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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Microsoft Sued After Windows 10 Upgrade “Destroyed Users’ Computers”

    In the lawsuit documents (via The Reg), the plaintiffs explain that Microsoft did not “exercise reasonable care in designing, formulating, and manufacturing the Windows 10 upgrade,” becoming responsible for damages caused to users in the form of data loss and hardware issues.

  • WebTorrent Desktop: Instant Video Streaming App for Linux Desktop

    WebTorrent Desktop is a cross-platform open source torrent client with which you can instantly stream audio and video torrent files without waiting to completely download them.

    It features a beautiful and modern User Interface, streaming support for videos from Internet Archive, music from Creative Commons, and audiobooks from Librivox, and has the ability to talk to BitTorrent and WebTorrent peers while providing a seamless User Experience.

  • Humble Store has some noteworthy deals on this weekend
  • clr-boot-manager now available in Solus

    We’re happy to announce the rollout of clr-boot-manager in our stable repository. clr-boot-manager, from the Clear Linux Project For Intel Architecture, enables a more bulletproof update experience by handling the maintenance and garbage collection of kernels, as well as configuration of the bootloader itself (i.e. GRUB2 for Legacy Boot, goofiboot for UEFI boot on Solus). Furthermore, it enables us to retain older, known-working kernels, so in the event a kernel upgrade results in the inability to boot, you’ll still be able to roll back to the last good kernel.

  • Ubuntu vs Arch Linux

    Comparing Ubuntu to Arch Linux. Focus is entirely on the underlying system, as Arch don’t offer a specific interface to compare with Ubuntu’s Unity desktop.

  • Packaging Ishiiruka-Dolphin (GameCube/Wii Emulator)
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) To Kick Off Another Week Of Big Earnings Reports
  • Debian Project Leader elections 2017

    It's that time of year again for the Debian Project: the elections of its Project Leader!

    The Project Leader position is described in the Debian Constitution.

today's leftovers

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  • Why You Should Consider Open Sourcing Your Software

    Free & Open source software have grown so rapidly in the last few years. Just compare the situation of being ignored and considered like a nerds-movement in the early 2000’s to the situation today in 2017. We surly made a huge advancement so far. Thanks to the amazing ecosystem of open source which links both communities and enterprises together.

    However, when it comes to individuals, a lot of people are hesitant when it comes to open-sourcing their software. They think that the “secret” behind it will be stolen. They think that they will be releasing their work “for nothing in return” when they do so. That’s definitely false.

  • Caspia Projects and Thunderbird – Open Source In Absentia

    What does this have to do with Thunderbird? I sat in a room a few weeks ago with 10 guys at Clallam Bay, all who have been in a full-time, intensive software training program for about a year, who are really interested in trying to do real-world projects rather than simply hidden internal projects that are classroom assignments, or personal projects with no public outlet. I start in April spending two days per week with these guys. Then there are another 10 or so guys at WSR in Monroe that started last month, though the situation there is more complex. The situation is similar to other groups of students that might be able to work on Thunderbird or Mozilla projects, with these differences:1) Student or GSOC projects tend to have a duration of a few months, while the expected commitment time for this group is much longer.

  • Make Dragonfly BSD great again!

    Recently I spent some time reading Dragonfly BSD code. While doing so I spotted a vulnerability in the sysvsem subsystem that let user to point to any piece of memory and write data through it (including the kernel space). This can be turned into execution of arbitrary code in the kernel context and by exploiting this, we're gonna make Dragonfly BSD great again!

today's leftovers

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  • Puppet Wins Best DevOps Tool for Open Source at the 2017 DevOps Excellence Awards
  • The goal of HP's radical The Machine: Reshaping computing around memory

    Not every computer owner would be as pleased as Andrew Wheeler that their new machine could run "all weekend" without crashing.

    But not everyone's machine is "The Machine," an attempt to redefine a relationship between memory and processor that has held since the earliest days of parallel computing.

    Wheeler is a vice president and deputy labs director at Hewlett Packard Enterprise. He's at the Cebit trade show in Hanover, Germany, to tell people about The Machine, a key part of which is on display in HPE's booth.

    [...]

    HPE has tweaked the Linux operating system and other software to take advantage of The Machine's unusual architecture, and released its changes under open source licenses, making it possible for others to simulate the performance of their applications in the new memory fabric.

  • Eudyptula Challenge Status report

    Welcome to another very semi-irregular update from the Eudyptula Challenge.

