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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Kernel Podcast for 2017/03/21
  • Announcing the Shim review process [Ed: accepting rather than fighting very malicious things]

    However, a legitimate criticism has been that there's very little transparency in Microsoft's signing process. Some people have waited for significant periods of time before being receiving a response. A large part of this is simply that demand has been greater than expected, and Microsoft aren't in the best position to review code that they didn't write in the first place.

  • rtop – A Nifty Tool to Monitor Remote Server Over SSH

    rtop is a simple, agent-less, remote server monitoring tool that works over SSH. It doesn’t required any other software to be installed on remote machine, except openSSH server package & remote server credentials.

  • Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.9.3 and KDE Applications 16.12.3, More

    Neofytos Kolokotronis from the Chakra GNU/Linux project, an open-source operating system originally based on Arch Linux and the KDE Plasma desktop environment, announced the availability of the latest KDE updates in the distro's repositories.

    Those of you using Chakra GNU/Linux as your daily drive will be happy to learn that the stable repos were filled with numerous up-to-date packages from the recently released KDE Plasma 5.9.3 desktop environment, KDE Applications 16.12.3 software suite, and KDE Frameworks 5.32.0 collection of over 70 add-on libraries for Qt 5.

  • YaST Team: Highlights of YaST development sprint 32

    One of the known limitations of the current installer is that it’s only able to automatically propose an encrypted schema if LVM is used. For historical reasons, if you want to encrypt your root and/or home partitions but not to use LVM, you would need to use the expert partitioner… and hope for the best from the bootloader proposal.

    But the new storage stack is here (well, almost here) to make all the old limitations vanish. With our testing ISO it’s already possible to set encryption with just one click for both partition-based and LVM-based proposals. The best possible partition schema is correctly created and everything is encrypted as the user would expect. We even have continuous tests in our internal openQA instance for it.

    The part of the installer managing the bootloader installation is still not adapted, which means the resulting system would need some manual fixing of Grub before being able to boot… but that’s something for an upcoming sprint (likely the very next one).

  • Debian stretch on the Raspberry Pi 3 (update) (2017-03-22)

    I previously wrote about my Debian stretch preview image for the Raspberry Pi 3.

  • Asus Tinker Board – Chromium YouTube Performance

    One of the many strengths of the Asus Tinker Board is its multimedia support. This 4K video capable machine is a mouthwatering prospect for the multimedia enthusiast. The machine has a respectable 1.8GHz ARM Cortex-A17 quad-core processor. It’s only 32-bit (unlike the Raspberry Pi 3) but has a higher clock speed. The Tinker Board also sports an integrated ARM-based Mali T764 graphics processor (GPU).

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Microsoft's latest Windows 10 ad annoys Chrome users with taskbar pop-ups

    Microsoft’s aggressive advertising push inside Windows 10 is going beyond pop-ups for Microsoft Edge.

    Myce recently spotted yet another pop-up ad on the taskbar in Windows 10. This time around Microsoft was advertising its extension for Chrome dubbed the Personal Shopping Assistant (Beta). The extension is a Microsoft Garage project that lets you compare prices across shopping sites.

    Prior to the Chrome extension pop-up, Microsoft was advertising its rewards program for Microsoft Edge, which we spotted in early November. The earlier ad appeared to be targeted at people who didn’t use Edge that frequently.

  • OpenStack Private Cloud is Doing Just Fine

    Sometimes you have to dig beneath the surface of headlines to understand what’s really going on. I guess that’s one thing most of us have learned in recent months. Sometimes you need some careful analysis to get to the real story. It seems like that’s as true in the IT world as it is with tabloid news.

  • [Tumbleweed] Review of the week 2017/11
  • Valve & Microsoft Are Among The Sponsors For Debian's DebConf 17

    Valve is returning as a gold sponsor to this year's Debian DebConf event.

    Last year Valve sponsored DebConf 16 and this year they are back to their golden sponsor tier for backing DebConf 17 in Montreal, Canada.

