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Mac

Want to Make Linux Mint Look Like a Mac? This Theme Can Help

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

We’ve established how easy it is to make Ubuntu look like a Mac but theming Linux Mint, the popular Ubuntu-based offshoot, is a little trickier.

But no more.

It’s now possible to make Linux Mint look like a Mac too, and it’s all thanks to a customised version of the uncannily accurate macOS Mojave GTK theme we highlighted here, just a few weeks ago.

If you’ve longed to add some Cupertino styling to the Cinnamon desktop, keep reading!

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Making GNOME Look Like Apple's Operating System

Filed under
Mac
GNOME
  • A macOS Mojave Inspired GTK Theme Appears

    A new GTK theme brings the luscious look of macOS Mojave to the Linux desktop.

    Not that you should be surprised; we’ve written before about how easy it is to make Ubuntu look like a Mac.

    But thanks to this new macOS Mojave inspired GTK theme that fact is truer, and more faithful, than ever.

  • Make Ubuntu Look Like macOS Mojave’s Dark Mode

    If you’re a Linux user who likes the look of the dark mode coming in macOS Mojave, you’re in luck: there’s a GTK theme just for you.

    The theme is available on Gnome-Look.org alongside several other macOS inspired themes. You’re looking for the one titled McOS-MJV-Dark-mode, but feel free to download more if you think you might want to switch it up later.

    Installing is a little tricky: you need to create a .themes directory in your home folder, then extract the folder in the downloaded archive into that folder. Next you need to install Gnome Tweaks in the Ubuntu Software Store, which you can use to change the theme. You can also use Gnome Tweaks to move the buttons to the left side of the window, where they belong. Fight me.

Microsoft's and Apple's Lies About Free/Open Source Software

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac

8 MacOS Like Docks for Ubuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac
Ubuntu

You might not be running macOS but you’re a GNU/Linux user so you have the option to switch your style up and make your app launcher similar to the dock on macOS.

The dock apps here are top-class so don’t blame me if you have a tough time picking one of them. On the plus side, you can use them all!

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Also: FAI 5.7

3 macOS Mojave Features Already Available on Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

Apple has revealed details about the next version of its desktop operating system, macOS Mojave.

As expected, macOS 10.14 is a major software upgrade. It brings a flurry new features to the fore, like better desktop organisation, auto-changing backgrounds, and a sleek new dark mode.

All very swish.

But do any of those features sound familiar to you?

They might do; many of macOS Mojave’s new features are old news to Linux users.

We’ve written about how easy it is to make Ubuntu look like a Mac before (an article we will update soon) and it’s just as easy to add familiar macOS features to the desktop too, from quick look and global menu, to launchpad and dashboard widgets.

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Also: Ubuntu Server development summary – 05 June 2018

Apple and Microsoft on the Line

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
  • 2016 MacBook Pro butterfly keyboards failing twice as frequently as older models

    Apple launched its new butterfly key-switch keyboard with the MacBook, with some usability complaints starting nearly immediately, but it wasn't until its adoption in the MacBook Pro in 2016 that reliability concerns started popping up —and AppleInsider has the hard data on failure rates.

  • Apple demanding 'unnecessary' repairs before replacing iPhone batteries

    If you've forgotten, Apple was last year forced to admit that it's deliberately throttling the performance of older iPhones running newer versions of iOS. At the time, the firm justified the move by claiming it prevents processors from demanding too much power from older Lithium-ion battery packs, which degrade over time struggle to deliver the peak currents and battery life they could when new.

  • Viral Video Shows How Hard It Is to Remove Windows 10 Bloatware

    Microsoft came under fire several times for not making Windows 10 a bloat-free operating system, and despite several updates, this hasn’t changed in a substantial way since the debut of the original RTM build nearly three years ago.
    Removing the Windows 10 pre-installed apps shouldn’t be such a difficult thing to do since Microsoft itself included uninstalling options, but it’s not a secret that these items come and go with each update.

    In other words, even if you delete the pre-installed apps, they could be restored by a future update, not to say that in some cases, it’s much harder than you think to get rid of them in the first place.

    The video that you see here was posted on reddit by user drakulaboy and shows just how difficult it is to remove the apps that you don’t want in Windows 10. Uninstalling one game brings back another, and it happens in an infinite loop which for the casual user has no end.

