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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Futatabi video out

    After some delay, the video of my FOSDEM talk about Futatabi, my instant replay system, is out on YouTube. Actually, the official recording has been out for a while, but this is a special edit; nearly all of the computer content has been replaced with clean 720p59.94 versions.

  • Meeks of The Document Foundation

    Valentine's day release of Collabora Online 4.0 with an associated CODE update too. Tons of rather excellent work from the team there - its a privilege to be able work with them, and to fund almost all of that at Collabora. Then again - if you'd like to help out with both the funding, and directing the next round of feature work, we'd really appreciate you as a partner or customer.

  • RIP Dr. Bernard L. Peuto, Porting Android 9 Pie Go Stack to Rpi 3, LibreOffice v6.2 Coming Soon, Red Hat Virtualization Platform 4.3 Beta Released, Deepin Desktop Environment

    LibreOffice version 6.2 is right around the corner and the killer feature it will be sporting is a new tabbed layout for the menu items, making it similar to the competitive Microsoft Office suite.

  • Snapd flaw gives attackers root access on Linux systems
  • Dimitri John Ledkov: Encrypt all the things

    Went into blogger settings and enabled TLS on my custom domain blogger blog. So it is now finally a https://blog.surgut.co.uk However, I do use feedburner and syndicate that to the planet. I am not sure if that is end-to-end TLS connections, thus I will look into removing feedburner between my blog and the ubuntu/debian planets. My experience with changing feeds in the planets is that I end up spamming everyone. I wonder, if I should make a new tag and add that one, and add both feeds to the planet config to avoid spamming old posts.

    Next up went into gandi LiveDNS platform and enabled DNSSEC on my domain. It propagated quite quickly, but I believe my domain is now correctly signed with DNSSEC stuff. Next up I guess, is to fix DNSSEC with captive portals. I guess what we really want to have on "wifi" like devices, is to first connect to wifi and not set it as default route. Perform captive portal check, potentially with a reduced DNS server capabilities (ie. no EDNS, no DNSSEC, etc) and only route traffic to the captive portal to authenticate. Once past the captive portal, test and upgrade connectivity to have DNSSEC on. In the cloud, and on the wired connections, I'd expect that DNSSEC should just work, and if it does we should be enforcing DNSSEC validation by default.

    So I'll start enforcing DNSSEC on my laptop I think, and will start reporting issues to all of the UK banks if they dare not to have DNSSEC. If I managed to do it, on my own domain, so should they!

  • Cameron Kaiser: So long, Opportunity rover

    Both Opportunity and Spirit were powered by the 20MHz BAE RAD6000, a radiation-hardened version of the original IBM POWER1 RISC Single Chip CPU and the indirect ancestor of the PowerPC 601. Many PowerPC-based spacecraft are still in operation, both with the original RAD6000 and its successor the RAD750, a radiation-hardened version of the G3.

  • Six Hallmarks Of Successful Crowdfunding Campaigns

    While crowdfunding can be a good way to raise funds, it is risky. Here are six hallmarks of successful projects which you can use to hotrod your own campaigns.

    forbes.com

  • Welcoming a new Firefox/Toolkit peer

    Please join me in welcoming Bianca Danforth to the set of peers blessed with reviewing patches to Firefox and Toolkit. She’s been doing great work making testing experiment extensions easy and so it’s time for her to level-up.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • IBM Puffs Up Power Iron On Its Public Cloud
  • Big Blue Finally Brings IBM i To Its Own Public Cloud

    Well, that took quite a long time. After what seems like eons of nudging and cajoling and pushing, IBM is making the IBM i operating system and its integrated database management system, as well as the application development tools and other systems software, available on its self-branded IBM Cloud public cloud.

    Big Blue previewed its plans to bring both IBM i and AIX to the IBM Cloud at its annual Think conference in Las Vegas, on scale out machines aimed at small and medium businesses as well as to customers who want to run clusters of machines, and on scale up systems that have NUMA electronics that more tightly cluster them into shared memory systems.

    There are a lot of questions about how this will be all be packaged up and sold under the unwieldy name of the IBM Power Systems Virtual Server on IBM Cloud. But we will tell you all that we know and fill you in as we learn more.

