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HowTos

today's leftovers and howtos

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Misc
HowTos
  • Shadow Icons Looks Great With All Themes, Install in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Shadow icon theme is a new comer for Linux desktop, it looks beautiful with all kind of themes. It is meant to be modern clean and customizable, the primary color of this set most likely bluish and many apps icons are in round shape. So basically this theme is mixture of round and normal (square) shape icons, lets see where this theme will head in the future, it should choose shape what users asks. As creator mentioned this icon theme is his first so please bare any bugs or missing icons. You can report bugs or suggest new icons to include in this set via this link. You can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool to change themes/icons.

  • Obsidian Icon Theme Based On Faenza And It Revives Desktop

    Obsidian icons are based on Faenza icon theme which is around from some years but the development of Faenza is almost stopped, hope creator again give some time to his popular icons. Obisidian-1 icon theme offers icons for panels, toolbars and buttons and colourful squared icons for devices, applications, folder, files and menu items, there are two version included to fit with light or dark themes. It is in active development which means if you find any missing icon or problem with this icon set then you can report it via linked page and hopefully it will be fixed in the next update. Arc theme suite used in the following screenshots and you can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool to change themes/icons.

  • Input Updates Submitted For Linux 4.13 Kernel

    Dmitry Torokhov submitted the input subsystem updates today for the Linux 4.13 kernel merge window.

  • [Video] Qubes OS Part 1: Overview and Features
  • Success

    In November 2012 I started running an irregular rebuild of all Mageia packages on x86_64, discarding the built packages, to just detect build breakages.

    At first it was running a few times a month, now once a week, except before releases where I run it twice a week.

  • How to install Debian+LXDE on ANY Android Tablet

    Running a linux distro on android devices is a hot topic these days, and why not? After all, android is already based on linux kernel, but a pretty much locked-down and dumbed-down version of it. The OEM doesn’t give you root and in most cases, not even an open source bootloader and/or kernel. That way, its good for maybe the most average user who doesn’t care about the OS and just want to use their phones. But for a power user, that’s not enough.

  • Not So Fast, Slick or Why Did it Take Devuan Two Years to Replace Systemd?

    Recently, a guy asked me two questions: If it is so easy to uninstall and switch init systems why did it take devuan 2 years to figure it out? Why are so many struggling to make something so easy work?

  • Some Extra Game Tests Showing AMDGPU+RadeonSI Improvements Since Ubuntu 17.04

    In yesterday's Windows 10 Radeon Software vs. Ubuntu 17.04 + Linux 4.12 + Mesa 17.2-dev comparison I tested both Ubuntu 17.04 out-of-the-box and then upgraded it to the Linux 4.12 kernel and Mesa 17.2-dev. Here are some complementary tests I did with a larger set of Linux games.

    These results show the stock Linux 4.10 + Mesa 17.0.3 performance of Ubuntu 17.04 compared to the same system upgraded to Linux 4.12 + Mesa 17.2-dev for showing the bleeding-edge Linux gaming experience.

  • Privileged Ports Cause Climate Change

    I'm thirty seven years old, which is like ninety nine in programmer years. I'm old enough to remember the earliest days of the public Internet and the first boutique Internet service providers. My first online account was via one called Internet Access Cincinnati (IAC). It provided dialup modem access to a Sun SparcStation 10 where users could run such venerable old terminal applications as elm (a mail client), emacs, lynx (text-mode web browser), and of course IRC.

    Later they added the ability to dial into a CSLIP (predecessor to PPP) terminal server and connect your own Linux or Trumpet WinSock equipped Windows system directly to the Internet with a real bona-fide IP address.

    [...]

    This is all probably water under the bridge. Chances are the path forward will be to develop true secure container multi-tenancy and to achieve with containers what should have been achieved by extending the Unix permission model to networking in user space.

    The purpose of this post is to show how small decisions that nobody really thinks about can have dramatic effects on the future evolution of technology (and society). The 1970s decision to use port numbers as an in-band signaling mechanism to implement cross-system security validation might have been, in retrospect, a trillion dollar mistake that pushed the evolution of the Unix platform down a path of significantly greater complexity, resource use, and cost.

    But hey, maybe it's not a done deal yet. There's over a dozen Linux distributions and most of them are doing more or less the same things with a slightly different spin. Implementing something like this would be an interesting way for one of them to differentiate. The first step would be to implement networking permissions something like what was discussed above and to propose it as a kernel patch. For backward compatibility you could make it something enabled via a sysctl setting, or maybe a module (if modules can make changes that deep).

