Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Misc

Various Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
Misc
  • XFree KWin: Ridding KDE's Wayland Compositor Of X11 Dependencies

    Martin Flöser (nee Gräßlin) has announced the "XFree KWin" project. This isn't to be confused with XFree86 but rather is about ridding KWin optionally of X11/X.Org dependencies.

  • Bad News for Users of TopIcons Plus

    The development of the popular TopIcons Plus GNOME extension has been put on pause.

    Offering a convenient way to access indicator applets and system tray icons from the GNOME top bar, the extension has proven popular with GNOME Shell users, especially as GNOME 3.26 removes the legacy tray entirely.

  • Fix the “This version of Skype is not supported” Error on Ubuntu
  • Will Blockchain Race to the Front of the Disruption Line in IoT?

    The group, founded in 2015, is the fastest-growing project in the history of the Linux Foundation according to Hyperledger Executive Director Brian Behlendorf.  This project has reached out to various industries in addition to IoT, industries which also are adopting IoT including healthcare.

  • The State Of Intel's GPU Virtualization Pass-Through On Linux

    Wrapping up our XDC2017 coverage for this annual X.Org developer event that took place this past week in Mountain View, Zhenyu Wang of Intel presented on their ongoing work for mediated GPU virtualization pass-through support on Linux, Intel GVT.

  • Red Hat announces that Ansible Project 2.4 now generally available

    Red Hat announced this week general availability of Ansible Project 2.4, its simple and agentless open source IT automation framework. The upstream Ansible project is one of the world’s most popular open source IT automation technologies, with nearly 3,000 unique contributors, more than 32,000 commits to the upstream Ansible open source project, and a user base that spans industries and the globe.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) is Under Analysts Radar
  • Best Self-Hosted CRM Apps

    Customer relationship management or simply CRM is a term or specifically an approach to managing and analyzing the interaction of your current customers and leads. The CRM software allows you to manage the customer data, customer interaction, automate sales, manage client contacts and employees, customer support etc. In this article we will cover some of the best self-hosted CRM applications which you can install on a CRM Linux VPS and use for managing your company.

  • Electric Cars, Open Source Summit, and Linux Server Innovation [Ed: "This article was sponsored and written by IBM." Linux Foundation writes what Big Bully IBM tells it to write.]
  • Intel IX4 Networking Performance On DragonFly Gets Boosted By Direct Input Support

    DragonFlyBSD today picked up direct input support within the kernel's polling code. This can boost the networking performance though for now is just supported by the IX4 driver, what is used as the Intel 10Gb Ethernet driv

  • Chicago School Official: US IT Jobs Offshored Because 'We Weren't Making Our Own' Coders

    In the video, the Director of Computer Science and IT Education for the nation's third largest school district offers a take on why U.S. IT jobs were offshored that jibes nicely with the city's new computer science high school graduation requirement. From the transcript: "People still talk about it's all offshored, it's all in India and you know, there are some things that are there but they don't even realize some of the reasons that they went there in the first place is because we weren't making our own."

  • After the breach, Equifax now faces the lawsuits

    Since it announced a massive data breach earlier this month, Equifax has been hit with dozens of lawsuits from shareholders, consumers and now one filed by a small Wisconsin credit union that represents what could be the first by a financial institution attempting to preemptively recoup losses caused by alleged fraud the hack could cause.

    Equifax has said its breach exposed sensitive information about 143 million consumers, including Social Security and driver's license numbers. This kind of data could be used for identity theft and to create fake accounts, cybersecurity experts have said.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Sonic Mania ‘Plays Perfectly’ on Linux via WINE

    The Windows version of Sonic Mania is playable on Linux using WINE — and that’s not just me saying that, that’s a bunch of Linux gamers over on Reddit (where else?).

  • Icculus has ported The End is Nigh to on-demand service 'Jump', Linux may come soon plus some thoughts

    Ever heard of the on-demand subscription gaming service Jump? It's an on-demand game streaming service and Icculus just ported The End is Nigh to it.

