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today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux systems: Scraping up information about apt updates
  • Kiwi TCMS is going to FOSDEM 2019

    We are turning 10 years old and we have presents for you!

  • MDN Changelog – Looking back at 2018

    December is when Mozilla meets as a company for our biannual All-Hands, and we reflect on the past year and plan for the future. Here are some of the highlights of 2018.

    The browser-compat-data (BCD) project required a sustained effort to convert MDN’s documentation to structured data. The conversion was 39% complete at the start of 2018, and ended the year at 98% complete. Florian Scholz coordinated a large community of staff and volunteers, breaking up the work into human-sized chunks that could be done in parallel. The community converted, verified, and refreshed the data, and converted thousands of MDN pages to use the new data sources. Volunteers also built tools and integrations on top of the data.

    The interactive-examples project had a great year as well. Will Bamberg coordinated the work, including some all-staff efforts to write new examples. Schalk Neethling improved the platform as it grew to handle CSS, JavaScript, and HTML examples.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Scylla

    With data having an impact on almost every part of today’s business, Scylla wants to make sure applications are powered by a database that can handle the influx of data without compromising performance.

    Scylla is a NoSQL database that provides low latency, always-on availability, high throughput, is scalable, easy to use, and community-backed.

    “Scylla is an open source NoSQL database that offers the horizontal scale-out and fault-tolerance of Apache Cassandra, but delivers 10X the throughput and consistent, low single-digit latencies. Implemented from scratch in C++, Scylla’s close-to-the-hardware design significantly reduces the number of database nodes you require and self-optimizes to dynamic workloads and various hardware combinations,” Peter Corless, technical marketing manager for Scylla, wrote in a post.

  • NomadBSD 1.2-RC1 released!

    The first release candidate of NomadBSD-1.2 is available! If you notice any problems, please let us know.

  • Winds of change? Winds of mediocrity.

    You'd think the world of open-source would escape this cheap reduction of human intellect. But no. The world's saddest violin is playing mightily loudly in the halls of Tux, too. Linux distributions are, by far and large, less stable, less ergonomic and less capable than they were five or six years ago. Lots of activity, few results.

    And when you do get results, they are made by devs for devs, object-oriented software solutions that intrude into the user space and complicate things without any benefits. Systemd is a good example. Wayland is another. Network tools yet another. Then, we also have the flattification of UI elements, the same kind of stuff that Google's been doing. And everyone is doing it, because hey, if Google does it, then if they imitate Google, they will be like Google, right. None of these things help, but we can tolerate them because they don't really make any difference in the overall story of human survival.

    [...]

    Don't embrace the change. Evaluate the change. Judge it. Be strict. Because we've come too far as a race to allow stupidity to become the driving factor. That's an insult to the billions of humans who have died to mosquitoes and common flu and famine so that we could reach an evolutionary point where people accept low-quality, low-efficiency nonsense into their lives, and then sermonize about that with the obtuse optimism of religiously passionate fanboys.

    But there's a happy side to this story, too. Not that long ago, I wouldn't contemplate rejecting the "modern" technology that much or that often. There was almost a thought of discomfort at such a move. But now? It does not seem so bad. Having gone through a few cycles of big tech changes, I don't see anything special or revolutionary in the Peckham water that companies are dishing out to the masses. It's an almost liberating thought, sprinkled with illumination, epiphany and other long words. Perhaps I should thank the agile crowds for this unintentional contribution of disdain and apathy. Good stuff, I'd say. Be if you're still out there, wondering if you can change the world, start by small things. Say no to stupid things. Don't embrace the change, embrace critical thinking.

  • mintCast 300.3 interview 3 SiKing

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • MuseScore 3.0.1 Released with Redesigned New Score Wizard

    Free Scorewriter MuseScore released version 3.0.1 yesterday with some improvements and numerous bug-fixes.

    MuseScore 3.0.1 redesigned New Score Wizard for easy searching templates, better score previews, and accessibility improvements for blind users. The new release also features better import of 2.X scores, better automatic placement of hairpins and dynamics, and reworked Mixer UI.

