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Misc

Post/Node #111111

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This is the 111111th node. It's a special number and a milestone for us. Will we have reached the 222222nd by 2030? Time will tell. Maybe Drupal won't even be around by then.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Google looks set to offer Linux on Chromebooks in the next few months

    If that wasn't enough, a new commit in the parent Chromium OS offers "new device policy to allow Linux VMs on Chrome OS." Which about seals it.

    Read the accompanying Gerrit documentation and you get further confirmation: "At this time, in order for Linux VMs to run, the Finch experiment also needs to be enabled. After this feature is fully launched, the Finch control logic will be removed."

  • xorg-server 1.19.99.905

    More bugfixes, and streams support for Xwayland. This will almost certainly be the last RC.

  • X.Org Server 1.20 RC5 Released, Adds EGLStreams To Let NVIDIA Work With XWayland

    Adam Jackson of Red Hat today announced the X.Org Server 1.20 Release Candidate 5, which he believes will be the last test release before going gold. Most excitingly about this new release candidate is the merged support for allowing the NVIDIA proprietary driver to work with XWayland.

  • Darktable Receives Support for Fujifilm X-H1 and Sony Alpha A7 Mark III Cameras

    darktable, the open-source and cross-platform RAW image editor supporting GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows operating systems, has been updated today to version 2.4.3.

    darktable 2.4.3 is a maintenance update that brings support for new digital cameras, including the recently released Fujifilm X-H1 and Sony Alpha A7 Mark III (includes noise profiles and white balance presets), as well as the Kodak EOS DCS 3, Olympus PEN E-PL9, Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9, and Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX1R II cameras.

    The update also brings noise profiles for the Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III and Nikon D7500 digital cameras, and a bunch of new features like support for ratings and tags in the watermark module, a script to help users convert .dtyle files to the .xmp format, and support for building and installing noise tools.

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  • Compact action-RPG 'The Swords of Ditto' is out with day-1 Linux support

    The Swords of Ditto is the new compact action-RPG from developer onebitbeyond and publisher Devolver Digital and it just released, although it has a big flaw right now on Linux. Sadly, Devolver Digital didn't respond to our review request. Thankfully, the Linux heroes over at GOG sent over a copy for me.

  • Q4OS Centaurus 3.2 - new testing release

    A new updated image of the Q4OS Centaurus testing live media has been just released, its core is based on the latest Debian Buster testing and Trinity Desktop 14.0.5 testing versions.

  • Ubuntu Touch lives on in Purism's Librem 5 smartphone

    Not quite five years ago, Canonical tried to challenge Apple iOS and Google Android with Ubuntu Touch, an alternative smartphone Linux. Users, phone carriers, and the open-source community failed to support it, so Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth closed the door on Ubuntu Touch development. But, in open source, programs don't die until its last developer gives up on it. Purism and UBports have partnered to offer Ubuntu Touch on Purism's Librem 5 smartphone.

  • Saying Something in April 2018

    Being able to bang on (that is to say, percussively test) Bionic Beaver has been a blast. I haven't done ISO testing this round. Instead, I've been using my Xubuntu desktop daily watching things break and have been watching apport file bugs. Doing so makes me realize that, frankly, I am not normal in terms of installed packages or workflow. I have quite a bit of LaTeX installed due to church work. I have many ham radio-related things installed. Audio production and video production packages are installed too. Yes, sometimes I break down and even use LibreOffice. I don't have the whole package archive installed but I have a visible chunk of it in place as I use many things in many ways.

  • “Unpatchable” Nintendo Switch Bug Lets Hackers Fullfill Their Wild Dreams
  • Spectral Monitoring for Drone Defense Applications

    The USRP Embedded Series platform uses the OpenEmbedded framework to create custom Linux distributions tailored to application specific needs. The default operating system is pre-installed with the UHD software API and a variety of third party development tools such as GNU Radio. Support for the RFNoC FPGA development framework enables deterministic computations for real-time and wideband signal processing.