  • Eudyptula Challenge Status report

    The Eudyptula Challenge is a series of programming exercises for the Linux kernel. It starts from a very basic "Hello world" kernel module, moves up in complexity to getting patches accepted into the main kernel. The challenge will be closed to new participants in a few months, when 20,000 people have signed up.

  • Daimler Jumps on Linux Bandwagon

    Not long ago, if a major corporation were to take out membership in an open source project, that would be big news -- doubly so for a company whose primary business isn't tech related. Times have changed. These days the corporate world's involvement in open source is taken for granted, even for companies whose business isn't computer related. Actually, there's really no such thing anymore. One way or another, computer technology is at the core of nearly every product on the market.

    So it wasn't surprising that hardly anyone noticed earlier this month when Daimler AG, maker of Mercedes-Benz and the world's largest manufacturer of commercial vehicles, announced it had joined the Open Invention Network (OIN), an organization that seeks to protect open source projects from patent litigation. According to a quick and unscientific search of Google, only one tech site covered the news, and that didn't come until a full 10 days after the announcement was made.

  • ONAP: Raising the Standard for NFV/SDN Telecom Networks [Ed: Amdocs pays the Linux Foundation for editorial control and puff pieces]

    This article is paid for by Amdocs...

  • Plamo 6.2 リリース

    Plamo 6.2 をリリースしました。

  • Dominique Leuenberger: [Tumbleweed] Review of the week 2017/12

    What a week! Tumbleweed once again is the first (to my knowledge) to ship the just released GNOME 3.24.0 as part of its main repository. Being shipped to the users in less than 48 hours since the official release announcement is something we can only do thanks to all the automatic building and testing AND the efforts put into the packages! If packagers would not be at the ball the whole time, this would not be possible. Even though the week has seen ‘only’ 4 snapshots (0317, 0318, 0320 and 0322) the changes delivered to the user base is enormous.

  • VMware Workstation 12.x.x for latest openSUSE Tumbleweed
  • Zero Terminal Mini Linux Laptop Created Using Raspberry Pi Zero W And Smartphone Keyboard
  • Zero Terminal: A DIY handheld Linux PC made from a Raspberry Pi and a cheap iPhone keyboard accessory

today's leftovers

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  • Linux Kernel Podcast for 2017/03/21
  • Announcing the Shim review process [Ed: accepting rather than fighting very malicious things]

    However, a legitimate criticism has been that there's very little transparency in Microsoft's signing process. Some people have waited for significant periods of time before being receiving a response. A large part of this is simply that demand has been greater than expected, and Microsoft aren't in the best position to review code that they didn't write in the first place.

  • rtop – A Nifty Tool to Monitor Remote Server Over SSH

    rtop is a simple, agent-less, remote server monitoring tool that works over SSH. It doesn’t required any other software to be installed on remote machine, except openSSH server package & remote server credentials.

  • Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.9.3 and KDE Applications 16.12.3, More

    Neofytos Kolokotronis from the Chakra GNU/Linux project, an open-source operating system originally based on Arch Linux and the KDE Plasma desktop environment, announced the availability of the latest KDE updates in the distro's repositories.

    Those of you using Chakra GNU/Linux as your daily drive will be happy to learn that the stable repos were filled with numerous up-to-date packages from the recently released KDE Plasma 5.9.3 desktop environment, KDE Applications 16.12.3 software suite, and KDE Frameworks 5.32.0 collection of over 70 add-on libraries for Qt 5.

  • YaST Team: Highlights of YaST development sprint 32

    One of the known limitations of the current installer is that it’s only able to automatically propose an encrypted schema if LVM is used. For historical reasons, if you want to encrypt your root and/or home partitions but not to use LVM, you would need to use the expert partitioner… and hope for the best from the bootloader proposal.

    But the new storage stack is here (well, almost here) to make all the old limitations vanish. With our testing ISO it’s already possible to set encryption with just one click for both partition-based and LVM-based proposals. The best possible partition schema is correctly created and everything is encrypted as the user would expect. We even have continuous tests in our internal openQA instance for it.

    The part of the installer managing the bootloader installation is still not adapted, which means the resulting system would need some manual fixing of Grub before being able to boot… but that’s something for an upcoming sprint (likely the very next one).

  • Debian stretch on the Raspberry Pi 3 (update) (2017-03-22)

    I previously wrote about my Debian stretch preview image for the Raspberry Pi 3.

