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HowTos

few howtos:

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HowTos
  • How to set Default Operating System to boot IN GRUB

  • Aenigma Fonts for Ubuntu
  • Use more than 3GB RAM on 32-bit Ubuntu 8.04
  • Sierra Wireless MC5725 on Debian Linux
  • Howto Read Vista Burnt DVDs in Ubuntu

The Linux Terminal For Beginners

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HowTos

davestechsupport.com/blog: A very long time ago, computers didn’t have mice, icons or fancy graphics. Instead of an Operating System with a Graphical User Interface, there was the Command Line Interface. Many computer technicians, expecially Linux geeks, consider it to be one of the best ways to interact with the PC for certain kinds of tasks.

The Definitive Guide to VoIP for Linux Users

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HowTos

voipnow.org: Have you tried lately to figure out which Linux operating system you’d like to use? And, did you think about adding a VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) device to that Linux system? We provide you with a definitive guide to choices available, and to the choices that provide the most documentation for ease of use.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • HowTo: Use Flood Ping to Test For Lost Packets

  • how to add multimedia support to Ubuntu
  • Shell Script To Produce Prime Numbers On Linux And Unix
  • Developing a Simple Backup Strategy
  • Converting DVD9 to DVD5 In Linux
  • Linux web tools, Pt. 2 - Using LAMP for testing
  • Getting NVIDIA and ATI drivers on openSUSE 11.0
  • Gentoo on the Asus Eee PC - Part 1
  • Use composition effects in KDE 4 without fancy graphic cards
  • Ghost your Suse installation with dd

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Google search in command line

  • Speed up your Ubuntu Linux boot
  • Fedora 9: Rsyslog - Most Advanced Log Server
  • Better font display in Firefox 3 on Ubuntu
  • How to prevent a package from being updated in Debian
  • ASCII Pronunciation Rules for Programmers
  • Headless torrent downloads with rTorrent and Screen
  • Howto Increase video performance in Ubuntu
  • Using NTSYSV To Manage Linux Services

Mobile devices in GNU/Linux and GNOME

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HowTos

freesoftwaremagazine.com: You have a computer (a laptop or a desktop). Since it’s a machine you use often and don’t tinker with much, it probably runs Linux. You also have a brand new digital camera, or a shiny new MP3 player. And you feel the dread: are those pure consumer oriented pieces of hardware compatible with my machine?

some more howtos:

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HowTos
  • Using chkconfig To Manage Linux Service Run Levels

  • Fedora 9 Nvidia
  • Short Tip: Searching files and packages
  • 5 easy steps to install Puppy Linux on your USB drive
  • Getting that wiki feeling on the desktop, part 2
  • Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Touchpad “Tap zones”
  • Timing processes in the shell
  • Finding "leaf" nodes on a file system
  • Installing Microsoft Fonts on openSUSE 11.0

How to Dual Boot Linux and Windows XP

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HowTos

pcmag.com: Why choose between two operating systems when you can have both in one PC? We show you how to dual-boot Linux and Windows XP in the ASUS EeePC 900.

Chiron FS lets you set up RAID-1 over the network

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Software
HowTos

linux.com: The Linux kernel includes support for performing RAID-1 in software. RAID-1 maintains the same filesystem on two or more disks, so that you can lose all but the last disk and still retain all of your data. This seems wonderful until you consider that an error in RAM, a power supply failure, or another hardware component in the machine can still potentially corrupt your precious data.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Boost security by stopping these 10 Linux services on your server

  • Save disk space - use compFUSEd to transparently compress filesystems
  • Access your Gentoo calendar
  • Realize the flexibility of OpenSSH
  • How To Create An Ubuntu Repository Mirror on Ubuntu 8.04
  • Ubuntu Mirror? What if I need it easy?
  • How do I… Set up a printer using the Common UNIX Printing System?
  • Making changes to an OpenOffice.org chart in Draw
  • Webalizer - Apache web server log file analysis Tool
  • Be in sync with your GMail Inbox with CheckGmail
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More in Tux Machines