    Recently, I wrote about how The End is Nigh might be coming to Linux. Sadly, that's not actually the case just yet. Announcing it on his Patreon, Icculus noted about his work to port it to the on-demand service Jump. They actually reached out to him to do it, as it turns out.

  • liveslak 1.1.9 and new ISO images

    The ‘liveslak‘ scripts used to create the ISO images for Slackware Live Edition have been stamped with a new version, 1.1.9. The updates are significant enough to warrant an ‘official’ update and new ISO images.

    The latest set of Slackware Live Edition ISOs are based on liveslak 1.1.9 and Slackware-current dated “Tue Sep 19 20:49:07 UTC 2017“. Just in time (I was already creating ISOS based on -current “Mon Sep 18 19:15:03 UTC 2017“) I noticed that Patrick downgraded the freetype package in Slackware, and I re-generated all of the ISO images to incorporate the latest freetype package – because that one is working and the previous one had serious issues.

    If you already use a Slackware Live USB stick that you do not want to re-format, you should use the “-r” parameter to the “iso2usb.sh” script. The “-r” or refresh parameter allows you to refresh the liveslak files on your USB stick without touching your custom content.

  • The best of Tizen deals from Samsung’s ‘Smart Utsav’ festive offers in India
  • Chrome 62 Beta: Network Quality Estimator API, OpenType variable fonts, and media capture from DOM elements

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, Mac, and Windows.

  • Chrome 62 Beta Released With OpenType Font Variations, DOM Media Capture

    Google has rolled out their public beta of the upcoming Chrome/Chromium 62 web-browser update.

  • Turning Off Wi-Fi and Bluetooth in iOS 11's Control Center Doesn’t Actually Turn Off Wi-Fi or Bluetooth [Ed: Proprietary software means you cannot trust it and anything you think it does it likely won't]

    Turning off Bluetooth and Wi-Fi when you're not using them on your smartphone has long been standard, common sense, advice. Unfortunately, with the iPhone's new operating system iOS 11, turning them off is not as easy as it used to be.

    Now, when you toggle Bluetooth and Wi-Fi off from the iPhone's Control Center—the somewhat confusing menu that appears when you swipe up from the bottom of the phone—it actually doesn't completely turn them off. While that might sound like a bug, that's actually what Apple intended in the new operating system. But security researchers warn that users might not realize this and, as a consequence, could leave Bluetooth and Wi-Fi on without noticing.

  • HP Brings Back Obnoxious DRM That Cripples Competing Printer Cartridges

    Around a year ago, HP was roundly and justly ridiculed for launching a DRM time bomb -- or a software update designed specifically to disable competing printer cartridges starting on a set date. As a result, HP Printer owners using third-party cartridges woke up one day to warnings about a "cartridge problem," or errors stating, "one or more cartridges are missing or damaged," or that the user was using an "older generation cartridge." The EFF was quick to lambast the practice in a letter to HP, noting that HP abused its security update mechanism to trick its customers and actively erode product functionality.

    HP only made matters worse for itself by claiming at the time that it was only looking out for the safety and security of its customers, while patting itself on the back for being pro-active about addressing a problem it caused -- only after a massive consumer backlash occurred.

  • EFF quits W3C over decision to accept EME as Web standard

     

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation has resigned from the World Wide Web Consortium after the latter announced it was accepting the published Encrypted Media Extensions as a Web standard.  

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Black screen of death after Win10 update? Microsoft blames HP

    Microsoft is pointing the finger of blame at HP's factory image for black screens of death appearing after a Windows Update.

    Scores of PC owners took to the HP forums last week to report that Windows 10 updates released September 12 were slowing down the login process. Users stated that once they downloaded the updates and entered their username and password, they only saw black screens for about five to 10 minutes.

    The forum members said that clean installs or disabling a service called "app readiness", which "gets apps ready for use the first time a user signs in to this PC and when adding new apps" seemed to fix the delay.

    Today, a Microsoft spokesperson told The Register: "We're working to resolve this as soon as possible" and referred affected customers to a new support post.

