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HowTos

Build a faster and more secure UNIX file system

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HowTos

UNIX's method of handling file systems and volumes provides you with an opportunity to improve your systems' security and performance. This article addresses the issue of why you should split up your disk data into multiple volumes for optimized performance and security.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • HOWTO : VirtualBox 2.1.4 on Ubuntu 8.10

  • Update Gimp in Ubuntu Hardy 8.04 - The Fast Way
  • Non-Ubuntu Installation of conkyForecast
  • Power Tools: Piles of Files
  • Using DNSSEC Today
  • Email Notification of Available Updates: Ubuntu/Debian Server
  • How To Password Protect GRUB Entries (Linux)

The Perfect Desktop - Debian Lenny

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HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a Debian Lenny desktop that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Compare two files in Linux and find the differences

  • How to convert the search field into a button in the Opera Search panel?
  • How to finding out which directory is the largest on your device
  • Get Awesome
  • How to tether AT&T's Fuze phone to Ubuntu Linux
  • quick and dirty distcc
  • How to: Install R on Debian from the CRAN repositories
  • Getting your scanner to work with Ubuntu (gt68xx)
  • Merging Mkdir and Cd

xrandr and the X Window System

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Software
HowTos

blog.hydrasystemsllc: For those of us who have traveled outside of the world of Microsoft Windows and into UNIX-like operating systems, we should already be somewhat familiar with the X Window System. Some of us even understand its full potential. Over the years, I have grown really fond of one specific command line utility and that is xrandr.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • A free, open-source Linux multimedia streamer

  • How to Join the Ubuntu Community
  • Creating an adhoc host with Ubuntu
  • Taming the Wild Eee PC: Replacing the Operating System, Part 1
  • The Detail Guide To Perform A Debian 5.0 Network Install
  • 10 iptables rules to help secure your Linux box
  • Aligning filesystems to an SSD’s erase block size
  • Use netstat to See Internet Connections
  • Using ntfs partitions from GNU/Linux
  • Make Firefox flag secure web pages in Ubuntu and Mint
  • Retheaming Ubuntu - Part 2
  • Building OpenJDK under Ubuntu

Connecting to Windows servers from GNU/Linux using pyNeighborhood

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HowTos

Need to connect to a Windows server from a computer running GNU/Linux? pyNeighborhood gives you an easy and graphical way to do just that.

Read the full tutorial at Freesoftware Magazine.

The Perfect Server - Debian Lenny (Debian 5.0) [ISPConfig 2]

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HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a Debian Lenny (Debian 5.0) server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Courier POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.

some howtos:

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HowTos
  • Per-Process Namespaces

  • Duplicate your Ubuntu Installation....
  • Fast access to frequently used directories
  • How Linux Shuts Down
  • bash completion: /dev/fd/62: No such file or directory
  • Adding Custom Shortcuts to Gnome
  • How to resolve the ‘/bin/rm: Argument list too long’ error
  • Extract the MP3 Audio Portion of a Video

How To: Turn Your Linux Rig into a Streaming Media Center

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HowTos

maximumpc.com: These days, most people have at least one computer and a large collection of media files. The conventional practice for most people has always been to have redundant copies of their media collection on their various computers. While this system technically works, it is highly inefficient.

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Porteus Kiosk 4.0 Modular Linux Web Kiosk Released, Drops Chrome 32-bit Support

Porteus Solutions' Tomasz Jokiel announced on May 30, 2016, the release of the final Porteus Kiosk 4.0.0 Web Kiosk operating system based on the latest GNU/Linux technologies and open-source software. Porteus Kiosk 4.0.0 comes three months after the release of the last maintenance build in the Porteus Kiosk 3.x series, introducing numerous new features and improvements. But first, let's take a quick look under the hood, as the OS is now powered by Linux kernel 4.4.11 LTS (Long Term Support), and it's based on the Mozilla Firefox 45.1.1 ESR and Google Chrome 50.0.2661.102 web browsers. Read more

Fresh 10-Way GeForce Linux Benchmarks With The NVIDIA 367.18 Driver

In prepping for our forthcoming GeForce GTX 1070 and GTX 1080 Linux benchmarking, I've been running fresh rounds of benchmarks on my large assortment of GPUs, beginning with the GeForce hardware supported by the NVIDIA 367.18 beta driver. Here are the first of those benchmarks with the ten Maxwell/Kepler GPUs I've tested thus far. Earlier this month I posted the With Pascal Ahead, A 16-Way Recap From NVIDIA's 9800 GTX To Maxwell but in still waiting for my GTX 1070/1080 samples to arrive, I've restarted all of those tests now using the newer 367.18 driver as well as incorporating some extra tests like the recently released F1 2015 for Linux, not having done any SHOC OpenCL tests in a while, etc. Read more

Arch Linux-Based ArchAssault Ethical Hacking Distro Changes Name to ArchStrike

The team over at ArchAssault, a GNU/Linux operating system based on the famous Arch Linux distro and designed for ethical hackers, announced a few minutes ago on their Twitter account that they are changing the OS' name to ArchStrike. Designed from the ground up as a security layer to Arch Linux, the ArchAssault project provides security researchers and hackers with one of the most powerful open source and totally free Linux kernel-based operating system for penetration testing and security auditing operations. Read more

Systemd change has Linux users up in arms

A change in the most recent version of systemd, the init system that has been recently adopted by many GNU/Linux distributions, has users up in arms. The change, announced a few days ago, kills background processes by default when a user logs out, the opposite of the behaviour that was exhibited earlier. This would cause problems for users, for example, of terminal multiplexers like screen and tmux as they would be unable to return to a process once they have logged out. If a server admin had a bunch of scripts that logged into a server, then started a process using screen and logged out, the process would be killed. This is a fairly common thing that many admins do. Read more