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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc

Leftovers: ExeeLinux Show/Unleaded Hangouts, Linux Foundation's CNCF/Akraino and More

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Misc
  • What’s Holding Linux Back – Unleaded Hangouts

    What’s Holding Linux Back? Obviously we’ve seen some growth, but it does feel like there may be some things that hold Linux back a bit. We discuss.

  • ExeeLinux Show 18.9 | Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Ep. 9 – PDisks

    ExeeLinux Show 18.9 | Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Ep. 9 – PDisks

  • How Kubernetes became the solution for migrating legacy applications

    In 2015, Google released Kubernetes as an open source project. It was an implementation of Google's internal system called Borg. Google and the Linux Foundation created the Cloud-Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) to host Kubernetes (and other cloud-native projects) as an independent project governed by a community around it. Kubernetes quickly became one of the fastest growing open source projects in history, growing to thousands of contributors across dozens of companies and organizations.

    What makes Kubernetes so incredible is its implementation of Google's own experience with Borg. Nothing beats the scale of Google. Borg launches more than 2-billion containers per week, an average of 3,300 per second. At its peak, it's many, many more. Kubernetes was born in a cauldron of fire, battle-tested and ready for massive workloads.

  • Akraino, a New Linux Foundation Project, Aims to Drive Alignment Around High-Availability Cloud Services for Network Edge

    Akraino will offer users new levels of flexibility to scale edge cloud services quickly, to maximize the applications or subscribers supported on each server, and to help ensure the reliability of systems that must be up at all times. While several open source projects exist to help solve pieces of the puzzle, nothing currently meets the need for an edge infrastructure solution. Integration of existing efforts in this new project will help deliver ease of use, hardened reliability, unique features, and performance for carrier, provider, and IoT networks.

  • Absolute 15.0 Beta 4 released

    Based on Slackware64-current

    Another beta... with all the kernel updates, glib and such -- trying to make things easier on beta testers Smile

  • State of Wisconsin Investment Board Has $33.92 Million Stake in Red Hat Inc (RHT)

today's lefftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • MX Linux Review of MX-17 – For The Record

    MX Linux Review of MX-17. MX-17 is a cooperative venture between the antiX and former MEPIS Linux communities. It’s XFCE based, lightning fast, comes with both 32 and 64-bit CPU support…and the tools. Oh man, the tools available in this distro are both reminders of Mepis past and current tech found in modern distros.

  • Samsung Halts Android 8.0 Oreo Rollouts for Galaxy S8 Due to Unexpected Reboots

    Samsung stopped the distribution of the Android 8.0 Oreo operating system update for its Galaxy S8 and S8+ smartphones due to unexpected reboots reported by several users.

    SamMobile reported the other day that Samsung halted all Android 8.0 Oreo rollouts for its Galaxy S8/S8+ series of Android smartphones after approximately a week since the initial release. But only today Samsung published a statement to inform user why it stopped the rollouts, and the cause appears to be related to a limited number of cases of unexpected reboots after installing the update.

  • Xen Project Contributor Spotlight: Kevin Tian

    The Xen Project is comprised of a diverse set of member companies and contributors that are committed to the growth and success of the Xen Project Hypervisor. The Xen Project Hypervisor is a staple technology for server and cloud vendors, and is gaining traction in the embedded, security and automotive space. This blog series highlights the companies contributing to the changes and growth being made to the Xen Project and how the Xen Project technology bolsters their business.

  • Initial Intel Icelake Support Lands In Mesa OpenGL Driver, Vulkan Support Started

    A few days back I reported on Intel Icelake patches for the i965 Mesa driver in bringing up the OpenGL support now that several kernel patch series have been published for enabling these "Gen 11" graphics within the Direct Rendering Manager driver. This Icelake support has been quick to materialize even with Cannonlake hardware not yet being available.

  • LunarG's Vulkan Layer Factory Aims To Make Writing Vulkan Layers Easier

    Introduced as part of LunarG's recent Vulkan SDK update is the VLF, the Vulkan Layer Factory.

    The Vulkan Layer Factory aims to creating Vulkan layers easier by taking care of a lot of the boilerplate code for dealing with the initialization, etc. This framework also provides for "interceptor objects" for overriding functions pre/post API calls for Vulkan entry points of interest.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • util-linux v2.32 -- what's new?

    This release (rc1 now) is without dramatic changes and game-changing improvements.

    We have again invested our time and love to make cal(1) more usable. The most visible change is possibility to specify calendar system.

  • GLXVND Support Lands In Git For X.Org Server 1.20

    There's been a lot of activity in xorg-server Git the past few days, making it look like the developers may be trying to wrap up the very long X.Org Server 1.20 cycle. The latest major feature work landing is GLXVND.

    GLXVND is the feature work spearheaded last year by NVIDIA for what is effectively "server-side GLVND", or taking their OpenGL Vendor Neutral Dispatch Library approach from the user-space OpenGL drivers and applying the same concept to allowing multiple GLX modules to happily co-exist on the same running X.Org Server.

  • Weblate 2.19

    Weblate 2.19 has been released today. The biggest improvement are probably addons to customize translation workflow, but there are some other enhancements as well.

  • Apache Camel URI completion in VS Code XML Editor and Eclipse Che
  • Certmonger, SELinux and Keystores in random locations
  • Red Hat’s David Egts on 3 Application Migration Approaches

    David Egts, chief technologist for Red Hat’s public sector, told MeriTalk in an interview published Wednesday that lift and shift, augment with new layers and rewrite are three approaches government agencies and companies can adopt to modernize aging applications.

    Egts said the effectiveness of the approaches depends on the application, contextual factors and business and that agencies should work with system integrators that help execute those three app migration approaches.