  • How To Make Your Phone Look Like Android P
  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup time: April 27th starting at 12:00 p.m. EDT/16:00 UTC
  • PyRoMine uses NSA exploits to mine Monero and disable security features [Ed: NSA back doors in Microsoft Windows is a gift that keeps giving... to crackers]

    In an age where cryptomining software is beating out ransomware as the go-to for most hackers, a Python-based Monero miner is using stolen NSA exploits to gain an edge.

    In 2016 the Shadow Brokers leaked several hacking tools and zero-day exploits including ETERNALBLUE and ETERNALROMANCE  that targeted versions of Windows XP/Vista/8.1/7/10 and Windows Server 2003/2008/2012/2016 and took advantage of CVE-2017-0144 and CVE-2017-0145.

    Fortinet researchers spotted a malware dubbed “PyRoMine” which uses the ETERNALROMANCE exploit to spread to vulnerable Windows machines, according to an April 24 blog post. The malware isn't the first to mine cryptocurrency that uses previously leaked NSA exploits the malware is still a threat as it leaves machines vulnerable to future attacks because it starts RDP services and disables security services.

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes

    Harry (Lei) Zhang, together with the CTO of HyperHQ, Xu Wang, will present “CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes” at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU 2018, May 2-4 in Copenhagen, Denmark. The presentation will clarify about more about CRI, container runtimes, KataContainers and where they are going. Please join them if you are interested in learning more.

  • Meet Gloo, the ‘Function Gateway’ That Unifies Legacy APIs, Microservices, and Serverless

    Gloo, a single binary file written in Go, can be deployed as a Kubernetes pod, in a Docker container, and now also on Cloud Foundry. The setup also requires a copy of Envoy, though the installation process can be greatly simplified through additional software developed by the company, TheTool. The user then writes configuration objects to capture the workflow logic.

  • Why is the kernel community replacing iptables with BPF?

    The Linux kernel community recently announced bpfilter, which will replace the long-standing in-kernel implementation of iptables with high-performance network filtering powered by Linux BPF, all while guaranteeing a non-disruptive transition for Linux users.

  • The developer of Helium Rain gave an update on their sales, low overall sales but a high Linux percentage

    Helium Rain [Steam, Official Site], the gorgeous space sim from Deimos Games is really quite good so it's a shame they've seen such low overall sales. In total, they've had around 14,000€ (~$17,000) in sales which is not a lot for a game at all.

    The good news, is that out of the two thousand copies they say they've sold, a huge 14% of them have come from Linux. It's worth noting, that number has actually gone up since we last spoke to them, where they gave us a figure of 11% sales on Linux.

  • Want to try Wild Terra Online? We have another load of keys to give away (update: all gone)

    Wild Terra Online [Steam], the MMO from Juvty Worlds has a small but dedicated following, now is your chance to see if it's for you.

  • Arch Linux Finally Rolling Out Glibc 2.27

    Arch Linux is finally transitioning to glibc 2.27, which may make for a faster system.

    Glibc 2.27 was released at the start of February. This updated GNU C Library shipped with many performance optimizations particularly for Intel/x86_64 but also some ARM tuning and more. Glibc 2.27 also has memory protection keys support and other feature additions, but the performance potential has been most interesting to us.

  • Installed nvidia driver
  • Stephen Smoogen: Fedora Infrastructure Hackathon (day 1-5)
  • Design and Web team summary – 20 April 2018

    The team manages all web projects across Canonical. From www.ubuntu.com to the Juju GUI we help to bring beauty and consistency to all the web projects.

  • Costales: UbuCon Europe 2018 | 1 Week to go!!

    We'll have an awesome weekend of conferences (with 4 parallel talks), podcasts, stands, social events... Most of them are in English, but there will be in Spanish & Asturian too.

  • Tough, modular embedded PCs start at $875

    Advantech has launched two rugged, Linux-ready embedded DIN-rail computers with Intel Bay Trail SoCs and iDoor expansion: an “UNO-1372G-E” with 3x GbE ports and a smaller UNO-1372G-J with only 2x GbE, but with more serial and USB ports.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • KDE Applications 18.04 Brings Dolphin Improvements, JuK Wayland Support

    The KDE community has announced the release today of KDE Applications 18.04 as the first major update to the open-source KDE application set for 2018.

