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How to: Installing and running Ubuntu on the Eee PC

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HowTos When the Asus Eee PC came out last year, we found that the eeextremely eeenticing subnotebook had the potential to be a real game-changer. Indeed, the diminutive wonder has spawned countless imitation products from a wide range of other vendors.

some howtos:

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  • How To Find BASH Shell Array Length

  • Setting up mpd locally
  • Keyboard Shortcut Keys in Ubuntu
  • Gmrun - Substitute for gnome run dialog in Ubuntu
  • VirtualBox Wireless Bridging
  • Getting VirtualBox working on Ubuntu after a kernel upgrade
  • Automated scanning with the shell
  • Automatically mount a windows share at boot time in OpenSuse 11
  • Taking Screenshots in Gnome
  • HOWTO: PCLOS custom session
  • Customize Compiz Fusion effects In Ubuntu
  • Compiz Fusion in openSUSE 11.0

Virtual Hosting With PureFTPd And MySQL On Fedora 9

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This document describes how to install a PureFTPd server that uses virtual users from a MySQL database instead of real system users. This is much more performant and allows to have thousands of ftp users on a single machine. In addition to that I will show the use of quota and upload/download bandwidth limits with this setup. Passwords will be stored encrypted as MD5 strings in the database.

How To Move Linux to a New Hard Drive

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HowTos It's been a busy week for me. It's been one of those weeks where all the machines in the house gang up on me and demand attention at once. One of the computers ran out of hard drive space. So I had a bigger hard drive with four times the disk space handy, and swapped them. The steps:

few more howtos:

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  • Ubuntu / Vista dual boot installation on a Sony VGN-FZ

  • Mixing A Podcast In Ardour - Part 5, Part 6
  • Setup ATI Graphics with AIGLX Rendering in openSUSE 11.0 for Compiz
  • Setup Intel Graphics card with AIGLX Rendering for Compiz-Fusion
  • Setup nVidia Graphics card with AIGLX rendering for openSUSE 11.0

few other howtos:

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  • RPMing the night away!

  • How to make QT applications look better in GNOME
  • How To Tell If An Application Is 64-bit In Ubuntu Hardy Heron

few howtos:

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  • GIMP Tricks: Fake Fill Flash

  • Create video animations with Inkscape, ImageMagick and FFmpeg
  • Apt and Dpkg Tips

some howtos:

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  • HOW-TO enable read/write in FAT partition after error

  • Howto: Use xplanet for a desktop weather map
  • How To Harden Your Linux Server (Debian / Ubuntu)
  • Gentoo Prefix: PORTAGE_TMPDIR on NFS solution
  • Install “ubuntu netboot remix” menu in hardy heron
  • Mixing A Podcast In Ardour - Part 5
  • Performance Tuning Best Practices for MySQL
  • debian: building custom exim packages
  • Lenovo ThinkPad X61t Touch support
  • Dpkg Cheat Sheet
  • The Sort Command
  • Upgrade to the Latest Compiz Fusion Release
  • -A RH-Firewall-1-INPUT -p 50 -j ACCEPT
  • Bash scripting Tutorial
  • Getting that wiki feeling on the desktop, part 3

some howtos:

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  • Mixing A Podcast In Ardour - Part 3, Part 4

  • Howto: build and install the intl PECL extension for PHP5 in Debian
  • How to change the default timeout before default OS boots in grub
  • Using Adobe Flash and other 32-bit applications on 64-bit Linux
  • Guake Drop-Down Terminal for GNOME
  • How to install the Web 2.0 i686 Flock Web Browser on 64-bit Gentoo Linux…
  • Installing Fonts Using Synaptic In Ubuntu Hardy Heron

10 ways to make Linux boot faster

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HowTos Linux rarely needs to be rebooted. But when it does, it’s often slow to boot. Fortunately, there are ways to speed things up. Some of these methods are not terribly difficult. (although some, unfortunately, are). Let’s take a look.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Friday's security updates
  • Researchers poke hole in custom crypto built for Amazon Web Services
    Underscoring just how hard it is to design secure cryptographic software, academic researchers recently uncovered a potentially serious weakness in an early version of the code library protecting Amazon Web Services. Ironically, s2n, as Amazon's transport layer security implementation is called, was intended to be a simpler, more secure way to encrypt and authenticate Web sessions. Where the OpenSSL library requires more than 70,000 lines of code to execute the highly complex TLS standard, s2n—short for signal to noise—has just 6,000 lines. Amazon hailed the brevity as a key security feature when unveiling s2n in June. What's more, Amazon said the new code had already passed three external security evaluations and penetration tests.
  • Social engineering: hacker tricks that make recipients click
    Social engineering is one of the most powerful tools in the hacker's arsenal and it generally plays a part in most of the major security breaches we hear about today. However, there is a common misconception around the role social engineering plays in attacks.
  • Judge Gives Preliminary Approval to $8 Million Settlement Over Sony Hack
    Sony agreed to reimburse employees up to $10,000 apiece for identity-theft losses
  • Cyber Monday: it's the most wonderful time of year for cyber-attackers
    Malicious attacks on shoppers increased 40% on Cyber Monday in 2013 and 2014, according to, an anti-malware and spyware company, compared to the average number of attacks on days during the month prior. Other cybersecurity software providers have identified the December holiday shopping season as the most dangerous time of year to make online purchases. “The attackers know that there are more people online, so there will be more attacks,” said Christopher Budd, Trend Micro’s global threat communications manager. “Cyber Monday is not a one-day thing, it’s the beginning of a sustained focus on attacks that go after people in the holiday shopping season.”

Openwashing (Fake FOSS)

Android Leftovers

Slackware Live Edition – Beta 2

  • Slackware Live Edition – Beta 2
    Thanks for all the valuable feedback on the first public beta of my Slackware Live Edition. It allowed me to fix quite a few bugs in the Live scripts (thanks again!), add new functionality (requested by you or from my own TODO) and I took the opportunity to fix the packages in my Plasma 5 repository so that its Live Edition should actually work now.
  • Updated multilib packages for -current
  • (Hopefully) final recompilations for KDE 5_15.11
    There was still some work to do about my Plasma 5 package repository. The recent updates in slackware-current broke several packages that were still linking to older (and no longer present) libraries which were part of the icu4c and udev packages.