  • Developer's Toolkit - The Most Useful Tools for Programmers

    The most useful tools that every programmer should know and use. These tools are essential to every coding working and also increase productivity.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Blog: Building a Kubernetes Edge (Ingress) Control Plane for Envoy v2

    Kubernetes has become the de facto runtime for container-based microservice applications, but this orchestration framework alone does not provide all of the infrastructure necessary for running a distributed system. Microservices typically communicate through Layer 7 protocols such as HTTP, gRPC, or WebSockets, and therefore having the ability to make routing decisions, manipulate protocol metadata, and observe at this layer is vital. However, traditional load balancers and edge proxies have predominantly focused on L3/4 traffic. This is where the Envoy Proxy comes into play.

    Envoy proxy was designed as a universal data plane from the ground-up by the Lyft Engineering team for today’s distributed, L7-centric world, with broad support for L7 protocols, a real-time API for managing its configuration, first-class observability, and high performance within a small memory footprint. However, Envoy’s vast feature set and flexibility of operation also makes its configuration highly complicated – this is evident from looking at its rich but verbose control plane syntax.

    With the open source Ambassador API Gateway, we wanted to tackle the challenge of creating a new control plane that focuses on the use case of deploying Envoy as an forward-facing edge proxy within a Kubernetes cluster, in a way that is idiomatic to Kubernetes operators. In this article, we’ll walk through two major iterations of the Ambassador design, and how we integrated Ambassador with Kubernetes.

  • RIP Dr Peuto, Zilog and Sun's bright SPARC

    The 16-bit Z8000 was the big brother of the 8-bit Z80, used in the first wave of low cost microcomputers like the Spectrum and TRS80, but had a starring role in its own right. As a 16-bit CPU it powered several Unix systems, including Commodore, Olivetti and Onyx, as well as Zilog's own System 8000 machines.

    Astonishingly, the ambitious project began in early 1976, long before the personal workstation was a market.

  • Reading the Output of a Weather Station Using Software Defined Radio

    A while back, Dave ordered a weather station. His research pointed to the Ambient Weather WS-2000 as the best bang for the buck as far as accuracy (after it's calibrated, which is a time consuming and exacting process that I suspect most weather station owners don't bother with). It comes with a "console", a little 7" display that sits indoors and reads the radio signal from the outside station as well as a second thermometer inside, then displays all the current weather data. It also uses wi-fi to report the data upstream to Ambient and, optionally, to a weather site such as Wunderground. (Which we did for a while, but now Wunderground is closing off their public API, so why give them data if they're not going to make it easy to share it?)

  • Tiny module runs Linux on i.MX8M Mini

    F&S unveiled a 40 x 35mm “PicoCore MX8MM” module that runs Linux on an up to quad-A53, 1.8GHz i.MX8 Mini with up to 8GB LPDDR4 and 32GB eMMC plus WiFi/BT, a GbE controller, PCIe, and optional -40 to 85°C support.

    F&S Elektronik Systeme pre-announced a tiny PicoCore MX8MM compute module featuring NXP’s new i.MX8 Mini — an i.MX8M variant with lower video resolution, but a faster clock rate. In September, Variscite announced a slightly larger (55 x 30mm) DART-MX8M-Mini COM with the Mini SoC, and Boundary Devices recently revealed details on a Nitrogen8M-Mini SBC. None of these boards appear to have shipped in volume.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Action News 92

    A week of nasty security flaws, and a lack of patches... For some of us. Raspberry Pi opens a physical store, our thoughts on the new LibreOffice interface, and the new round of nasty flaws hitting all versions of Android.

    Plus new disk encryption coming to Linux, Intel releases their open source encoder for future video on the web, and more.

  • 2018 Open Source Yearbook: Download the PDF

    The 2018 Open Source Yearbook is the 4th annual community-contributed collection of the past year's top open source projects, people, tools, and stories.

    Submit the form below to download the free PDF to read the complete collection.

  • Community Member Monday: Khaled Hosny

    With LibreOffice 6.2 now available, we return to our regular chats with LibreOffice community members! Today we’re talking to Khaled Hosny, who is working on the software’s font handling and user interface…

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • How to Watch Netflix on Raspberry Pi: A Step-By-Step Guide
  • Only a Few Days Left to Cast Your Ballot in the Board Elections

    With only a few days left to go in the Board Elections, openSUSE enthusiast Ahmad Romadhon would like to urge all openSUSE Members who have not yet voted to cast their ballots before voting closes Friday, February 15, 2019 at 12h00 UTC.