  • Plasma Startup

    Startup is one of the rougher aspects of the Plasma experience and therefore something we’ve put some time into fixing

    [...]

    The most important part of any speed work is correctly analysing it.
    systemd-bootchart is nearly perfect for this job, but it’s filled with a lot of system noise.

  • Announcing Virtlyst – a web interface to manage virtual machines

    Virtlyst is a web tool that allows you to manage virtual machines.

    In essence it’s a clone of webvirtmgr, but using Cutelyst as the backend, the reasoning behind this was that my father in law needs a server for his ASP app on a Win2k server, the server has only 4 GiB of RAM and after a week running webvirtmgr it was eating 300 MiB close to 10% of all available RAM. To get a VNC or SPICE tunnel it spawns websockify which on each new instance around 20 MiB of RAM get’s used.

    I found this unacceptable, a tool that is only going to be used once in a while, like if the win2k freezes or goes BSOD, CPU usage while higher didn’t play a role on this.

  • OPNFV: driving the network towards open source "Tip to Top"

    Heather provides an update on the current status of OPNFV. How is its work continuing and how is it pursuing the overall mission? Heather says much of its work is really ‘devops’ and it's working on a continuous integration basis with the other open source bodies. That work continues as more bodies join forces with the Linux Foundation. Most recently OPNFV has signed a partnership agreement with the open compute project. Heather says the overall OPNFV objective is to work towards open source ‘Tip to top’ and all built by the community in ‘open source’. “When we started, OPNFV was very VM oriented (virtual machine), but now the open source movement is looking more to cloud native and containerisation as the way forward,” she says. The body has also launched a C-RAN project to ensure that NFV will be ready to underpin 5G networks as they emerge.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E07 – Seven Years in Tibet - Ubuntu Podcast
  • Failure to automate: 3 ways it costs you

    When I ask IT leaders what they see as the biggest benefit to automation, “savings” is often the first word out of their mouths. They’re under pressure to make their departments run as efficiently as possible and see automation as a way to help them do so.

    Cost savings are certainly a benefit of automation, but I’d argue that IT leaders who pursue automation for cost-savings alone are missing the bigger picture of how it can help their businesses.

    The true value of automation doesn’t lie in bringing down expenses, but rather in enabling IT teams to scale their businesses.

  • Docker Enterprise Edition 2.0 Launches With Secured Kubernetes

    After months of development effort, Kubernetes is now fully supported in the stable release of the Docker Enterprise Edition.

    Docker Inc. officially announced Docker EE 2.0 on April 17, adding features that have been in development in the Docker Community Edition (CE) as well as enhanced enterprise grade capabilities. Docker first announced its intention to support Kubernetes in October 2017. With Docker EE 2.0, Docker is providing a secured configuration of Kubernetes for container orchestration.

    "Docker EE 2.0 brings the promise of choice," Docker Chief Operating Officer Scott Johnston told eWEEK. "We have been investing heavily in security in the last few years, and you'll see that in our Kubernetes integration as well."

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • simple

    Every now and then, for one reason or another, I am sat in front of a Linux-powered computer with the graphical user interface disabled, instead using an old-school text-only mode.

  • A month with Dell XPS 13 (9370)

    After years of using Thinkpads, I went for a Dell XPS 13 with Ubuntu. Although I had bought devices with Linux pre-installed and laptops for friends as well, this  was going to be my first own laptop coming with Ubuntu straight from the factory.

  • Thin Clients, The Walking Dead Of Computing

     

    Most of us are doing a lot on the web anyway. There’s not much difference between a web-application running on a server somewhere or a desktop application running on a server in the building. Thin clients just won’t die as much as haters wish.

  • logstash 5.6.9 released with logstash-filter-grok 4.0.3
  • Calamares GeoIP

    Calamares is a distribution-independent (Linux) system installer. Outside of the “big five” distro’s, many smaller “boutique” distro’s need an installer, and Calamares is a highly configurable one that they can use. There’s a few dozen distro’s that I know of that use it (although I’ve only actually installed maybe six of them).

  • Cockpit 166

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 166.