  • Secretive Billionaire Reveals How He Toppled Apple in China

    The duo together shipped more than 147 million smartphones in China in 2016, dwarfing Huawei Technologies Co.’s 76.6 million units, Apple’s 44.9 million and Xiaomi’s 41.5 million, IDC estimates. Oppo and Vivo both doubled their 2015 haul. In the fourth quarter, they were No. 1 and No. 3, respectively -- Huawei was second. Their approach worked particularly well in lower-tier cities, where mid-range phones became a mainstream hit, said Tay Xiaohan, an IDC analyst.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Munich's desktop Linux was 'working fine' before politicians decreed return to Windows

    That is the claim of Karl-Heinz Schneider, the head of IT at the City of Munich's IT services provider [email protected], the company behind the City's desktop Linux implementation. In an interview, he claimed that there were no "compelling technical reasons" for the authority to order a migration back to Windows, suggesting that political interference was behind the move.

  • Joyent + Shippable Fireside Chat

    Shippable CEO, Avi Cavale and Joyent CTO, Bryan Cantrill join for a fireside chat to learn what both organizations are currently up to, and what contributions are ahead for the microservices ecosystem.

  • KDE neon With Testing Translations

    For the longest time, the plan was to equip KDE neon’s Developer Editions with translations. As the Developer Editions are built directly from our Git repositories and we do not maintain translations alongside the source code, there is a bit of a problem as the build somehow needs to bridge the gap between code and translations.

    It’s fortunate that I also happen to work on ReleaseMe, a KDE tarball release application, and rebuilt it from scratch years ago already, so it supports third party usage of some of its functionality.

  • GNOME 3.24 RC2 Released

    The final GNOME 3.23 development release is out ahead of next week's planned GNOME 3.24 debut.

  • PHP version 7.0.17 and 7.1.3
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, February 2017

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • LXLE 16.04.2 GNU/Linux Distro to Bring All the Goodies from Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS

    The developer of the LXLE GNU/Linux distribution announced the immediate availability for download of the Beta build of his upcoming LXLE 16.04.2 release.

    LXLE 16.04.2 Beta is here to address various of the issues that have been discovered since the previous version of the distro, namely LXLE 16.04.1, but also to improve some of the functionalities and sync the software repositories with the upstream ones of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Hyper Knights, a surprisingly fun and cheap mix of strategy and action
  • Chakra GNU/Linux 2017.03 "Goedel" Released to Support LUKS Encrypted Partitions

    Neofytos Kolokotronis from the Chakra GNU/Linux distribution was proud to announce a few moments ago the release and immediate availability of the Chakra GNU/Linux 2017.03 "Goedel."

    Dubbed Goedel, in the memory of the mathematician, philosopher, and logician Kurt Goedel, Chakra GNU/Linux 2017.03 is the first ISO snapshot of the KDE Plasma oriented distribution originally based on Arch Linux. The new release comes with a revamped Heritage theme and the Calamares installer with support for LUKS encrypted partitions.

  • Parrot Security OS 3.5 Improves Linux Security Tools Distribution
  • Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE 2 Betsy) Gets Updated ISO Images, Download Now
  • MATE Desktop 1.18 Released, Is Now GTK3 Only

    MATE Desktop 1.18 is now available to download. The release completes the migration to GTK3, and adds a splash of improvements to many of its core apps.

  • Five issues that will determine the future of Internet Health [Ed: It would be awesome if not rather bitter-sweet and ironic now that Mozilla helps make the WWW less 'sanitary' with DRM]

    In January, we published our first Internet Health Report on the current state and future of the Internet. In the report, we broke down the concept of Internet health into five issues. Today, we are publishing issue briefs about each of them: online privacy and security, decentralization, openness, web literacy and digital inclusion. These issues are the building blocks to a healthy and vibrant Internet. We hope they will be a guide and resource to you.

    We live in a complex, fast moving, political environment. As policies and laws around the world change, we all need to help protect our shared global resource, the Internet. Internet health shouldn’t be a partisan issue, but rather, a cause we can all get behind. And our choices and actions will affect the future health of the Internet, for better or for worse.

  • FSFE Newsletter - March 2017
  • Solving Monitoring in the Cloud With Prometheus

    Hundreds of companies are now using the open source Prometheus monitoring solution in production, across industries ranging from telecommunications and cloud providers to video streaming and databases.