  • MuseScore 3.0.1 Release

    Today we are pleased to release MuseScore 3.0.1. This is the first in what we intend to be a regular series of updates to MuseScore 3, the ground-breaking version of the world’s most popular music notation software.

  • Microsoft Updates Skype for Windows and Linux with Blurred Background Feature
  • Fedora 29-20190115 updated Live isos released
  • What Are Various Debian Installation Discs

    Ever got confused by the amount of disc made available for downloading on Debian servers? Worry not, if this is your approach looking around the Internet for an explanation why and what are those various discs for installing Debian on your beloved computer, you are at the right place. I'll try to be quick and concise so you can get on with Debian installation within 2 minutes read Smile

  • Arm Posts Initial Ares CPU Tuning Support For GCC, Helps SPEC Performance By ~1%

    Arm continues plumbing the open-source GNU compiler toolchain support for their next-generation "Ares" high-performance server/HPC core. 

    Back in November they presented the initial Ares compiler patches for GCC. Those patches presented Ares as an ARMv8-based design that has statistical profiling, dot product, and FP16 extensions by default. We've also seen other Ares toolchain patches by Arm developers like the recent GNU Assembler support.

  • ANAVI Thermometer open source temp and humidity sensor board

    Anavi Technology has this month launched a new product via the Crowd Supply in the form of the ANAVI Thermometer, an ESP8266-powered, open source, wireless dev board equipped with temperature and humidity sensors. The Anavi Thermometer Development board is fully compatible with the Arduino IDE, PlatformIO, and Home Assistant via the MQTT messaging protocol. Watch the demonstration video below to learn more about the open source dev board and its features.

    The development team behind the ANAVI Thermometer explain more about its hardware and specifications:

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Archman 2019.01 Openbox Run Through

    In this video, we look at Archman 2019.01 Openbox.

  • And the Race is On! 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections Enter Campaign Phase

    Marina is a very active Italian openSUSE Advocate, involved in the Project since 2009, deeply involved in LibreOffice.  She relocated to Munich last June, where she is working for CIB mainly on its LibreOffice team as Senior Migrations & Deployments Engineer.  You may read more about Marina on her Wiki User page.

    Marina joins an already impressive line-up of Quality Candidates who announced they were stepping up during the past week, adding to what will be very tough decisions for the Voters in the upcoming Elections.  Official openSUSE Members in Good Standing are qualified to vote in the Elections, and they will have to make difficult choices for who should take the three open Board Seats, choosing between Marina, incumbent Christian Boltz aka cboltz, Dr. Axel Braun aka DocB, incumbent Sarah Julia Kriesch aka AdaLovelace, Sébastien Poher aka sogal, Vinzenz Vietzke aka vinzv, and Nathan Wolf aka futureboy and CubicleNate on IRC.

    Sarah and Sébastien’s run for the Board was announced in last Wednesday’s openSUSE News, while the Candidacies of Christian, Dr. Braun, Vinzenz, and  Nathan were announced in the next day’s news article.

  • Entry-level Bay Trail SBC ready for workhorse duty

    Acrosser’s 3.5-inch “AMB-BT19S1” SBC runs on an Intel Bay Trail SoC and offers up to 8GB RAM, dual display support, plus SATA, mSATA, mini-PCIe, serial, USB 3.0, and GbE ports.

    With newer Atom processor families such as Cherry Trail, Braswell, Apollo Lake, and now Gemini Lake, the popular, five-year old Bay Trail product line appears to be close to “legacy” status. Yet, aside from graphics capabilities and support for the latest memories and peripherals, there’s not that much separating Bay Trail from Gemini Lake in terms of CPU performance and power consumption. Depending on the price, an “entry level” Bay Trail SBC like Acrosser’s 3.5-inch AMB-BT19S1 board could be the smart move for some applications.

today's howtos and leftovers

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Misc
HowTos
  • How to Setup DRBD to Replicate Storage on Two CentOS 7 Servers
  • How to Install WebStorm on Debian 9
  • How to install FFmpeg on CentOS 7
  • Facebook AccountKit with Qt/C++ on Android

    Facebook’s AccountKit is an authentication service that can use your email or phone number to login to your services, it doesn’t require that the user has a Facebook account, just a valid email or phone.

    The cool thing about it is that it sends SMS for free, and although sending SMSs is cheap being free of charge is something you might want to look when creating a new App, in fact here in Brazil some big Apps do make use of it.

    So long story short story I wanted to add this to my Qt Android App.

  • NeuroFedora updated: 2019 week 2

    We had our first meeting of the year. The full logs from our meeting are available here on the Fedora mote application. I have pasted the minutes of the meeting at the end for your convenience.

    The meeting was broadly for the team to come together and discuss a few things. We checked on the status of current tasks, and discussed our future steps. We've got to work on our documentation, for example. There's a lot to do, and a lot of cool new things to learn---in science, computing, and community development. If you'd like to get involved, please get in touch.

  • Alibaba Snaps Up data Artisans for €90 million: Open Sources “Blink”

    Streaming analytics market projected to reach $47 billion by 2025

    Alibaba has bought Berlin-based startup Data Artisans for a reported €90 million (£80 million) in a deal that will see the $39 billion (by 2017-2018 revenues) Chinese juggernaut take its in-house Apache Flink code developments open source.

    Data Artisans was founded in 2014 by the creators of data stream processing engine Flink. It won Intel Capital funding for its Series A round in 2016 and appears to have also had Alibaba backing in an unreported Series B.

  • LCZero Chess Engine Performance With OpenCL vs. CUDA + cuDNN vs. FP16 With Tensor Cores

    A Phoronix reader pointed out LCZero (Leela Chess Zero) a few days ago as an interesting chess engine powered by neural networks and supports BLAS, OpenCL, and NVIDIA CUDA+cuDNN back-ends. Particularly with the FP16 cuDNN support, this chess engine can be super fast on NVIDIA's latest Turing GPUs with tensor cores. 

    With LCZero's build process being sane for its different back-ends and the program turning out to be benchmark-friendly and meeting my requirements, it's now available via the Phoronix Test Suite with a simple phoronix-test-suite benchmark lczero (granted, the back-end support may obviously vary depending upon your hardware/driver support) and more details over on OpenBenchmarking.org.

  • NASA Publishes Proposal for Air Traffic Management Blockchain Based on HyperLedger

    The United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has proposed an air traffic management blockchain, according to a paper published on the agency’s official website on Jan. 10.

today's leftovers

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  • Smith and Winston Enters Early Access for Linux and Windows

    The rise of Geometry Wars 15 years ago on the original Xbox led to a slew of imitators across all platforms. However, the biggest thing it did was revive the long-dead twin-stick shooter genre. Small attempts had been made to revive it in the form of a new Robotron game in the late '90s, but nothing stuff until Bizarre Creations' fun little side game brought the shooting sub-genre back into the limelight again. Later full-fledged entries saw it gain even more popularity, and since then, it's had a bit of a downward turn once again. Enter Smith and Winston - beyond its gun brand-inspired name, you have a game that blends retro with modern in a unique way.

  • FPgM report: 2019-02
  • Investment in open source software is soaking up investment by IT firms

    Traditional IT providers have seen the light and are shifting their focus to new technologies supporting open source software development.

    In recent months, the HPE’s, Cisco’s and VMware’s of the industry are offering their core customers cloud services previously dominated by the big three providers: Amazon, Microsoft and Google.

    The latest buzzword is DevOps, and it refers to a merging of the responsibilities between data centre operations teams and developers.

  • Get your tickets while they’re hot!

    For the fourth year running, foss-north is taking place. Now bigger than ever.

    It all started as a one day conference in a room with too much people in it. We gathered ten speakers and started something that continues to this day.

  • Etch a Sketch lives on in browser-based Chrome Labs project

    Everyone who remembers the Etch A Sketch slabs of yesteryear remembers how difficult it was to translate your vision onto its "magic screen," and how proud you felt upon success. Now, Google's Chrome Labs has translated that experience (quite literally) for the digital age with the fun Web A Skeb project. It's a browser-contained version of an Etch A Sketch that you can use to draw and doodle—if you can get the hang of its dials.

    [...]

    Google's Chrome Labs lets developers make weird, fun, and interesting projects to show the power that a simple Web browser has. Those involved have produced things like the open source image compression tool Squoosh, the Web actor library Clooney, and Project VisBug, a Chrome extension that lets users edit webpages using design tool interactions and hotkeys.

    Web A Skeb is available not only in Chrome but in other desktop and mobile browsers as well. It's actually a bit easier to draw on mobile, since you can use both of your thumbs to turn the dials at the same time. Those interested can check out the source code on GitHub.

  • AWS, MongoDB database collision stirs open source tensions

    AWS' introduction of the DocumentDB managed database service sparks competition with the backers of the popular MongoDB database, as well as debate over the nature of open source licensing.

    DocumentDB is a fully managed document database service that is compatible with MongoDB workloads. Rather than build on MongoDB's core code base, it implements an API that supports workloads from MongoDB 3.6 and earlier. This effectively emulates the responses that a MongoDB client expects from a MongoDB server, and customers can use their existing MongoDB drivers and tools, AWS said.

    MongoDB is the fifth-most popular database today, according to ranking site DB-Engines.com. Its parent company provides commercial support for the service, which went public in October 2017 and is now valued at more than $4 billion.

  • Ockam Open Sources its IoT SDK
  • Global Industry Leaders to Showcase Real-World Digital Transformations at 2019 Alfresco Day San Francisco
  • Wikipedia is using Google Translate to make its articles available in more languages

    Wikipedia’s goal is to make the world’s knowledge accessible to everyone on the planet, but it would be the first to admit that its efforts are skewed somewhat toward those who read English. To help fix this, the Wikimedia Foundation (which runs Wikipedia) announced today that it’s partnering with Google to take advantage of the company’s AI translation skills.

  • Wavestore releases feature-loaded v6.14 Linux-based Video Management Software

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • AT&T's Conversion to Virtualization, Software Control On Track

    ONAP resulted from The Linux Foundation combining two of its open source projects into one for automating virtual network functions in software-defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) implementations.

  • Texas Linux Fest 2019 in Dallas

    A few years ago I started to suggest to TXLF staff that coming to Dallas was a good idea. I wanted there to be more tech conferences in Dallas, and I love the community organized nature of TXLF and similarly SCALE. Plus, it was Texas Linux Fest, it can't always be in Austin! This year I was able to convince them to take the risk and try a year in Dallas. It is a huge risk, as it is likely that many sponsors and regular attendees might not be interested in traveling up I-35 to attend. Being in Dallas also opens up huge opportunity to reach new audiences and new sponsors. Now to prove that.

  • Linux Fu: The Kitchen Sync

    One of the great things about Linux and similar operating systems is they are configurable. If you don’t like something, there’s a great chance you can change it easily with a few entries in a file somewhere. For example, take bash — a very popular shell by any measure. If you want a different style of command line editing, there’s an option. You want the tab key to match files regardless of case? Another option. Usually, these are set in one of your so-called profile files like .bashrc in your home directory.

    As long as you are sitting in front of your single computer working, this is great. You customize your .bashrc and other files to your heart’s content and then you work in an environment that acts the way you want it to. The problem is when you have a lot of computers. Maybe you have a web server, a desktop, a firewall machine, and a few dozen Raspberry Pi computers. How do you keep all the configurations the same? Then once they are the same, how do you keep them up to date?

  • How to set up Icinga2 agent monitoring
  • ext3grep – Recover Deleted Files on Debian and Ubuntu

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Kiwi TCMS: Project mission and goals for 2019

    Hello testers, Kiwi TCMS has taken on a brave new mission! We would like to transform the testing process by making it more organized, transparent & accountable for everyone on your team. Our goal is to improve engineering productivity and participation in testing. The following blog post outlines how we would like to achieve this and what goals we put before ourselves for this year.

  • Lightworks Video Editor Plans For A Busy 2019 But No Signs Of The Open-Source Version

    EditShare, which continues developing the professional-grade Lightworks video editor, does continue maintaining their Linux support and this year they are planning for more improvements. But not shared as part of their 2019 plans is any word on making good about the "open-source" version of the software they originally announced back in 2010. 

  • How to download & install Cloudready Chromium OS on VirtualMachine
  • Gentoo News: FOSDEM 2019

    It’s FOSDEM time again! Join us at Université libre de Bruxelles, Campus du Solbosch, in Brussels, Belgium. This year’s FOSDEM 2019 will be held on February 2nd and 3rd.

  • Markus Koschany: My Free Software Activities in December 2018

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • Google Chrome’s Ad Blocker Ready For A Global Launch Starting July 9th

    The in-house Google Chrome ad-blocker, which was initially launched for United States, Canada, and Europe last year, is ready to roll out worldwide on July 9th, Google said in a blog post.

    Google has been following the Better Ads Standards from the Coalition for Better ads for more than a year. This group’s sole purpose is to improve the user experience while surfing the web.

  • AWS gives open source the middle finger

    AWS launched DocumentDB today, a new database offering that is compatible with the MongoDB API. The company describes DocumentDB as a “fast, scalable, and highly available document database that is designed to be compatible with your existing MongoDB  applications and tools.” In effect, it’s a hosted drop-in replacement for MongoDB that doesn’t use any MongoDB code.

    AWS argues that while MongoDB is great at what it does, its customers have found it hard to build fast and highly available applications on the open-source platform that can scale to multiple terabytes and hundreds of thousands of reads and writes per second. So what the company did was build its own document database, but made it compatible with the Apache 2.0 open source MongoDB 3.6 API.

  • Red Hat’s David Egts Pushes Open Source Software for Cost-Efficient Gov’t IT Training

    David Egts, chief technologist for the North American public sector business at Red Hat (NYSE: RHT), has identified open source training as an approach that the federal government can take to advance the cybersecurity and information technology skills of its workforce, ExecutiveBiz reported Thursday.

    “[The] open source community has put effective training on a number of topics, including cloud migration and deployment and cybersecurity, well within the reach of every agency and IT administrator,” Egts wrote in a Nextgov guest piece published Wednesday.

  • Quartz AI Studio launches an open-source platform to help journalists use machine learning

    Imagine you had a personal assistant that you can task with sorting out a pile of messy documents, or ploughing through a mountain of spreadsheets to find what you are looking for.

    Enter the Quartz AI Studio, a US-based project that helps journalists use machine learning to write better stories.

    The initiative, launched in November 2018 with the support of Knight Foundation, is spearheaded by John Keefe, Quartz’s technical architect for bots and machine learning, who previously led the Quartz Bot Studio.

  • Open-source microscope targets brain imaging and disease diagnosis

    A team of researchers at Tel Aviv University in Israel has developed a new multiphoton microscopy tool, known as Pysight, for rapid 2D and 3D imaging of the brain and other tissues.

    Among other things, the team hopes that the tool could soon boost scientists' efforts to attain a deeper understand of brain dynamics, assisting in the discovery of groundbreaking treatments for a range of health problems including stroke, epilepsy and dementia.

    Pablo Blinder, who heads up the team at the Neurobiology, Biochemistry and Biophysics School and Sagol School for Neuroscience at Tel Aviv University, explains that PySight combines commercially available, off-the-shelf hardware with open-source software tailored for photon-depleted imaging conditions, such as those characteristic of rapid multiphoton microscopy.

    “[PySight’s] commercial hardware converts the noisy output of each photodetector into uniform photon detection events, and registers their absolute arrival time with a temporal precision of 100 picoseconds,” he says.

    “Its software package then reads the resulting list of photon arrival times, determines the respective origin within the brain of each detected photon, and generates volumetric movies over time.”

    In a recent paper published in the journal Optica, Blinder and his co-authors demonstrate the benefits of using PySight for tracking neuronal activity in awake mice and fruit flies. While initially developed with neuroimaging purposes in mind, Blinder reveals that the tool could just as easily be used for a range of other imaging applications - including detection of malignant cells in human patients during surgical procedures.

today's leftovers

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  • Episode 49 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, there’s a brand new release of the Linux Kernel with 4.20. The EU is offering Bug Bounties for Open Source software and MIPS has announced it’s going to become Open Source. We’ll have a follow up to the Necuno Mobile topic from Episode 45 and then we’ll take a look at some Distro News for Septor Linux, OviOS and One Laptop Per Child. Then we’ll cover some App News from Syncthing, Mixxx, Darktable, RawTherapee, KStars, and much more. Later in the show, we’ll talk about some Linux Gaming news. All that and much more!

  • Gergely Nagy: One hat less

    At the time, I was... a different person. I was full of myself at times, I was angry, perhaps a tad too elitist at times too. I'm not proud of old me, but it's part of me. I grew, and became a better person, there's no shame in being able to grow - quite the contrary. And Debian helped immensely. I've had role models in the project, who I look up to even to this day, who helped shape me one way or the other.

    There are two people I need to mention specifically: Martin Michlmayr and Rhonda D'Vine.

    Martin was my Application Manager when I applied, I considered him a mentor, a friend. The example he set were instrumental in shaping me too. Rhonda helped me get to my first ever conference: I got on a train to Vienna, and she took me to LinuxTag in her car from there, and then back again. That first LinuxTag, the path that led there, the conference itself, was formative, and both Martin and Rhonda had a big part in it being so. Thank you again - so many years later, I still smile when I think back. Those years we were in touch, meant a lot to me.

  • resvg: worth having in Debian?

    ...MPL 2.0-licensed SVG rendering and optimisation library and a tool, written in Rust.

  • Speeding up Open vSwitch with partial hardware offloading

    Open vSwitch (OVS) can use the kernel datapath or the userspace datapath. There are interesting developments in the kernel datapath using hardware offloading through the TC Flower packet classifier, but in this article, the focus will be on the userspace datapath accelerated with the Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) and its new feature—partial flow hardware offloading—to accelerate the virtual switch even more.

    This article explains how the virtual switch worked before versus now and why the new feature can potentially save resources while improving the packet processing rate.

    Open vSwitch (OVS) can use the kernel datapath or the userspace datapath. There are interesting developments in the kernel datapath using hardware offloading through the TC Flower packet classifier, but in this article, the focus will be on the userspace datapath accelerated with the Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) and its new feature—partial flow hardware offloading—to accelerate the virtual switch even more.

    This article explains how the virtual switch worked before versus now and why the new feature can potentially save resources while improving the packet processing rate.

  • Alibaba invests in open source tech with data Artisans

    Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba Group has acquired German startup data Artisans (dA) to build an initiative around Big Data open source technologies.

    The move is also aimed at developing stream processing, batch processing and machine learning for developers to leverage in areas like artificial intelligence, Internet of Things and other real-time processing applications.

    As per local media reports, the deal has been valued at EUR 90 million. While both firms issued official statements, the details of the deal were not disclosed.

  • Next C++ workshop: 10 January 2019 at 19:00 UTC

    Yes, we’re running another C++ workshop, where you can watch a video about a specific feature of the language, then join our community of developers for a live discussion!

  • The Open Source LMS in 2019 – A Moodle Wishlist & Trends to Watch: A Look At The World
  • UK is testing self-driving Mars rovers

    Despite the fact that landing on Mars is hard, robotic rovers and landers have now become a regular feature of Mars exploration. These advanced exploratory machines are sending back unprecedented information about this fascinating red world. One limitation, however, has been that rovers and landers are still, for the most part, controlled by human operators back on Earth. On January 2, 2019, the U.K. government announced the testing of new software that’ll help make future rovers more autonomous – “smarter” and more capable of making their own decisions, such as deciding where to go and how to get there – i.e. self-driving.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Thursday - Jan 4, 2019 - New Year Edition
  • One Week at a Time | Coder Radio 339

    Mike’s just had the talk, and now it’s time to make some changes. Including admitting he was wrong about Swift.

    Plus we read some feedback, answer some questions, and destroy another computer.