Firefox Fading, Ditching OpenOffice, and Containers

Dissatisfaction with Mozilla's recent announcement to change its extension core code is being expressed across the Internet. Folks aren't happy. Elsewhere, Chris Hoffman explains why you should switch from OpenOffice to LibreOffice and the Canonical IP fight continues. In other news, several container headlines caught my eye recently. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • GTX 760 Vs R7 370 4G In Company Of Heroes 2
    Liam has done his initial port reports and such so it's my turn to feed you some information. I'm once again putting my GTX 760 against the R7 370 to see what kind of performance we can expect from Company of Heroes 2.
  • KDE Plasma 5.4 Enhances Linux Desktop Experience
    The K Desktop Environment (KDE) is one of the earliest Linux desktop environments, dating all the way back to 1996, predating even the popular GNOME desktop environment, which was started in 1999. On Aug. 25, the core KDE desktop, Plasma, got an incremental update to version 5.4 that builds on the innovations that the first Plasma 5 release introduced in July. Among the many changes that users will notice with Plasma 5.4 are more than 1,400 new icons for all KDE applications, providing a more streamlined, modern look and feel to the desktop. Also new to Plasma 5.4 is an optional Application Dashboard that provides a different way to open up applications. Finding an application, or anything else on the KDE desktop, is also improved by way of enhanced search history in the integrated KRunner search tool that is part of the desktop. Plus, the 5.4 update now provides initial support for the Wayland display server that is intended to be a replacement for the decade-old X-Window server. KDE as a desktop environment is available on multiple Linux distributions, including Ubuntu, Fedora and openSUSE. In this slide show, eWEEK examines some of the key features of the KDE Plasma 5.4 desktop.
  • KDE Sprints - who wins?
    To start with, KDE sprints are intensive sessions centered around coding. They take place in person over several days, during which time skillful developers eat, drink and sleep code. There are breaks to refresh and gain perspective, but mostly sprints involve hard, focused work. All of this developer time and effort is unpaid. However travel expenses for some developers are covered by KDE. KDE is a frugal organization with comparatively low administrative costs, and only one paid person who works part time. So the money donated for sprints goes to cover actual expenses. Who gets the money? Almost all of it goes to transportation companies.
  • GNOME Developers Discuss Codenames, GNOME 3.18 Might be Dubbed "Gothenburg"
    Allan Day, a GNOME UX designer working for Red Hat and renowned GNOME developer/contributor, opened an interesting discussion on the official GNOME mailing list, about possible codenames for upcoming releases of the acclaimed desktop environment for GNU/Linux operating systems.
  • ReadySpace Joins Red Hat Certified Cloud and Service Provider Program
    Hong-Kong based cloud service provider ReadySpace announced Thursday that it has joined the Red Hat Certified Cloud and Service Provider program. The new Red Hat partner program, launched in July, allows ReadySpace to deliver solutions based on Red Hat’s open source technologies. ReadySpace CEO David Loke said customers building on open source software and Linux servers had been asking for Red Hat solutions by name to run critical workloads in private and hybrid environments. The company will now offer private cloud build-outs, Linux infrastructure and PaaS solutions based on Red Hat.
  • Ubuntu, Canonical, and IP
    Recently there has been a flurry of concerns relating to the IP policy at Canonical. I have not wanted to throw my hat into the ring, but I figured I would share a few simple thoughts.
  • Canonical urges customers to ditch Windows 10 for Ubuntu
    In a recent posting, Canonical has tried new methods to appeal to Chief Technology Officers (CTOs) and cost conscious home users that they should switch to Ubuntu in lieu of Windows 10.

Leftovers: Software and Games

  • Gnome Boxes – A Front-end Tool For QEMU And KVM
    As we all know, there are is no doubt that Linux has tremendous support for Virtualization. There are so many virtualization softwares available including VMWare, VirtualBox, OpenVZ, XEN, KVM, Docker and the list goes. These software are mainly for intermediate and advanced Linux users. If you’re a beginner and having very little knowledge in Virtualization, then it is bit difficult to use the above mentioned tools. You may, probably, need an Intermediate or an expert user’s help. I bet you what? you don’t need anyone help. Yes. Meet Gnome Boxes, a beginner friendly, lightweight, graphical tool that makes virtualization lot easier.
  • Zbackup 1.4.3 Has Been Released. Install It On Ubuntu Or Arch Linux Now
  • Company of Heroes 2 Released on Mac and Linux
    Developed by Relic Entertainment and previously published by SEGA for PC, Company of Heroes 2 is also available now for Mac and Linux via Steam, with the Mac App Store version to follow shortly afterwards, Feral Interactive announced.
  • Carmageddon: Reincarnation Is Still Coming to Linux
    Carmageddon: Reincarnation is a game developed by the same team that made the first title all the way back in 1997. They have already released the game on Windows, and they plan to make it available for Linux users as well.