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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E23 – Twenty-Three Tales - Ubuntu Podcast

    We’ve been upgrading RAM and tooting in the fediverse. We discuss Hollywood embracing open source, a new release of LibreOffice, pacemakers getting hacked and fax machines becoming selfaware and taking over the planet. We also round up the community news and events.

  • How to install InvoicePlane on Ubuntu 18.04
  • What is your favorite Linux window manager?

    While many Linux users have a strong preference for a window manager of choice, for those just making their way over from Windows or Mac, it may be hard to understand what a window manager is, or that it's even something you have a choice in. A window manager is the part of your system that dictates how individual application windows look, and how you can interact with, control, and arrange them.

    There are many choices, some more popular than others. Yesterday, we wished the GNOME Project a happy twenty-first birthday and launched a cheat sheet for interacting with GNOME 3's windows via hotkeys. But others are popular too; our article on "5 reasons the i3 window manager makes Linux better" was last week's most-read article.

  • Elive 3.0 to be released in a month

    For those of us who have been following this stunningly beautiful distro, the 8-year waiting seems to be finally coming to an end.

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  • Android 9 Pie Digital Wellbeing: Here Is Everything You Need to Know

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • libinput's "new" trackpoint acceleration method

    This is mostly a request for testing, because I've received zero feedback on the patches that I merged a month ago and libinput 1.12 is due to be out. No comments so far on the RC1 and RC2 either, so... well, maybe this gets a bit broader attention so we can address some things before the release. One can hope.

    [...]

    Because basically every trackpoint has different random data ranges not linked to anything easily measurable, libinput's device quirks now support a magic multiplier to scale the trackpoint range into something resembling a sane range. This is basically what we did before with the systemd POINTINGSTICK_CONST_ACCEL property except that we're handling this in libinput now (which is where acceleration is handled, so it kinda makes sense to move it here). There is no good conversion from the previous trackpoint range property to the new multiplier because the range didn't really have any relation to the physical input users expected.

  • 15 Tips On How to Use ‘Curl’ Command in Linux
  • Disassembling JITed code in GDB
  • PSA: Workaround for a working MTP

    KDE Connect is awesome, we all know that. But sometimes you still want (or need) to acces the files on your Android phone via a good old USB cable. And to do so, you need a working implementation of the MTP protocol.

    Many people on bugzilla complain that the MTP support in Plasma is just broken. And indeed the MTP implementation we have has always been ignoring a fundamental limitation of MTP: the protocol doesn’t allow parallel operations, unlike the old Android USB mass storage did. In practice, if more than one process spawns an mtp ioslave, everything breaks.

  • Museum Day, or, the Benefit of Skiving Off

    Tomorrow, there’s the fund raiser training session. Given that we’ve been raising funds for Krita since time immemorial (our first fund raiser was for two Wacom tablets and art pens so we could implement support for them, the second to let Lukas Tvrdy work on Krita for a couple of months and after that, we’ve had the kickstarters), that might seem superfluous. But I’m still hoping to learn lots. After all, it’s not like we’re exactly awash in money.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Google’s New Chromebook Might Come With A Snapdragon 845 And A Detachable 2K Display

    It’s been sometime since we saw a Chromebook from Google. Although the Chromebook series didn’t do well with consumers, Google didn’t stop development on it.

    Multiple codes uploaded on Gerrit (web-based team code collaboration tool) on Chromium OS has given us a lot of information on the next Chromebook or the Pixelbook previously. The device is codenamed Cheza (As seen on the Code on 14th line).

  • Builder Session Restore

    People have asked for more advanced session restore for quite some time, and now Builder can do it. Builder will now restore your previous session, and in particular, horizontal and vertical splits.

    Like previously, you can disable session restore in preferences if that’s not your jam.

  • packer renamed to packer-aur

    The famous AUR helper `packer` has been renamed to `packer-aur` in favor of the Hashicorp image builder `packer` (community/packer)

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Dropbox plans to drop encrypted Linux filesystems in November

    Linux users are calling on Dropbox to reverse a decision to trim its filesystem support to unencrypted EXT4 only.

