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The privacy differential - why don't more non-US and open source firms use the NSA as marketing collateral?

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
OSS

The shockwaves generated by Edward Snowden's revelations of the close collaboration between US tech giants such as Microsoft and Apple and the NSA are still reverberating through the industry. Those disclosures, together with related ones such as the involvement of the NSA in industrial espionage, as well as the asymmetric nature of US law when it comes to gathering data from foreign individuals, present something of an open goal for non-US technology companies - or so one might have thought.

On the face of it, then, it is surprising that non-US technology firms and others that can distance themselves from the US law are not proclaiming this fact more loudly. After all, there must be a considerable number of organisations that would dearly love to locate their data as far away from the attentions of the NSA as possible.

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Hey Windows User, Should You Switch To Linux or Mac?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Mac

You can answer three questions to choose between Linux or Windows, and you can gripe about how Windows is killing the traditional desktop, but all that is fluff. The purpose of an operating system is to put forth an environment where you can get things done—where you can get things done. You are what matters and everything else is bullshit.

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Is the iPhone really better than Android phones?

Filed under
Android
Mac

My feeling is that we ought to be grateful that people have a choice. I can’t imagine anything worse than one platform dominating any particular market completely. We saw what that looked like on the desktop when Microsoft ruled the roost with Windows back in the 90s, and it wasn’t pretty.

I wouldn’t want Android or iOS to completely dominate the mobile phone market. In fact, I’d much rather there were a strong third or fourth choice available as well. It’s never a good idea for one or two companies or platforms to have too much power or control over consumers.

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Apple makes money, but Android makes markets

Filed under
Android
Mac

We rightly laud Apple for its ability to get us to pay a premium, but the world owes more to Google for making mobile computing a commodity.

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Ubuntu 14.10 running on my MacBook

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

A few days ago I thought I’d never run something different than Mac OS X on my MacBook, but then I remembered how great Ubuntu ran some years ago on my old laptop. Apart from that my development environment was easily adoptable to Ubuntu and I really love customising stuff, so I made the switch to Ubuntu.

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Why do some Mac owners run Linux instead of OS X?

Filed under
Linux
Mac

There’s an odd thing happening out there in the world. Some Mac owners are actually replacing OS X with Linux. While there are no numbers available to show how many are doing this, it’s clearly something that has been happening for a while as you can see from this thread on Reddit. I have some thoughts of my own to share about this, and I’ll tell you in this post why some Apple customers might be moving to Linux on their Macs.

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Why some Apple customers run Linux on Macbooks instead of OS X

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

Apple has always had attractive and stylish hardware, but now it seems that some users are opting to run Linux instead of OS X on their Macbooks. A redditor asked about this trend and got some very interesting answers.

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Why Mac users don’t switch to Linux

Filed under
Linux
Mac

Linux and Mac users share at least one common thing: they prefer not to use Windows. But after that the two groups part company and tend to go their separate ways. But why don’t more Mac users switch to Linux? Is there something that prevents Mac users from making the jump?

Datamation took a look at these questions and tried to answer them. Datamation’s conclusion was that it’s really about the applications and workflow, not the operating system:

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Linus Torvalds Says Apple's HFS+ Is the Worst, Probably Designed by Monkeys

Filed under
Linux
Mac

Linus Torvalds doesn't usually talk about things he doesn't know, so it's probably fair to imagine that, when he says that the HFS+ file system used on Mac OS X is garbage, he's not wrong.

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Why Linux Isn't Winning Over Mac Users

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

Despite my affinity for the Linux desktop, I'm still part of the Mac world, thanks to my wife and her preference for OS X.

As such, this means helping out with TimeMachine backups, software updates and handling anything that might happen to come up when she needs a hand. Much like one might find with the Linux desktop, left alone, the Mac does a pretty good job of just "working" and allowing its users to get their daily duties completed without much hassle.

In the past, I've heard rumors about folks coming from OS X to Linux and sometimes, even switching from Linux over to OS X. After all, users of both platforms tend to rely on the web browser as their primary software application.

However, I want to dive into the idea that a multitude of Mac users are switching to Linux. In this article, I'll explain why multitudes of Mac users aren't switching to Linux, and I’ll provide some specific exceptions on the occasions when they are.

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More in Tux Machines

Updated Debian 8: 8.11 released

The Debian project is pleased to announce the eleventh (and final) update of its oldstable distribution Debian 8 (codename "jessie"). This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available. After this point release, Debian's Security and Release Teams will no longer be producing updates for Debian 8. Users wishing to continue to receive security support should upgrade to Debian 9, or see https://wiki.debian.org/LTS for details about the subset of architectures and packages covered by the Long Term Support project. The packages for some architectures for DSA 3746, DSA 3944, DSA 3968, DSA 4010, DSA 4014, DSA 4061, DSA 4075, DSA 4102, DSA 4155, DSA 4209 and DSA 4218 are not included in this point release for technical reasons. All other security updates released during the lifetime of "jessie" that have not previously been part of a point release are included in this update. Read more Also: Debian 8.11 Released As The End Of The Line For Jessie

Today in Techrights

Red Hat Woes and Fedora 29 Plans

  • Shares of open-source giant Red Hat pounded on weaker outlook
  • Fedora 29 Aims To Offer Up Modules For Everyone
    The latest Fedora 29 feature proposal is about offering "modules for everyone" across all Fedora editions. The "modules for everyone" proposal would make it where all Fedora installations have modular repositories enabled by default. Up to now the modular functionality was just enabled by default in Fedora Server 28. The modular functionality allows Fedora users to choose alternate versions of popular software, such as different versions of Node.js and other server software components where you might want to stick to a particular version.

GNU Make, FSFE Newsletter, and FSF's BLAG Removal

  • Linux Fu: The Great Power of Make
    Over the years, Linux (well, the operating system that is commonly known as Linux which is the Linux kernel and the GNU tools) has become much more complicated than its Unix roots. That’s inevitable, of course. However, it means old-timers get to slowly grow into new features while new people have to learn all in one gulp. A good example of this is how software is typically built on a Linux system. Fundamentally, most projects use make — a program that tries to be smart about running compiles. This was especially important when your 100 MHz CPU connected to a very slow disk drive would take a day to build a significant piece of software. On the face of it, make is pretty simple. But today, looking at a typical makefile will give you a headache, and many projects use an abstraction over make that further obscures things.
  • FSFE Newsletter June 2018
  • About BLAG's removal from our list of endorsed distributions
    We recently updated our list of free GNU/Linux distributions to add a "Historical" section. BLAG Linux and GNU, based on Fedora, joined the list many years ago. But the maintainers no longer believe they can keep things running at this time. As such, they requested that they be removed from our list. The list helps users to find operating systems that come with only free software and documentation, and that do not promote any nonfree software. Being added to the list means that a distribution has gone through a rigorous screening process, and is dedicated to diligently fixing any freedom issues that may arise.