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Audio With DeaDBeeF, Demise of Apple's "Pod" Empire, New Podcast About Go

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac
  • DeaDBeeF 1.8.1 Released! How to Install in Ubuntu 18.04 / Higher

    Deadbeef audio player 1.8.1 was released a few days ago with various bug-fixes and performance improvements for the 1.8 series.

  • Jony Ive ‘dispirited’ by Tim Cook’s lack of interest in product design: WSJ

    The WSJ report follows a similar piece published by Bloomberg last week. Both reports describe an Apple design team, led by Jony Ive, increasingly frustrated by his absence after the launch of the Apple Watch in 2015. They tell the story of a company that once put design at the forefront, progressively being led by operational concerns. Ive’s absence was “straining the cohesion central to product development,” according to the WSJ, causing several key design team members to leave Apple over the last few years.

  • Gabbing About Go | Coder Radio 364

    Mike and Wes burrow into the concurrent world of Go and debate where it makes sense and where it may not.

    Plus gradual typing for Ruby, a new solution for Python packaging, and the real story behind Jony Ive’s exit.

Darling Still Has A Goal Of Running macOS Apps On Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

Darling is the open-source project we first covered back in 2012 that aimed to be able to run macOS software (binaries) on Linux. It's what Wine is to running Windows programs on Linux but rather to be able to handle Apple/Mac software. While we haven't heard much from the project recently, they still are pursuing their goal.

Over the years Darling has made some project on handling Mac binaries on Linux albeit times that the project seemed on hiatus without any development work. The last time we covered Darling on Phoronix was in November of 2017 when they were still aiming for macOS apps on Linux.

Read more

Direct: Darling Progress Report Q1 2019

Switching From Mac to Linux? 5 Tips to Make Your Life Easier

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

There are a lot of things to love about macOS, but there are definitely issues with using it. One of the bigger problems is that it’s exclusive to Apple computers. If you don’t like the hardware the company offers, you’re out of luck when it comes to using macOS.

If you’re looking for a desktop operating system that runs on top of a solid Unix-based foundation, Linux can be a good alternative. To make it easier to get used to Linux, you might want to make your installation a little more Mac-like.

[...]

There are two types of Mac users: those who launch applications through Launchpad and those who use Spotlight. If you’re in the latter group, moving to Linux will be much easier for you, since you can replicate this very easily. Some Linux desktops will come with this type of behavior by default, but if not, it’s easy to install a Spotlight-style launcher.

A few launchers for Linux will seem familiar to Mac users, but the most Spotlight-like is Cerebro. In addition to launching apps and searching files, it can function as a basic calculator, show maps, and add other functions with plugins. If you’re more familiar with the third-party launcher Alfred, you might want to look into Albert instead. Both apps are free.

Those two are far from the only app launchers available. If neither is your cup of tea, we have a list of nine of the best app launchers for Linux. Chances are good you’ll find at least one that you really like among them.

Read more

GAFAM: Microsoft's Misappropriation of "Linux", Google 'Invents' Linux Support for Sound, Apple Shuns GNU/Linux

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
Mac

So long, Macbook. Hello again, Linux.

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

Long story short, after a decade on my Macbook, I switched back to Linux. Recently I’ve just found myself disenchanted with Apple in a way similar to how I felt maybe twelve years earlier with Microsoft, when I switched to Linux the first time.

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5 of the Best Linux Distributions for Mac Users

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

The Mac is an ever-increasingly closed-off ecosystem, with users finding that they need to use dongles and converters for everything from ethernet cables to SD card readers. The decision to replace the Escape and Command keys with the gimmicky “touch bar” a couple of years ago wasn’t great either.

It’s safe to say that when it comes to macOS, the honeymoon is over. Longtime users are starting to get fed up with Apple from the way they restrict compatibility to their amateur file system, to the way their operating system takes away advanced functions longtime users are used to using.