  • Asus Tinker Board – Chromium YouTube Performance

    One of the many strengths of the Asus Tinker Board is its multimedia support. This 4K video capable machine is a mouthwatering prospect for the multimedia enthusiast. The machine has a respectable 1.8GHz ARM Cortex-A17 quad-core processor. It’s only 32-bit (unlike the Raspberry Pi 3) but has a higher clock speed. The Tinker Board also sports an integrated ARM-based Mali T764 graphics processor (GPU).

today's leftovers

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  • Microsoft's latest Windows 10 ad annoys Chrome users with taskbar pop-ups

    Microsoft’s aggressive advertising push inside Windows 10 is going beyond pop-ups for Microsoft Edge.

    Myce recently spotted yet another pop-up ad on the taskbar in Windows 10. This time around Microsoft was advertising its extension for Chrome dubbed the Personal Shopping Assistant (Beta). The extension is a Microsoft Garage project that lets you compare prices across shopping sites.

    Prior to the Chrome extension pop-up, Microsoft was advertising its rewards program for Microsoft Edge, which we spotted in early November. The earlier ad appeared to be targeted at people who didn’t use Edge that frequently.

  • OpenStack Private Cloud is Doing Just Fine

    Sometimes you have to dig beneath the surface of headlines to understand what’s really going on. I guess that’s one thing most of us have learned in recent months. Sometimes you need some careful analysis to get to the real story. It seems like that’s as true in the IT world as it is with tabloid news.

  • [Tumbleweed] Review of the week 2017/11
  • Valve & Microsoft Are Among The Sponsors For Debian's DebConf 17

    Valve is returning as a gold sponsor to this year's Debian DebConf event.

    Last year Valve sponsored DebConf 16 and this year they are back to their golden sponsor tier for backing DebConf 17 in Montreal, Canada.

  • Secretive Billionaire Reveals How He Toppled Apple in China

    The duo together shipped more than 147 million smartphones in China in 2016, dwarfing Huawei Technologies Co.’s 76.6 million units, Apple’s 44.9 million and Xiaomi’s 41.5 million, IDC estimates. Oppo and Vivo both doubled their 2015 haul. In the fourth quarter, they were No. 1 and No. 3, respectively -- Huawei was second. Their approach worked particularly well in lower-tier cities, where mid-range phones became a mainstream hit, said Tay Xiaohan, an IDC analyst.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Munich's desktop Linux was 'working fine' before politicians decreed return to Windows

    That is the claim of Karl-Heinz Schneider, the head of IT at the City of Munich's IT services provider [email protected], the company behind the City's desktop Linux implementation. In an interview, he claimed that there were no "compelling technical reasons" for the authority to order a migration back to Windows, suggesting that political interference was behind the move.

  • Joyent + Shippable Fireside Chat

    Shippable CEO, Avi Cavale and Joyent CTO, Bryan Cantrill join for a fireside chat to learn what both organizations are currently up to, and what contributions are ahead for the microservices ecosystem.

  • KDE neon With Testing Translations

    For the longest time, the plan was to equip KDE neon’s Developer Editions with translations. As the Developer Editions are built directly from our Git repositories and we do not maintain translations alongside the source code, there is a bit of a problem as the build somehow needs to bridge the gap between code and translations.

    It’s fortunate that I also happen to work on ReleaseMe, a KDE tarball release application, and rebuilt it from scratch years ago already, so it supports third party usage of some of its functionality.

  • GNOME 3.24 RC2 Released

    The final GNOME 3.23 development release is out ahead of next week's planned GNOME 3.24 debut.

  • PHP version 7.0.17 and 7.1.3
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, February 2017

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • LXLE 16.04.2 GNU/Linux Distro to Bring All the Goodies from Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS

    The developer of the LXLE GNU/Linux distribution announced the immediate availability for download of the Beta build of his upcoming LXLE 16.04.2 release.

    LXLE 16.04.2 Beta is here to address various of the issues that have been discovered since the previous version of the distro, namely LXLE 16.04.1, but also to improve some of the functionalities and sync the software repositories with the upstream ones of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Hyper Knights, a surprisingly fun and cheap mix of strategy and action
  • Chakra GNU/Linux 2017.03 "Goedel" Released to Support LUKS Encrypted Partitions

    Neofytos Kolokotronis from the Chakra GNU/Linux distribution was proud to announce a few moments ago the release and immediate availability of the Chakra GNU/Linux 2017.03 "Goedel."

