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today's leftovers

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  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E02 – A Tale of Two Cities - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we interview Will Cooke, Manager of the Ubuntu Desktop team, about the changes we can expect to see in Ubuntu 18.04.

  • The Latest Winevulkan Patches Make It Usable For Doom, Wolfenstein & DXVK

    Roderick Colenbrander and those working with him on "Winevulkan" to provide a clean Vulkan implementation for Wine supporting the Vulkan ICD concept, etc, rather than the old hacked together code in Wine-Staging have done a great job. With Roderick's latest Winevulkan patches, this new implementation is considered usable.

    It was just at the start of March that the initial Winevulkan support merged and since then more patch series have landed for this implementation that allows Windows programs on Wine to tap Vulkan support, permitting the host system has working Vulkan API support.

  • Samsung/Enlightenment Developers Are Busy At Work On EFL 2.0

    Cedric Bail of Samsung's Open-Source Group presented today at the Embedded Linux Conference on EFL 2.0 as part of the Enlightenment project's long-standing goal to provide a new and unified API.

    While the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries 1.x (EFL1) continues to be maintained, the developers at Samsung OSG that are part of the Enlightenment team have been busy construction EFL 2.0 and hope to show off the first of their new wares in 2018.

  • Present your images from the couch with Gwenview, MPRIS & KDE Connect

    KDE Applications 18.04 Feature Freeze is setting in. Or: reminder to do finally that feature you always wanted to implement.

  • Reflections on the GNOME 3.28 Release Video

    I just flipped the switch for the 3.28 Release Video. I’m really excited for all the new awesome features the community has landed, but I am a bit sad that I don’t have time to put more effort into the video this time around. A busy time schedule collided with technical difficulties in recording some of the apps. When I was staring at my weekly schedule Monday there didn’t seem much chance for a release video to be published at all..

  • Slackware: What all happened in March so far

    I realize I have been a wee bit silent on the blog (not counting my replies in the comments section). This was due to private issues that drained the desire for social interactions. Nevertheless there was quite a bit of activity on the Slackware packaging front.

  • Development Versions of Oracle Linux UEK now available on GitHub

    The source for UEK has always been available at, as a git repository with full git history. Starting now, we'll also be posting the UEK source on By doing so, we intend to increase the visibility for our work and to make it even easier for people to access the source for UEK. We will also use this repository for working with developers at partner companies and in the Linux community. The repository contains the source for the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel including a small number of Oracle additions which have not yet been accepted into the mainline Linux kernel source tree.

    The Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel (UEK) is a Linux kernel built by Oracle and supported via Oracle Linux support. Its focus is performance, stability, and minimal backports by tracking the mainline source code as closely as is practical. UEK is well-tested and used to run Oracle's Engineered Systems, Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, and large enterprise deployments for Oracle customers.

  • Defining the Spectrum of Cloud Deployment Technologies

    “Cloud computing” has been a catch-all phrase over the past decade to describe anything that’s a shift away from hardware servers. However, the term has become nebulous in recent times with the growing diversity in how many different ways you can leverage the cloud.

    We’ve come far from a simplistic separation between on-premises and cloud. Today, it’s about on-premises versus a range of different cloud options. Indeed, the cloud can be a confusing place for newcomers and veterans alike, with new options cropping up every few months, and the landscape always shifting towards the newer and better.

    But how do you choose between good, better and best? Let’s compare the various cloud deployment technologies available today and find the common ground and what separates them from each other.

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Chromebooks Getting All-New Wallpaper Picker and Support for Exporting Passwords

    We have some good news for you if you're a Chromebook user, as Google has added a bunch of goodies to Chrome OS, which you can try right now from the Canary experimental channel.

    Chromium evangelist at Google François Beaufort recently shared details about several new features that have been added to the Chrome Canary experimental channel for Google's Chrome OS operating system for Chromebooks, including a brand-new wallpaper picker, support for exporting passwords, and a revamped keyboard shortcut viewer.