    The company's supported file system list, here, is missing some formats – including various encrypted Linux filesystems.

    Until that list was revised, Dropbox said it supported NTFS, HFS, EXT4, and APFS on Linux; as the new requirements makes clear, Linux users will only be able to run unencrypted EXT4.

  • MacBuntu 18.04 Transformation Pack Ready for Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver

    MacBuntu (Macbuntu Mojave/High Sierra/El Capitan/Yosemite) transformation pack is ready for Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver, we were constantly asked for this pack to be available on our site, so here it is for you guys. In this transformation pack we are featuring many themes for almost every desktop, so you don't have to worry about the desktop you are using whether it is Gnome Shell, Mate, Xfce, Cinnamon or any other desktop. You can simply install it in Ubuntu/Linux Mint or any other Ubuntu based distribution and make your desktop look like Mac OS X. The Unity desktop is still supported in case you are using unofficial version of Unity desktop. In this pack you will find plenty of light variants as well as dark versions, which is managed by different creators and I would like to thank all of them for contributing these themes (McOS-themes, macOS High Sierra, macOS 11, macOS High Sierra - ELBULLAZUL).  There are two themes for cursors, for dock we recommend you to install Plank dock and we are providing themes for it as well (credits: KenHarkey and erikdubois. Also we are including themes for Gnome Shell, for Cinnamon, and three icon packs in this transformation pack.

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  • TensorFlow Pi port is latest salvo in battle for edge analytics

    The recent port of TensorFlow to the Raspberry Pi is the latest in a series of chess moves from Google and its chief AI rival Nvidia to win the hearts and keyboards of embedded Linux developers.

    Google’s recent announcement that it had ported its open source TensorFlow machine intelligence (ML) library for neural networking to the Raspberry Pi was the latest in a series of chess moves from Google and its chief AI rival Nvidia to win the hearts and keyboards of embedded Linux developers. The competition is a part of a wider battle with Amazon, Microsoft, Intel, and others to bring cloud analytics to the edge in IoT networks to reduce latency, increase reliability, and improve security.

  • 9 Android Pie Hidden Features: Best Android 9 Tricks You Might Have Missed
  • TicWatch Pro: Reviewing the 30-Day Battery Smartwatch

today's leftover

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Misc
  • Linux 4.18 Arrives With Some Big Changes
  • IBM S/390 Linux 4.19 Kernel Code Sees More Spectre Updates, Boot Code Rework

    The IBM System/390 "s390" architecture code has seen a number of improvements for Linux 4.19.

    Highlights of the s390 code updates sent in today for the just-opened Linux 4.19 kernel merge window include:

  • Hollywood Casts Open Source Software in Starring Role

    Amazing news out of Variety, the entertainment website, this weekend: Hollywood is going open source. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences — best known for ‘The Oscars’ award ceremony — has teamed up with the Linux Foundation to launch the Academy Software Foundation (ASWF).

  • SIGGRAPH 2018: OpenCL-Next Taking Shape, Vulkan Continues Evolving

    It's a busy week folks as besides the AMD Threadripper 2 performance embargo expiring, it is also SIGGRAPH 2018 week in Vancouver and as well the start of the Linux 4.19 kernel cycle... No longer under wraps are the Khronos announcements from this annual graphics conference. Continue reading to learn about the latest happenings for the various Khronos industry-standard APIs and efforts like Vulkan and OpenCL-Next.

  • Dropbox drops any file system but ext4 on Linux

    Come November 7, cloud storage and synchronization provider Dropbox will drop support for any file system on Linux but ext4.

    In fact, Dropbox announced that it will support only four file systems on desktop systems going forward. Company representative Jay revealed as much on the official Dropbox forum.

  • How to display data in a human-friendly way on Linux
  • Wine Had A Successful GSoC 2018, Better Direct3D Game Benchmarks

    The Wine project once again participated in Google Summer of Code (GSoC) for furthering their open-source agenda of better support for Windows programs on Linux and other operating systems.

