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2018 Mac Mini blocks Linux, here are alternative small form factor PCs

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Mac

Apple's long-awaited refresh of the Mac Mini includes a component called the "T2 Security Chip" which Apple touts as having "a Secure Enclave coprocessor, which provides the foundation for APFS encrypted storage, secure boot, and Touch ID on Mac," as well as integrating "the system management controller, image signal processor, audio controller, and SSD controller," which were separate components in previous Mac systems. Because of the extent to which T2 is involved with the boot sequence of this new hardware, Apple controls what operating systems can be loaded onto their hardware.

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Blocking Linux From Booting

Filed under
Linux
Mac
  • Don’t Panic, You Can Boot Linux on Apple’s New Devices

    Does Apple stop Linux from booting on its newly refreshed Mac Mini PC or MacBookAir laptops?

    That’s the claim currently circling the web‘s collective drain. The posit is that the new T2 ‘secure enclave’ chip Apple has baked in to its new models prevents Linux from booting.

    But is this actually true?

    Kinda. The answer is both “yes, technically” and “no, not completely”.

  • Apple's New Hardware With The T2 Security Chip Will Currently Block Linux From Booting

    Apple's MacBook Pro laptops have become increasingly unfriendly with Linux in recent years while their Mac Mini computers have generally continued working out okay with most Linux distributions due to not having to worry about multiple GPUs, keyboards/touchpads, and other Apple hardware that often proves problematic with the Linux kernel. But now with the latest Mac Mini systems employing Apple's T2 security chip, they took are likely to crush any Linux dreams.

    At least until further notice, these new Apple systems sporting the T2 chip will not be able to boot Linux operating systems. Apple's T2 security chip being embedded into their newest products provides a secure enclave, APFS storage encryption, UEFI Secure Boot validation, Touch ID handling, a hardware microphone disconnect on lid close, and other security tasks. The T2 restricts the boot process quite a bit and verifies each step of the process using crypto keys signed by Apple.

Themes/GTK: Enhancing the Looks of GNU/Linux

Filed under
Mac
GNOME
  • elementary OS 5.0 Capitaine-X Combo Customization

    This short tutorial explains in brief to customize elementary OS 5.0 with Capitaine icons + Elementary-X theme combo. You see, this will make your OS looks like Apple macOS smoother. This combo is really beautiful, thanks to Keefer Rourke and Suraj Mandal, the talented developers of the respective artworks. I also mention here a one-liner command so you can test this in instant (i.e. one tap on LiveCD session). Okay, enjoy this customization!

  • Nordic Theme And Zafiro Icons Looks Amazing Together On Desktop

    If you are fond of dark theme whether it's your personal liking or for comfort of your eyes, then you landed on the right page. Today, we introduce you to the very elegant theme called "Nordic". This Gtk theme is created using the awesome Nord color pallete which looks amazing on the desktop, it is released under GNU General Public License V3. Nordic also pack theme for Gnome Shell, and support almost every desktop environment such as Gnome, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce, Mate, Budgie, Panteon, etc. If you are using distribution other than Ubuntu/Linux Mint then download the theme directly from its page and install it in this location "~/.themes" or "/usr/share/themes". Since Nordic theme pack is in active development that means if you find any kind of bug or issue with it then report it to get fixed.

​IBM Code Release for Mac@IBM

Filed under
Mac
OSS
  • Mac@IBM code goes open source

    Designed to streamline the integration of corporate-owned or BYOD Apple Mac devices and applications into the enterprise while delivering a personalized experience, Mac@IBM has seen the number of IBMers using Macs increase from 30,000 in 2015 to 134,000 in 2018.

  • IBM open-sources Mac@IBM code, spreading tech to other businesses

    IBM on Tuesday shared word that it's open-sourcing its Mac@IBM provisioning code, which should enable other companies to provision Macs using similar architecture.

  • ​IBM open-sources Mac sysadmin software

    In 2015, IBM had half-a-million Windows users. It then gave its staffers the option to switch to Apple Macs. Six months later, over 30,000 had made the shift. Today, over 134,000 IBMers are Mac users. To manage them, IBM created its own Mac-specific system administration program: Mac@IBM. Now, IBM is open-sourcing this program.

  • IBM open sources Mac@IBM code

    At the Jamf Nation User Conference, IBM has announced that it is open sourcing its Mac@IBM provisioning code. The code being open-sourced offers IT departments the ability to gather additional information about their employees during macOS setup and allows employees to customize their enrollment by selecting apps or bundles of apps to install.

Apple Wipes

Filed under
Hardware
Mac

Linux vs Mac: 7 Reasons Why Linux is a Better Choice than Mac

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

If you’re already using a Mac or planning to get one, we recommend you to thoroughly analyze the reasons to decide whether you need to switch/keep using Linux or continue using Mac.