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  • KDE’s New Elisa Music Player: So Close, Yet So Far Away

    With the rise of streaming services bringing easy access to media, owning your own music and movies is at a seemingly all-time low. In my case, it wasn’t until recently that I started recollecting local music files again once I started caring more about the quality of music that I was listening to.

  • Atom-based embedded PC supports up to four removable SATA drives

    IEI’s Linux-ready “IBX-660” is a rugged, storage-oriented embedded computer with a Bay Trail Atom, 4x removable SATA bays, 2x GbE ports, 4x USB, HDMI, mini-PCIe, and -40 to 50°C support.

  • Eclipse and Linux Launch Projects to Help IoT Developers

    The Eclipse and Linux foundations are offering new projects for developers working on Internet of Things (IoT) projects.

    Eclipse is introducing Mita, a language for embedded IoT. Linux has announced an open source reference hypervisor project designed for IoT device development.

  • 7 tips from multi-cloud masters
  • Google Kaniko Tool Wrenches on Container Privilege Concern

    Google unveiled an open source tool that targets container security issues tied to the granting of privileged access to a Docker-based container. Docker containers are by default not granted privileged access to root content, though that does limit their agility.

    Analysts have noted that the privileged and root access issues remain a sticking point for securing container deployments.

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  • An Update on Linux Journal

    First, keep the great ideas coming—we all want to continue making Linux Journal 2.0 something special, and we need this community to do it.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Retro-inspired racer Horizon Chase Turbo announced with Linux support

    Aquiris Game Studio, developer of FPS Ballistic Overkill has announced their retro-inspired racing game Horizon Chase Turbo [Official Site].

    It's actually a revamp of an older title of their's named Horizon Chase World Tour, only this time it's not locked to mobile platforms and it will be getting a Linux version too! Honestly, it looks like a really fantastic attempt to bring out a classic-style racing game for a new generation of players.

  • RUINER officially released for Linux on Steam, coming to GOG soon

    RUINER, the absolutely brutal and damn fun action game is now out of beta and officially available on Steam, with a GOG release to follow. I have it confirmed from my GOG contacts it will land soonish, but if you doubt my own word, the developer said so on the Steam forum as well.

    I already wrote some thoughts up on the game here, so I won't reiterate too much. As it stands, it's an excellent action game full of character customisation with tons of perks you can activate and deactivate any time, brutal take-downs and plenty of blood.

  • Red Hat Summit 2018: Learn how other developers are producing cloud-native applications

    Want insights into how other organizations are building cloud-native applications and microservices? At Red Hat Summit 2018, developers from a number of different companies will be sharing their stories in break-out sessions, lightning talks, and birds-of-a-feather discussions. Learn how they solved real business problems using containers, microservices, API management, integration services, and other middleware.

  • Analyst’s Trends to observe: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • TeX Live 2018 for Debian

    TeX Live 2018 has hit Debian/unstable today. The packages are based on what will be (most likely, baring any late desasters) on the TeX Live DVD which is going to press this week. This brings the newest and shiniest version of TeX Live to Debian. There have

  • alioth deprecation - next steps

    As you should be aware, alioth.debian.org will be decommissioned with the EOL of wheezy, which is at the end of May. The replacement for the main part of alioth, git, is alive and out of beta, you know it as salsa.debian.org. If you did not move your git repository yet, hurry up, time is running out.

  • Linux-ready computer monitors condition of industrial equipment

    Adlink’s rugged, Ubuntu-friendly “MCM-100” is a condition monitoring system for industrial machines that offers an Intel Apollo Lake SoC and a 24-bit analog sampling input for up to 128kS/s frequencies.

  • Gear Sport update brings new features with Tizen version 3.0.0.2

    Samsung want you to know that they are serious about their wearable devices, and one way of showing the “Love” is continued development and support. Support can come in many forms and one of the best for end-users software updates.