    The projects achieved this year were for better automated game benchmarks and implementing a subset of the concurrency namespace. (There also was a project originally listed for implementing missing bits of the Direct3D API, but that doesn't seen to have panned out and is no longer listed.)

  • Congratulations: Hanno Böck and co-authors win Pwnie!

    Congratulations to security researcher and Gentoo developer Hanno Böck and his co-authors Juraj Somorovsky and Craig Young for winning one of this year’s coveted Pwnie awards!

  • Gentoo booth at the FrOSCon, St. Augustin, Germany

    s last year, there will be a Gentoo booth again at the upcoming FrOSCon “Free and Open Source Conference” in St. Augustin near Bonn! Visitors can meet Gentoo developers to ask any question, get Gentoo swag, and prepare, configure, and compile their own Gentoo buttons.

  • Official Debian testing OpenStack image news

    A few things happened to the testing image, thanks to Steve McIntire, myself, and … some debconf18 foo!

  • Remember Palm? They will be back with a 3.3-inch mini smartphone

    The device is still known as Pepito, but the smartphone seems to be almost ready for commercial debut. However, instead of embracing the modern large-display smartphone phenomenon, the revived Palm will stick to its core principles — smaller and pocketable phones. Therefore, if the leaks are to be believed, then the Palm Pepito will sport a 3.3-inch touchscreen display with 720p picture resolution. It will be powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 435 processor paired with 3GB of RAM and 32GB of internal storage.

  • Android Pie Smartphones List: Will My Phone Get Android 9 Update?

    Now that Android Pie is live, the first thing that comes to our mind is when my Android device will receive the new update. The exciting new features of Android P and the whole gesture navigation thing is not something anyone would want to miss.

  • Huawei Mate 20 Lite To Come With A 2K Display 6GBs Of Ram And Kirin 710 According to Leaks

    The Mate series have generally been Huawei’s flagship phablet series. The Mate 10 did great with consumers and reviewers alike. Infact Huawei also came out with the Mate 10 lite which had Huawei’s own Kirin 659 chip. The Kirin 659 chip at the time performed somewhat similar to the Snapdragon 625.

  • A bit more on privacy respecting health monitor / fitness tracker

    A few days ago, I wondered if there are any privacy respecting health monitors and/or fitness trackers available for sale these days. I would like to buy one, but do not want to share my personal data with strangers, nor be forced to have a mobile phone to get data out of the unit. I've received some ideas, and would like to share them with you. One interesting data point was a pointer to a Free Software app for Android named Gadgetbridge. It provide cloudless collection and storing of data from a variety of trackers. Its list of supported devices is a good indicator for units where the protocol is fairly open, as it is obviously being handled by Free Software. Other units are reportedly encrypting the collected information with their own public key, making sure only the vendor cloud service is able to extract data from the unit. The people contacting me about Gadgetbirde said they were using Amazfit Bip and Xiaomi Band 3.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Apps Are Now Available on More Chromebooks Powered by Intel Braswell CPUs

    It looks like Google is taking support for Linux apps very serious lately by recently enabling its integrated virtualization machine for running Linux apps on Chrome OS to support Chromebooks powered by Intel Braswell CPUs.

  • The Academy launches open-source foundation for media developers

    The idea is to enable them to share resources and collaborate on technologies for image creation, visual effects, animation and sound.

    “We are thrilled to partner with The Linux Foundation for this vital initiative that fosters more innovation, more collaboration, more creativity among artists and engineers in our community,” said Academy CEO Dawn Hudson. “The Academy Software Foundation is core to the mission of our Academy: promoting the arts and sciences of motion pictures.”

  • GSoC’18 Phase-3

    For this phase, I started with implementing Stamps feature in the Drawing activity. This feature allows users to use different stamps images in their beautiful arts. For now, I have added images from solar activity to use as stamps.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 31

    This week we’re all at Akademy–KDE’s yearly gathering of developers, designers, system administrators, and users. I’m giving a presentation later today about how we can make KDE Software irresistible!

    As such, it as a bit of a lighter week for the Usability & Productivity initiative, what with all the preparation and conference-going, but we still managed to get quite a bit done. And all the in-person interactions are setting the stage for many more good things to come.