  • Mesosphere Extends DC/OS to the EDGE, Adds Multi-Cloud, Kubernetes Support
  • SOGo v4.0.0 released

    The Inverse team is pleased to announce the immediate availability of SOGo v4.0.0. This is a major release of SOGo which focuses on new features, various enhancements and improved stability over previous versions.

  • An argument against proxies

    Proxies? In companies getting started with an upstream first concept this is what people are called who act as the only interface between their employer and an open source project: All information from any project used internally flows through them. All bug reports and patches intended as upstream contribution also flows through them - hiding entire teams producing the actual contributions.

    At Apache projects I learnt to dislike this setup of having proxies act in place of the real contributors. Why so?

    Apache is built on the premise of individuals working together in the best interest of their projects. Over time, people who prove to commit themselves to a project get added to that project. Work contributed to a project gets rewarded - in a merit doesn't go away kind-of sense working on an Apache project is a role independent of other work committments - in the "merit doesn't go away" sense this merit is attached to the individual making contributions, not to the entity sponsoring that individual in one way or another.

  • HDCP 2.2 Content Protection Being Worked On For The i915 DRM Driver [Ed: DRM in Linux]

    With the upcoming Linux 4.17 kernel cycle there will be initial support for HDCP with the i915 DRM driver. That High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP) support in its initial form is limited to v1.4 on HDMI/DP connectors, but HDCP 2.2 is now being tackled.

    Building off that HDCP v1.4 support done by Google's Chrome OS developers for the i915 DRM Linux driver, Intel developers are now working on extending that to HDCP v2.2 capabilities. HDCP2 is an entirely different link protection design from HDCP1. HDCP 2.x support for newer devices supports more encryption standards, supports WirelessHD and Miracast wireless display standards, a new authentication protocol, and other changes effectively making it a clean sheet design but with some commonalities between the versions.

  • How to create a cron job with Kubernetes on a Raspberry Pi
  • herbstluftwm – A Manual Tiling Window Manager for X11

    herbstluftwm is an open-source tiling window manager with which you can manually organize your screens into mutually non-overlapping frames. i.e app windows will be stacked above each other instead of the typical overlapping window settings.

    herbstluftwm offers a swift operation and since its configuration file is a script that runs at startup, it is configured at runtime via ipc calls from herbstclient same as wmii/musca. It makes use of tags (read workspaces) which can be added or removed at runtime.

  • Device Integration

    I’ve been working on some groundwork features to sneak into Builder 3.28 so that we can build upon them for 3.30. In particular, I’ve started to land device abstractions. The goal around this is to make it easier to do cross-architecture development as well as support devices like phones, tablets, and IoT.

  • 20 questions DevOps job candidates should be prepared to answer [Ed: more of that inane "DevOps" hype in Red Hat sites]
  • Infrastructure 2.0: Whatever We’re Calling it Now, It’s Here [Ed: "DevOps" again, Now with 2.0.]
  • Another motive To buy these stock: DiamondRock Hospitality Company (DRH), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • An intro to ONLYOFFICE – now available as a snap

    Two years ago ONLYOFFICE developers released a desktop office suite that combined viewers and editors for text documents, spreadsheets and presentations.

    Last week ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors was released as a snap – the universal Linux packaging format. This blog explains with closer insight how the editors were created, the technological aspects, and why we decided to build the snap.

  • Kotlin programming language now available as a snap for Ubuntu
  • Purism Partners with Cryptography Pioneer Werner Koch to Create a New Encrypted Communication Standard for Security-Focused Devices

    Purism, maker of security-focused laptops has announced today that they have joined forces with leading cryptography pioneer, Werner Koch, to integrate hardware encryption into the company’s Librem laptops and forthcoming Librem 5 phone. By manufacturing hardware with its own software and services, Purism will include cryptography by default pushing the industry forward with unprecedented protection for end-user devices.

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Chromebooks Will Soon Get a Docked Magnifier Accessibility Tool, Try It Out Now

    Chromium evangelist at Google François Beaufort shares today with us a new experimental feature that's coming to a Chromebook near you later this year and it's now available for public testing.