  • An Exploration of Citrix Delivery Networks

    While many of us may be more familiar with the virtualization and remote access products from Citrix, Danny Phillips was talking about their products in the networking space during his keynote presentation at LinuxCon Europe.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • A baudy Linux Hack: Hayes Modem modded to Linux Desktop (and modem time machine).
  • Post -Linux Playa at PUCP
  • Surf Demystified

    Surf is a simple, lightweight browser from Suckless Tools, the same people who brought you dmenu and dwm. When compiled and configured right, Surf is incredibly robust and stable, able to handle most websites extremely well, and it has a clean and simple layout without buttons and bars to encroach on the web material you're reading. Unfortunately, Surf is underdocumented, so most who try Surf give up after a few minutes, moving on to Firefox or Chromium or Palemoon or Midori. This web page serves as the needed documentation to make Surf a pleasure to work with.

    Surf gains a new credibility and significance now (2017), because in 2017, most browsers have declined in stability and performance, over the last several years, to the point where several of them are unusable on various distros.
    ...

  • When the memory allocator works against you

    Cloning mozilla-central with git-cinnabar requires a lot of memory. Actually too much memory to fit in a 32-bits address space.

    I hadn’t optimized for memory use in the first place. For instance, git-cinnabar keeps sha-1s in memory as hex values (40 bytes) rather than raw values (20 bytes). When I wrote the initial prototype, it didn’t matter that much, and while close(ish) to the tipping point, it didn’t require more than 2GB of memory at the time.

    Time passed, and mozilla-central grew. I suspect the recent addition of several thousands of commits and files has made things worse.

  • Microsoft's former open source VP Wim Coekaerts [iophk: "Swapnil knows better than that, I guess he's just after money now"]
  • GNU Health, openSUSE Pioneer Shift in Healthcare Management

    The GNU Health Project is one of many noble open-source projects and the openSUSE Project is pleased to announce it has donated 10 Raspberry Pis to help expand the use and development of the project on affordable ARM hardware.

    GNU Health, which is a non-profit, non-government organizations (NGO), delivers free open-source software for health practitioners, health institutions and governments worldwide.

  • Consumer Reports to Begin Evaluating Products, Services for Privacy and Data Security

    The standard as it’s now written is a first draft. We hope that everyone from engineers to industry groups to concerned parents will get involved in shaping future versions of it. We’ve placed the standards on GitHub, a website that’s widely used by software developers to share ideas and work on group projects. Because GitHub can be hard for newcomers to navigate, we’ve also built a website that has the same information.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Foundation Highly Relevant to Data Center Networking Evolution Says SDxCentral Report

    Data centers must continue to evolve to handle the increasing network load generated by our frequent use of applications and services like voice activated network applications (OK Google, Alexa), video, mobile phones, IoT devices, and more, according to SDxCentral’s 2017 Next Gen Data Center Networking Report.

  • Chakra GNU/Linux to Get a Revamped Heritage Theme in Upcoming ISO Snapshot

    Neofytos Kolokotronis from the Chakra GNU/Linux development team is announcing that the default Heritage desktop theme will get a well-deserved revamp soon as part of a new ISO snapshot that should be released very soon.

    Those who have used the Chakra GNU/Linux distribution before know that it comes with a specially crafted, in-house built theme for the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, called Heritage. We don't even know when was the last time Chakra devs updated the theme, so the time has come for a refreshed version.

  • 6 best free Linux firewalls of 2017

    Note: Our best free Linux firewalls round-up has been fully updated. This feature was first published in June 2010.

  • Parrot Security OS 3.5 is released

    Parrot Security, the Debian-based distribution just got new release Parrot 3.5 available to download.The Parrot team proudly announced the release of this new release after a call for Beta-testers and final fixes(must be made) based on it. Just a few days back the team has come up with an announcement of a release date as 8th march and here they are.

  • Systemd Gets Important Commit in Tumbleweed

    A total of five snapshots this week brought openSUSE Tumbleweed users and developers several new packages and an important systemd commit.

    Topping this week’s updates were Wireshark, Wayland and KDE Frameworks 5.31.0.

  • New Linux Kernel Security Update for Debian 8 "Jessie" Patches 9 Vulnerabilities

    Debian Project, through Salvatore Bonaccorso, has announced the availability of a new Linux kernel security update for the Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" stable operating system series.