  • Something Happened to My OpenMandriva Lx OS

    Yesterday I booted my laptop with OpenMandriva Lx and went to look for a book. When I returned to the machine, a kernel panic was waiting for me on the screen.

    Apparently, something went very wrong with the updates that I performed last week, but I did not notice.

    This has happened before, though. As the laptop boots seven OSs (OpenMandriva, Mageia, PCLinuxOS, Pisi, Elive, Fedora, and PicarOS), when I install a system that changes the OMV-controlled GRUB2, OpenMandriva gets a panic.

    I do not have the expertise to rectify things other than by performing a re-install. So, I reinstalled OpenMandriva, updated it (the process did not last more than an hour or so) and, sure enough, the OS was bootable again.

    [...]

    Maybe it is time for me to start experimenting with BSD, Haiku, or something.

  • Google Pixel 3 XL Leak Reveals 6.7-inch Screen With Triple Camera Setup
  • Intel has no chance in servers and they know it

    Intel is flying press to an Analyst day to discuss their impending server meltdown. SemiAccurate has been detailing this impending catastrophe for over a year now, it is now time for the details.

  • Journeys

    This would be a long blog post as I would be sharing a lot of journeys, so have your favorite beverage in your hand and prepare for an evening of musing.

    Before starting the blog post, I have been surprised as the last week and the week before, lot of people have been liking my Debconf 2016 blog post on diaspora which is almost two years old. Almost all the names mean nothing to me but was left unsure as to reason of the spike. Were they debconf newcomers who saw my blog post and their experience was similar to mine or something, don’t know.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • PGP Clean Room 1.0 Release

    After several months of work, I am proud to announce that my GSoC 2018 project, the PGP/PKI Clean Room, has arrived at a stable (1.0) release!

  • Review: The Binary Times Podcast

    I recently authored a detailed review of the Linux podcast scene, grilling 25 podcasts targeted at Linux and open source enthusiasts. Like any roundup of this type, it’s almost inevitable that a few podcasts missed my radar. One of these is The Binary Times Podcast. Apologies to the hosts of the show.

    To rectify matters, here’s my take on The Binary Times Podcast.

    This review is incorporated into my detailed review, so you can see where they rank among their peers.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E22 – Catch-22 - Ubuntu Podcast

    It’s Season 11 Episode 22 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope and Mark Johnson are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Conference Report: Fullstack 2018 London

    I recently attended Fullstack 2018, “The Conference on JavaScript, Node & Internet of Things” with my colleagues from the Canonical Web Team in London. Fullstack attempts to cover the full spectrum of the JS ecosystem – frontend, backend, IoT, machine learning and a number of other topics. While I attended a broad range of talks, I’ll just mention those that I think are most pertinent to the work we are doing currently in the web team.

  • Dropbox Client Will Only Support Ext4 Filesystems On Linux Beginning November 7

    Beginning November 7, 2018, the Dropbox client will only support the Ext4 filesystem on Linux. The news, coming from the Dropbox forums, mentions that the only supported filesystems will be Ext4 for Linux, NTFS for Windows, and HFS+ or APFS for Mac.

  • Opera Wants to Be World's First PC Web Browser with a Built-In Crypto Wallet

    Opera Software announced that it plans to bring its famous crypto wallet used on the Opera for Android mobile web browser to the desktop on Linux, Mac, and Windows platforms, in an upcoming Opera for PC stable release.

    Opera was already the world's first web browser to introduce a built-in crypto wallet when Opera Software announced it for its Opera for Android mobile web browser, allowing users to do seamless transactions on the Internet while promoting the adoption of cryptocurrencies by the mainstream.

  • Opera opens its PC browsers to crypto

    - Opera to soon ship crypto wallet access with its PC browser

    - Opera PC browser will give users access to the built-in crypto wallet in Opera for Android

    - After strong interest in the private beta, Opera is opening the crypto wallet to a larger audience for testing.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • What to expect from Tibco Now 2018

    Only Splunk comes forward with a real twist and calls its event .conf as a geeky nod to those that know a CONF file is a configuration or “config” file used on Unix and Linux based systems to stores settings used to configure system processes and applications.