    The new feature we're talking about here is a docked magnifier tool that will be available from the accessibility settings of the Chrome OS operating system and promises to let you magnify the top section of your screen. Users will be able to choose between a 2x and 20x zoom level value.

  • OpenMAX Tizonia H.264 Encoder/Decoder Land In Mesa 18.1 Git

    It was last summer that a GSoC student developer worked on an OpenMAX Tizonia state tracker for Gallium3D to replace the existing and out-of-date "Bellagio" code. Finally today that new Tizonia code has landed in Mesa 18.1-devel Git.

  • Termshot - Take Image Screenshot of Command Line Output

    In this article, I'll show you how to turn a command line output in Linux into an image using Termshot. Termshot is Linux tool which turns a cli command's output into a screenshot including colors and interactive text. This is of the essence if working on something that you need to screenshot for sharing, reference or documentation purposes. Sometimes you would copy terminal output in a text format but when you paste it on a different platform like CMS, it will lose original formatting and its colors giving it an atrocious look.


  • Back to Basics Part 4 – using grep in GNU/Linux

    One of the really confusing things for users who are new to messing with the command line, can be trying to search with specifics. A useful little tool for aiding in this process, is called grep, or “global regular expression print,” which will search for regular statements in anything you pipe it through, and show you matches for what you looked for (if any exist.)

  • Way of the Passive Fist is out and it’s finger-aching fun

    Way of the Passive Fist [Steam] is not the type of brawler I expected it to be, but it’s still a very fun experience.

  • The Linux beta of Arma 3 has been updated to 1.80, compatible with Windows again for a time

    The Linux beta of Arma 3 [Steam] is once again up to date with the Windows client at version 1.80 (meaning for now multiplayer with Windows gamers is possible), this also brings compatibility with the Tac-Ops Mission Pack.

  • MX-17.1-RC1 Release Candidate 1 available for testing

    We are pleased to offer MX-17.1-RC1 for testing.

today's leftovers

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  • Data Destroyer, Testdisk, Boot-repair and Windows7

    Nevertheless, the laptop became unusable. I could not boot it from HDD. I had to save it. I managed to create a Live USB with Kubuntu 16.04 image using another laptop I had. But even then, HDD partition table was destroyed. Linux operating system could not read anything from the disk.

    Here comes Testdisk. This is a small CLI utility to help in these situations. I installed it in the Live Kubuntu 16.04 and let it run. It took some time for Testdisk to scan my 1TB drive. I must admit that the interface of Testdisk is far from perfect, and you can easily null the scan results by pressing just one button. That made my work iterative before I finally managed to rescue my drive.

    Testdisk found partitions on my HDD, and even helped me to copy files from the data partition to an external HDD. At least, I saved my data.

    The next step was to recreate partition table. There were certain partitions for Linux, Linux Swap, OS restore and data. But the main Windows partition was lost, and instead I saw couple dozen broken bit-size partitions. Using Testdisk, I managed to recreate the partition table. Live Kubuntu could mount these partitions normally, which was already a big achievement. Few more files were copied from the Linux partition to the external drive, just in case.


  • The Engine Of HPC And Machine Learning

    The GPU motor has come a long way since the “G80” GPU was launched by Nvidia back in 2006, laying the groundwork for what has evolved into the Volta GPU, arguably them most complex and rich computing engine yet put into the field for parallel processing. This GPU had eight shader cores, each with sixteen processing elements, introducing a much more parallel architecture than prior chips from Nvidia.

  • DRI3 v1.2 Lands In X.Org Server 1.20

    We knew it was coming still for X.Org Server 1.20, but now the DRI3 v1.2 support has landed in the server.

    Along with the X.Org Server bits are support within the modesetting DDX driver and GLAMOR acceleration for the new DRI3 v1.2 capabilities. This includes support for multiple planes and buffer modifier requests. The modesetting DDX work includes atomic mode-setting support and supporting buffer formats/modifiers. The multi-plane support should be particularly useful for ARM/embedded Linux devices.