  • Today’s Brokerage Rating: Tyson Foods, Inc. (TSN), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • CenturyLink, Inc. (CTL) is at $17.58 per share and Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) is listed at $134.19
  • Airtop2 Inferno Offers i7-7700K + GeForce GTX 1080 While Being Fanless
  • ‘Like a phoenix from the ashes’ – Nokia’s brand value jumped a whopping 70% last year [Ed: Maybe because they got rid of Microsoft and Windows]

    Anderson credits Nokia's rise in value to its two-pronged strategy. On the one hand, there's the core Networks business – which, despite a recent slowdown, has done well and could see a boost from ensuing 5G rollouts – and, on the other, the company's lucrative and fast-growing tech licensing operation.

    [...]

    Nokia Technologies, the company's patent licensing business, has become a major revenue source for Nokia, which has even turned to third party litigation specialists to help secure a portfolio of patents dating back to the company's heyday (Nokia ranked 9th on Brand Finance's list in 2008).

  • F-Droid: an alternative to Google Play

    It is important to talk about Android at Linux conferences like linux.conf.au, Peter Serwylo said to start his talk. Android is deployed on millions or billions of devices, but it does suffer from some problems that F-Droid, an alternative Android app store, tries to address. The title of his talk noted that F-Droid is private, secure, free, and open, all of which are desirable traits for many in our community.

    Serwylo got interested in Android because it was running on the first smart device he ever owned. He chose Android because he was getting interested in free software and recognized that Android was a well-supported version of Linux that was available on lots of different devices. But he found that the Android experience was not quite the "Linux experience that you are used to".

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Is it an upgrade, or a sidegrade?

    I went to a nearby store, looked at the offers... And, in part due to the attitude of the salesguy, I decided not to (installing Linux will void any warranty, WTF‽ In 2018‽). Came back home, and... My Acer works again!

  • How To Install KDE Plasma Mobile On Your Android Smartphone?

    New Linux-based mobile operating systems and hardware projects have been making numerous headlines in the recent months. Projects like postmarketOS, Plasma Mobile, Librem 5, etc., have managed to gain momentum and support of open source community.

    To give you a rough idea of how things are going on the Plasma Mobile land, its developers have shared two methods (Via: Softpedia) to test Plasma Mobile on an actual Android smartphone. In a previous post, they also shared virtual machine images of the OS.

  • A KDE Love Story: Translating Kalzium into Chinese

    When I was a high school student, chemistry was not my cup of tea. My grades in chemistry were not bad either, but I hated memorizing those organic compounds. Then, I decided to major in computer science at university, and from that moment, destiny tightly bonded me and Free and Open Source Software.

  • Last week in Kube
  • fwupd now tells you about known issues

    That one little URL for the user to click on is the result of a rule engine being added to the LVFS. Of course, firmware updates shouldn’t ever fail, but in the real world they do, because distros don’t create /boot/efi correctly (cough, Arch Linux) or just because some people are running old versions of efivar, a broken git snapshot of libfwupdate or because a vendor firmware updater doesn’t work with secure boot turned on (urgh). Of all the failures logged on the LVFS, 95% fall into about 3 or 4 different failure causes, and if we know hundreds of people are hitting an issue we already understand we can provide them with some help.

  • I love free software… and Gentoo does! #ilovefs

    Some people care if software is free of cost or if it has the best features, above everything else. I don’t. I care that I can legally inspect its inner workings, modify and share modified versions. That’s why I happily avoid macOS, Windows, Skype, Photoshop.

  • Multiplexing Input or Output on a Raspberry Pi Part 1: Shift Registers

    A Raspberry Pi doesn't have that many GPIO pins, and neither does an Arduino Uno. An Arduino Mega does, but buying a Mega to go between the Pi and the keyboard kind of misses the point of scavenging a $3 keyboard; I might as well just buy an I2C or MIDI keyboard. So I needed some sort of I/O multiplexer that would let me read 31 keys using a lot fewer pins.

    There are a bunch of different approaches to multiplexing. A lot of keyboards use a matrix approach, but that makes more sense when you're wiring up all the buttons from scratch, not starting with a pre-wired keyboard like this. The two approaches I'll discuss here are shift registers and multiplexer chips.

  • Fanless, Linux-friendly Kaby Lake mini-tower drives seven 4K displays

    Compulab’s rugged “Airtop2” mini-tower runs Linux Mint or Win 10 on a Xeon E3-1275 or Core i7-7700 CPU with optional Nvidia Quadro P4000 graphics plus up to 64GB DDR4, a 6-drive NVMe/SATA subsystem, up to 7x display ports, and optional M.2 and FACE modules.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 2017 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Award Winners

    The polls are closed and the results are in. We once again had some extremely close races and the large number of new categories this year certainly kept things interesting. Congratulations to each and every nominee.

  •  

  • MATE 1.20 Released
  • Plasma 5.12 Brings Wayland to Leap

    This Tuesday KDE released the latest Long Term Support (LTS) version of the Plasma desktop 5.12.

    A key point in this new release is that Wayland support was extensively worked on and is now suitable as part of the Long Term Support guarantees. In particular, the Plasma session in Wayland now plays nicer with multiple screens, and has added support for screen rotation and touchscreen calibration. It also gained a new exclusive feature, Night Color, which removes blue light from the screen at night time in a similar fashion to Redshift, which only works in X11.

    This means that the upcoming openSUSE Leap 15 will offer a far more complete Wayland experience installed by default. It will just be a matter of selecting “Plasma (Wayland)” in the session list of the display manager before logging in. Nothing will change for Tumbleweed users, which had already a Wayland session available since Plasma 5.4.

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