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HowTos

today's howtos and programming leftovers

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Development
HowTos

today's howtos and programming bits

Filed under
Development
HowTos

Find lost files with Scalpel

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Red Hat
Software
HowTos

As a system administrator, part of your responsibility is to help users manage their data. One of the vital aspects of doing that is to ensure your organization has a good backup plan, and that your users either make their backups regularly, or else don’t have to because you’ve automated the process.

However, sometimes the worst happens. A file gets deleted by mistake, a filesystem becomes corrupt, or a partition gets lost, and for whatever reason, the backups don’t contain what you need.

As we discussed in How to prevent and recover from accidental file deletion in Linux, before trying to recover lost data, you must find out why the data is missing in the first place. It’s possible that a user has simply misplaced the file, or that there is a backup that the user isn’t aware of. But if a user has indeed removed a file with no backups, then you know you need to recover a deleted file. If a partition table has become scrambled, though, then the files aren’t really lost at all, and you might want to consider using TestDisk to recover the partition table, or the partition itself.

What happens if your file or partition recovery isn’t successful, or is only in part? Then it’s time for Scalpel. Scalpel performs file carving operations based on patterns describing unique file types. It looks for these patterns based on binary strings and regular expressions, and then extracts the file accordingly.

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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • How to Install phpMyAdmin with Apache (LAMP) on Ubuntu 18.04
  • How to Install WonderCMS on Fedora 30
  • How to install Mageia 7
  • How To Install The Budgie Desktop on Ubuntu
  • How to install Skype on Debian Linux 9
  • Matthias Clasen: Settings, in a sandbox world
  • How to change hostname on Debian 10 Linux
  • How to install Debian 10 "Buster" (Net Install Method) Installation Walkthrough
  • How to install Debian 10 "Buster" (Live Media Method) Installation Walkthrough and Tutorial
  • How to Install Vanilla Forums on CentOS 7
  • 10 Useful Examples of the Sort Command in Linux
  • How to fix media keys not working on Linux

    Lots of desktop keyboards have media playback buttons the user can use to pause, stop, skip and play music with the press of a button. For the most part, the Linux kernel, and Linux operating systems have support for these devices, due to increased Linux driver development over the years. That said, not every single keyboard’s media keys are supported out of the box, and that’s a real shame.

    If you’re looking to get your play, pause, stop, and skip buttons on the keyboard to work with your favorite open-source media players, you’ve come to the right place. Follow along as we show you how to fix media keys not working on Linux!

  • How to Install Jenkins with Docker on Ubuntu 18.04

    What is Docker? Docker is a free and open source software tool that can be used to pack, ship and run any application as a container. It has not any packaging system or frameworks, it can be run from anywhere from a small computer to large servers. You can easily deploy and scale your applications, databases and other services without depending on any provider.

  • Install Nagios Monitoring Tool On RHEL 8

    In this tutorial, we will show you the method to install the Nagios monitoring tool on Redhat operating system. Nagios or Nagios Core is an open-source IT monitoring, server, network monitoring, and application monitoring tool. You can monitor servers, switches, applications, and services.

  • How to make the Plasma desktop look like a Mac

    The world of things falls into three categories - the things you don't want to do but have to, the things you want to do but can't and the things you can do. Skinning your KDE desktop to look like macOS falls in the third category. It serves no higher purpose, philosophical or existential, but it is something that Plasma users have the option to try, and try they will.

    I've dabbled in the Mac transformation packs for many years now. The original Macbuntu test was the best. Ever since, the subsequent attempts came out somewhat short. However, I've always done this on Gnome- and Unity-based desktops, never Plasma. Well, that's about to change. We're attempting the unattemptable.

  • Creating Debian 10 Bootable USB Thumb Drive for Installing Debian 10

    In this age, very few people use CDs and DVDs to install a new operating system on computers. The USB thumb drive has replaced bootable CDs and DVDs. It is cheaper as you can reuse the USB thumb drive over and over again. It is also simpler.
    There are many ways to make a bootable USB thumb drive on Windows and Linux.

    In this article, I am going to show you how to create a Debian 10 Buster (the new kid in town) bootable USB thumb drive on Windows and Linux.

  • Bash History: How To Show A Timestamp When Each Command Was Executed

    With the help of the HISTTIMEFORMAT Bash variable you can show the date and time when each command was executed. This can be useful in various occasions, including to remember which commands you ran in a specific time-frame, to undo various operations, and so on.

    It's worth noting that if this variable is set, the time stamps are written to the history file so they are preserved across shell sessions. So the first time you enable it, you won't see the correct date and time for your previously used commands.

