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today's leftovers

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  • Refracta 8 Beta 2 Screenshot Tour
  • Please share the news! OpenMandriva Lx Project of the Week at SourceForge

    OpenMandriva Lx has been chosen by SourceForge to be among Projects of the Week August 22nd, 2016.

  • Ceph, Git, YaST, kernel update in Tumbleweed

    Four Tumbleweed snapshots were released since the last article and the snapshot of the week, 20160816, brought users a new version of gtk3 (3.20.8). Updated in the repositories for this snapshot was an updated version of yast2-auth-client (3.3.10). Cairo graphics fixed several bugs and Apache2 removed the omc xml config because the change log states it is “useless nowdays.”

    Snapshot 20160817 has several updates for the scalable storage platform ceph, which added an ability to reduce the constraints on resources required to build ceph and ceph-test packages. Git updated to version 2.9.3 and glib2 had several subpackages updated as did gnome-desktop. This snapshot caused quite a bit of chatter on the openSUSE Factory mailing list and serves as a reminder for people using openSUSE Tumbleweed to subscribed to the mailing list so they are aware of the updates.

  • Slackware Live Edition 1.1.3 based on Slackware -current 11 Aug 2016

    Last time I wrote about Slackware Live Edition was when I released the version 1.1.0 of the scripts. And that was two months ago; lots of updates have been made inbetween. Today I released version 1.1.3 of ‘liveslak’.

    I made a set of ISO images (during the last couple of days actually… it is time-consuming) for the Slackware Live Edition based on liveslak 1.1.3 and using Slackware-current dated “Thu Aug 11 18:24:29 UTC 2016“. These ISO images have been uploaded and are available on the primary server ‘bear‘.

  • Take that boredom

    While I was bored on Defcon, I took the smallest VPS in DO offering (512MB RAM, 20GB disk), configured nginx on it, bought domain zlatan.tech and cp'ed my blog data to blog.zlatan.tech. I thought it will just be out of boredom and tear it apart in a day or two but it is still there.

    Not only that, the droplet came with Debian 8.5 but I just added unstable and experimental to it and upgraded. Just to experiment and see what time will I need to break it. To make it even more adventurous (and also force me to not take it too much serious, at least at this point) I did something on what Lars would scream - I did not enable backups!

  • Mir 0.24 Released, Vulkan Still Not Supported
  • First Ever Smartphone Market Recession - Two Quarters of Market Decline Means Flat or Declining Annual Smartphone Sales for 2016 - Oh, and Q2 Market Data

    First off, the big news. We’ve hit the first Smartphone Market Recession. I just finished doing the Q2 market analysis (its the summer vacation and a slow time in tech, and the numbers are of course here, below) but yeah. We now do see the numbers clearly. Like in how they measure the GDP growth/decline as a measure of an economy being in a recession, we can now declare that officially, the smartphone market has hit its first-ever recession. For two quarters in a row, counting a 12 month moving average sales, the smartphone market has contracted. It hasn’t contracted by much (only 2%) but it is nonetheless the first time ever that this industry of less than 20 years of age has contracted. Even in previous global economic recessions, the smartphone market grew. Now it didn’t. So previously I was predicting a modest growth for the market from year 2015 to 2016, now I say there will be no growth, we’ll be lucky to have flat sales (about 1.44 Billion smartphones sold) and its likely we’ll be down a bit, like 1.41 Billion)

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Microsoft Has Broken Millions Of Webcams With Windows 10 Anniversary Update

    On August 2nd, Microsoft released the Anniversary Update for Windows 10 and when the bits arrived on computers around the globe, it brought with it new features and also broke webcams for millions of consumers. If your webcam has stopped functioning since the release of the Anniversary update, you are not alone but the good news is a fix is coming, hopefully in September.

    Microsoft made a significant change with the release of Windows 10 and support for webcams that is causing serious problems for not only consumers but also the enterprise. The problem is that after installing the update, Windows no longer allows USB webcams to use MJPEG or H264 encoded streams and is only allowing YUY2 encoding.

    Why did the company remove these options? The short answer is that with the Anniversary update there are new scenarios for applications to be able to access the webcam and the MJPEG or H264 encoding processes could have resulted in duplication of encoding the stream (poor performance) so the company limited the input methods to stop this from happening.

    Because of this change, which Microsoft tried to defend but then realized the scale of the impact this change has caused, means that when a webcam tries to use MJPEG or H264, the device will freeze. If you use Skype and your webcam freezes after about a minute, this is the reason.

  • RcppEigen 0.3.2.9.0
  • Flock 2016 in Krakow – Recap

    The fourth annual Flock conference for Fedora contributors took place from August 2nd-5th in Krakow, Poland. Over 200 developers and enthusiasts from different continents met to learn, present, debate, plan, and celebrate. Although Fedora is the innovation source for a major Red Hat product (Red Hat Enterprise Linux), this event received “gold” level sponsorship from a sister community — openSUSE. openSUSE serves the same function for SuSE Linux Enterprise as Fedora does for RHEL. SUSE showed the fellowship that rules in the open source world, which is why we love it!

  • GSoC 2016: That’s a wrap!

    Tomorrow, August 22, 2016, marks the end of the Google Summer of Code 2016 program. This year, I participated as a student for the Fedora Project working on my proposal, “Ansible and the Community (or automation improving innovation)“. You can read my original project proposal on the Fedora wiki. Over the summer, I spent time learning more about Ansible, applying the knowledge to real-world applications, and then taking that experience and writing my final deliverable. The last deliverable items, closing plans, and thoughts on the journey are detailed as follows.

  • Freelance Debian consultant: running DEBAMAX

    Everything started two years ago. Back then I blogged about one of the biggest changes in my life: trying to find the right balance between volunteer work as a Debian Developer, and entrepreneurship as a Freelance Debian consultant. Big change because it meant giving up the comfort of the salaried world, and figuring out whether working this way would be sufficient to earn a living…

  • Instagraph Update Adds Direct Messages, Pull-to-Refresh Support, Plus More

    A big update to the unofficial Instagram app for Ubuntu Touch just hit the Ubuntu Store.

  • Lunduke & Whatnot - Solus, elementary & Ubuntu-MATE
  • $5 Linux IoT compute module targets connected hardware applications

    Omega 2 is a Linux compute module designed specifically for building connected hardware applications. It combines, say Onion, its designers, “the tiny form factor and power-efficiency of the Arduino, with the power and flexibilities of the Raspberry Pi.”

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Foundation Picks Up a Big Data Platform

    The Linux Foundation announced today that it is adding Platform for Network Data Analytics (PNDA) as a Linux Foundation project. PNDA provides users with an open source big data platform for network analytics.

    PNDA’s vision is to remove the complexity of combining multiple technologies into an end-to-end system, using open source technology to provide a big data analytics platform. It has a streamlined data pipeline to surface the right data at the right time.

  • Intel Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Linux

    Earlier this year I heard from an Intel PR representative they had no plans for a Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Linux driver and immediately heard after that from a developer it was bollocks from the media department as usual. Today patches have emerged for supporting Turbo Boost Max 3.0 in the Linux kernel.

    Turbo Boost Max 3.0 is a feature to the Intel Broadwell-E CPUs and presumably more forthcoming high-end CPUs. Turbo Boost Max 3.0 is about boosting the frequency of a single CPU core when a single-threaded application is busy on the system occupied. TBM Tech 3.0 is in contrast to Turbo Boost 2.0 that boosts the frequency of all CPU cores when needed for short periods of time. But over the older Turbo Boost tech, TBM 3.0 can maintain its single-boosted-core frequency for a longer duration.

  • Linux Foundation Offering New Online Security Course

    The Linux Foundation's new online Linux security training program will cover a broad range of topics, from application security to network security. The course is geared toward professionals who are already running Linux systems.
    IT security threats seem to be everywhere, but skilled IT security professionals do not seem to be nearly as pervasive. It's a conundrum that the Linux Foundation wants to help alleviate with the introduction of a new online Linux skills training program.

    The online course, called Linux Security Fundamentals (LFS216), is an attempt to help individuals evaluate their own organizations' security readiness. The course is not intended as an introduction for those who are new to Linux, but rather is targeted at those already running Linux systems.

  • Geary User? Here’s A Question For You…

    If you’ve ever used the (frankly awesome) desktop e-mail app Geary, its maintainer has a question for you. He’s launched a poll asking for your feedback on whether the app should switch to instant search and away from the single-keystroke commands it currently uses. Not sure what either of those are? I’ll explain.

  • keysafe alpha release

    Keysafe securely backs up a gpg secret key or other short secret to the cloud. But not yet. Today's alpha release only supports storing the data locally, and I still need to finish tuning the argon2 hash difficulties with modern hardware. Other than that, I'm fairly happy with how it's turned out.

    Keysafe is written in Haskell, and many of the data types in it keep track of the estimated CPU time needed to create, decrypt, and brute-force them. Running that through a AWS SPOT pricing cost model lets keysafe estimate how much an attacker would need to spend to crack your password.

  • RQuantLib 0.4.3: Lots of new Fixed Income functions
  • Wammu 0.42
  • Full Metal Backup Using the dd Command
  • Basics of Backups
  • Monit is not limited to Monitor Linux system performance, also doing auto repair action for dead services
  • Latest Steam Client Update Now Rolling Out, This Is What’s New

    A new update to the Steam desktop client on Linux is rolling out. Though short on big new features there are some welcome fixes on offer.

  • The BeagleBone's I/O pins: inside the software stack that makes them work

    This article focuses on the BeagleBone Black, the popular new member of the BeagleBoard family. If you're familiar with the Arduino, the BeagleBone is much more complex; while the Arduino is a microcontroller, the BeagleBone is a full computer running Linux. If you need more than an Arduino can easily provide (more processing, Ethernet, WiFi), the BeagleBone may be a good choice.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Windows 10's upgrade model temporarily wipes $1.6B from Microsoft's books

    the distribution and maintenance of Windows 10 put a $1.6 billion temporary dent in its revenue, the company said Thursday.

    In a filing covering the March quarter, Microsoft pointed to the revenue deferral of Windows 10 -- a relatively new way of accounting for the Redmond, Wash. company -- as a reason for the 6% year-over-year decline in revenue.

    "Revenue decreased $1.2 billion or 6%, primarily due to the impact of a net revenue deferral related to Windows 10 of $1.6 billion and an unfavorable foreign currency impact of approximately $838 million or 4%," Microsoft's 10-Q filing with the U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) stated.

    The $1.6 billion in Windows 10 revenue during the March quarter didn't actually vanish: It was instead deferred and will hit the bottom line over the next two to four years.

  • Netrunner Desktop version becomes Maui 1

    Maui will continue as the full desktop version of the previously Kubuntu based Netrunner line:

    What basically equals Netrunner+1 is simply released under the new name “Maui 1″.

    Being based on KDE neon, Maui also marks the transition to an LTS base, where some parts are receiving regular updates during its lifecycle (so called “partially rolling”).

  • YaST Team: Highlights of YaST development sprint 23

    As you may know, it’s possible to install (open)SUSE in an automatic, even completely unattended, basis using AutoYaST. AutoYaST can be configured to display custom configuration dialogs to the user and wait for the reply a certain amount of time before automatically selecting the default options. Until now, the only way for the user to stop that countdown was to start editing some of the fields in the dialog.

    We got a bug report because that functionality was not working exactly as expected in some cases so, in addition to fixing the problem, we decided to revamp the user interface a little bit to improve usability. Now there are more user interactions that are taken into account to stop the counter, specially we added a new “stop” button displaying the remaining seconds. You can see an example of the result below.

  • Fedora 25 Alpha status is NO-GO
  • FOSS wave: Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India

    Furthering the efforts of some work around building a strong, tight-knit FOSS community around Fedora, I approached a few people from Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh. I figured out the scope to talk about Fedora and Fedora quality assurance (QA). The target audience was bringing more college students from Bhopal into open source and Fedora.

  • The top 10 IoT application areas – based on real IoT projects

    As part of a larger effort to track the IoT ecosystem, we set out, mining hundreds of homepages, and managed to assemble and verify 640 actual enterprise IoT projects (Note: We did not include any consumer IoT projects such as wearable devices or hobby projects).

  • This tiny $5 computer is giving the Raspberry Pi a run for its money

    When it comes simple homebrew computers, the Raspberry Pi has been king of the mountain for a long time. The ruler might have some new competition, however, if the wild Kickstarter success of Onion’s Omega2 is any indication.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • With Windows 10, Microsoft Blatantly Disregards User Choice and Privacy: A Deep Dive

    Microsoft had an ambitious goal with the launch of Windows 10: a billion devices running the software by the end of 2018. In its quest to reach that goal, the company aggressively pushed Windows 10 on its users and went so far as to offer free upgrades for a whole year. However, the company’s strategy for user adoption has trampled on essential aspects of modern computing: user choice and privacy. We think that’s wrong.

    You don’t need to search long to come across stories of people who are horrified and amazed at just how far Microsoft has gone in order to increase Windows 10’s install base. Sure, there is some misinformation and hyperbole, but there are also some real concerns that current and future users of Windows 10 should be aware of. As the company is currently rolling out its “Anniversary Update” to Windows 10, we think it’s an appropriate time to focus on and examine the company’s strategy behind deploying Windows 10.

  • How Twitter Avoids the Microservice Version of “Works on My Machine”

    Apache Mesos and Apache Aurora initially helped Twitter engineers to implement more sophisticated DevOps processes and streamline tooling, says software engineer David McLaughlin. But over time a whole new class of bespoke tooling emerged to manage deployment across multiple availability zones as the number of microservices grew.

    “As the number of microservices grows and the dependency graph between them grows, the confidence level you achieve from unit tests and mocks alone rapidly decreases,” McLaughlin says, in the interview below. “You end up in the microservice version of “works on my machine.”

  • It's time to say goodbye to Linux 4.6

    If you're using a version of Linux based on the 4.6 series of the kernel, the software's lead maintainer has a message for you: It's time to upgrade.

    Greg Kroah-Hartman on Tuesday announced the arrival of Linux 4.6.7 and made it clear that it will be the last in the kernel's 4.6 series. Version 4.7.1 made its debut on Tuesday as well, and that's where the future lies, Kroah-Hartman said.

  • Linux Foundation touts open-source PNDA for network analytics

    The Linux Foundation has taken another open-source project under its wing, one that’s focused on the architecture, implementation and support of digital networks.

    Called the Platform for Network Data Analytics (or “PNDA” for short), the initiative aims to better integrate and manage massive amounts of network information, and deploy analytics applications and services.

    “PNDA addresses a critical need for a scalable platform that fosters innovation in reactive network analytics for both service providers and enterprises,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director of The Linux Foundation, in a statement.

    To coincide with the announcement, the PNDA community has just shipped out its first version of the software, which is described as a production-ready solution for platforms based on OpenStack.

  • Linux Kernel 4.4.18 LTS Has Lots of x86 Improvements, Security Updates and Fixes

    After announcing the end of life for the Linux 4.6 kernel series with the release of Linux kernel 4.6.7 as the last maintenance update, as well as the availability of the first point release of Linux kernel 4.7, Greg Kroah-Hartman now informs us about Linux kernel 4.4.18 LTS.

    Linux kernel 4.4 is an LTS (Long Term Support) one, the latest and most advanced, currently used by many popular GNU/Linux operating systems, including Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Ubuntu 14.04.5 LTS (Trusty Tahr), and all of their derivatives, such as Xubuntu, Kubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu MATE, etc., and the Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" series of distributions.

  • Six Tumbleweed snapshots roll, update systemd, xen, Firefox

    Snapshot 20160808 brought openSUSE Tumbleweed users Plasma 5.72 shortly after last week’s article was published, but it didn’t last long.

  • ArcherMind Joins 96Boards and Launches Deci-Core ARMv8 Product

    Linaro Ltd, the collaborative engineering organization developing open source software for the ARM® architecture, today announced that ArcherMind Technology (Nanjing) Co., Ltd has joined the 96Boards initiative as a Steering Committee Member and Manufacturing Partner and they are preparing the launch of their first 96Boards product.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • The Linux Setup - Andrew Conway, Astronomer/Podcaster

    I know Andrew from his Linux Voice work. It’s interesting to learn how he came to Linux through academia. It just goes to show the importance of powerful software on solid hardware and how it can change your life. Andrew is also a KDE user who feels he hasn’t tapped into the full potential of that desktop. Of course, if anyone did tap into everything KDE could do, they’d get sucked into the Matrix, so I’m glad he hasn’t.