  • Set the date: Qualcomm likely to announce next-gen wearable chipset for Wear OS on September 10

    If you’re curious about the future of Wear OS smartwatches, you’d want to mark this date, September 10, on your calendar. After a full two and a half years, Wear OS is finally getting a new chipset from Qualcomm.

  • Getting to know Grommet, an open source UI dev tool

    While Grommet has been around since 2016, it is not among the best-known open source development tools. The library of reusable UI components helps developers create web applications. This overview explains what Grommet can do, the problems it addresses, and what makes it appealing.

    It is time consuming and difficult to making web applications both beautiful and functional. The skills that make a programmer successful at building an application back end don’t always translate to good user interface (UI) design or creating an ideal user experience (UX). Even when developers get UI help from design specialists, creating the code to control how the software looks—its dialog boxes, information layout, the organization of application features—sometimes seems like a black art. Trying to make a beautiful page work quickly on every device with a consistent appearance seems nearly impossible.

  • Apple Might Ditch Lightning Connector After Pressure From The EU

    Apple might have to part ways with the lightning connector after the EU is planning to launch an investigation against the issue of different types of chargers present in the smartphone industry.

    In 2009, 14 companies including Apple, Samsung, Huawei, and Nokia signed a voluntary memorandum of understanding (MoU) in favor of bringing universal chargers for the smartphones coming into the market from 2011 onwards. The EU clearly directed companies to coordinate and come up with a universal type of charger; micro-USB was the mutually decided type then.

today's leftovers

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  • Episode 34 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux: Linus Torvalds gave his opinion on Wireguard, Lubuntu Takes a New Direction, LineageOS launches their annual Summer Survey, and Hiri’s Experience with Selling on Linux. Then we’ll check out some distro news from Slackware, OpenWRT, Ubuntu LTS, and RebeccaBlackOS. Later in the show, we’ll look at the new NetSpectre vulnerability varient, Forbes’ 5 Reasons to Switch to Linux, a really interesting blog post from the KDE Team about Plasma’s Engineering and finally we’ll check out some Linux Gaming news. All that and much more!

  • 14 must-read tech newsletters
  • Building more trustful teams in four steps

    Robin Dreeke's The Code of Trust is a helpful guide to developing trustful relationships, and it's particularly useful to people working in open organizations (where trust is fundamental to any kind of work). As its title implies, Dreeke's book presents a "code" or set of principles people can follow when attempting to establish trust. I explained those in the first installment of this review. In this article, then, I'll outline what Dreeke (a former FBI agent) calls "The Four Steps to Inspiring Trust"—a set of practices for enacting the principles. In other words, the Steps make the Code work in the real world.

  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities July 2018
  • This Week in Lubuntu Development #8

    Here is the eighth issue of This Week in Lubuntu Development. You can read the last issue here.

  • Ikea’s ‘open source’ Delaktig sofa is designed to be built and rebuilt again and again
  • UF/IFAS researchers to develop open-source library for farmers
  • BBC Wants Microsoft to Expose ‘Doctor Who’ Leaker

    New court documents suggest that the BBC has yet to find the source of the leaked 'Doctor Who' footage that previously appeared online. The British company is hoping that Microsoft can help. At a federal court in Washington, the BBC requested a DMCA subpoena targeted at a OneDrive user who shared the infringing material online late June.

  • Surface Go racks up another terrible iFixit repairability score for Microsoft

    But the iFixit team has slightly different criteria. Is it self-repairable? The answer is a big wet sloppy ‘no'.

  • [Older] MDT-9100T

    Several Motorola MDT-9100T "Mobile Data Terminals" came up on eBay and their retro-future design was too neat to pass up. The stylish housing combined with an aperture-less amber CRT looks like something slipped from the Fallout or BladeRunner universe into our own. Some of us at NYC Resistor bought them and are repurposing them.

    [...]