Opposition: FOSS FUD, Microsoft Back Doors and Apple Failures

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
  • Sonatype Named IDC Innovator [Ed: Yet another one of these firms that attempt to profit from badmouthing FOSS security whilst ignoring back doors in proprietary software]
  • PyRo Mine Malware Uses NSA Tool to Collect Monero [Ed: No, it uses Windows and Microsoft back doors for the NSA.]

    Attackers are known to leverage any means available to go after cryptocurrencies, and Fortinet researchers reported this week that hackers are using a new crypto-mining malware they are calling PyRo Mine to quietly collect Monero.

    The Python-based malware uses an NSA exploit to spread to Windows machines while also disabling security software and allowing the exfiltration of unencrypted data. By also configuring the Windows Remote Management Service, the machine becomes vulnerable to future attacks.

    "Researchers have discovered malware authors using the ETERNALBLUE exploit in cryptocurrency mining malware, such as Adylkuzz, Smominru, and WannaMine. PyRo Mine uses the ETERNALROMANCE exploit," wrote Fortinet security researcher Jasper Manuel in his blog.

    The malicious URL with a downloadable zip file compiled with PyInstaller is dangerous because it packages Python programs into stand-alone executable so that the attacker does not need to install Python on the machine to execute the program.

  • My iPhone 8 Just Failed a Durability Test and All I Think Of Is Bendgate 2

    Apple gave up on aluminum for the new iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X in favor of glass, a more exquisite material which not only makes the device look more premium, but also allows for other features like wireless charging.
    A side-effect of having a phone with a body made of glass is that it is incredibly slippery, so it’s extremely easy to drop it to the ground, which in the case of glass is obviously something you should avoid.

    Apple has paid particular attention to this thing and tried to make the glass as durable as possible, while also improving the metal frame that’s still being used on all three models to be as tough as possible.

    At first glance, all these efforts paid off. Torture tests performed by so many people after the launch of these models proved that all three iPhones are extremely durable and they can withstand shocks and hits that they wouldn’t normally be exposed to. Furthermore, what these tests have shown was that new-generation iPhones are no longer prone to bending, a problem that affected the iPhone 6 Plus and which Apple first addressed with the release of the 6s upgrade.

  • Apple discontinues its AirPort WiFi routers

Apple Threats

Filed under
Mac
  • Apple threatens leakers with criminal action in leaked memo – report

     

    The memo about leaking, which was leaked to Bloomberg and published on Friday, threatened employees with criminal consequences and shines a harsh light on the Silicon Valley company’s aggressive surveillance of its own employees and intensive investigative efforts to catch and punish leakers.  

  • In a Leaked Memo, Apple Warns Employees to Stop Leaking Information

     

    The Cupertino, California-based company said in a lengthy memo posted to its internal blog that it "caught 29 leakers," last year and noted that 12 of those were arrested. "These people not only lose their jobs, they can face extreme difficulty finding employment elsewhere," Apple added. The company declined to comment on Friday.

  • Apple's memo warning employees about leaking information is predictably leaked

    An internal memo warning Apple employees that leaking information could result in legal action and criminal charges has, rather predictably, been leaked.

  • Apple Sued an Independent iPhone Repair Shop Owner and Lost

    Last year, Apple’s lawyers sent Henrik Huseby, the owner of a small electronics repair shop in Norway, a letter demanding that he immediately stop using aftermarket iPhone screens at his repair business and that he pay the company a settlement.

    Norway’s customs officials had seized a shipment of 63 iPhone 6 and 6S replacement screens on their way to Henrik’s shop from Asia and alerted Apple; the company said they were counterfeit.

    In order to avoid being sued, Apple asked Huseby for “copies of invoices, product lists, order forms, payment information, prints from the internet and other relevant material regarding the purchase [of screens], including copies of any correspondence with the supplier … we reserve the right to request further documentation at a later date.”

Why Classrooms Are Apple, Google and Microsoft's Next Big Battleground

Filed under
Linux
Google
Microsoft
Mac

Google’s Chromebooks accounted for 59.6% of mobile computing shipments in the kindergarten through 12th grade market in the fourth quarter of 2017, according to Futuresource Consulting. By comparison, Windows accounted for 25.6% and iOS comprised 10.6% of shipments.

Among the reasons tech giants are scrambling to get their gadgets into schools: It’s a big business opportunity. The education technology market is expected to reach $252 billion by 2020, according to a report published by education-focused technology conference host EdTechXGlobal and advisory firm IBIS Capital. But there’s potential upside even after students leave the classroom and turn into fully-fledged consumers, too. “It gets people using your technology young,” says Avi Greengart, research director for consumer platforms and devices for GlobalData. “The hope is that they stick with it.”

