HowTos

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen (version 3.0.3) on a CentOS 5.4 (x86_64) system. Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called "virtual machines" or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0). Using Xen you can separate your applications into different virtual machines that are totally independent from each other, but still use the same hardware.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Tech Tip: Periodically Update Your MOTD with update-motd
  • 6 Different Ways To End Unresponsive Programs In Linux
  • Online Desktop Integration with KDE4
  • 64-Bit Native Linux Macromedia Flash – openSUSE, Fedora, Ubuntu
  • BIND DNS: Disable Dynamic Updates
  • How I Shutdown Fluxbox
  • Unix and Linux startup scripts, Part 3
  • Best Linux and KVM switch practices
  • Create a cool wax seal with an engraved eagle in GIMP
  • Recursive Regular Expressions
  • Leave the Num Lock on
  • Adding the Debian menu in Window Maker

today's howtos & leftovers:

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News
HowTos
  • Upgrade Ubuntu 9.10 to Ubuntu 10.04 Alpha 1
  • Google facing privacy backlash
  • Easily Install Android On A Netbook
  • Custom Compiz Effects configuration in Ubuntu
  • Mounting Remote Directories with SSHFS
  • Install cairo-dock on fedora12
  • Managing virtual machines in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.4
  • Howto: Install a console-only Slitaz system
  • Top Geeks To Converge On Wellington
  • Arduino development on OpenSolaris
  • A bad workman blames his (open source) tools
  • Ripping DVD’s using K3b
  • Luckybackup - A powerful, fast and reliable backup & sync tool
  • Web pages and DNS requests
  • Sync your Android phone with Kubuntu 9.10 – part 3
  • A spectacular view of the entire Milky Way... using open source!

Pimp my Slack!

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Slack
HowTos

pdg86.wordpress: I am a KDE fan. Besides the eye-candy, I love the KDE apps. This article is about what I did with my default Slackware install to make it more beautiful. I will be using Slackware 13.0 with vbatts KDE4.3.1 packages.

Virtual Users/Domains With Postfix, Courier, MySQL, SquirrelMail (Ubuntu 9.10)

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Ubuntu
HowTos

This document describes how to install a Postfix mail server that is based on virtual users and domains, i.e. users and domains that are in a MySQL database. I'll also demonstrate the installation and configuration of Courier (Courier-POP3, Courier-IMAP), so that Courier can authenticate against the same MySQL database Postfix uses. The resulting Postfix server is capable of SMTP-AUTH and TLS and quota. Passwords are stored in encrypted form in the database. In addition to that, this tutorial covers the installation of Amavisd, SpamAssassin and ClamAV so that emails will be scanned for spam and viruses. I will also show how to install SquirrelMail as a webmail interface so that users can read and send emails and change their passwords.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • xine Tips & Tricks
  • Meet the GIMP - Episode 129: Octave Sharpening Python Plugin
  • How to install nVidia Graphics driver in Ubuntu
  • Installing Ubuntu 9.10 - VirtualBox
  • How I manage my Perl modules on Debian
  • Faster Browsing In Linux With Local DNS Cache
  • Telecom’s T-Stick under Mandriva Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to install graphic drivers for old and unsupported hardware in Ubuntu
  • Create a graph of your system’s performance
  • Cloning openSUSE VirtualBox Machines
  • Wicd - Easy network connection manager in Debian
  • How to Change Sudo Password Remembering Time in Ubuntu
  • How to install Avant Window Navigator (AWN) in Ubuntu
  • Installing Gnome-Do the Minimal Way
  • Installing openSUSE 11.2 Walk Through – VirtualBox
  • Vim 401: Extending Vim and More
  • Managing Software under Linux (RPM) – Part 2

Sun VirtualBox - Free, Powerful Virtualization

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HowTos

techgage.com: Where virtualization is concerned, "free" certainly doesn't equate with "cheap". Sun's VirtualBox is a perfect example of that. For non-commercial use, it's a cost-free hypervisor that's feature-robust, offers great performance and stability, and supports a wide-variety of guest operating systems.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming