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Misc

Leftovers: Audiocasts, Linux Graphics, and OnePlus Breach (JS)

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today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Amazing Facts about Linux Operating System You Probably Don't Know [Ed: This gets some facts wrong, right from the very first sentence]

    It was almost 20 years ago when the first version of Linux came into the market and since then, this operating system has made its important stature beside Microsoft Windows. Linux has turned out to be one of the most acknowledged and extensively used operating system. Enthused by UNIX, Linux has smartly managed to attract a lot of tech giants such as Facebook, Google, Yahoo, Twitter, Amazon, and much more. However, when it comes to assessing the exact rate of adoption of Linux in the market, the task is a bit tough since the sources to get copies are wide in number. Appreciating workers' and developers' hard-work, Linux has been designed in such a way that exploring and learning things on this operating system has become quite captivating and enthralling.

    In this post, let's know more about amazing features and facts of this operating system.

  • MenuLibre 2.1.4 Released For Menu Editing On GNOME/LXDE/Xfce/Unity

    MenuLibre is an advanced menu editor that supports not just one desktop environment but GNOME, LXDE, Xfce, Cinnamon, and Unity Linux systems.

    Today's MenuLibre 2.1.4 for advanced menu editing of Linux desktop systems has a new "test launcher" option, new sorting abilities for menus, new layout preferences for desktops supporting client-side decorations, improved file handling, and many bug fixes.

  • EU Makes EUR 1B Bid to Boost Supercomputer Efforts

    The market for High-Performance Computing (HPC) has increasingly been dominated in recent years by China. Now the European Union (EU) is aiming to get back into the hunt with a new initiative called the EuroHPC Joint Undertaking.

    The goal of the EuroHPC effort is to acquire, build and deploy a world-class High-Performance Computing (HPC) infrastructure. The effort will also involve the development of application software that will run on the HPC infrastructure.

    The EU will contribute EUR 486 million, which will be matched by Member States and associated countries. According to the EU, approximately EUR 1 billion in total will be invested in the effort by 2020.

  • EasyLinux Show 18.2 | Meltdown, Spectre and Linux Mint
  • Videos on Samba shares

    A longstanding complaint about KDE Plasma is that it’s a pain in the butt to stream videos that are located on Samba shares. It’s a usability issue for sure. I’d like to talk a bit about the origins of the problem and how I helped drive a solution.

  • 3 Growth Stocks to Buy and Hold for 25 Years
  • Swing Trading Earnings Bullish Momentum With Options in Red Hat Inc
  • 10 Best Android Cleaner Apps For 2018

today's leftovers

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  • Freedreno Gallium3D Lands A5xx Texture Tiling For Better Performance

    Freedreno lead developer Rob Clark has landed initial support for texture tiling with Qualcomm Adreno A5xx graphics hardware.

  • Nintendo Switch 'Yuzu' Emulator Announced for PC, Mac, Linux

    A new emulator that aims to open up the doors to Nintendo Switch-exclusive games has just been announced for computers. Named Yuzu, the emulator was created by the same team that designed Citra, a similar 3DS emulator. Yuzu's official website calls it an "experimental" open-source emulator, and has builds ready and maintained for PC, Mac, and Linux. The project is "in its infancy" for now, but has some pretty big goals on the horizon.

  • I pushed an implementation of myself to GitHub

    Roughly 4 years ago, I mentioned that there appears to be an esotieric programming language which shares my full name.

    I know, it is really late, but two days ago, I discovered Racket. As a Lisp person, I immediately felt at home. And realizing how the language dispatch mechanism works, I couldn't resist and write a Racket implementation of MarioLANG. A nice play on words and a good toy project to get my feet wet.

  • digest 0.6.14

    Another small maintenance release, version 0.6.14, of the digest package arrived on CRAN and in Debian today.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • GTK's Vulkan Renderer Will Now Let You Pick The GPU For Rendering

    One of the features exciting us the most about GTK4 is the Vulkan renderer that will make its premiere. This Vulkan renderer continues getting worked into shape for GTK+ 4.0.

    The most recent addition to this Vulkan renderer is a means to allow specifying a device (GPU) to use for rendering, in the event of having multiple Vulkan graphics processors on the same system.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Now Patched Against Meltdown/Spectre, Adopts LibreOffice 6.0

    openSUSE Project reports today through Douglas DeMaio that the openSUSE Tumbleweed software repositories have been flooded this week by four new snapshots that brought updated components and other improvements.

    According to the developer, much of the efforts of the openSUSE Tumbleweed's maintainers were focused this week on patching the recently unearthed Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities that put billions of devices at risk of attacks by allowing unprivileged attackers to steal your sensitive data from memory.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, December 2017
  • Debian/TeX Live 2017.20180110-1 – the big rework

    In short succession a new release of TeX Live for Debian – what could that bring? While there are not a lot of new and updated packages, there is a lot of restructuring of the packages in Debian, mostly trying to placate the voices that the TeX Live packages are getting bigger and bigger and bigger (which is true). In this release we have introduce two measures to allow for smaller installations: optional font package dependencies and downgrade of the -doc packages to suggests.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Look Munich, City of Barcelona Is Dumping Windows and Switches to Ubuntu Linux

    While the City of Munich is switching back to Windows after running Linux on their public PCs, a move that will cost them over €100 million euros, the City of Barcelona is making the smart choice of dumping Microsoft's products and switch to Linux and Open Source.

    First spotted by It's FOSS, this fantastic news was reported by Spanish newspaper El País, stating that the City of Barcelona is currently in talks of migrating all of their public computer systems to Open Source software products like LibreOffice and Open-Xchange, replacing Microsoft's expensive products.

  • Clipboard Anywhere – A Multi-Platform Lightweight Clipboard App

    Clipboard Anywhere is a free, lightweight, and cloud-enabled clipboard application with which you can copy to and paste from its clipboard universally synced across all connected devices.

    It is important to remember that Clipboard Anywhere is NOT a clipboard manager app but simply a clipboard app via which you can have texts and images that you copy on your desktop available on your mobile devices and vice versa.

  • Storaji – A Free, Modern Lightweight Inventory Management System

    Storaji is a free, Electron-powered, open-source and lightweight Inventory Management System. Its development is aimed at Middle-Low Companies who might not be able to afford the license for similar applications to manage their stock.

  • How to Install Snipe-IT Asset Management Software on Debian 9
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  • Introducing a Full Self-hosted Audio/video and Chat Communication Platform: Nextcloud Talk

    We’re very proud to announce today Nextcloud Talk, the first enterprise-ready, self-hosted communication technology giving users the highest degree of control over their data and communication. Nextcloud Talk is a fully open source video meeting software, on-premise hosted and end-to-end encrypted. It features a text chat and is available for web and mobile. In related news, Nextcloud has become the vendor with the greatest momentum in the self-hosted Enterprise File Sync and Share market and increased its customer base by 7 times in 2017. And over 500 individuals contributed more than 6.6 million lines of code to Nextcloud last year!

  • Nextcloud Talk is an Open Source Alternative to Google Hangouts

    Nextcloud has launched a self-hosted open source alternative to Google Hangouts, Skype, and similar chat services.

    Called ‘Nextcloud Talk’, the feature brings audio, video and messaging features based on WebRTC to the personal cloud server software, which was forked from OwnCloud back in 2016.

  • Nextcloud Rolls Out Audio/Video/Chat Support

    The Nextcloud cloud hosting software forked from ownCloud now has audio/video/chat abilities.

  • Krita Digital Painting Program Hits The 4.0 Beta Milestone

    The KDE/Qt-aligned Krita digital painting program has released its first beta release of the major 4.0 update that also marks its string freeze. Now marks the period of bug fixing before shipping Krita 4.0 within a few months.

  • Fedora 28 Looking To Replace Glibc's libcrypt With libxcrypt

    As upstream Glibc is working on deprecating libcrypt for its eventual removal from the codebase, Fedora developers are looking at using libxcrypt for their hashing/encoding crypto library.

    Some Fedora / Red Hat developers have been working on libxcrypt as the distribution's potential replacement to libcrypt. Libxcrypt is inspired in part by Openwall Linux, supports most all password hashing algorithms, offers a faster development cycle, and makes adding new hashing algorithms easy.

  • Sleep Fast, Sleep Hard with the Pzizz Android App
  • Five Ways to Free Up Space on Your Android Device
  • New Python3, LibreOffice, Google RE2 Packages Released in Tumbleweed

    Several openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots arrive before and after the new year and this post will focus on the most recent snapshots released this week.

    Much of the efforts of developers this week have focused on patching the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities. openSUSE’s rolling distribution produced four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots so far this week.

    While the Long-Term Support 4.4 Linux Kernel has patched many of the vulnerabilities associated with Meltdown and Spectre, the 4.14.12 Linux Kernel released in snapshot 20180107  hasn’t, but Tumbleweed users will likely see the vulnerabilities patched soon.

  • openSUSE Conference Registration, Call For Papers Opens Today

    openSUSE is pleased to announce that registration and the call for papers for the openSUSE Conference 2018 (oSC18), which takes place in Prague, Czech Republic, are open.

    The dates for this year’s conference will be May 25 through May 27 at Faculty of Information Technologies of Czech Technical University in Prague. Submission for the call for papers will be open until April 20. There are 99 day from today to submit a proposal, but don’t wait until the late minute. Registration will be open from today until the day oSC18 begins; make sure to answer the survey question regarding the T-Shirt size.

today's leftovers

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  • Automotive Grade Linux Hits the Road Globally with Toyota; Amazon Alexa Joins AGL to Support Voice Recognition

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open platform for the connected car, today announced that AGL is now in Toyota vehicles around the world. AGL also announced five new members, including Amazon Alexa, which joined as a Silver member.

    "Having AGL in vehicles on the road globally is a significant milestone for both AGL and the automotive open source community," said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at The Linux Foundation. "Toyota has been a strong proponent of open source for years, and we believe their adoption of an AGL-based infotainment system has set a precedent that other automakers will follow."

  • Intel Posts Initial Open-Source Graphics Driver Patches For Icelake "Gen 11" Hardware

    While Intel Cannonlake processors aren't out yet with their new "Gen 10" graphics hardware, Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has published their first graphics driver patches for Linux enablement of Icelake "Gen 11" hardware.

    Cannonlake CPUs will be shipping this year while Icelake is at least a year out, which will feature further improvements to the Intel onboard graphics. Intel OTC developers had posted their first GPU Linux driver patches last April for Cannonlake in order to get the support reviewed and upstream well ahead of the hardware launch.

  • Best free open source alternatives to Windows 10: What's the best open source OS?

    There will most likely be a learning curve involved with picking up an open source OS, but the community, customisation and cost (free) should definitely be enough to draw you in.

  • What is your favorite desktop Linux distribution?

    There are all sorts of reasons people take their pick. It could be based on familiarity, on the UI, on performance, on package availability, on stability, on support, or thousands of other factors. Every year, just once, we let you chime in and tell us your favorite.

    This year, in an effort to keep the conversation a little more focused, we're asking specifically, what's your favorite desktop distribution? And we're adding a few more choices this year. To be as fair as possible when it's impossible to list every distribution, we pulled the top 15 distributions according to DistroWatch over the past 12 months. It's not scientific—but it's something to start with, and we had to cull it down somehow.

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  • MAMA Cross Spotted in Red Hat Inc (RHT) Shares
  • A small 2017 retrospective

    In the ARM space there was quite a lot of achievements. The big one being the initial support of aarch64 SBCs (finally!), I was very proud of the work we achieved here, it’s a single install path with uEFI/grub2 and a single install path. More work in the short term, by a team of cross team distro people, which took us a lot longer than I’d hoped, but the outcome is a lot better experience for end users and a much more supportable platform for those that need to support it moving forward! It was no means our only achievement with a lot of other ARM improvements including on the Raspberry Pi, accelerated GPUs, initial support for the 96boards platforms. Three is of coarse already LOTS of work in motion for the ARM architectures in 2018 and I’m sure it’ll be as fun and insanely busy as always but I feel we’re now going into it with a good base for the aarch64 SBCs which will rapidly expand in the devices we support moving forward!

  • Razer’s Project Linda Turns Your Phone Into A Breathtaking Laptop

    Project Linda is basically a dock that lets you seamlessly dock your Android-powered Razer Phone at the place where the touchpad usually resides (see picture below). Once you connect the phone, the 5.7-inch display becomes a touchpad; it can alternatively be used as a second screen. With the press of a button, a USB-C port inserts inside the phone.

  • Most popular Tizen Apps / Games downloaded in 2017

    In a past life (a couple of weeks ago), we used to report on the previous months Tizen apps that had been downloaded from the Tizen Apps Store. Now, we have a list of the Top 20 Tizen Apps / Games for the whole of 2017. This will be our last round-up of the Tizen Store and I’m doing this more out of nostalgia than anything else.

  • 8 Best Free Android Music Players | 2018 Edition

    Android smartphones come with a default music player for audio playback. So, why should you look for an alternate music player? Because the default player might not be feature-rich, it might not provide you with a satisfactory equalizer or its user interface might not be convenient. For instance, most devices nowadays come with Google Play Music as the default music player. It is simple and does the job, but lacks features like folder view in the library, the ability to edit tags for files and many other necessary tools.

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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Libstorage-NG Landing Soon In openSUSE Tumbleweed For Improving The Installer

    Users of the openSUSE rolling-release Linux distribution will soon find an improved installer thanks to Libstorage-NG landing soon and improvements to YaST.

    Libstorage is a low-level storage library used by SUSE's YaST for dealing with disk / partition / LVM management and other storage device interaction. For over the past two years, libstorage-ng has been in development as the next-generation implementation.

  • Debbugs Versioning: Merging

    One of the key features of Debbugs, the bug tracking system Debian uses, is its ability to figure out which bugs apply to which versions of a package by tracking package uploads. This system generally works well, but when a package maintainer's workflow doesn't match the assumptions of Debbugs, unexpected things can happen.

  • Ubuntu Server Development Summary – 09 Jan 2018

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

  • LXD Weekly Status #29

    And we’re back from the holidays!
    This “weekly” summary is covering everything that happened the past 3 weeks.

    The big highlight was the release of LXD 2.21 on the 19th of December.

    During the holidays, we merged quite a number of bugfixes and smaller features in LXC and LXD with the bigger feature development only resuming now.

    The end of year was also the deadline for our users to migrate off of the LXD PPAs.
    Those have now been fully deleted and users looking for newer builds of LXD should use the official basckport packages or the LXD snap.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • What I See for LJ 2.0: in a Word, Community

    It has been too long, but I was at least one of the founders of the Seattle UNIX User's Group. I remember the first meeting well. It took place at Seattle University, and our guest speaker was Bill Joy. He impressed me in that he had a huge pile of overhead transparencies (remember, this was in the 1980s), asked a few questions of the group, selected some of them and started talking. He was right on target.

    My point is that I became a UNIX geek in about 1980, and although UNIX was hot stuff at Bell Labs, it wasn't exactly a household word. The users group was our tool to build the community.

    In the 1980s, I was running a small company that published UNIX reference cards and did UNIX training and consulting. I chose UNIX because I saw a need for decent documentation and training. We were filling that void.

  • Nouveau NVC0 Gallium3D Lands OpenGL Bindless Texture Support

    Longtime Nouveau Gallium3D contributor Ilia Mirkin has landed OpenGL bindless texture (ARB_bindless_texture) support within Mesa 17.4-dev Git.

    ARB_bindless_texture is an important OpenGL extension for reducing the API and OpenGL driver overhead of resource bindings and allows accessing texture objects without first needing to bind/re-bind them. RadeonSI has already supported this extension as it's needed for Feral's port of Dawn of War III for Linux. This extension isn't currently mandated through OpenGL 4.6 but is important for "AZDO" purposes.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 7.8 Milestone 1 Released
  • Salsa webhooks and integrated services

    Since many years now, Debian is facing an issue with one of its most important services: alioth.debian.org (Debian's forge). It is used by most the teams and hosts thousands of repositories (of all sorts) and mailing-lists. The service was stable (and still is), but not maintained. So it became increasingly important to find its replacement.

