Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Mac

Android Apps Turn Chromebooks Into Macbook Killers

Filed under
Android
Mac
  • Android Apps Turn Chromebooks Into Macbook Killers

    When Chromebooks launched in the summer of 2011, they seemed destined to fail, much like the underpowered, internet-dependent netbooks that came before them. But in the five years since, Chromebooks have defied expectations, becoming the most used device in US classrooms and even outselling Macs for the first time this year. Still, people complain about their inability to run useful software, but that’s all about to change.

  • Android apps could turn Chromebooks into MacBook killers

Apple Lock-in

Filed under
Mac

Android vs. iOS: Key Features Android Lacks

Filed under
Mac

Despite the things I feel are missing from Android, I believe it remains the best mobile operating system for my needs. It's got the apps I want, allows me control over my phone and I get to choose my default applications. Perhaps best of all, I get to choose my user interface thanks to launchers like Nova. Toss in the fact that I get to choose my phone hardware vs having it dictated to me and I can't fathom returning to iOS – ever. My needs have simply outgrown it.

Read more

Android vs. iPhone: Pros and Cons

Filed under
Android
Mac

Despite its painful shortcomings, Android treats me like an adult. It doesn't lock me into only two methods for backing up my data. Yes, some of Android's limitations are due to the fact that it's focused on letting me choose how to handle my data. But, I also get to choose my own device, add storage on a whim. Android enables me to do a lot of cool stuff that the iPhone simply isn't capable of doing.

At its core, Android gives non-root users greater access to the phone's functionality. For better or worse, it's a level of freedom that I think people are gravitating towards. Now there are going to be many of you who swear by the iPhone thanks to efforts like the libimobiledevice project. But take a long hard look at all the stuff Apple blocks Linux users from doing...then ask yourself – is it really worth it as a Linux user? Hit the Comments, share your thoughts on Android, iPhone or Ubuntu.

Read more

iPhone vs Android: Almost Half Of iPhone Users Think Android Phones Are More Advanced

Filed under
Android
Mac

Forty-five percent of iPhone users say they believe Android phones are "more advanced" than iPhones, a survey of smartphone owners released Wednesday indicated. Thirty-one percent disagreed while the rest were unsure.

The survey was conducted by OnePulse, a London startup, which surveyed 1,500 iPhone and Android users via its app. Overall, including iPhone and Android users, 40 percent of those surveyed said Android was more advanced than iPhone.

Read more

​Why switch to Windows 10 or a Mac when you can use Linux Mint 17.3 instead?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Mac

Yes, I'm serious. I use all the above desktops -- yes I'm a Windows 7 and 10 user as well as a Linux guy -- and for people I think Mint 17.3 makes a great desktop.

I've been using Mint as my main Linux desktop for years now. Unlike some desktops I could name -- cough, Windows 8, cough -- Linux Mint has never had a flop. Every year that goes by, this operating system keeps getting better. The other desktops? Not so much.

Let's take a closer look.at Windows 7 vs. Linux Mint 17.3

Read more

Satire and Prose: Apple and Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
  • [Satire] Jono Bacon urges users to ditch Linux and move to Mac OS X
  • Jono Bacon introduces Bad Voltage spin-off Mac Voltage at SCaLE 14x
  • Redmond Admits Using Microsoft Supported Windows Is ‘Risky’ [Ed: back doors as standard]

    In previous visits to Claude and Jane’s house I had cautioned both of them that if the messages they got for any reason seemed to be pushy or if those messages are telling you that you are in danger of infection, that is more than likely malware designed to get you to click a link. Evidently, Jane had listened. Since the “Upgrade to Windows 10” was a clickable link, she stopped what she was doing and signed out of Windows and booted back into Linux. From those friendly confines she began to do a bit of research as to what malware might be threatening her.

    Turns out, she discovered that malware was Windows 10.

    She called me to see if I was busy and would I come over and take a look at this for her. She wanted to make sure she was going to be safe in Windows — or as safe as anyone can be in Windows anyway.

    Jane had taken it on herself to see what this was all about and in that look around the internet she found what she suspected to be true. Microsoft Windows it seems, is in the business of trying to scare old ladies or anyone else who doesn’t really feel comfortable in a technology environment. When I was able to get over there, she showed me what she had found.

Was ​Apple the first major open-source company? Not even close

Filed under
Mac
OSS

Ah, I don't think so.

Many older open-source programmers think, with reason, that's nonsense.