    In order to replace the i386 with a BeagleBone Black it was necessary to build an adapter board that plugs into the ribbon cable, deduce the VGA timings and write a Device Tree overlay (DTBO) to configure the LVDS framing for the special screen, and design a USB HID keyboard interface for the keyboard and function keys.

  • SMS Two-Factor Auth Isn’t Perfect, But You Should Still Use It

    In a quest for perfect security, the perfect is the enemy of the good. People are criticizing SMS-based two-factor authentication in the wake of the Reddit hack, but using SMS-based two factor is still much better than not using two-factor authentication at all.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME: NVMe Firmware and GSConnect

  • Richard Hughes: NVMe Firmware: I Need Your Data
    In a recent Google Plus post I asked what kind of hardware was most interesting to be focusing on next. UEFI updating is now working well with a large number of vendors, and the LVFS “onboarding” process is well established now. On that topic we’ll hopefully have some more announcements soon. Anyway, back to the topic in hand: The overwhelming result from the poll was that people wanted NVMe hardware supported, so that you can trivially update the firmware of your SSD. Firmware updates for SSDs are important, as most either address data consistency issues or provide nice performance fixes.
  • Gnome Shell Android Integration Extension GSConnect V12 Released
    GSConnect v12 was released yesterday with changes like more resilient sshfs connections (which should make browsing your Android device from the desktop more reliable), fixed extension icon alignment, along with other improvements. GSConnect is a Gnome Shell extension that integrates your Android device(s) with the desktop. The tool makes use of the KDE Connect protocol but without using any KDE dependencies, keeping your desktop clean of unwanted packages.
  • Linux Release Roundup: Communitheme, Cantata & VS Code
    GSconnect is a magical GNOME extension that lets your Android phone integrate with your Linux desktop. So good, in fact, that Ubuntu devs want to ship it as part of the upcoming Ubuntu 18.10 release (though last I heard it probably just end up in the repos instead). Anyway, a new version of GSconnect popped out this week. GSconnect v12 adds a nifty new features or two, as well as a few fixes here, and a few UI tweaks there.

Red Hat Leftovers

  • Red Hat Advances Container Storage
    Red Hat has moved to make storage a standard element of a container platform with the release of version 3.1 of Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage (OCS), previously known as Red Hat Container Native Storage. Irshad Raihan, senior manager for product marketing for Red Hat Storage, says Red Hat decided to rebrand its container storage offering to better reflect its tight integration with the Red Hat OpenShift platform. In addition, the term “container native” continues to lose relevance given all the different flavors of container storage that now exist, adds Raihan. The latest version of the container storage software from Red Hat adds arbiter volume support to enable high availability with efficient storage utilization and better performance, enhanced storage monitoring and configuration via the Red Hat implementation of the Prometheus container monitoring framework, and block-backed persistent volumes (PVs) that can be applied to both general application workloads and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP) infrastructure workloads. Support for PVs is especially critical because to in the case of Red Hat OCS organizations can deploy more than 1,000 PVs per cluster, which helps to reduce cluster sprawl within the IT environment, says Raihan.
  • Is Red Hat Inc’s (NYSE:RHT) ROE Of 20.72% Sustainable?
  • FPgM report: 2018-33