In this article we’ll go over the best Linux distributions that Mac users can install either on their Macs or on dedicated Linux computers.

Read more

Apple Poverty and Dodgy Reviews

Filed under
Mac
  • Apple Users In China Are The ‘Invisible Poors’: Report

    Owning an Apple iPhone has been synonymous with great class. However, a new research report has something contradicting to say about Apple’s ownership status in China.

    According to a report by the research agency MobData, Apple iPhone users in China are the ones with low income, less education, and fewer valuable assets.

  • Never trust the Apple army of iPhone reviewers

    The reason you will not get a fair unbiased honest review of an iPhone or any other Apple product by mainstream reviewers is because nearly all of the reviewers get their review products from Apple. They are on Apple’s Christmas list – otherwise no review product. Understand?

    Thus, in order to get an honest review you need to be able to find an independent reviewer who purchased his own iPhone. Even in that rare case, however, you are still not likely to get an honest review. The reviewer just paid through the nose to buy a new iPhone! Do you really think he is going to rubbish his own hard earned acquisition?

Unhappy With Apple

Filed under
Hardware
Mac
  • New iPad Pro Reportedly Suffering From Bending Issues

    It has not been one month since Apple launched its latest iPad Pro models. It has been found that the nearly bezel-less iPad Pro models are prone to bending issues.

    In a durability test video by the famous YouTuber JerryRigEverything, iPad Pro models bent when a slight force was applied to it. Many new iPad owners also took to MacRumor’s forum to complain about the bending of the latest iPad.

  • How Apple tricked me into buying a new MacBook Air

     

    I have been using MacBook Air laptops for several years now and I like them much better than anything in the Windows space. However, my experience has been far from problem-free and I am angry at what I believe is a deceptive business practice designed to screw money out of loyal users.
     

     

    [...]

     

    So for $175 I got my computer completely fixed after being told by both Apple and an Authorised Apple repairer that it could not be salvaged. Furthermore, I subsequently discovered through online inquiry that this particular keyboard had a design fault and that I was not to blame at all for the damage. I had been tricked into buying a new computer needlessly.

Special 'Fun' With Apple’s iCloud and Microsoft's 'Cloud'

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
  • Windows 10’s October Update Breaks Apple’s iCloud

    Windows 10’s October 2018 Update has more bugs. Microsoft won’t offer the update if you have iCloud installed, and Apple won’t let you install iCloud if you’ve already upgraded. You’ll also have trouble if you have F5 VPN software installed.

    This information comes from Microsoft’s own Windows 10 Update History page, where Microsoft is publicly tracking the October Update’s bugs.

    According to Microsoft, Apple iCloud version 7.7.0.27 has an incompatibility with the latest update. You’ll have trouble updating or synchronizing Shared Albums after upgrading. If you try installing iCloud on the October Update, you’ll see an error message saying “iCloud for Windows requires Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10 (April 2018 Update) and earlier.”

  • Microsoft limits functionality for older versions of the Office: Enterprise users to suffer additional subscription costs

    Initially launched as a whole suite for businesses of all kinds, Microsoft Office 365 came out back in 2011, introducing a cloud based software service. Before this, Microsoft only focused on corporate software on the cloud, which was very limited. Since then, Office 365 has gained quite the customer satisfaction, considering it is used in almost all universities for education, in corporate firms, in households, with their sharing plans and otherwise. While this was a good way of revenue generation, Microsoft went a step further, when it launched the new Office 2019 this past September.

    While this new Office opens up features for the users, it also puts a nail in the way for Corporations that have found ways around office subscriptions, limiting them to an older version in order to get full functionality. Microsoft steps in this time around, with the release of their latest version of the Office platform.

Microsoft and Apple Against Repairs

Filed under
Hardware
Microsoft
Mac
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More in Tux Machines

libinput 1.16.0

libinput 1.16.0 is now available.

No significant changes since the second RC, so here's slightly polished RC1
announcement text.