  • How To Understand And Identify File types in Linux
  • How to add data into MySQL tables from the command line
  • Integration of sandboxed Qt applications

    We have been using various tweaks to make sandboxed Qt apps well integrated into the system. For KDE Plasma integration, we have been allowing access to kdeglobals config file, where we store the most common configuration, like used icon theme, widget style, etc. A similar approach has been used by Gnome, where they need to allow access to DConf, otherwise applications will not be able to read default system configuration. These tweaks have been usually set in the runtimes and applications using these runtimes automatically inherited all the needed permissions during the build. This has some weak spots, because changing permissions in the runtime requires all applications to be rebuild to pick up the changes, or applications not using the runtimes at all had to allow all the access themself and really not everyone knows what everything needs to be enabled.

  • Fedora Firefox heads to updates with PGO/LTO.

    I’ve had lots of fun with GCC performance tuning at Fedora but without much results. When Mozilla switched its official builds to clang I considered that too due to difficulties with GCC PGO/LTO setup and inferior Fedora Firefox builds speed compared to Mozilla official builds.

    That movement woke up GCC fans to parry that threat. Lots of arguments were brought to that ticket about clang insecurity and missing features. More importantly upstream developer Honza Hubicka found and fixed profile data generation bug (beside the others) and Jakub Jelinek worked out a GCC bug which caused Firefox crash at startup.

  • Will the world embrace Plan S, the radical proposal to mandate open access to science papers?
  • Apple’s Biggest Problem? My Mom

    But the most consequential hit to Apple’s bottom line may be from people who are holding on to their phones for longer. Back in 2015, iPhones were being replaced after roughly two years, on average, according to BayStreet Research, a firm that tracks smartphone sales. That period has jumped to roughly three years, and is expected to grow even more.

  • Aquantia Announces Multi-Gig Ethernet Controllers, Coming Soon To ASUS Boards

    Separately, Intel has been prepping their own 2.5G Ethernet controllers and as of Linux 4.20 is already the "IGC" Intel 2.5G Ethernet driver.

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Android Leftovers

Parrot 4.5 Ethical Hacking OS Released with Metasploit 5.0, Drops 32-Bit Support

Parrot 4.5 is now available, powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.19 kernel series, preparing the project for the upcoming Parrot 5.0 LTS release. For future releases, Parrot Security plans to a support two kernels, stable kernel and a testing kernel. Parrot 4.5 also comes with the latest Metasploit 5.0 penetration testing framework, which introduces major features like new evasion modules, a new search engine, a json-rpc daemon, integrated web services, and support for writting shellcode in C. Read more Also: Parrot 4.5 release notes

GPU acceleration for Linux apps on Chrome OS enabled

It’s happening, and it’s happening early. GPU acceleration for Linux apps on Chrome OS has arrived. According to a recent report, Chromebooks with ‘Eve’ and ‘Nami’ baseboard should now, or very soon, be able to try GPU hardware acceleration. GPU acceleration allows applications to fully leverage the GPU of a device to better run graphic-intensive tasks, like gaming. The feature will make for a much smoother Linux apps experience for Chromebook users. Read more

Out-Of-The-Box 10GbE Network Benchmarks On Nine Linux Distributions Plus FreeBSD 12

Last week I started running some fresh 10GbE Linux networking performance benchmarks across a few different Linux distributions. That testing has now been extended to cover nine Linux distributions plus FreeBSD 12.0 to compare the out-of-the-box networking performance. Tested this round alongside FreeBSD 12.0 was Antergos 19.1, CentOS 7, Clear Linux, Debian 9.6, Fedora Server 29, openSUSE Leap 15.0, openSUSE Tumbleweed, Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS, and Ubuntu 18.10. All of the tests were done with a Tyan S7106 1U server featuring two Intel Xeon Gold 6138 CPUs, 96GB of DDR4 system memory, and Samsung 970 EVO SSD. For the 10GbE connectivity on this server was an add-in HP NC523SFP PCIe adapter providing two 10Gb SPF+ ports using a QLogic 8214 controller. Read more