  • Solaris 11.4 Beta Updated With Spectre V1 Mitigation, Systemd Bit To Make GNOME Happy
  • Chrome 66 rolling out on Mac, Windows, Linux w/ media autoplay restrictions, password export

    Chrome 66 is rolling out today on Mac, Windows, and Linux with a number of user-facing features and policy changes that have been in development for the past several months. This includes new media autoplay behavior, blocking third-party software, and other security changes.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • OLPC’s $100 laptop was going to change the world — then it all went wrong [iophk: "This new article is a bit of revisionism as OLPC was killed by Microsoft and Intel"]
  • DOSBox Part 2: Creating, Handling, and Booting from Floppy Images

    Continuing on from the previous tutorial, we move on to boot DOS systems from floppy images. Many floppies contained games or other software that would have automatically booted once the system started (using the autoexec.bat script). This can be simulated by using a floppy image which is simply a file that represents an entire floppy disk drive.

  • Weekly Roundup 2018 – Weeks 14 & 15

    Many thanks for your patience! This is turning into a bi-weekly roundup lately, but we’ll try to get it back on track very soon.

    Team leader elections are happening: Donald and Filip continue to lead Atelier, Papoteur leads Docteam, Yuri leads i18n and the process is underway for all teams. We’ll know the make-up of the Council in the coming days – thanks to Marja for the updates. After that, we’ll be finding out the new composition of the Board. All should be in place by early May.

    The Great Plasma Update is almost there: it includes updates of the KF5, Plasma, KDE applications, LXQT and the underlying QT stacks. It’s currently waiting for the LXQT stack to be fixed. It’s a massive number of packages. We’re hoping it will be moved into updates within the week. Once that’s done, Mageia 6.1 will happen soon after.

  • Manjaro Download now hosted at OSDN

    After a period of testing in close cooperation with OSDN’s CEO Shuji Sado, Manjaro is proud to announce that all our Official and Community ISOs and torrents have found a new home on OSDN‘s Japan-based servers, using their just recently launched File Storage service.
    Sofar we are extremely happy with transfer rates and stability and, above all, OSDN’s truely outstanding personal, highly competent and friendly support.

    Current download links to our install media can of course be found on the Download Page as usual.

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  • 8 Best Android Drawing Apps To Unleash Your Creativity | 2018 Edition
  • An Early Look at Zircon, Google Fuchsia New Microkernel [iophk: "C++"]

     

    Zircon manages the following resources: processor time, memory, I/O, interrupts, and signaling and waiting. Resources are used from user land through handles. Handles have rights associated to them which convey privileges to perform actions such as duplicating, transferring, reading, writing, executing, etc. Drivers in Zircon are implemented as ELF libraries which are loaded into processes. A device manager process, devmgr, keeps track of drivers and devices, manages the discovery of drivers, and administers access to devices. Devices may implement Protocols, using C ABI, such the PCI protocol, the USB protocol and so on.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • MEF launches SDN certification and specs for Presto APIs

    MEF worked with The Linux Foundation and ETSI to develop an NFV and SDN certification to focus on related knowledge and skills. Meantime, MEF published specs for its Presto APIs.

  • Brainstorm – A Note-Taking App with Syntax Highlighting

    Brainstorm is an open source note-taking application with a modern clutter-free UI, live preview, syntax highlighting for all languages supported by highlight.js, and GitHub Flavored Markdown.

    You can use it to make notes, make plans, and create cheat sheets which you can share with your friends and categorize using tags.

    You can further organize your tagged notes into smartly named boards. You can also decide to run host your app data locally (using extra time,) or on a server.

  • Manjaro + Microsoft Office Online - Yup, come over

    I can hear the trumpets of cynicism already blaring loudly. But to deny the reality is to deprive oneself of actual value and advantages that modern technologies can offer. There's no place for ideology in that space, I'm afraid. Ideologies are reserved to true believers and the truly rich, and most people aren't in either group. Microsoft Office makes perfect sense, and having access to this software on Linux is a very good thing. The native integration places Manjaro in a league of its own.

    Of course, I would love to see this project grow and propagate and become "the thing" across all distributions, rather than a point of contention, rivalry and ego-forking for a dozen similar projects. Then, because I always think strategically, long term and end to end, I want to see the integration taken to the pro level. Cloud storage, account sync and backup, and more. Well, this is superb, I like it, I see the potential, and hopefully, the community will embrace the project. It is upon efforts like this that the distinction between obscurity and greatness lies. In the land of Mordor, where the geeks code. Take care.