  • GNOME 3.26 Released! Check Out the New Features

    GNOME 3.26 is the latest version of GNOME 3 released six months after the last stable release GNOME 3.24. The release, code-named “Manchester”, is the 33rd stable release of the free, open-source desktop.

  • Arch Arch and away! What's with the Arch warriors?

    If you choose to begin your Linux adventures with Arch Linux after trying Ubuntu for a month, you're probably doing it wrong. If there's a solid reason why you think Arch is for you; awesome! Do it. You will learn new things. A lot of new things. But hey, what's the point in learning what arch-chroot does if you can't figure out what sudo is or what wpa_supplicant does?

  • Setting a primary monitor for launching games in a dual monitor rig
  • AMD Zen Temperature Monitoring On Linux Is Working With Hwmon-Next

    If you want CPU temperature monitoring to work under Linux for your Ryzen / Threadripper / EPYC processor(s), it's working on hwmon-next.

    The temperature monitoring support didn't make it for Linux 4.14 but being published earlier this month were finally patches for Zen temperature monitoring by extending the k10temp Linux driver.

  • Fanless Skylake computer offers four PCI and PCIe slots

    Adlink’s MVP-6010 and MVP-6020 embedded computers run Linux or Windows on Intel 6th Gen CPUs, and offer 4x PCI/PCIe slots, 6x USB ports, and 4x COM ports.

    If Adlink’s new MVP-6010/6020 Series looks familiar, that’s because it’s a modified version of the recent MVP-5000 and last year’s MVP-6000 industrial PCs. The top half appears to be identical, with the same ports, layout, and Intel 6th Gen Core “Skylake” TE series processors. Like the MVP-6000, it adds a PCI and PCIe expansion unit on the bottom, but whereas the MVP-6000 had two slots, the MVP-6010 and MVP-6020 have four.

  • How Qi wireless charging works, and why it hasn’t taken over yet

    Qi has been an Android staple for a while, and now it’s coming to iPhones, too.

  • W3C DRM appeal fails, votes kept secret

    Earlier this summer, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) — the organization responsible for defining the standards that make up the Web — decided to embrace DRM (aka "EME") as a web standard. I wasn’t happy about this. I don’t know many who were.

    Shortly after that, the W3C agreed to talk with me about the issue. During that discussion, I encouraged the W3C to increase their level of transparency going forward — and if there is an appeal of their DRM decision, to make that process completely open and visible to the public (including how individual members of the W3C vote on the issue).

    The appeal happened and has officially ended. I immediately reached out to the W3C to gather some details. What I found out was highly concerning. I’ll include the most interesting bits below, as un-edited as possible.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Verified cryptography for Firefox 57

    Traditionally, software is produced in this way: write some code, maybe do some code review, run unit-tests, and then hope it is correct. Hard experience shows that it is very hard for programmers to write bug-free software. These bugs are sometimes caught in manual testing, but many bugs still are exposed to users, and then must be fixed in patches or subsequent versions. This works for most software, but it’s not a great way to write cryptographic software; users expect and deserve assurances that the code providing security and privacy is well written and bug free.

  • Busting the myth that net neutrality hampers investment

    This week I had the opportunity to share Mozilla’s vision for an Internet that is open and accessible to all with the audience at MWC Americas.

    I took this opportunity because we are at a pivotal point in the debate between the FCC, companies, and users over the FCC’s proposal to roll back protections for net neutrality. Net neutrality is a key part of ensuring freedom of choice to access content and services for consumers.

    Earlier this week Mozilla’s Heather West wrote a letter to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai highlighting how net neutrality has fueled innovation in Silicon Valley and can do so still across the United States.

    The FCC claims these protections hamper investment and are bad for business. And they may vote to end them as early as October. Chairman Pai calls his rule rollback “restoring internet freedom” but that’s really the freedom of the 1% to make decisions that limit the rest of the population.

  • Sysadmin war story: “The network ate my font!”