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Openwashing iPhone With "HeadGaze" and Microsoft Openwashing Itself

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
OSS

Linux Kernel Vs. Mac Kernel

Filed under
Linux
Mac

Both the Linux kernel and the macOS kernel are UNIX-based. Some people say that macOS is "linux", some say that both are compatible due to similarities between commands and file system hierarchy. Today I want to show a little of both, showing the differences and similarities between Linux Kernel & Mac kernel like I mentioned in previous Linux kernel articles.

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Also: A Batch Of x86 Speculation Fixes Headed To The Linux 4.19 Kernel

10 Best Linux Distros to Install on Your MacBook

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

macOS is a Unix-like Operating System so many of the features in Linux distros are similar to those that it offers. That notwithstanding, because it is Unix-like does not mean that it is Linux and for one reason or the other you may want to run a full-fledged OS.

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Microsoft and Apple Piggybacking the Competition

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
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More in Tux Machines

libinput 1.16.0

libinput 1.16.0 is now available.

No significant changes since the second RC, so here's slightly polished RC1
announcement text.

This has been a long cycle, mostly because there weren't any huge changes on
the main development branch and a lot of the minor annoyances have found
their way into the 1.15.x releases anyway.

libinput now monitors timestamps of the events vs the current time when
libinput_dispatch() is called by the compositor. Where the difference
*may* result in issues, a (rate-limited) warning is printed to the log.
So you may see messages popping up in the form of
  "event processing lagging behind by XYZms, your system is too slow"
This is a warning only and has no immediate effect. Previously we would only
notice (and warn about) this when it affected an internal timer. Note that
these warnings do not show an issue with libinput, it shows that the the
compositor is not calling libinput_dispatch() quick enough.

The wheel tilt axis source was deprecated. No device ever had the required
udev properties set so we should stop pretending we support this.

Touchpads now support the "flat" acceleration profile. The default remains
unchanged and this needs to be selected in the configuration interface. The
"flat" profile applies a constant factor to movement deltas (1.0 for the
default speed setting).

Events from lid or tablet-mode switches that are known to libinput as being
unreliable are now filtered and no longer passed to the caller.
This prevents callers from receiving those known-bogus events and having to
replicate the same heuristics to identify unreliable devices that libinput
employs internally.

A new "libinput analyze" debugging tool is the entry tool for analysing
various aspects of devices. Right now the only tool is
"libinput analyze per-slot-delta" which can be used to detect pointer jumps
in a libiput record output. This tool used to live elsewhere, it was moved
to libinput so that reporters can easier run this tool, reducing the load on
the maintainers.

The tools have seen a few minor improvements, e.g.
- "libinput record touchpad.yml" does the right thing, no explicit --output
  argument required
- libinput measure touchpad-pressure has been revamped to be a bit more
  obvious
- libinput measure touchpad-size has been added (as replacement for the
  touchpad-edge-detector tool)
- libinput measure fuzz has been fixed to work (again and) slightly more
  reliable

The libinput test suite has been fixed to avoid interference with the
currently running session. Previously it was virtually impossible to work
while the test suite is running - multiple windows would pop up, the screen
would blank regularly, etc.

And of course a collection of fixes, quirks and new bugs.

As usual, see the git shortlog for details.

Diego Abad A (1):
      FIX: typo on building documentation

Peter Hutterer (2):
      test: semi-fix the switch_suspend_with_touchpad test
      libinput 1.16.0

git tag: 1.16.0
Read more Also: >Libinput 1.16 Released - Ready To Warn You If Your System Is Too Slow

18 Frameworks, Libraries, and Projects for Building Medical Applications

Open-source is not just a license or a code-based that left free on an online repository, It's a complete concept which comes with several advantages. Moreover, the most advantage you can get from Open-source is beyond the open-code it's FREEDOM; freedom to use or re-shape it as you see fit within your project commercial or otherwise, and that depends on the license of course. You are free from the headache of license conflict legal problems but also from the dilemma of dealing with restrections and limitations which come with property licenses. You are free from the system lock-in schemes, furthermore, you own your data, and freedom to customize the software as your structure requires and workflow demands. The Community: The Open-source project gains a powerful community as they gain users, the community users vary between advanced users, end-users, developers and end-users on decision-making level. Many of the community users are providing quality inputs from their usage and customized use-case and workflow or test-runs, Furthermore, they always have something to add as new features, UI modification, different usability setup, and overall introducing new workflows and tools, and That's what makes the progress of the open-source different than non-free solutions. While, Good community means good support, The community is a good resource to hire advanced users, developers, and system experts. It also provides alternative options when hiring developers. Unlike non-free software which are not blessed with such communities and where the options there are limited, The rich open-source community provides rich questions and answers sets that contributed by users from all around the world. Higher education value for the in-house team The open-source concept itself provides educational value, I owe most of what I know to open-source communities.The access to the source code and open-channels communication with the core developers is the best educational value any developer can get. Read more

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