  • Kali Linux For Windows 10 Arrives In Microsoft Store
  • Kali Linux for Windows 10 now available in Microsoft Store
  • Kali Linux now available for download from Microsoft Store
  • Kali Linux hits the Microsoft Store (for Windows Subsystem on Linux)

    It still feels weird writing that a Linux distribution is something you can download and install from the Microsoft Store. But it’s been true for a while now. Windows 10 has an optional feature called the Windows Subsystem for Linux that lets you load a command-line Linux operating system that runs inside of Windows, allowing you to use Linux tools without rebooting or opening a virtual machine.

  • Redcore Linux Hardened 1803 Jupiter Alpha

    We are very happy to announce that Redcore Linux Hardened 1803 (Jupiter) reached Alpha status. This development cycle we are leaving new features on a second plan, and we are focusing mostly on the security aspect of the distribution.

today's leftovers: MX Linux 17, tiled map editor for GNU/Linux and more

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  • EzeeLinux Show 18.11 | PreShrink-VM and A Look At MX Linux 17
  • A Look at Tiled – Tiled map editor for GNU/Linux

    I’ve been a D&D Player for a long time, but have been without a campaign now for a few years. I’ve spoken to some friends, and there seems to be some building interest in starting an online campaign on such a website like Roll20.

    I started looking into options for building maps, outside of just using the Roll20 editor itself, and discovered a program called Tiled, which was exactly what I was looking for. It didn’t take me long after downloading it, to fall in love.

  • Encrypted files in Dropbox
  • How to Setup ConkyMatic on Arch Linux
  • UBPorts Is Working On Unity 8 For Debian

    The UBPorts community continues pushing Unity 8 for their mobile/convergence vision in the absence of Canonical as well as making other improvements. Besides offering Unity 8 to Ubuntu users, they are also working on Debian support.

    In today's latest Ubuntu Touch Q&A, there is a small reference near the end that they are working on the Unity 8 desktop environment as an option for Debian too. "Yes... But shhh this is a secret..."

  • Open-source trusted computing for IoT

    At this year's FOSDEM in Brussels, Jan Tobias Mühlberg gave a talk on the latest work on Sancus, a project that was originally presented at the USENIX Security Symposium in 2013. The project is a fully open-source hardware platform to support "trusted computing" and other security functionality. It is designed to be used for internet of things (IoT) devices, automotive applications, critical infrastructure, and other embedded devices where trusted code is expected to be run.

    A common security practice for some time now has been to sign executables to ensure that only the expected code is running on a system and to prevent software that is not trusted from being loaded and executed. Sancus is an architecture for trusted embedded computing that enables local and remote attestation of signed software, safe and secure storage of secrets such as encryption keys and certificates, and isolation of memory regions between software modules. In addition to the technical specification [PDF], the project also has a working implementation of code and hardware consisting of compiler modifications, additions to the hardware description language for a microcontroller to add functionality to the processor, a simulator, header files, and assorted tools to tie everything together.

    Many people are already familiar with code signing; by default, smartphones won't install apps that haven't been approved by the vendor (i.e. Apple or Google) because each app must be submitted for approval and then signed using a key that is shipped pre-installed on every phone. Similarly, many computers support mechanisms like ARM TrustZone or UEFI Secure Boot that are designed to prevent hardware rootkits at the bootloader level. In practice, some of those technologies have been used to restrict computers to boot only Microsoft Windows or Google Chrome OS, though there are ways to disable the enforcement for most hardware.

  • Longer upgrade cycles and growing purchases of used smartphones said to threaten flagship sales

    Longer upgrade cycles and an increasing number of consumers opting to buy used models poses a threat to future sales of flagship smartphones, argue industry commentators.