    The Gajah Mada University Indonesian Literature student from Yogyakarta, Indonesia, has contributed a new Poster for the openSUSE Elections with this goal in mind, as a healthy Community depends entirely on the active participation of its Members.

    The ballots were sent out last week for the voting process to choose three Board Members in the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections from a total of seven top quality Candidates in the running.

  • Printing Industry Leader Heidelberg Joins the OIN Community in Support of its Digital Future

    Open Invention Network (OIN), the largest patent non-aggression community in history, announced today that Heidelberger Drucksmachinen (Heidelberg) has joined as a community member. As a global leader in prepress, printing and finishing, service and consumables, and software solutions, with a strong focus on a digital future, Heidelberg is demonstrating its commitment to open source software as an enabler of innovation across the printing industry.

    ?Heidelberg?s decision to join OIN is indicative of the global trend towards increased value creation through software, not only in the printing industry but across all industrials. Forward looking industrial companies realize that open source software is the most efficient way to transform their business through software,? said Keith Bergelt, CEO of OIN. ?We?ve clearly seen this in the automotive industry with Automotive Grade Linux, and there is promise in energy via LF Energy. We are pleased that an industry thought leader such as Heidelberg, which is driving the digital transformation of the printing industry, is joining OIN.?

  • Heidelberg Joins the Open Invention Network in Support of its Digital Future

    Open Invention Network (OIN), the largest patent non-aggression community in history, announced that Heidelberger Drucksmachinen (Heidelberg) has joined as a community member. As a global leader in prepress, printing and finishing, service and consumables, and software solutions, with a strong focus on a digital future, Heidelberg is demonstrating its commitment to open source software as an enabler of innovation across the printing industry.

  • Why Apple is Patenting Swift Features, Even Though It’s Open Source

    Many think of ‘open source’ the same way they do free software: totally free and open for everyone to use. And Swift is indeed open and free. Released under the Apache license, Swift is also gaining LSP support, which will give it the ability to compile in just about any IDE you’d want to use (and even some you don’t).

    Apple still drives Swift’s progress. Swift.org, the site dedicated to Swift’s open-source roadmap and release history, is owned and managed by Apple. Those who contribute most to the language’s success are typically Apple staffers, or were (Swift creator Chris Lattner, who is now at Google, is still heavily involved with the language).

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Databricks Continues To Grow Big Data Platform For Enterprise Apps

    Demand for advanced data analytics is helping to push Databricks and the open source Apache Spark project forward.

    At the core of many modern enterprise apps and services is a fundamental need for data analytics. It's a need that Databricks and the open source Apache Spark project that it leads both help to fill.

    It's also a need that a lot of organizations are willing to pay for. On Feb. 5, Databricks announced that it now generates over $100 million in annual revenue. Databricks still wants to grow more, and to that end the company raised a $250 million Series E funding round led by Andreessen Horowitz, Coatue Management, Microsoft, and New Enterprise Associates (NEA). Total funding to date for Databricks now stands at $498.5 million, and the company has a publicly stated valuation of $2.75 billion.

  • Don't Trust CloudFlare

     

    Outline:
    1. The immediate problem with CloudFlare, with a fix for lazy admins.
    2. The fundamental issue with CloudFlare and similar services.
    3. CloudFlare as a threat to federation.
    4. CloudFlare's expansion into the decentralized web and beyond.

  • HP’s Ink Subscription Has DRM That Disables Your Printer Cartridges

    In mid-2016 I was running into a recurring issue. I was always out of printer ink, and new cartridges were expensive. Laser printers can be cheaper for many people, but my household does print as many color photos as it does text documents, which means they’re not a good choice for me. So I purchased a new inkjet printer on the promise of HP’s easy-to-use ink subscription service. For a low cost, I would always have all the ink I needed—as long as I kept to a page limit, that is.

    Now, years later, I’ve realized there was one other price of admission. The ink they’ve sent me isn’t mine; it’s theirs. And if I cancel the subscription when the billing cycle ends, the printer won’t use the ink anymore, and HP requires I send it back to them. I have to buy new ink to replace the ink that is already in my house.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Upcoming ‘App Service’ For Chromebooks Could Help Simplify Chrome OS’ Current App Complexity

    Over the past couple days, a new addition to Chrome has been uncovered that looks to unify the various apps available on Chromebooks. First discovered as simply the chrome://apps page by Chrome Story, Kyle Bradshaw over at 9to5 Google dug a bit deeper and uncovered an entirely new effort behind the simple settings page that could fundamentally change the way Chromebook users manage their apps regardless of where they installed them from.

