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Why Linux is More Practical Than OS X

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

OS X is a solid operating system for those who enjoy Apple's vision of the ideal desktop. It offers access to pro-level applications that many industries rely on. Yet it isn't always the most practical operating system for the casual end user. In fact, in some cases, it's completely overkill.

In this article, I'll explore why I believe Linux is a more practical solution than OS X, if local techs would simply bother to support it. This article isn't about which platform is “better.” Instead, it's a matter of which platform is more practical.

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Galaxy S6 user switches to the iPhone 6, runs back to Android after two weeks

Filed under
Android
Mac

As we’ve seen countless times in the past, neither iOS nor Android is objectively “better” than the other — both platforms have pluses and minuses and there are legitimate reasons for people to choose either one. Business Insider‘s Antonio Villas-Boas had been a Galaxy S6 owner for a while who was curious enough to give the iPhone 6 a shot. However, he’s gone back to Android after just two weeks with Apple’s smartphone for three key reasons.

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A Chromebook replaced the MacBook Pro on my desk

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Mac

The Acer Chromebook 13 so impressed me when I reviewed it months ago that I bought one. After using it for months it has replaced the 13-inch MacBook Pro as my daily work system in the office.

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Also: Google was downloading audio listeners onto computers without consent, say Chromium users

Why Greet Apple's Swift 2.0 With Open Arms?

Filed under
Mac
OSS
Legal

Apple announced last week that its Swift programming language — a currently fully proprietary software successor to Objective C — will probably be partially released under an OSI-approved license eventually. Apple explicitly stated though that such released software will not be copylefted. (Apple's pathological hatred of copyleft is reasonably well documented.) Apple's announcement remained completely silent on patents, and we should expect the chosen non-copyleft license will not contain a patent grant. (I've explained at great length in the past why software patents are a particularly dangerous threat to programming language infrastructure.)

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7 reasons why you should develop apps for Android rather than iOS

Filed under
Android
Mac

There are multiple operating systems powering our mobile devices today. For both indie developers and large companies, there is a critical question that needs to be answered before development begins: what platform should be targeted first? For larger companies, with more resources, development can be done simultaneously for different platforms, while for smaller shops, it is a very critical question, which could determine the success or failure of the business.

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Also: Key Android M features that Google swiped from iOS

Everybody copies everyone: iOS 9 features inspired by Android

Android M vs Android 5.1 Lollipop Walkthrough: What’s New So Far

GSOC update: Unit tests for KDE Connect Android

Apple Releases CUPS 2.0.3 for Linux with Over 20 Bug Fixes

Filed under
Linux
Mac

Apple announced the immediate availability of the third maintenance release of the CUPS 2.0 (Common UNIX Printing System) software for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux and Mac OS X.

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Apple to tailor Swift into a fully open-source language – for Linux, too

Filed under
Development
Linux
Mac
OSS

Open source and Apple: The nagging nausea

Filed under
Mac
OSS

Open source software fans hate walled gardens. After all, they believe in communities supporting each other for the greater good. Sure, they fight over the details and who gets the most support, but that's part of what it means to be a creator, an owner, a participant in both the journey and the final result.

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Is Linux Better than OS X? GNU, Open Source and Apple in History

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

Open source fans have long had a rocky relationship with Microsoft. Everyone knows that. But, in many ways, the tension between Apple and supporters of free or open source software is even starker—even if it receives much less attention in the press.

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More in Tux Machines

San Francisco Open Source Voting System Project Continues On

At the February 15 Elections Commission meeting, the Elections Commission voted unanimously to ask the Mayor's Office to allocate $4 million towards initial development of the open source voting project for the 2018-19 fiscal year (from Aug. 2018 - July 2019). This would go towards initial development once the planning phase is complete. Read more

Detailed change log for deepin 15.4 RC

deepin is a Linux distribution devoted to providing beautiful, easy to use, safe and reliable system for global users. After public test of deepin 15.4 Beta, we have received a lot of suggestions and feedback, we adopted part of them and fixed a lot of problems. Read more

GNOME 3.24: New Linux desktop is fast, responsive

I’ve been a fan of the work of the GNOME team for quite some time. They put together one heck of an excellent Linux desktop environment. But of late, I’ve found myself gravitating towards some of the more lightweight environments. MATE (which is a forked version of GNOME 2) and xmonad. I like my systems to be light on resource usage and highly responsive—those are two absolutely critical things for the way I use my computers. With this week’s release of GNOME 3.24, I decided to jump back into the world of modern GNOME desktops and kick the tires again. In order to give it the best possible shot, I did a clean install of openSUSE Tumbleweed (the rolling release version of openSUSE) and then installed GNOME 3.24 on top of it. (Side note: 3.24 was not yet available in the default repositories when I wrote this article, but it should be shortly.) Read more Also: Applying to Outreachy and GSoC for Fedora and GNOME

OpenSuse Leap Reinforces Linux Faith

Leap is a solid performer. I had no trouble installing it on MBR and EFI systems. Secure Boot tends to be buggy with some configurations, but it was incident-free with this installation. The bootloader handles multiboot with other Linux distributions or Windows fairly trouble-free. Installation is routine, thanks to the graphical format used. Only 64-bit versions are available for x86 computers, which limits access to legacy hardware in the 32-bit machines. ARM ports are available if you can track them down through the project's wiki. Read more