    Back in 2014, the average upgrade cycle was 23 months – likely attributable to most consumers upgrading every two years, while a much smaller number upgraded every year. But that number has already hit 31 months, says BayStreet Research, and is set to climb higher still  …

today's leftovers

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  • Using AMD Open Source and the amdgpu-pro OpenCL driver for image processing

    I have a AMD grahpics card and use the great Open Source driver which comes with my Linux distribution. However for image processing I want the OpenCL support of my graphics card. Currently that’s only provided by the amdgpu-pro driver.

  • AMDGPU 18.0 X.Org Driver Released

    It had been a half-year since the release of the last AMDGPU DDX release, xf86-video-amdgpu 1.4.0, but today that has been succeeded by xf86-video-amdgpu 18.0 as they also embark on a year-based versioning scheme.

    xf86-video-amdgpu 18.0.0 was released today as they move to a year-based versioning scheme with X.Org/DDX driver releases becoming less frequent thanks to the maturing xf86-video-modesetting generic driver and also more users moving to Wayland-based Linux desktops.

  • Google Updates: I/O is go, Linux in Chrome, free apps by the load

    IN A WEEK when so much attention has been focused on Barcelona, there's a few stories that still managed to sneak in under the radar, Google-wise. For everything we've already covered you can go here.

    Firstly, there's indications that we're going to start seeing Linux containers that can run in Chrome OS, much as Snaps do for Windows in Linux.

    Its' been possible through a hack for a while, but this appears to be the real deal, with a "Project Crostini" being the name for the integration.

  • Project Crostini: Chrome OS prepares to support Linux apps

    Similar to Microsoft’s attempts, it’s clear Google believes supporting Linux will ensure developers spend as much time on their respective platforms as possible. While it may seem counterintuitive, it means developers are more likely to make native apps for the platform they’re using in their spare time.

  • The Kubernetes Lesson

    When Kubernetes was first announced in 2014, reactions were mixed. Some pointed to its pedigree and that of its creators, Brendan Burns, Craig McLuckie and Joe Beda, as reason enough to pay attention. Others focused on the fact that it was derived from Google’s Borg software but was not itself Borg, dismissing it as “Borg-lite” or little more than an interesting science project. Both camps were forced to acknowledge, however, that it was entering a crowded and fragmented software market. It was one project among a rapidly expanding array of options.

    In this first quarter of 2018, however, Kubernetes is arguably the most visible of core infrastructure projects. Kubernetes has gone from curiosity to mainstream acceptance, crossing any number of chasms in the process. The project has been successful enough that even companies and projects that have competing container implementation strategies have been compelled to adopt it.

  • Open Source Disk Cleaner App BleachBit Gets First Update After 19 Months

    Brief: Open Source system cleaner application BleachBit version 2.0 has been released. The new version brings some improvements and new features to the most used system cleaning application on Linux.

  • A site for reviews of Tumbleweed snapshots

    As leading-edge rolling distributions go, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed is relatively stable, but it is still true that some snapshots are better than others. Jimmy Berry has announced the creation of a web site tracking the quality of each day's snapshot.

  • The Impact of Open Source Software on Developing IoT Solutions

    Global IoT spending could reach $1 trillion by 2020. This growth means that IoT development will accelerate and open source software solutions are critical.

  • IoT Developer Survey – Deadline March 5, 2018

    We are seeking input from Internet of Things (#IoT) developers to better understand their needs for software and related tools. Whether you’re a hacker instrumenting your home with Raspberry Pi, or an IT developer working on Industrial IoT solutions, we want to know how you’re using open source technologies to build your IoT solution. The output from this survey will help the open source community focus on the resources most needed by IoT developers.

  • Is The Stock A Good Investment? – Red Hat Inc (NYSE: RHT)
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Relative Momentum Indicator Trending Higher
  • Schroder Investment Management Group Purchases 4,156 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Snapdragon 820 based system can identify faces, age, gender, and emotion

    The VIA Smart Recognition Platform is a facial and object recognition board that runs Android 7.1.1 or Linux on a Snapdragon 820 by way of VIA’s SOM-9X20 module.