    According to Debian Security Advisory DSA-3804-1, a total of nine kernel vulnerabilities discovered recently have been patched in the new kernel version that's not available for installation in the stable repositories of Debian Jessie. "Several vulnerabilities have been discovered in the Linux kernel that may lead to a privilege escalation, denial of service or have other impacts," said Salvatore Bonaccorso.

  • Updated Debian packaging example: PHP webapp with dbconfig-common
  • Extended temp COM offers Snapdragon 410E, WiFi, BT, and LVDS

    Ka-Ro’s rugged, SODIMM-style “TXSD-410E” COM runs Linux with U-Boot on a Snapdragon 410E, and offers WiFi, Bluetooth, LVDS, and a choice of dev kits.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • What Drives Linux Guru Wim Coekaerts? Have Fun, Build Things People Will Use [Ed: I'm sorry, but Wim Coekaerts is not a "Linux" guru; he sold his soul to Microsoft, which does this]

    When Wim Coekaerts is solving problems and building things, he’s happy. When he’s not, he’s not.

    In his long career, he’s found joy working on early database appliances, and later guiding Oracle’s effort to make Linux, the open source operating system he’d played with since his school days in Belgium, its OS of record. Now, “Linux has become the operating system of the cloud,” Coekearts says, so he sees lots more fun on the horizon.

  • How an amateur opera singer uses MuseScore
  • From dotCloud to Docker
  • How to Easily Hide Files and Folders in Linux
  • Call Ansible or Ansible Playbooks without an inventory
  • Canonical Launches New Ubuntu Tutorials Website
  • openSUSE Developers Implement Rolling Development Phase of openSUSE Leap 42.3

    openSUSE Project's Ludwig Nussel is announcing today that the rolling development phase of the upcoming openSUSE Leap 42.3 operating system is now up and running.

    What this means exactly is that the download server will also serve development builds of openSUSE Leap 42.3 if they are good enough for testing, besides the latest OBS builds. However, you should know that this doesn't mean that openSUSE Leap 42.3 will follow a rolling release model because that's what openSUSE Tumbleweed is designed for.

    "That means just like with Tumbleweed, the download server doesn't just serve the latest build OBS produces. A build only shows up there if the automated testing results of openQA are sufficiently green. So from now on until the gold master zypper dup will update step by step to the final 42.3," explains Ludwig Nussel in the announcement.

  • Equity Perception: Analyst’s Indicator Review for Unum Group (UNM), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Pico-ITX SBC runs Linux on quad Cortex-A53 Snapdragon

    F&S unveiled a Linux-ready “armStone A53SD” Pico-ITX SBC with a Snapdragon 410E, up to 8GB LPDDR3 and 32GB eMMC, plus Ethernet, WiFi, BT, and 4x USB ports.

    F&S Elektronik Systeme is expanding its line of armStone-branded Pico-ITX boards, including its i.MX6-based ArmStone A9-v2, with an armStone A53SD SBC that employs Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 410E. Other Snadragon 410E embedded boards include Inforce Computing’s Inforce 6309L SBC and Inforce 6301 COM.

  • Firefox 52 Brings WebAssembly and Security fixes

    Mozilla patches Firefox for 28 different vulnerabilities, with seven rated as having critical impact.

    Mozilla released Firefox 52 on March 7, providing users of the open-source web browser with new features as well well as patches for 28 security vulnerabilities. The Firefox 52 release is the second major milestone release of Firefox in 2017 so far, following the Firefox 51 milestone that debuted on Jan. 24.

  • Firefox 52 Released with WebAssembly Support, Enhanced Sync

    Mozilla Firefox 52 has been released and is now available to download. Among new features in Firefox 52 is support for WebAssembly. Mozilla describes this as “an emerging standard that brings near-native performance to Web-based games, apps, and software libraries without the use of plugins.”

  • Establishing a Clean Software Baseline for Open Source License Compliance

    One of a company’s first challenges when starting an open source compliance program is to find exactly which open source software is already in use and under which licenses it is available.

    This initial auditing process is often described as establishing a clean compliance baseline for your product or software portfolio. This is an intensive activity over a period of time that can extend for months, depending on how soon you started the compliance activities in parallel to the development activities.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Litebook Linux Laptop Launches From $249

    A new Linux laptop has been launched this week and is available to purchase from $249 in the form of the Litebook, which is equipped with a 14 inch display offering users a resolution of 1920 x 1080 pixels.