  • Who finished DEP 5?

    Many people worked on finishing DEP 5. I think that the blog of Lars does not show enough how collective the effort was.

  • Wanna build your own drone? Intel emits Linux-powered x86 brains for DIY flying gizmos

    Intel has a bunch of new and updated hardware kits for engineers to toy with and use to build prototypes – from a DIY drone kit to a bunch of beefy Internet of Things packages.

    The most interesting is the Aero drone-building kit, available now to order. You use this single-board computer as the control electronics in a quadcopter: it does everything from the decision-making logic and processing of incoming remote control signals to driving the IO lines to the drone's propellers.

  • He's a p0wnball Wizard, and he's twisted one Ubuntu-powered game

    Security pro Mark Lachniet has stamped himself as a p0wnball wizard by cracking a commercial pinball machine.

    Lachniet, who goes by the handle “Bede”, was able to crack a pinball titled The Hobbit.

    Detailed here, the hack saw Bede find his way inside the Jersey Jack production. Inside he found a Celeron-powered PC running Ubuntu 15.10.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • SELKS 3.0 Screenshot Tour
  • Live USB improvements

    live-grub-stick can now create bootable USB from openSUSE installation media isos (standard DVD or NET), difference from --isohybrid option is that the data already on the stick is not touched, the whole iso is available on the stick so you can use the stick to copy it around apart from being able to install from it.

  • Ubuntu Fan Launches Bid To Get ZTE to Make an Ubuntu Phone

    An Ubuntu Phone fan is attempting to get ZTE to make an Ubuntu-powered device, using the smartphone maker's new crowdsourced ideas platform.

  • Really Small Cheap Computers

    She runs FireFox, Chromium, LibreOffice and Gimp without issue. Browsing the web is much faster on her new PC even if it is small and cheap.

today's leftovers

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  • A Proper Linux Workstation

    The software I rely on daily includes LibreOffice Writer, Thunderbird, Audacity, SimpleScreenRecorder and Kdenlive. Accessibility applications I rely on include redshift-gtk and Workrave.

  • Download Linux Voice issue 21

    Issue 21 of Linux Voice is nine months old, so we’re releasing it under the Creative Commons BY-SA license. You can share and modify all content from the magazine (apart from adverts), providing you credit Linux Voice as the original source and retain the same license.

  • 5 Best Modern Linux ‘init’ Systems (1992-2015)

    Over the years, many init systems have emerged in major Linux distributions and in this guide, we shall take a look at some of the best init systems you can work with on the Linux operating system.

  • git-pbuilder 1.42

    A minor update to my glue script for building software with pdebuild and git-buildpackage. (Yes, still needs to get rewritten in Python.)

    This release stops using the old backport location for oldstable builds since oldstable is now wheezy, which merged the backports archive into the regular archive location. The old location is still there for squeeze just in case anyone needs it.

  • Atmospheric, Limbo-esque platformer 'Selma and the Wisp' is released for Linux on Steam

    Honestly, I've never heard of this game before, so I can't give an opinion about it, but I do think that its aesthetics and background score look pretty interesting. The creators clearly state they took inspiration from Limbo, but also some comparisons with Fran Bow can be made: besides the obvious fact that one of the lead characters is a little girl, the story is put in motion by an horrendous event in her house, as it's told in the following link (check second paragraph).

  • Multilib updates: gcc and glibc for slackware-current
  • The Onion Omega2 lets you add Linux to your hardware projects

    Need a tiny, $5 computer to build a robot that will bring you your slippers, initiate a massage chair session, and pour out your daily dose of bourbon?
    The Onion Omega2 can do all that and more.

    This tiny board is Arduino-compatible but also runs Linux natively. This means you can plug it in and get a command line or access the system via a desktop-like web interface. It has Wi-Fi built in and can be expanded to support cellular, Bluebooth, and GPS connections.

  • DataWind Launches Linux based PocketSurfer GZ Smartphone For Rs. 1499 With Free Internet For 1 Year

today's leftovers

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