OSS Leftovers

  • Infineon enables open source TSS ESAPI layer
    This is the first open source TPM middleware that complies with the Software Stack (TSS) Enhanced System API (ESAPI) specification of the Trusted Computing Group . “The ease of integration on Linux and other embedded platforms that comes with the release of the TPM 2.0 ESAPI stack speeds up the adoption of TPM 2.0 in embedded systems such as network equipment and industrial systems,” says Gordon Muehl, Global CTO Security at Huawei.
  • Open source RDBMS uses spurred by lower costs, cloud options
    As the volumes of data generated by organizations get larger and larger, data professionals face a dilemma: Must database bills get bigger in the process? And, increasingly, IT shops with an eye on costs are looking to open source RDBMS platforms as a potential alternative to proprietary relational database technologies.
  • Progress open sources ABL code in Spark Toolkit
    New England headquartered application development company Progress is flexing its programmer credentials this month. The Massachusetts-HQ’d firm has now come forward with its Progress Spark Toolkit… but what is it? The Progress Spark Toolkit is a set of open source ABL code combined with some recommended best-practices.
  • Mixing software development roles produces great results
    Most open source communities don’t have a lot of formal roles. There are certainly people who help with sysadmin tasks, testing, writing documentation, and translating or developing code. But people in open source communities typically move among different roles, often fulfilling several at once. In contrast, team members at most traditional companies have defined roles, working on documentation, support, QA, and in other areas. Why do open source communities take a shared-role approach, and more importantly, how does this way of collaborating affect products and customers? Nextcloud has adopted this community-style practice of mixing roles, and we see large benefits for our customers and our users.
  • FOSS Project Spotlight: SIT (Serverless Information Tracker)
    In the past decade or so, we've learned to equate the ability to collaborate with the need to be online. The advent of SaaS clearly marked the departure from a decentralized collaboration model to a heavily centralized one. While on the surface this is a very convenient delivery model, it simply doesn't fit a number of scenarios well. As somebody once said, "you can't FTP to Mars", but we don't need to go as far. There are plenty of use cases here on Earth that are less than perfectly suited for this "online world". Lower power chips and sensors, vessel/offshore collaboration, disaster recovery, remote areas, sporadically reshaping groups—all these make use of central online services a challenge. Another challenge with centralization is somewhat less thought of—building software that can handle a lot of concurrent users and that stores and processes a lot of information and never goes down is challenging and expensive, and we, as consumers, pay dearly for that effort. And not least important, software in the cloud removes our ability to adapt it perfectly for use cases beyond its owner's vision, scope and profitability considerations. Convenience isn't free, and this goes way beyond the price tag.
  • ProtonMail's open source encryption library, OpenPGPjs, passes independent audit
    ProtonMail, the secure email provider, has just had its credentials re-affirmed after its encryption library, OpenPGPjs, passed an independent security audit. The audit was carried out by the respected security firm, Cure53, after the developer community commissioned a review following the release of OpenPGPjs 3.0 back in March.
  • Uber Announces Open Source Fusion.js Framework
    Uber Announces Fusion.js, an open source "Plugin-based Universal Web Framework." In the announcement, Uber senior software engineer Leo Horie explains that Uber builds hundreds of web-based applications, and with web technologies changing quickly and best practices continually evolving, it is a challenge to have hundreds of web engineers leverage modern language features while staying current with the dynamic nature of the web platform. Fusion.js is Uber's solution to this problem.
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  • ASAN And LSAN Work In rr
    AddressSanitizer has worked in rr for a while. I just found that LeakSanitizer wasn't working and landed a fix for that. This means you can record an ASAN build and if there's an ASAN error, or LSAN finds a leak, you can replay it in rr knowing the exact addresses of the data that leaked — along with the usual rr goodness of reverse execution, watchpoints, etc. Well, hopefully. Report an issue if you find more problems.
  • Oracle Open-Sources GraphPipe to Support ML Development
    Oracle on Wednesday announced that it has open-sourced GraphPipe to enhance machine learning applications. The project's goal is to improve deployment results for machine learning models, noted Project Leader Vish Abrams. That process includes creating an open standard. The company has a questionable relationship with open source developers, so its decision to open-source GraphPipe might not receive a flood of interest. Oracle hopes developers will rally behind the project to simplify and standardize the deployment of machine learning models. GraphPipe consists of a set of libraries and tools for following a deployment standard.
  • OERu makes a college education affordable
    Open, higher education courses are a boon to adults who don’t have the time, money, or confidence to enroll in traditional college courses but want to further their education for work or personal satisfaction. OERu is a great option for these learners. It allows people to take courses assembled by accredited colleges and universities for free, using open textbooks, and pay for assessment only when (and if) they want to apply for formal academic credit. I spoke with Dave Lane, open source technologist at the Open Education Resource Foundation, which is OERu’s parent organization, to learn more about the program. The OER Foundation is a nonprofit organization hosted by Otago Polytechnic in Dunedin, New Zealand. It partners with organizations around the globe to provide leadership, networking, and support to help advance open education principles.
  • Tomu Is A Tiny, Open Source Computer That Easily Fits In Your USB Port
    There are a number of USB stick computers available in the market at varying prices. One of them that really stands out is Tomu — a teeny weeny ARM processor that can entirely fit inside your computer’s USB port. Tomu is based on Silicon Labs Happy Gecko EFM32HG309 Arm Cortex-M0+ microcontroller that runs at 25 MHz. It sports 8 kb of RAM and 60 kb of flash onboard. In spite of the small size, it supports two LEDs and two capacitance touch buttons.
  • RcppArmadillo 0.9.100.5.0
    A new RcppArmadillo release 0.9.100.5.0, based on the new Armadillo release 9.100.5 from earlier today, is now on CRAN and in Debian. It once again follows our (and Conrad's) bi-monthly release schedule. Conrad started with a new 9.100.* series a few days ago. I ran reverse-depends checks and found an issue which he promptly addressed; CRAN found another which he also very promptly addressed. It remains a true pleasure to work with such experienced professionals as Conrad (with whom I finally had a beer around the recent useR! in his home town) and of course the CRAN team whose superb package repository truly is the bedrock of the R community.
  • PHP version 7.1.21 and 7.2.9
    RPM of PHP version 7.2.9 are available in remi repository for Fedora 28 and in remi-php72 repository for Fedora 25-27 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS). RPM of PHP version 7.1.21 are available in remi repository for Fedora 26-27 and in remi-php71 repository for Fedora 25 and Enterprise Linux (RHEL, CentOS).