  • Battle Royale game 'Darwin Project' looks like it might actually be coming to Linux

    Begin warming up the hype machine, as it looks like Battle Royale game 'Darwin Project' [Steam] might be getting a Linux version.

  • Hedge fund Elliott Management wants Micro Focus, which bought HPE Software and SUSE Linux, to go private

    Hedge fund Elliott Management is pushing UK software company Micro Focus, which merged with Hewlett Packard Enterprise's software business last year, to sell to a private equity firm, according to people familiar with the matter.

    Elliott has taken a stake in Micro Focus, said the people, who asked not to be named because the transaction is private. The stake is not quite five percent, which is the automatic disclosure threshold, said the people.

    Micro Focus has already received inbound interest from several private equity companies, said the people.

  • Epiq Solutions unveils highly integrated RF + Linux module to simplify wireless product development cycle

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Streaming the Norwegian ultimate championships

    As the Norwegian indoor frisbee season is coming to a close, the Norwegian ultimate nationals are coming up, too. Much like in Trøndisk 2017, we'll be doing the stream this year, replacing a single-camera Windows/XSplit setup with a multi-camera free software stack based on Nageru.

  • Spaces – uncomplicating your network

    For past 5-6 years I’ve been in business of deploying cloud solutions for our customers. Vast majority of that was some form of OpenStack, either a simple cloud or a complicated one. But when you think about it – what is a simple cloud? It’s easy to say that small amount of machines makes an easy, and large amount of machines makes a complicated cloud. But, that is not true. Complexity of a typical IaaS solution is pretty much determined by network complexity. Network, in all shapes and forms, from the underlay network to the customer’s overlay network requirements. I’ll try to explain how we deal with the underlay part in this blog.

  • System76 Gets On The GNOME Advisory Board

    With Linux PC vendor System76 getting more involved in the open-source software game since they began developing their Ubuntu-derived Pop!_OS operating system last year, their latest step forward is joining the GNOME Advisory Board.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E06 – Six Feet Over It - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we review the Dell XPS 13 (9370) Developer Edition laptop, bring you some command line lurve and go over all your feedback.

    It’s Season 11 Episode 06 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Of course it runs NetBSD
  • DRM, DRM, oh how I hate DRM...

    After waiting for a couple of weeks, it arrived in a nonexciting little envelope straight from Hong Kong. If you look closely, you can even appreciate there's a line (just below the smaller barcode) that reads "Lenovo"). I soon found how to open this laptop (kudos to Lenovo for a very sensible and easy opening process, great documentation... So far, it's the "openest" computer I have had!) and installed my new card!

  • Entries for the Catalog of Missing Devices, courtesy of EFF supporters like you

    The Catalog of Missing Devices is a tour through some of the legitimate, useful and missing gadgets, tools and services that don't exist but should. They're technologies whose chance to exist was snuffed out by Section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998, which makes tampering with "Digital Rights Management" into a legal no-go zone, scaring off toolsmiths, entrepreneurs, and tinkerers.

    We're still adding our own designs to the Catalog, but we've also been honored by EFF supporters who've come up with their own additions. One such supporter is Dustin Rodriguez, who sends us these five great ideas for future entries. If you have great ideas for additions, send them to me and maybe you'll see them here on Deeplinks!

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More in Tux Machines

Openwashing: Microsoft, Apple and Symphony Software Foundation

Linux Foundation: Real-Time Linux (RT Linux), LF Deep Learning Foundation, OpenTracing and More