    Recently, a team for volunteers organized a sprint to work on the replacement of Alioth. I was very skeptical about the status of this new project until... tada! An announcement was sent out about the beta release of this new service: salsa.debian.org (a GitLab CE instance). Of course, Salsa hosts only Git repositories and doesn't deal with other {D,}VCSes used on Alioth (like Darcs, Svn, CVS, Bazaar and Mercurial) but it is a huge step forward!

today's leftovers

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Firefox 58.0, Paying it forward, Firefox Nightly, Lantea Maps

  • Firefox 58.0 “Quantum” Arrives With Faster Page Load Speeds And Code Compilation
    In November 2017, Mozilla launched its Firefox 57 web browser that was also called Firefox Quantum. It was hailed as a strong competitor to powerful Chrome web browser and we conducted a comparison of both browsers to give you a better idea. But, the story doesn’t end here; Mozilla is continuing to improve its work to deliver better performance with each release.
  • Paying it forward at Global Diversity CFP Day
    A CFP is a “Call for Papers” or “Call for Proposals” – many technical and academic conferences discover and vet speakers and their talk topics through an open, deadline-driven, online proposal submission process. This CFP process provides a chance for anyone to pitch a talk and pitch themselves as the presenter. Submitting a CFP, and having your proposal accepted, is one great way to get a foot in the door if you’re just getting started as a new speaker. And, for some developers, public speaking can be the door to many types of opportunity.
  • Firefox Nightly
    Creating a Gnome Dock launcher and a terminal command for Firefox Nightly About 18 months ago, Wil Clouser wrote a blog post on the very blog titled Getting Firefox Nightly to stick to Ubuntu’s Unity Dock. Fast forward to 2018, Ubuntu announced last year that it is giving up on their Unity desktop and will use Gnome Shell instead. Indeed, the last Ubuntu 17.10 release uses Gnome Shell by default. That means that the article above is slightly outdated now as its .desktop file was targeting the Unity environment which had its own quirks.
  • Lantea Maps Updates to Track Saving and Drawing
    After my last post on Lantea Maps (my web app to record GPS tracks), I started working on some improvements to its code. First, I created a new backend for storing GPS tracks on my servers and integrated it into the web app. You need to log in via my own OAuth2 server, and then you can upload tracks fairly seamlessly and nicely. The UI for uploading is now also fully integrated into the track "drawer" which should make uploading tracks a smoother experience than previously. And as a helpful feature for people who use Lantea Maps on multiple devices, a device name can be configured via the settings "drawer".

Red Hat and Fedora

Perl Advocacy

  • My DeLorean runs Perl
    My signature hobby project these days is a computerized instrument cluster for my car, which happens to be a DeLorean. But, whenever I show it to someone, I usually have to give them a while to marvel at the car before they even notice that there's a computer screen in the dashboard. There's a similar problem when I start describing the software; programmers immediately get hung up on "Why Perl???" when they learn that the real-time OpenGL rendering of instrument data is all coded in Perl. So, any discussion of my project usually starts with the history of the DeLorean or a discussion of the merits of Perl vs. other, more-likely tools.
  • An overview of the Perl 5 engine
    As I described in "My DeLorean runs Perl," switching to Perl has vastly improved my development speed and possibilities. Here I'll dive deeper into the design of Perl 5 to discuss aspects important to systems programming.

FOSS Linux App Development In Decline, Canonical Promotes Snap Using Proprietary Software

  • Is Native Linux App Development In Decline?
    A blog like mine thrives, in part, on there being a steady supply of good quality native Linux apps to write about. We do news too of course, and tutorials, how tos, lists, eye candy, and even the odd opinion piece (like this post). But I know you like reading about new and updated Linux apps, and, to be fair, I like writing about them. And yet… Where have all the Linux apps gone? Bear with me as what follows is more of a ramble than a coherent essay. For background, I’m writing this on day four of an enthusiasm drought.
  • Slack launches on Linux
  • Slack gets the Linux treatment: New snap available for Mint, Ubuntu, Debian, and more
    Slack is now available as a snap, which means Linux users can take advantage of the workplace collaboration platform, Canonical announced last week. Slack has recently debuted a number of features that make it more appealing to businesses, including Shared Channels and Private Shared Channels, which allow employees from different companies to work together on projects in private if they so choose. With more than 9 million weekly active users, Slack has gained a lot of traction in the enterprise, as noted by our sister site ZDNet. Back in October 2017, Linux overtook MacOS for the first time in terms of global operating system market share—which means the move opens up even more users to the Slack platform.
  • Canonical slaps Slack snap onto stack
    As the ‘company behind’ Ubuntu, Canonical has brought forward the first iteration of Slack as a snap on its software platform. Slack is a cloud-based set of proprietary team collaboration tools and services that go some way beyond core ‘messaging’ functionality into areas including project management.