  • Upgrade Debian 9 Stretch to Debian 10 Buster

    Debian 10 Buster was released recently. Debian 10 comes with Linux Kernel 4.19, GNOME 3.30, KDE Plasma 5.14, Cinnamon 3.8, LXDE 0.99.2, LxQt 0.14, MATE 1.20, Xfce 4.12 and many more. Debian 10 also comes with awesome new artworks.

    Debian may be your daily driver. So, you may have a lot of important files and softwares in your Debian 9 installation. In that case, you can simply upgrade your existing Debian 9 installation to Debian 10.

    In this article, I am going to show you how to upgrade your existing Debian 9 Stretch installation to Debian 10 Buster.

  • Vim Split Screen

    The controls of Vim circulate around keyboard and the keyboard only. This is especially useful when you’re dealing with code and tasks that require full focus. The “keyboard-only” nature allows more focus headroom for your code. Well, you’re free to interact using the mouse.

    Say, you’re working with a file that requires keeping an eye on multiple parts of the file. For programming, that’s a common scenario. There are also other scenarios when a split view can be useful. Yes, let’s check out how to split view and edit on Vim.

  • How to Install the latest WPS Office on Linux

    The Free and Open-Source alternative to Microsoft’s widely popular Office Suite of apps is evolving and the latest update is rather controversial. Other than dropping support for 32 bit operating systems, it picks up a bunch of new tricks.

    WPS Office 11.1.0.8722 features a stack of iterative improvements, but no major new features to speak of, besides the ability to open and display PDF documents natively.

Raspberry Pi 4 Model B and Raspbian Buster: How to set up your board

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Linux
HowTos

The glaring omission here is any kind of micro-HDMI cable or adapter. There are still no such cables in stock at the Pi-Shop (which probably also explains why there wasn't one included in this starter kit), so I had also ordered an adapter.

There is a limitation when using the micro-HDMI adapter, which is perhaps not obvious from just looking at these pictures. Because the two micro-HDMI connectors are relatively close together on the board, it is not possible to use two adapters side by side - there's just not enough room for the HDMI heads of both of them.

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More in Tux Machines

Mutter 3.33.4

About mutter
============

Mutter is a window and compositing manager that displays and manages
your desktop via OpenGL. Mutter combines a sophisticated display
engine using the Clutter toolkit with solid window-management logic
inherited from the Metacity window manager.

While Mutter can be used stand-alone, it is primarily intended to be
used as the display core of a larger system such as GNOME Shell. For
this reason, Mutter is very extensible via plugins, which are used
both to add fancy visual effects and to rework the window management
behaviors to meet the needs of the environment.

News
====

* Discard page flip retries on hotplug [Jonas; !630]
* Add xdg-output v2 support [Olivier; #645]
* Restore DRM format fallbacks [Jonas; !662]
* Don't emit ::size-changed when only position changed [Daniel; !568]
* Expose workspace layout properties [Florian; !618]
* Don't use grab modifiers when shortcuts are inhibited [Olivier; #642]
* Fix stuttering due to unchanged power save mode notifications [Georges; !674]
* Add API to reorder workspaces [Adam; !670]
* Make picking a new focus window more reliable [Marco; !669]
* Defer actor allocation till shown [Carlos; !677]
* Try to use primary GPU for copy instead of glReadPixels [Pekka; !615]
* Unset pointer focus when the cursor is hidden [Jonas D.; !448]
* Fix modifier-drag on wayland subsurfaces [Robert; !604]
* Fix background corruption on Nvidia after resuming from suspend [Daniel; !600]
* Only grab the locate-pointer key when necessary [Olivier; !685, #647]
* Misc. bug fixes and cleanups [Florian, Jonas, Daniel, Robert, Olivier,
  Georges, Marco, Carlos, Emmanuele; !648, !650, !647, !656, !658, !637,
  !663, !660, !659, !665, !666, !668, !667, #667, !676, !678, #672, !680,
  !683, !688, !689, !687]

Contributors:
  Jonas Ådahl, Emmanuele Bassi, Adam Bieńkowski, Piotr Drąg, Jonas Dreßler,
  Olivier Fourdan, Carlos Garnacho, Robert Mader, Florian Müllner,
  Georges Basile Stavracas Neto, Pekka Paalanen, Marco Trevisan (Treviño),
  Daniel van Vugt

Translators:
  Fabio Tomat [fur], Kukuh Syafaat [id]
Read more Also: GNOME Shell + Mutter 3.33.4 Released

KDE Usability & Productivity: Week 80

Somehow we’ve gone through 80 weeks of progress reports for KDE’s Usability & Productivity initiative! Does that seem like a lot to you? Because it seems like a lot to me. Speaking of a lot, features are now pouring in for KDE’s Plasma 5.17 release, as well as Applications 19.08. Even more is lined up for Applications 19.12 too, which promises to be quite a release. Read more

Android Leftovers

IBM Announcements