    Dubbed Goedel, in the memory of the mathematician, philosopher, and logician Kurt Goedel, Chakra GNU/Linux 2017.03 is the first ISO snapshot of the KDE Plasma oriented distribution originally based on Arch Linux. The new release comes with a revamped Heritage theme and the Calamares installer with support for LUKS encrypted partitions.

  • Parrot Security OS 3.5 Improves Linux Security Tools Distribution
  • Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE 2 Betsy) Gets Updated ISO Images, Download Now
  • MATE Desktop 1.18 Released, Is Now GTK3 Only

    MATE Desktop 1.18 is now available to download. The release completes the migration to GTK3, and adds a splash of improvements to many of its core apps.

  • Five issues that will determine the future of Internet Health [Ed: It would be awesome if not rather bitter-sweet and ironic now that Mozilla helps make the WWW less 'sanitary' with DRM]

    In January, we published our first Internet Health Report on the current state and future of the Internet. In the report, we broke down the concept of Internet health into five issues. Today, we are publishing issue briefs about each of them: online privacy and security, decentralization, openness, web literacy and digital inclusion. These issues are the building blocks to a healthy and vibrant Internet. We hope they will be a guide and resource to you.

    We live in a complex, fast moving, political environment. As policies and laws around the world change, we all need to help protect our shared global resource, the Internet. Internet health shouldn’t be a partisan issue, but rather, a cause we can all get behind. And our choices and actions will affect the future health of the Internet, for better or for worse.

  • FSFE Newsletter - March 2017
  • Solving Monitoring in the Cloud With Prometheus

    Hundreds of companies are now using the open source Prometheus monitoring solution in production, across industries ranging from telecommunications and cloud providers to video streaming and databases.

  • An Exploration of Citrix Delivery Networks

    While many of us may be more familiar with the virtualization and remote access products from Citrix, Danny Phillips was talking about their products in the networking space during his keynote presentation at LinuxCon Europe.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • A baudy Linux Hack: Hayes Modem modded to Linux Desktop (and modem time machine).
  • Post -Linux Playa at PUCP
  • Surf Demystified

    Surf is a simple, lightweight browser from Suckless Tools, the same people who brought you dmenu and dwm. When compiled and configured right, Surf is incredibly robust and stable, able to handle most websites extremely well, and it has a clean and simple layout without buttons and bars to encroach on the web material you're reading. Unfortunately, Surf is underdocumented, so most who try Surf give up after a few minutes, moving on to Firefox or Chromium or Palemoon or Midori. This web page serves as the needed documentation to make Surf a pleasure to work with.

    Surf gains a new credibility and significance now (2017), because in 2017, most browsers have declined in stability and performance, over the last several years, to the point where several of them are unusable on various distros.
    ...

  • When the memory allocator works against you

    Cloning mozilla-central with git-cinnabar requires a lot of memory. Actually too much memory to fit in a 32-bits address space.

    I hadn’t optimized for memory use in the first place. For instance, git-cinnabar keeps sha-1s in memory as hex values (40 bytes) rather than raw values (20 bytes). When I wrote the initial prototype, it didn’t matter that much, and while close(ish) to the tipping point, it didn’t require more than 2GB of memory at the time.

    Time passed, and mozilla-central grew. I suspect the recent addition of several thousands of commits and files has made things worse.

  • Microsoft's former open source VP Wim Coekaerts [iophk: "Swapnil knows better than that, I guess he's just after money now"]
  • GNU Health, openSUSE Pioneer Shift in Healthcare Management

    The GNU Health Project is one of many noble open-source projects and the openSUSE Project is pleased to announce it has donated 10 Raspberry Pis to help expand the use and development of the project on affordable ARM hardware.

    GNU Health, which is a non-profit, non-government organizations (NGO), delivers free open-source software for health practitioners, health institutions and governments worldwide.

  • Consumer Reports to Begin Evaluating Products, Services for Privacy and Data Security

    The standard as it’s now written is a first draft. We hope that everyone from engineers to industry groups to concerned parents will get involved in shaping future versions of it. We’ve placed the standards on GitHub, a website that’s widely used by software developers to share ideas and work on group projects. Because GitHub can be hard for newcomers to navigate, we’ve also built a website that has the same information.

today's leftovers

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