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Still Working Towards Video Acceleration, Unity 7 Woes

    Will Cooke of Canonical has shared another weekly status update for the work going into the GNOME desktop for Ubuntu 17.10 and their other efforts this cycle.

  • Tidbits from Smartphone Wars - Carl Zeiss, HTC, Sammy and look out for Huawei vs iPhone next two quarters.
  • How to fix IPMI KVM JAVA BMCMD5withRSA and is treated as unsigned error
  • How to Handle a Hi-Dpi Screen in Linux
  • Accessing your Linux server from within Microsoft Windows

today's leftovers and howtos

Filed under
Misc
HowTos
  • TUXEDO Computers to Develop Own Ubuntu-Based Linux Distro Using Xfce Desktop

    Vinzenz Vietzke of TUXEDO Computers announced today that the German electronics manufacturer, which is known for selling laptops and desktop computers that ship pre-loaded with Linux, created their own distro.

    The news comes just a week after System76 computer reseller announced Pop!_OS as their own GNU/Linux distribution based on Ubuntu and the GNOME desktop environment, and it now looks like TUXEDO Computers follow suit and announce TUXEDO Xubuntu, their own Xubuntu-based distro, which will power all of their computers in the near future.

  • Developer Replaces His MacBook Pro with a Raspberry Pi 3 Computer for One Week

    Node.js expert and backend software engineer Pierre-Gilles Leymarie has recently lost his precious MacBook Pro in a taxi in Paris, and since he didn't have any other computer at home, he decided to give Raspberry Pi a try.

    MacBook Pro is a powerful computer, running Apple's state-of-the-art macOS operating system, yet Pierre-Gilles Leymarie was using it for coding on his Gladys home assistant based on a Raspberry Pi single-board computer using software like VS Code, Node.js and MySQL, along with some other developer-related tools.

    Since Pierre-Gilles Leymarie was very familiar to Raspberry Pi, as it own a few of them at home to hack on his Gladys project, setting up a Raspberry Pi 3 SBC and convert it into a full-featured desktop PC was quite easy to do by installing Raspbian Jessie, an old wireless mouse, a very old USB keyboard, and a 22-inch HDMI LCD.

  • Post-mortem: Extended Deployment time on June 30, 2017

    On June 30, 2017 we had an extended deployment time of roughly 45 minutes for our reference server because of a couple of problems with one of the data migrations. We implemented a new feature, user notifications via RSS, that included a migration of data in our database. This migration was broken, causing this deployment to go terribly wrong.

    The frontend team afterward met to do a post-mortem to identify the problems, solutions and possible take aways for the future. This is the first post-mortem meeting we held, hopefully but not likely the last. Here goes the report.

  • Life full-time at Red Hat

    I had been talking with my manager, Paul Frields, for some time about transitioning to full-time after college. Long story short, the timing so happened to work out that I could be brought on slightly before I'm officially done with college. To that end, I am planning to finish college out part-time from here on out. I still have to take an Ethics course to finish my computer science degree, and I still have some math classes left, for my math degree. I plan on going <= 6 credit hours per semester until I am done, however long that takes.

  •  

  • No coding required: Node-RED on a Raspberry Pi

    Node-RED is a programming tool that lets you quickly connect hardware devices using a browser-based editor. It comes with a wide range of nodes that can be used to build flows in a drag-and-drop manner, significantly reducing your development time. Node-RED is installed with Raspian Jesse for Raspberry Pi, and there is also an option to download Node-RED separately.

  • KDE’s Promising New Email App Has a New Release

    We mentioned KDE Kube, a promising KDE email and PIM suite, earlier this year — and we’re pleased to report that there’s a brand new release available for testing.

  • Episode 54 - Turning into an old person

    Josh and Kurt talk about Canada Day, Not Petya, Interac goes down, Minecraft, airport security and books, then GDPR.

  • Having mouse issues in The Long Dark? Here's a quick fix for now

    The Long Dark [Steam, Official Site] is a beautiful survival game from Hinterland Studio. It's a good game, but it does suffer from one really annoying and game breaking issue on Linux.

  • SKIP grep, use AWK
  • GSoC Week 5: Tests, fallbacks and politics
  • Two great uses for the cp command
  • Attempt to verify patch for "metadata service PicklingError" on TripleO QS Master (Pike) via HA overcloud deployment

today's leftovers and howtos

Filed under
Misc
HowTos
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