This has been a long cycle, mostly because there weren't any huge changes on
the main development branch and a lot of the minor annoyances have found
their way into the 1.15.x releases anyway.

libinput now monitors timestamps of the events vs the current time when
libinput_dispatch() is called by the compositor. Where the difference
*may* result in issues, a (rate-limited) warning is printed to the log.
So you may see messages popping up in the form of
  "event processing lagging behind by XYZms, your system is too slow"
This is a warning only and has no immediate effect. Previously we would only
notice (and warn about) this when it affected an internal timer. Note that
these warnings do not show an issue with libinput, it shows that the the
compositor is not calling libinput_dispatch() quick enough.

The wheel tilt axis source was deprecated. No device ever had the required
udev properties set so we should stop pretending we support this.

Touchpads now support the "flat" acceleration profile. The default remains
unchanged and this needs to be selected in the configuration interface. The
"flat" profile applies a constant factor to movement deltas (1.0 for the
default speed setting).

Events from lid or tablet-mode switches that are known to libinput as being
unreliable are now filtered and no longer passed to the caller.
This prevents callers from receiving those known-bogus events and having to
replicate the same heuristics to identify unreliable devices that libinput
employs internally.

A new "libinput analyze" debugging tool is the entry tool for analysing
various aspects of devices. Right now the only tool is
"libinput analyze per-slot-delta" which can be used to detect pointer jumps
in a libiput record output. This tool used to live elsewhere, it was moved
to libinput so that reporters can easier run this tool, reducing the load on
the maintainers.

The tools have seen a few minor improvements, e.g.
- "libinput record touchpad.yml" does the right thing, no explicit --output
  argument required
- libinput measure touchpad-pressure has been revamped to be a bit more
  obvious
- libinput measure touchpad-size has been added (as replacement for the
  touchpad-edge-detector tool)
- libinput measure fuzz has been fixed to work (again and) slightly more
  reliable

The libinput test suite has been fixed to avoid interference with the
currently running session. Previously it was virtually impossible to work
while the test suite is running - multiple windows would pop up, the screen
would blank regularly, etc.

And of course a collection of fixes, quirks and new bugs.

As usual, see the git shortlog for details.

Diego Abad A (1):
      FIX: typo on building documentation

Peter Hutterer (2):
      test: semi-fix the switch_suspend_with_touchpad test
      libinput 1.16.0

git tag: 1.16.0
Read more Also: >Libinput 1.16 Released - Ready To Warn You If Your System Is Too Slow

18 Frameworks, Libraries, and Projects for Building Medical Applications

Open-source is not just a license or a code-based that left free on an online repository, It's a complete concept which comes with several advantages. Moreover, the most advantage you can get from Open-source is beyond the open-code it's FREEDOM; freedom to use or re-shape it as you see fit within your project commercial or otherwise, and that depends on the license of course. You are free from the headache of license conflict legal problems but also from the dilemma of dealing with restrections and limitations which come with property licenses. You are free from the system lock-in schemes, furthermore, you own your data, and freedom to customize the software as your structure requires and workflow demands. The Community: The Open-source project gains a powerful community as they gain users, the community users vary between advanced users, end-users, developers and end-users on decision-making level. Many of the community users are providing quality inputs from their usage and customized use-case and workflow or test-runs, Furthermore, they always have something to add as new features, UI modification, different usability setup, and overall introducing new workflows and tools, and That's what makes the progress of the open-source different than non-free solutions. While, Good community means good support, The community is a good resource to hire advanced users, developers, and system experts. It also provides alternative options when hiring developers. Unlike non-free software which are not blessed with such communities and where the options there are limited, The rich open-source community provides rich questions and answers sets that contributed by users from all around the world. Higher education value for the in-house team The open-source concept itself provides educational value, I owe most of what I know to open-source communities.The access to the source code and open-channels communication with the core developers is the best educational value any developer can get. Read more

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