     

    Turns out the printer had a cache for fonts and was using the font cached from the earlier check image which included the font! Moreover, the Toronto and Hollywood offices were on a different printer maintenance schedule — and as part of the maintenance the printers are rebooted which clears the font cache!

  • The Harmful Consequences of Postel's Maxim draft-thomson-postel-was-wrong-01

     

    Jon Postel's famous statement in RFC 1122 of "Be liberal in what you accept, and conservative in what you send" - is a principle that has long guided the design of Internet protocols and implementations of those protocols.  The posture this statement advocates might promote interoperability in the short term, but that short-term advantage is outweighed by negative consequences that affect the long-term maintenance of a protocol and its ecosystem.

  • Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc. (TSX:POT), Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT): VC in The Spotlight

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • IBM Linux-only mainframe delivers breakthrough security
  • Kubernetes Meets HPC

    Anyone who has worked with Docker can appreciate the enormous gains in efficiency achievable with containers. While Kubernetes excels at orchestrating containers, high-performance computing applications can be tricky to deploy on Kubernetes.

    In this post, I discuss some of the challenges of running HPC workloads with Kubernetes, explain how organizations approach these challenges today, and suggest an approach for supporting mixed workloads on a shared Kubernetes cluster. We will also provide information and links to a case study on a customer, IHME, showing how Kubernetes is extended to service their HPC workloads seamlessly while retaining scalability and interfaces familiar to HPC users.

  • The latest Windows Server beta has a surprising feature: Support for Linux containers
  • VMware wants the support of open-source developers
  • Public Money? Public Code!

    31 organisations ask to improve public procurement of software

    Today, on 13 September 2017, 31 organisations are publishing an open letter. The letter calls for lawmakers to advance legislation requiring publicly financed software that has been developed for the public sector be made available under a Free and Open Source Software licence.

  • WordPress to ditch React library over Facebook patent clause risk

    Automattic, the company behind the popular open source web publishing software WordPress, has said it will be pulling away from using Facebook’s React JavaScript library over concerns about a patent clause in Facebook’s open source license.

    In a blog post explaining the decision yesterday, WordPress’ Matt Mullenweg said Automattic had hoped to officially adopt React for WordPress — noting it has already used it for the Calypso ground-up rewrite of WordPress.com a few years ago, and had started using it for its major Gutenberg core project.

    But he reveals it’s changed its mind after seeing Facebook dig in behind the patent clause — which was recently added to the Apache Software Foundation’s (ASF) list of disallowed licenses.

  • Havenlabs' Open Source 3D Printed Utility Band Offers Simple Functionality for Amputees
  • Bluetooth problem could let hackers take control of Apple, Samsung and Google devices

    Millions of mobile phones, laptops and smart home devices could be at risk of hacking after researchers discovered a way to take over devices using the Bluetooth connection.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • ​New IBM big iron for Linux

    IBM mainframes are alive, well, and being designed to make the most of Linux.

  • Create a Linux VM with these potential limitations in mind

    it involves creating a VM object and allocating hardware resources, such as memory, virtual network adapters and virtual CPUs. As simple as the creation process might be, however, the OS that will eventually be installed onto the VM requires some consideration. For example, the VM will need to be provisioned with enough memory to run the OS. In some cases, there may be additional considerations that need to be made beyond meeting the minimum hardware requirements of the OS. This can be especially true for a Linux VM.

  • Cairo Adds Support For OpenGL ES 3.0

    The Cairo 2D vector graphics library used by GTK, Firefox, WebKit, and many other programs finally has an OpenGL ES 3.0 back-end merged.

    Cairo supports many different backends from OpenGL to DirectFB to outputting as SVG/PDF/PostScript files as well as Skia, Direct2D, OpenVG, and other less notable code paths. Finally, OpenGL ES 3.0 is now supported by mainline Cairo.