    VIA Technologies has re-spun its Snapdragon 820 based SOM-9X20 module and SOM-DB2 evaluation board as a VIA Smart Recognition Platform. The boards appear to be the same except that the SOM-9X20 is pre-loaded with a facial and object recognition stack.

  • Hot Chips Face Off at MWC and Embedded World

    This week’s Mobile World Congress in Barcelona and Embedded World in Nuremberg are primarily designed to showcase smartphones and embedded systems, respectively. Yet, increasingly the shows are focused on the processors that drive them.

    The only major chip announced in conjunction with this week’s conferences was Intel’s Stratix 10 TX FPGA, which is also the only chip covered here that doesn’t run Linux. Several other processors were announced earlier in the month, including AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V1000 and Epyc Embedded 3000. Meanwhile, new details were leaked about Intel’s 10nm Cannon Lake and Ice Lake chips, as well as some new 8th-Gen “Coffee Lake” models.

  • 8 Best Android Office Apps To Boost Your Productivity In 2018
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today's howtos

How to build something ‘useful’ with a Raspberry Pi

In honor of Pi Day, Chaim Gartenberg and I cooked up a tiny little Raspberry Pi project for yesterday’s episode of Circuit Breaker Live. We started with a simple concept: a button that says “Why?” when you press it, in honor of our favorite podcast. So we knew we’d need a button, some sound files, a little bit of Python code, and, of course, a Raspberry Pi. A new Pi is $35, but we found an old Raspberry Pi 2 in my desk drawer, which was up to the task. (Newer Pis have built-in Wi-Fi and faster processors, but for our simple button project we didn’t need internet or extra horsepower.) Read more

Wine 3.4

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 3.4 is now available.
  • Wine 3.4 Release Continues With Vulkan Upbringing, Some Wine-Staging Patches
    The latest bi-weekly release of Wine is now available for running your favorite or necessary Windows programs/games on Linux and macOS. Wine 3.4 is this latest release and it's significant for continuing to land the "WineVulkan" code. This does include the latest Wine Vulkan patches as of yesterday including the first bits of apps/games working and integration with the X11 driver.

Graphics: AMDGPU, Mesa 17.3.7, RADV

  • Linux 4.17 To Enable AMDGPU DC By Default For All Supported GPUs
    Since the introduction of the AMDGPU DC display code (formerly known as DAL) in Linux 4.15, this modern display stack has just been enabled by default for newer Radeon Vega and Raven Ridge devices. With Linux 4.17 that is changing with AMDGPU DC being enabled by default across the board for supported GPUs. Building off the earlier DRM-Next material for Linux 4.17, Alex Deucher minutes ago sent in another round of feature updates for targeting this next kernel cycle. This latest batch has continued code refactoring around PowerPlay, support for fetching the video RAM type from the video BIOS, allowing the TTM memory manager to drop its backing store when not needed, DC bandwidth calculation updates, enabling DC backlight control for pre-DCE11 GPUs, various display code fixes, and other bug fixes.
  • AMDGPU / ATI 18.0.1 X.Org DDX Driver Releases, Fixes Infinite Loop & Crashes
    Michel Dänzer of AMD issued bug-fix updates on Thursday for the xf86-video-ati and xf86-video-amdgpu DDX drivers. Just two weeks after the AMDGPU 18.0 X.Org driver release as the first version under their new year-based versioning scheme, the 18.0.1 bug-fix release is out. The xf86-video-amdgpu 18.0.1 DDX update fixes a potential infinite loop after a xorg-server reset in some configurations, Xorg crashing when multiple primary screens are configured, and using the TearFree feature could trigger Pixman library debugging spew.
  • Mesa 17.3.7 Nearing Release With 50+ Changes
    While waiting for Mesa 18.0, the Mesa 17.3.7 point release will soon hit stable users of this open-source, user-space graphics stack.
  • RADV Patches Are Closer For Sub-Group Capabilities
    Daniel Schürmann continues hacking on the sub-group patch-set for the RADV Vulkan driver to expose this important feature of the recent Vulkan 1.1 release.