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A Year Away From Mac OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

This is the fifth post in my series on finding an alternative to Mac OS X.

A bit over a year ago I wrote about my search for an alternative to Mac OS and switch to Linux. In this post I reflect on how that year went and detail some further adventures into Mac OS alternatives.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: C++, C and Python

  • Extend C++ capabilities with LLVM STLExtras.h

    The LLVM compiler project provides a header file called STLExtras.h that extends the capabilities of C++ without any dependency on the rest of LLVM. In this article, we take a quick look at its basic functionality.

  • Rewriting Old Solaris C Code In Python Yielded A 17x Performance Improvement

    While we normally hear of rewriting code from Python and other scripting languages into C/C++ when its a matter of performance, in the case of Oracle Solaris it was taking old C code and modernizing it in Python 3 to yield a ~17x performance improvement. Shared today on Oracle's official Solaris blog was an interesting anecdote about their listusers command being rewritten in Python 3 from C. Oracle's Darren Moffat noted the C code was largely untouched since around 1988 and given its design at a time when systems were less dense than today with hundreds or even thousands of users per system.

  • Python Projects for Beginners: The Best Way to Learn

    Learning Python can be difficult. You can spend time reading a textbook or watching videos, but then struggle to actually put what you've learned into practice. Or you might spend a ton of time learning syntax and get bored or lose motivation. How can you increase your chances of success? By building Python projects. That way you're learning by actually doing what you want to do! When I was learning Python, building projects helped me bring together everything I was learning. Once I started building projects, I immediately felt like I was making more progress.

  • PyCon 2019: The People of PyCon

    I can’t tell you how amazing it was to meet the individuals I read, listen to, or who make the tools I use. I was so happy to meet the authors that helped me to grow over the last few years, especially Dan Bader, Peter Baumgartner, Matt Harrison, Reuven Lerner, Harry Percival , and Lacey Williams Henschel. I love podcasts, so it was wonderful to meet Michael Kennedy and Brian Okken in person. And I was happy to meet Paul Ganssle, Russell Keith-Magee, Barry Warsaw, and other maintainers and contributors. It was a delight to meet Bob Belderbos and Julian Sequeira from PyBites.

  • Find the first non-consecutive number with Python

    Your task is to find the first element of an array that is not consecutive. E.g. If we have an array [1,2,3,4,6,7,8] then 1 then 2 then 3 then 4 are all consecutive but 6 is not, so that’s the first non-consecutive number. If the whole array is consecutive then return None.

  • Perceiving Python programming paradigms

    Early each year, TIOBE announces its Programming Language of The Year. When its latest annual TIOBE index report came out, I was not at all surprised to see Python again winning the title, which was based on capturing the most search engine ranking points (especially on Google, Bing, Yahoo, Wikipedia, Amazon, YouTube, and Baidu) in 2018.

OSI Announces Appointment of New Board Directors

The Open Source Initiative (OSI) is pleased to announce the appointments of Deb Bryant and Tracy Hinds to fill the two vacant seats on the OSI Board of Directors. Their terms will begin immediately and run through October 2021. We hope you will join us in welcoming both to the OSI. Deb Bryant is returning to the OSI Board after spending several years away. After spending her days as the Senior Director of the Open Source Programs Office at Red Hat, Deb volunteers for open source organizations and supports the open source community. Bryant is passionate about open and transparent governments, bringing open source technology and ideas into the public sector. Tracy Hinds has an impressive history of managing development, operations, and growth for non-profit and for-profit organizations. Previous Education and Community Manager as well as Board Director of the OpenJS(formerly Node.js) Foundation, Hinds now works as Head of Platform at Samsung NEXT and is the president of GatherScript, where she works to support startup engagement and community, inspired by her prior work as a web engineer, community builder, OSS advocate, and strategist. Read more

A Trustworthy Free/Libre Linux Capable 64bit RISC-V Computer

My goal is to build a Free/OpenSource computer from the ground up, so I may completely trust that the entire hardware+software system's behavior is 100% attributable to its fully available HDL (Hardware Description Language) and Software sources. More importantly, I need all the compilers and associated toolchains involved in building the overall system (from HDL and Software sources) to be Free/OpenSource, and to be themselves buildable and runnable on the computer system being described. In other words, I need a self-hosting Free/OpenSource hardware+software stack! Read more Also: COM offers 9th or 8th Gen Coffee Lake with 10Gbps USB 3.2 and up to 96GB RAM

Dragora 3.0-beta1 released

I am pleased to announce the release of Dragora 3.0 Beta 1.