True, Apple has used open-source software for years, but that's not the same thing as making open-source development "a key part of its strategy." It would be more correct to say that Apple was the first major company to take advantage of open source.

Read more

Also on this topic:

  • Is Open Source Swift a good thing ? [Ed (Roy): Apple and Microsoft 'contribute' to Open Source like animal farms (for meat) contribute to bovine and fowl]

    On December 3 Apple has open sourced the Swift programming language on Swift.org. The language was first released (not Open Source yet) about the same time as iOS 8 and was created by Apple to make Mac and iOS app development an easier task. Swift is welcome as one more Open Source language and project but is too early to make a lot of noise about it.

    [...]

    For now Swift has no client-side (as Angular for JavaScript) or server-side (as Rail for Ruby, Django for Python) application frameworks. Exceptions are the proprietary Cocoa and Cocoa Touch frameworks for Apple platforms only.

    For now Swift can only offer a very young set of core libraries.

    We have enough modern Open Source languages: Python, Ruby, Perl, JavaScript, PHP, Java just to mention the most recent ones. A lot of energy is required to create an ecosystem around a language.

    It is difficult to unbound Swift from Apple platforms since a lot of Open Source extensions for Swift still use proprietary Apple class libraries as NSString etc.

  • Apple retracts comment that it was first major open source company after criticism

    Last week Apple’s open sourcing of Swift naturally saw the spotlight thrown over Apple’s open source pages. This included a paragraph that claimed Apple was “the first major computer company to make Open Source a key part of its strategy”. Unsurprisingly, this riled some members of the developer community as being disingenuous and untrue.

  • Apple is proud of its open source software Swift. A bit too proud

    But it may be a bit too proud. On its page celebrating open-source software, Apple originally claimed it was “the first major computer company to make Open Source development a key part of its ongoing software strategy”.

    That claim will have come as some surprise to most major computer companies. While Apple has a long history of adopting open-source code for its own releases, most notably with the Unix basis of Mac OS X in 1999, it isn’t exactly the first mover in the field. And as for releasing its own proprietary code as open source, that’s something that it has been even slower on – certainly compared to arch rival Google, whose Android operating system is and always has been freely licensed.

Openwashing

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Feral Interactive Ports Life Is Strange to Linux and Mac, Episode 1 Is Now Free

Feral Interactive has recently announced that they have managed to successfully port the popular, award-winning Life Is Strange game to GNU/Linux and Mac OS X operating systems. Read more

Introduction to Modularity

Modularity is an exciting, new initiative aimed at resolving the issue of diverging (and occasionally conflicting) lifecycles of different “components” within Fedora. A great example of a diverging and conflicting lifecycle is the Ruby on Rails (RoR) lifecycle, whereby Fedora stipulates that itself can only have one version of RoR at any point in time – but that doesn’t mean Fedora’s version of RoR won’t conflict with another version of RoR used in an application. Therefore, we want to avoid having “components”, like RoR, conflict with other existing components within Fedora. Read more

Our First Look at Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon

Now that I’ve had about a week to play around in Mint 18, I find a lot to like and have no major complaints. While Cinnamon probably isn’t destined to become my desktop of choice, I don’t dislike it and find it, hands down, the best of the GNOME based desktops I’ve tried so far. Anybody looking for a powerful, all purpose distro that’s designed to work smoothly and which can be mastered with ease would be hard pressed to find anything better. Read more

The subtle art of the Desktop

The history of the Gnome and KDE desktops go a long way back and their competition, for the lack of a better term, is almost as famous in some circles as the religious divide between Emacs and Vi. But is that competition stil relevant in 2016? Are there notable differences between Gnome and KDE that would position each other on a specific segment of users? Having both desktops running on my systems (workstation + laptop) but using really only one of them at all times, I wanted to find out by myself. My workstation and laptop both run ArchLinux, which means I tend to run the latest stable versions of pretty much any desktop software. I will thus be considering the latest stable versions from Gnome and KDE in this post. Historically, the two environments stem from different technical platforms: Gnome relies on the GTK framework while KDE, or more exactly the Plasma desktop environment, relies on Qt. For a long time, that is until well into the development of the Gnome 3.x platform, the major difference was not just technical, it was one of style and experience. KDE used to offer a desktop experience that was built along the lines of Windows, with a start center on the bottom left, a customizable side bar, and desktop widgets. Gnome had its two bars on the top and bottom of the screen, and was seemingly used as the basis for the first design of Mac OS X, with the top bar offering features that were later found in the Apple operating system. Read more