GNU/Linux on Laptops and Desktops

  • Endless OS and Asus, Update on L1TF Exploit, Free Red Hat DevConf.US in Boston, Linux 4.19 Kernel Update
    Some of us may recall a time when ASUS used to ship a stripped down version of Xandros Linux with their line of Eee PC netbooks. Last week, the same company announced that Endless OS will be supporting non-OS offerings of their product. However it comes with a big disclaimer stating that ASUS will not officially support the operating system's compatibility issues.
  • The Chromebook Grows Up
    What started out as a project to provide a cheap, functional, secure and fast laptop experience has become so much more. Chromebooks in general have suffered from a lack of street-cred acceptance. Yes, they did a great job of doing the everyday basics—web browsing and...well, that was about it. Today, with the integration of Android apps, all new and recently built Chrome OS devices do much more offline—nearly as much as a conventional laptop or desktop, be it video editing, photo editing or a way to switch to a Linux desktop for developers or those who just like to do that sort of thing.
  • Windows 10 Linux Distribution Overload? We have just the thing [Ed: Microsoft is still striving to control and master GNU/Linux through malware, Vista 10]
  • What Dropbox dropping Linux support says
    You've probably already heard by now that Dropbox is nixing support for all Linux file systems but unencrypted ext4. When this was announced, much of the open source crowd was up in arms—and rightfully so. Dropbox has supported Linux for a long time, so this move came as a massive surprise.
  • Winds Beautifully Combines Feed Reader and Podcast Player in One Single App
    Billboard top 50 playlist is great for commuting. But I’m a nerd so I mostly prefer podcasts. Day after day, listening to podcasts on my phone has turned into a habit for the better and now, I crave my favorite podcasts even when I’m home, sitting in front of my computer. Thus began, my hunt for the perfect podcast app for Linux. Desktop Linux doesn’t have a huge selection of dedicated podcast applications. Of course, you can use Rhythmbox music player or VLC Media player to download podcasts (is there anything VLC can’t do?). There are even some great command line tools to download podcasts if you want to go down that road.
  • VirtualBox 5.2.18 Maintenance Update fixed VM process termination on RDP client disconnect
    Virtualbox developers released a maintenance update for virtualization solution on the 14th of August, 2018. The latest update raised the version of VirtualBox to 5.2.18. The improvements and additions have been welcomed by several users as it makes the virtualization product even more convenient to use.