  • Developers: Prepare Your Drivers for Real-Time Linux
    Although Real-Time Linux (RT Linux) has been a staple at Embedded Linux Conferences for years -- here’s a story on the RT presentations in 2007 -- many developers have viewed the technology to be peripheral to their own embedded projects. Yet as RT, enabled via the PREEMPT_RT patch, prepares to be fully integrated into the mainline kernel, a wider circle of developers should pay attention. In particular, Linux device driver authors will need to ensure that their drivers play nice with RT-enabled kernels. At the recent Embedded Linux Conference in Portland, National Instruments software engineer Julia Cartwright, an acting maintainer on a stable release of the RT patch, gave a well-attended presentation called “What Every Driver Developer Should Know about RT.” Cartwright started with an overview of RT, which helps provide guarantees for user task execution for embedded applications that require a high level of determinism. She then described the classes of driver-related problems that can have a detrimental impact to RT, as well as potential resolutions. One of the challenges of any real-time operating system is that most target applications have two types of tasks: those with real-time requirements and latency sensitivity, and those for non-time critical tasks such as disk monitoring, throughput, or I/O. “The two classes of tasks need to run together and maybe communicate with one another with mixed criticality,” explained Cartwright. “You must resolve two different degrees of time sensitivity.” One solution is to split the tasks by using two different hardware platforms. “You could have an Arm Cortex-R, FPGA, or PLD based board for super time-critical stuff, and then a Cortex-A series board with Linux,” said Cartwright. “This offers the best isolation, but it raises the per unit costs, and it’s hard to communicate between the domains.”
  • Clarifying the Linux Real Time Issue
    I recently posted an article about the increasing development and availability of Linux-powered automation devices. This is a clear industry trend that’s unavoidable for anyone following the automation technology industry. Shortly after posting the article, I heard from a reader who wrote: “I read your article and I am surprised that you would promote the idea that anyone would use Linux for anything critical. It isn’t even a real-time control system. It can be used for non-critical applications, but the article implies that industry is adopting it for everything.” This reader brings up a valid point. Linux is not a real-time OS in and of itself. As Vibhoosh Gupta of GE Automation & Controls noted in the original article, GE uses “Type 1 hypervisor technology to run a real-time OS, such as VxWorks, running traditional control loops alongside our PAC Edge technology operating on Linux.” [...] The Linux Foundation launched the RTL (Real Time Linux) Collaborative Project in October 2015. According to the Foundation, the project was “founded by industry experts to advance technologies for the robotics, telecom, manufacturing and medical industries. The aim of the RTL collaborative project is mainlining the PREEMPT_RT patch.” While there are plenty of mission critical applications running Linux OS with real-time extensions—as highlighted by GE, Opto and Wago—the Linux Foundation notes on its site that there remains “much work to be done.”
  • Linux Launches Deep Learning Foundation For Open Source Growth In AI
    The Linux Foundation has launched the LF Deep Learning Foundation, an umbrella organisation which will support and sustain open source innovation in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and deep learning. The organisation will strive to make these critical new technologies available to developers and data scientists everywhere, said a statement published by LF. Founding members of LF Deep Learning include Amdocs, AT&T, B.Yond, Baidu, Huawei, Nokia, Tech Mahindra, Tencent, Univa, and ZTE, among others. LF Deep Learning, members are working to create a neutral space where makers and sustainers of tools and infrastructure can interact and harmonise their efforts and accelerate the broad adoption of deep learning technologies.
  • OpenTracing: Distributed Tracing’s Emerging Industry Standard
    What was traditionally known as just Monitoring has clearly been going through a renaissance over the last few years. The industry as a whole is finally moving away from having Monitoring and Logging silos – something we’ve been doing and “preaching” for years – and the term Observability emerged as the new moniker for everything that encompasses any form of infrastructure and application monitoring. Microservices have been around for a over a decade under one name or another. Now often deployed in separate containers it became obvious we need a way to trace transactions through various microservice layers, from the client all the way down to queues, storage, calls to external services, etc. This created a new interest in Transaction Tracing that, although not new, has now re-emerged as the third pillar of observability.
  • There’s a Server in Every Serverless Platform [Ed: "Serverless" is a lie. It's a server. One that you do not control; one/s that control/s you. Even Swapnil finally or belatedly gets it. The LF really likes buzzwords.]
    Serverless computing or Function as a Service (FaaS) is a new buzzword created by an industry that loves to coin new terms as market dynamics change and technologies evolve. But what exactly does it mean? What is serverless computing?
  • Take the Open Source Job Survey from Dice and The Linux Foundation
    Interest in hiring open source professionals is on the rise, with more companies than ever looking for full-time hires with open source skills and experience. To gather more information about the changing landscape and opportunities for developers, administrators, managers, and other open source professionals, Dice and The Linux Foundation have partnered to produce two open source jobs surveys — designed specifically for hiring managers and industry professionals.
  • Automotive Linux Summit & OS Summit Japan Schedule Announced [Ed: "Brian Redmond, Microsoft" so you basically go to an event about Linux and must listen to a talk from a company which attacks Linux with patent blackmail, bribes etc.]