  • Install and Configure ISC DHCP Server in Debian 9
  • Solving Physics Problems on Linux

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers: GNU/Linux at Dropbox, Debian and Gentoo Development, Managing Linux Disks

Filed under
Misc
  • Optimizing web servers for high throughput and low latency

    This is an expanded version of my talk at NginxConf 2017 on September 6, 2017. As an SRE on the Dropbox Traffic Team, I’m responsible for our Edge network: its reliability, performance, and efficiency. The Dropbox edge network is an nginx-based proxy tier designed to handle both latency-sensitive metadata transactions and high-throughput data transfers. In a system that is handling tens of gigabits per second while simultaneously processing tens of thousands latency-sensitive transactions, there are efficiency/performance optimizations throughout the proxy stack, from drivers and interrupts, through TCP/IP and kernel, to library, and application level tunings.

  • Summary of the discussion on off-line keys.
  • Xiaomi’s stunning Mi Mix gets a sequel, the Mi Mix 2
  • Squeezing More Juice Out Of Gentoo With Graphite, LTO Optimizations

    Developer Shane Peelar has come up with a Gentoo Portage configuration for building out the distribution with aggressive compiler optimizations in the name of performance.

    Peelar's Gentoo configuration will build with -O3 optimizations, GCC Graphite optimizations, and LTO (Link Time Optimizations).

  • Debian-Administration.org is closing down

    The site will go read-only at the end of the month, and will slowly be stripped back from that point towards the end of the year - leaving only a static copy of the articles, and content.

  • What you need to know to manage Linux disks

    There are numerous other commands for examining disks and file systems. Those described here are some of the most useful and informative. Using them periodically has advantages as the easiest way to spot problems is becoming so used to the output of commands such as these that you easily spot the kind of differences that might indicate problems.

  • Install and Configure LEMP in Debian 9
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

KTextEditorPreviewPlugin Reaches 0.1.0 and a Quick Look (Screenshots) at KDE Plasma 5.11

  • KTextEditorPreviewPlugin 0.1.0
    The KTextEditorPreviewPlugin software provides the KTextEditor Document Preview Plugin, a plugin for the editor Kate, the IDE KDevelop, or other software using the KTextEditor framework. The plugin enables a live preview of the currently edited text document in the final format. For the display it uses the KParts plugin which is currently selected as the preferred one for the MIME type of the document. If there is no matching KParts plugin, no preview is possible.
  • Quick Look at KDE Plasma 5.11
    KDE released Plasma 5.11 beta version at 14 September 2017. The new star feature here is Plasma Vault, an ability to protect your folder with password. You can try it on the latest KDE neon before the Plasma finally released next October. Here is a quick look to the new things on KDE Plasma on neon dev-unstable.

Antergos 17.9 Gnome - Ghost riders in the Tux

Antergos 17.9 is a weird distro, full of polarities. It comes with a weak live session, and it does not really demo what it can do. The installer is good, robust, and if offers some neat tricks, including extra software and proprietary graphics driver. I'm really impressed by that. The installed system behaved reasonably, but with some oddities. Hardware support isn't the best, most notably touchpad and what happened after waking from suspend. On the other hand, you get good smartphone and media support, a colorful and practical software selection, a moderately reasonable package manager with some tiny dependency hiccups, pretty looks, okay performance, and nowhere does it advertise its Archness. Much better than I expected, not as good as it should be. Well, taking everything into consideration, I guess it deserves something like 7.5/10. Antergos needs a livelier live session, more hardware love out of the box, and a handful of small tweaks around desktop usability. Shouldn't be too hard to nail. Worth watching. Read more

LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.1.2 BETA

This is the third beta for our 8.2 release. It addresses minor findings related to the Samba bump: we now detect and avoid invalid Samba v3 configurations, old samba.conf.sample templates are overwritten with the new v4 template, and remote SMB shares are mounted using SMB2 or where possible SMB3. The release also adds support for the Raspberry Pi IQAudIO Digi+ board and a Xiaomi BT remote, and includes security fixes for the Blueborne Linux/BlueZ vulnerability. This is hopefully the final 8.1.x beta release; next will be 8.2.0. Read more

Android Leftovers