Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Mac

Why Linux is More Practical Than OS X

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

OS X is a solid operating system for those who enjoy Apple's vision of the ideal desktop. It offers access to pro-level applications that many industries rely on. Yet it isn't always the most practical operating system for the casual end user. In fact, in some cases, it's completely overkill.

In this article, I'll explore why I believe Linux is a more practical solution than OS X, if local techs would simply bother to support it. This article isn't about which platform is “better.” Instead, it's a matter of which platform is more practical.

Read more

Galaxy S6 user switches to the iPhone 6, runs back to Android after two weeks

Filed under
Android
Mac

As we’ve seen countless times in the past, neither iOS nor Android is objectively “better” than the other — both platforms have pluses and minuses and there are legitimate reasons for people to choose either one. Business Insider‘s Antonio Villas-Boas had been a Galaxy S6 owner for a while who was curious enough to give the iPhone 6 a shot. However, he’s gone back to Android after just two weeks with Apple’s smartphone for three key reasons.

Read more

A Chromebook replaced the MacBook Pro on my desk

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Mac

The Acer Chromebook 13 so impressed me when I reviewed it months ago that I bought one. After using it for months it has replaced the 13-inch MacBook Pro as my daily work system in the office.

Read more

Also: Google was downloading audio listeners onto computers without consent, say Chromium users

Why Greet Apple's Swift 2.0 With Open Arms?

Filed under
Mac
OSS
Legal

Apple announced last week that its Swift programming language — a currently fully proprietary software successor to Objective C — will probably be partially released under an OSI-approved license eventually. Apple explicitly stated though that such released software will not be copylefted. (Apple's pathological hatred of copyleft is reasonably well documented.) Apple's announcement remained completely silent on patents, and we should expect the chosen non-copyleft license will not contain a patent grant. (I've explained at great length in the past why software patents are a particularly dangerous threat to programming language infrastructure.)

Read more

7 reasons why you should develop apps for Android rather than iOS

Filed under
Android
Mac

There are multiple operating systems powering our mobile devices today. For both indie developers and large companies, there is a critical question that needs to be answered before development begins: what platform should be targeted first? For larger companies, with more resources, development can be done simultaneously for different platforms, while for smaller shops, it is a very critical question, which could determine the success or failure of the business.

Read more

Also: Key Android M features that Google swiped from iOS

Everybody copies everyone: iOS 9 features inspired by Android

Android M vs Android 5.1 Lollipop Walkthrough: What’s New So Far

GSOC update: Unit tests for KDE Connect Android

Apple Releases CUPS 2.0.3 for Linux with Over 20 Bug Fixes

Filed under
Linux
Mac

Apple announced the immediate availability of the third maintenance release of the CUPS 2.0 (Common UNIX Printing System) software for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux and Mac OS X.

Read more

Apple to tailor Swift into a fully open-source language – for Linux, too

Filed under
Development
Linux
Mac
OSS

Open source and Apple: The nagging nausea

Filed under
Mac
OSS

Open source software fans hate walled gardens. After all, they believe in communities supporting each other for the greater good. Sure, they fight over the details and who gets the most support, but that's part of what it means to be a creator, an owner, a participant in both the journey and the final result.

Read more

Is Linux Better than OS X? GNU, Open Source and Apple in History

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

Open source fans have long had a rocky relationship with Microsoft. Everyone knows that. But, in many ways, the tension between Apple and supporters of free or open source software is even starker—even if it receives much less attention in the press.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

How China Mobile Is Using Linux and Open Source

China Mobile is one of the biggest telecom companies in the world, with more than 800 million users in China -- all of whom are served with open source technologies. During the 2016 Mobile World Congress, China Mobile declared that the operational support system running their massive network would be based on open source software. China Mobile is not alone; many major networking vendors are moving to open source technologies. For example, AT&T is building their future network on top of OpenStack, and they have invested in software-defined technology so significantly that they now call themselves a software company. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • [elementaryOS] AppCenter: Funded
    A few moments ago, we hit 100% funded for our AppCenter campaign on Indiegogo. Thank you, backers! More than 300 people backed us over just two weeks to help bring our pay-what-you-want indie app store to life.
  • Linux Lite To Have These New Features In The Next Release Linux Lite 3.4
    ...we contacted the creator of the Linux Lite “Jerry Bezencon” and enquired the upcoming new features in the latest version of the Linux Lite. We have also done a review of the latest available distro i.e. 3.2 (32 bit) so that the readers can understand easily where are the new features headed towards.
  • Buy or Sell? What Analysts Recommends: CMS Energy Corporation (CMS), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • What Does The Chart For Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Tell Us Presently?
  • LEDE-17.01 is coming [Ed: it has actually just come out, just like LWN's paywall]
    For some years, OpenWrt has arguably been the most active router-oriented distribution. Things changed in May of last year, though, when a group of OpenWrt developers split off to form the competing LEDE project. While the LEDE developers have been busy, the project has yet to make its first release. That situation is about to change, though, as evidenced by the LEDE v17.01.0-rc1 release candidate, which came out on February 1. Many of the changes made in LEDE since the 2015 OpenWrt "Chaos Calmer" release will not be immediately visible to most users. The core software has been updated, of course, including a move to the 4.4.42 kernel. There are a number of security-oriented enhancements, including a switch to SHA256 for package verification, the disabling of support for several old and insecure protocols, compilation with stack-overwrite detection, and more. There is support for a number of new devices. Perhaps the most anticipated new feature, though, is the improved smart queue management and the WiFi fairness work that has been done as part of the bufferbloat project. It has been clear for some time that WiFi should work far better than it does; the work that has found its way into the LEDE release candidate should be a significant step in that direction. Your editor decided that it was time to give LEDE a try, but there was some shopping to be done first. Getting the full benefit from the bufferbloat and airtime fairness work requires the right chipset; most of this work has been done on the Atheros ath9k driver. So the first step was to go out and pick up a new router with ath9k wireless. That is where the things turned out to be harder than one might expect.
  • Microsoft Faces European Privacy Probes Over Windows 10
    Microsoft Corp. faces a coordinated investigation by European privacy regulators after it failed to do enough to address their concerns about the collection and processing of user data with a series of changes to Windows 10 last month. European Union data-protection officials sent a letter to Microsoft saying they remain “concerned about the level of protection of users’ personal data,” according to a copy of the document posted by the Dutch watchdog Tuesday. Regulators from seven countries are concerned that even after the announced changes, “Microsoft does not comply with fundamental privacy rules.”

Leftovers: OSS