Security: Updates, GrayKey, Google and Cilium

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Hackers Leaked The Code Of iPhone Cracking Device “GrayKey”, Attempted Extortion
    The mysterious piece of hardware GrayKey might give a sense of happiness to cops because they can get inside most of the iPhone models currently active, including the iPhone X. The $30,000 device is known to crack a 4-digit iPhone passcode in a matter of a few hours, and a six-digit passcode in 3 days, or possibly 11 hours in ideal scenarios. That’s why security experts suggest that iOS users should keep an alphanumeric passcode instead of an all-number passcode.
  • Someone Is Trying to Extort iPhone Crackers GrayShift With Leaked Code
    Law enforcement agencies across the country are buying or have expressed interest in buying GrayKey, a device that can unlock up-to-date iPhones. But Grayshift, the company that makes the device, has attracted some other attention as well. Last week, an unknown party quietly leaked portions of GrayKey code onto the internet, and demanded over $15,000 from Grayshift—ironically, the price of an entry-level GrayKey—in order to stop publishing the material. The code itself does not appear to be particularly sensitive, but Grayshift confirmed to Motherboard the brief data leak that led to the extortion attempt.
  • It's not you, it's Big G: Sneaky spammers slip strangers spoofed spam, swamp Gmail sent files
    Google has confirmed spammers can not only send out spoofed emails that appear to have been sent by Gmail users, but said messages also appear in those users' sent mail folders. The Chocolate Factory on Monday told The Register that someone has indeed created and sent spam with forged email headers. These not only override the send address, so that it appears a legit Gmail user sent the message, but it also mysteriously shows up in that person's sent box as if they had typed it and emitted themselves. In turn, the messages would also appear in their inboxes as sent mail.
  • Cilium 1.0 Advances Container Networking With Improved Security
    For last two decades, the IPtables technology has been the cornerstone of Linux networking implementations, including new container models. On April 24, the open-source Cilium 1.0 release was launched, providing a new alternative to IPtables by using BPF (Berkeley Packet Filter), which improves both networking and security. The Cilium project's GitHub code repository defines the effort as Linux Native, HTTP Aware Network Security for Containers. Cilium development has been driven to date by stealth startup Covalent, which is led by CEO Dan Wendlandt, who well-known in the networking community for his work at VMware on software-defined networking, and CTO Thomas Graf, who is a core Linux kernel networking developer.

Applications: KStars, Kurly, Pamac, QEMU

  • KStars 2.9.5 is out!
    Autofocus module users would be happy to learn that the HFR value is now responsive to changing seeing conditions. Previously, the first successful autofocus operation would set the HFR Threshold value of which subsequent measurements are compared against during the in-sequence-focusing step.
  • Kurly – An Alternative to Most Widely Used Curl Program
    Kurly is a free open source, simple but effective, cross-platform alternative to the popular curl command-line tool. It is written in Go programming language and works in the same way as curl but only aims to offer common usage options and procedures, with emphasis on the HTTP(S) operations. In this tutorial we will learn how to install and use kurly program – an alternative to most widely used curl command in Linux.
  • Pamac – Easily Install and Manage Software on Arch Linux
    Arch Linux is one of the most popular Linux distribution available despite its apparent technicality. Its default package manager pacman is powerful but as time always tells, it is a lot easier to get certain things done using a mouse because GUI apps barely require any typing nor do they require you to remember any commands; and this is where Pamac comes in. Pamac is a Gtk3 frontend for libalpm and it is the GUI tool that Arch Linux users turn to the most when they aren’t in the mood to manage their software packages via the terminal; and who can blame them? It was specifically created to be used with Pacman.
  • QEMU 2.12 Released With RISC-V, Spectre/Meltdown & Intel vGPU Action
    QEMU 2.12 is now officially available as the latest stable feature update to this important component to the open-source Linux virtualization stack.