Dragora is a complete and reliable distribution of the GNU/Linux operating system that is entirely free software. Dragora is founded on the concepts of simplicity and elegance, it can be run for almost any purpose (desktop,
workstation, server, development, etc.). The intended audience is people
interested in learning more about the technical aspects of a friendly
GNU/Linux distribution.  Also people looking to use the purest ethical
software for daily use.

The beginning of the development of the series 3.0 represents the
migration towards a new C library, Musl.  The continuation of
supervision capabilities (introduced for the services in 2012).
The restructuring of the hierarchy of directories, the improvement of
the tools provided by the distribution, a new automatic method to build
the distribution, the prebuilt cross-compiler set, and much more!

The homepage is at www.dragora.org

Current development pages are located at
https://git.savannah.nongnu.org/cgit/dragora.git/ and
https://notabug.org/dragora/

Changes in this version:

  * A new installer for this series has been introduced, it can be
    invoked from the command line as `dragora-installer'.

  * A new tool (based on dialog(1)) has been introduced to
    configure the keyboard mapping in the console, it is called
    `dragora-keymap'.

  * Our simple and friendly package manager has reached version 1.3,
    which contains minor changes and fixes.  It is worth mentioning
    that Qi now uses `tarlz' to produce, list packages in parallel.
    Tarlz uses a simplified and safer variant of the POSIX pax format
    compressed with our favorite compressor "lzip".

  * To complement the security in general, for binaries with PIE and
SSP (both are default features in Dragora), they are now complemented
    with RELRO by default.

  * The main toolchain has been upgraded.  This -beta1 have Binutils
    2.33.1, The GNU C Compiler 9, GNU Linux libre 4.19.78, and
    Musl 1.1.24.

  * LibreSSL has been upgraded to the version 3.0.1

  * Ruby (programming language) version 2.6.5 has been introduced.

  * Support for FUSE (in the kernel) and user space, is now available
    in Dragora.

  * Xfce 4.14 has been introduced in this version.

  * dragora-ice, a customized version of IceWM has been added.

  * All the official X.Org components has been updated (drivers, server,
    applications, etc.).  Included new drivers: xf86-input-elographics,
    xf86-video-amdgpu, xf86-video-vboxvideo.  The configuration for the
    xf86-video-intel driver has been fixed this time.

  * Work to complete DocBook support in Dragora is underway.

  * Build recipes for new packages have been built:

    Please, traverse the /usr/pkg hierarchy for a full view of
    installed packages.

  * Many general fixes, improvements, and clean ups have been performed.

The ISO images may be fetched at:

    https://sourceforge.net/projects/dragora/files/beta/

See http://dragora.org/en/mirrors.html for a list of available mirrors.

The sha256sums are:

59a1c1693d62c2d61a0d5b4b826313ce8b736768b1a42097f1478a20a37f7a80 dragora-3.0-i586-beta1-live.iso 3127ea5b619b8e049b45a17e1e4d9c538b35ac067a7cd63d2262a30782e7cc2d dragora-3.0-i586-beta1-packages.iso 1c0f63a69cd4b674b742550562605f240e98cdbc63ab670c9f8cdd5d2d134efc dragora-3.0-x86_64-beta1-live.iso 2dd58b1e6429876aa1883b4682914184bce6cac2adfe53ea7c2e0c46d7987385 dragora-3.0-x86_64-beta1-packages.iso

Dragora is available in "live" or hybrid ISO image form. You need the .iso
for the packages if you want to perform a hard disk installation.

Notes:

* The password for the root user in the Live CD is: dragora

This beta version can be considered as stable, it is catalogued just as
beta because it lacks many things that we will try to complement in future
versions.

We welcome feedback at our Freenode IRC channel, #dragora, and on our
mailing list.  We are looking for help with documentation, testing,
bug reports, patches, etc.

Thank you to all of you who support this humble project made with great
sacrifice.  And thank you especially for supporting the philosophy and
spirit of software freedom that Dragora aims to promote.

Best regards,
Matias Fonzo, Dragora author and maintainer.

--
``Someone told me I would never be free
The way you are is way you'll always be
But it's all wrong!
There's Time To Burn'' - Ronnie James Dio

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