    The Litebook is powered by an Intel Celeron N3150 quad-core Braswell processor supported by 4 GB of RAM and loaded with an Elementary OS Linux software. Although there are a few points that that need to be discussed before you part with your hard owned cash.

  • Kernel Podcast for March 6th, 2017

    In this week’s kernel podcast: Linus Torvalds announces Linux 4.11-rc1, rants about folks not correctly leveraging linux-next, the remainder of this cycle’s merge window pulls, and announcements concerning end of life for some features.

  • Solus' Linux Driver Management Tool Enables "Always-On" Nvidia Optimus Support

    Joshua Strobl from the Solus Project has managed to publish a new weekly newsletter to inform users of the independently-developed Solus operating system about the latest developments.

    It would appear that Solus' development team is still working hard these days to improve the upcoming Linux Driver Management (LDM) tool, which is now capable of detecting multiple system configurations, including hybrid Intel and AMD Radeon or Intel and Nvidia GPUs, but also computers with AMD APUs by automatically configuring the graphics stack.

  • [Stable Update] 2017-03-06 – Mesa, Xorg-Server, Deepin, Tesseract, Plasma5 [Ed: #Manjaro 17.0 released]

    Some more updated Deepin, Bluez and Haskell packages round-up this update for today. Please test and give us feedback as usual

  • Latest Weekly Build of Black Lab Linux Improves Microsoft Surface Studio Support

    Black Lab Software's CEO Robert J. Dohnert is informing Softpedia today about the availability of a new weekly snapshot of the Ubuntu-based Black Lab Linux operating system.

    At the end of February, we informed you that Black Lab Software decided to release weekly builds of Black Lab Linux, keeping users up-to-date with the latest GNU/Linux technologies, but also patching security flaws and fixing some of the most annoying bugs.

  • 3.5-inch Skylake SBC offers 4x SATA, 4x PCIe, and 5x USB 3.0

    ADL’s Linux-friendly, 3.5-inch “ADLQ170HDS” SBC offers Intel’s 6th Gen Core CPUs with extended temp support and plenty of of SATA 3, PCIe, and USB 3.0.

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Today in Techrights

Leftovers: OSS

  • Are Low-Code Platforms a Good Fit for Feds?
    Open-source code platforms — in part, because they’re often free — have long been a popular choice for digital service creation and maintenance. In recent years, however, some agencies have turned to low-code solutions for intuitive visual features such as drag-and-drop design functionality. As Forrester Research notes, low-code platforms are "application platforms that accelerate app delivery by dramatically reducing the amount of hand-coding required."
  • Crunchy Data Brings Enterprise Open Source POSTGRESQL To U.S. Government With New DISA Security Technical Implementation Guide
    Crunchy Data — a leading provider of trusted open source PostgreSQL and enterprise PostgreSQL technology, support and training — is pleased to announce the publication of a PostgreSQL Security Technical Implementation Guide (STIG) by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), making PostgreSQL the first open source database with a STIG. Crunchy Data collaborated with the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) to evaluate open source PostgreSQL against the DoD's security requirements and developed the guide to define how open source PostgreSQL can be deployed and configured to meet security requirements for government systems.
  • Democratizing IoT design with open source development boards and communities
    The Internet of Things (IoT) is at the heart of what the World Economic Forum has identified as the Fourth Industrial Revolution, an economic, technical, and cultural transformation that combines the physical, digital, and biological worlds. It is driven by such technologies as ubiquitous connectivity, big data, analytics and the cloud.

Software and today's howtos

Security and Bugs

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Devops embraces security measures to build safer software
    Devops isn’t simply transforming how developers and operations work together to deliver better software faster, it is also changing how developers view application security. A recent survey from software automation and security company Sonatype found that devops teams are increasingly adopting security automation to create better and safer software.
  • This Xfce Bug Is Wrecking Users’ Monitors
    The Xfce desktop environment for Linux may be fast and flexible — but it’s currently affected by a very serious flaw. Users of this lightweight alternative to GNOME and KDE have reported that the choice of default wallpaper in Xfce is causing damaging to laptop displays and LCD monitors. And there’s damning photographic evidence to back the claims up.