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More in Tux Machines

Michael Larabel on What's Coming in Linux 5.9: OpenRISC, NFS and Intel

  • OpenRISC Sees Sane TLB Flushing With Linux 5.9

    While RISC-V is flourishing when it comes to this open-source CPU architecture, the related OpenRISC architecture is still advancing but not seeing as much hardware efforts around it. In any case, the Linux kernel support continues improving for OpenRISC and with Linux 5.9 are more improvements.  OpenRISC still lacks any open-source ASIC with predominantly being used on FPGAs and a few commercial efforts based on the OpenRISC 1000 architecture. OpenRISC on the Linux software side has continued seeing improvements since its introduction back in 3.1. 

  • NFS Client Changes For Linux 5.9 Include User Xattr Support

    As reported a few days ago the NFS server with Linux 5.9 saw user xattr support finally merged for user-extended attributes as defined by RFC 8276. The NFS client changes have now been sent in for this kernel and include the user xattr support along with other changes.  The NFS client pull request was sent in on Friday by Trond Myklebust. Most notably is the support for user extended attributes through the NFSv4.2 protocol as previously covered on Phoronix. Both the client and server support was wired up by an Amazon engineer. 

  • Intel P-State With Linux 5.9 Adds Passive Mode With Hardware P-States

    Merged last week to Linux 5.9 were the main set of power management updates while hitting the kernel now are some last minute power-related changes.  Intel power management maintainer Rafael Wysocki for a while now has been working on allowing the P-State CPU frequency scaling driver to work in its passive mode when hardware p-states (HWP) is enabled for the system. That support is now deemed ready for mainline and will be available with Linux 5.9.

KDE Development Report From Nate Graham

  • This week in KDE: Highlight changed settings and much much more

    This week a big new feature landed for Plasma 5.20: the System Settings app now has the ability to optionally highlight any settings you’ve changed from their default states! This required a ton of engineering throughout the stack which will pay many dividends down the road. For example, it opens the door to a global “reset to defaults” button now that all of the pages know what their default states actually are and take into account distro default settings, rather than always using KDE upstream defaults. Big thanks to Kevin Ottens, Benjamin Port, and Cyril Rossi, who made this happen.

  • KDE Plasma 5.20 Seeing More System Settings Work, KDE-Inhibit Helper

    KDE developers remain very busy tacking new features onto Plasma 5.20 and other improvements for polishing their desktop.  KDE developer Nate Graham has published his weekend report on the various KDE changes that landed over the past week. Some of this week's highlights include:  - Plasma 5.20's System Settings can now highlight any settings that have been changed from their default states.  - The System Settings area's autostart page has been rewritten. Also, the System Settings global shortcuts and standard shortcuts have been combined into a single "shortcuts" area. 

Games: Vaporum, Veloren and Dota 2

           
  • The Vaporum: Lockdown teaser has me wanting more

    Vaporum: Lockdown is the upcoming prequel to 2017's Vaporum, a first-person real-time dungeon crawler that impressed with the graphical style and the gameplay. With grid-based movement, it was something of a highlight if you enjoyed classics like Dungeon Master I and II, the Eye of the Beholder series, and the more recent Legend of Grimrock I and II.

  • Want more professional Godot Engine tutorials? Check out this new Kickstarter

    Interested in game development? Godot Engine is a constantly improving free, open source and high quality game engine and one developer is trying to push out more professional content to help people using it. Nathan Lovato has been working on GDQuest, a free Software project and a social company that started off as a little YouTube channel focused on game art tutorials. They later moved onto Krita as their "first taste" of free software, and then they moved onto Godot Engine and Linux too. Since then they've continued to expand, putting out a ton of free tutorials and tools for developers over on the GDQuest website, which includes plenty of open source stuff.

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  • Papercraft tactical RPG 'Wildermyth' is now massively better after recent updates

    Wildermyth, a tactical turn-based RPG with a Papercraft styled design that's like a tabletop RPG mixed with XCOM has recently had some pretty huge tech upgrades. It's already winning me over as a game, with some fantastic campaigns to play through and a style that is just amazing. However, it has struggled with a few major technical issues across both Linux and Windows. In particular, the mouse was unusable in fullscreen which has now been fully solved. The developer has recently upgraded their use of the cross-platform tech: libGDX, LWJGL and GLFW to new major versions which has made the entire experience drastically better.

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  • Free and open source voxel RPG 'Veloren' has a huge new release out

    Veloren is an in-development open-world and open source voxel RPG, it shows a massive amount of promise and a brand new release is out for you to try. If you missed it, we did an interview with one of the developers back in June which is a good read if you want a little more background info. Inspired by the likes of Cube World, Dwarf Fortress, and Breath of the Wild it could be something special and this brand new 0.7 release is showing more of what it's capable of.

  • Dota 2 - The International 10 close to a record for the Battle Pass, new Collector’s Cache

    The International 10, Dota 2's upcoming major tournament is getting close to breaking another record for the prize pool. Plus there's a new Collector's Cache up. Mostly funded by the Battle Pass, where 25% of it goes into the prize pool and the rest to Valve, making it a tidy earner for Valve even with their costs. For the 2019 tournament, the total managed to hit $34,330,068 which was a world record for the biggest prize pool in a single e-sport event. It's looking this the next tournament is going to be even bigger with it currently sitting at $32,655,676. There's still quite a long while to go too, as the current Battle Pass isn't ending until September 19. Looks like we might have another world record on our hands here soon! A lot can happen though, as the actual tournament is no longer happening as planned. Valve delayed The International 10 until 2021, due to all the issues with COVID19 making travel a bad idea.

  • A weekend round-up: tell us what play button you've been clicking recently

    Another week has dragged on and here we are, the weekend. It's time to go over a few little bits and find out what our readers have been playing this week. For me, I've been playing rather a lot of DRAG, the fancy new racer from Orontes Games. As pretty as it is and how smooth the performance is, the game itself might be the most frustrated I've been with a racing game—ever. Not the kind of frustration to put me off because of technical issues, more at my own inability to keep the damn car from sliding about everywhere and then smashing into a tiny little tree and losing a precious wheel. [...] Something very concerning is what's happening over at Mozilla. There's been some conflicting reports but they're definitely changing and letting go of 250 staff members. MDN (Mozilla Developer Network), practically one of the go-to places for reading up on web tech and standards also had its team gutted and they're trying to find a way forwards. Hopefully it's not all as bad as it sounds. It's alarming since they make Firefox, and it would be really bad if we ended up with just Chromium sticking around. Open source still sure, but Google pretty firmly control it. The somewhat good news, is that Mozilla has now managed to sign a new deal with Google for funding, which makes up the majority of their incoming monies.

Android Leftovers