    That effort is being labeled as App Service and it looks to clean up some glaring inconsistencies currently present in the way Chrome OS handles apps. Right now, you get some serious variation in behavior between apps from the Play Store, Linux and the Web. For those of us who’ve used Chrome OS for a while, we understand the differences inherent to the app type, but for new users these inconsistencies often prove difficult to understand and navigate.

  • Qualcomm Vibrator Driver Queued For Linux 5.1

    The mainline Linux kernel support continues to improve for various ARM SoCs and different Android smartphone features. The latest driver on its way to the mainline Linux kernel is an adaptation of Android's Qualcomm MSM vibrator. 

    Just over three-hundred lines of code is the new msm-vibrator driver now queued into the input subsystem ahead of the upcoming Linux 5.1 kernel. This basic driver is enough to get the vibration hardware working with various Qualcomm-powered devices, like the LG Nexus 5.

  • Daniel Stenberg: commercial curl support!

    If you want commercial support, ports of curl to other operating systems or just instant help to fix your curl related problems, we’re here to help. Get in touch now! This is the premiere. This has not been offered by me or anyone else before.

    I’m not sure I need to say it, but I personally have authored almost 60% of all commits in the curl source code during my more than twenty years in the project. I started the project, I’ve designed its architecture etc. There is simply no one around with my curl experience and knowledge of curl internals. You can’t buy better curl expertise.

  • Sberbank wants to be a force in open source

    Open source refers to any programme whose source code is made available for use or modification as users or other developers see fit. Major global tech companies encourage the development of open source projects as a way to drive innovation.

    For engineers, participation in these projects is not just a nice addition to one’s CV. It also amounts to valuable experience designing and deploying distributed, fail-safe solutions that can provide high performance for tasks of various classes and that are in demand in the global IT market. This is an opportunity for the company to become an owner (instead of a user) of open source products and position itself on the cutting edge of IT development.

  • Reliable system was so reliable, no one noticed its licence had expired... until it was too late

    It's the end of the working week - for most of us. Time to kick back, brew a morning cuppa and delve into this week's On Call, our weekly readers' column of tech traumas.

    This time, we meet "Ted", who tells us about a time he worked for an outsourcer in a government department that got into a pickle over licensing for a very old piece of kit.

    "One of its core processes was a long serving scan and optical character recognition [OCR] program using a CDE interface running on propriety Unix servers fed by Windows work stations and other hardware," he said.

    The hardware, firmware and OS were all unpatched and out of date – "to avoid the risks of changes breaking something", Ted revealed.

    For years, the software had been scheduled for decommissioning – it was "always only six months away".

  • Microsoft Issues Yet Another Exchange Server Security Advisory
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 795

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Cockpit 187

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 187.

  • How to run a speed test from command line using speedtest-cli
  • Findmnt – Better Way of Finding Mounted Filesystems on Linux
  • What is Fuchsia OS? Is Fuchsia OS the Future?

    Fuchshia is one of the newest or the hottest entry in the operating system market. Why it is in so many rumours, and what makes it different, is what we're going cover in this article.

  • Raspberry Pi opens first High Street store

    Founder Eben Upton says the shop will attract customers who are "curious" about the tiny computer.

  • Red Hat Single Sign-On: Give it a try for no cost!

    In a software world where each day is more hostile than the previous one, security matters and developers are coping with more and more non-functional requirements about security. The most common ones are the “OWASP Top 10”: the ten security risks that every developer should know. There are many more security risks you should care about, but those ten risks are the ones having the most impact on the security of your software. Among them are authentication and access control.

    The good news is that authentication and access control are now commodities in the open source world, thanks to Red Hat Single Sign-On Red Hat Single Sign-On is an access management tool that takes care of the details of most authentication protocols such as SAML, OAuth, and OpenID Connect; user consent with UMA; and even access control. It is easy to use, is very well-documented, and has a very active community: Keycloak.

    This article describes how to download and install Red Hat Single Sign-On for no cost.

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