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Misc

leftovers and howtos

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Misc
HowTos
  • What is the preferred developer operating system?

    If you compare traditional OSes, the differences shouldn't be that significant for developers.

    We deploy most apps in the cloud now, where you can choose to host them on whichever developer operating system you want -- well, maybe not on macOS, but certainly Windows or Linux. And, even if you deploy your application locally, virtual machines (VMs) make it easy to set up whichever type of OS environment you need.

    Cross-platform portability is an explicit goal for most popular programming languages today, such as C, Java and Python. C was born in the early 1970s as a way to make Unix portable across different hardware platforms. The Java virtual machine greatly simplified cross-OS portability. And Python applications can run on virtually any OS.

    Modern programming languages still aren't entirely OS-agnostic, of course. Developers often have to address OS-specific dependencies when they write an application, and the installation process for most applications differs from one OS to the next.

    Still, by and large, the modern programmer doesn't have to think about the differences between various developer operating systems nearly as much as she did a decade ago. In some cases, you can drag and drop the same application from one OS to another without requiring any configuration changes at all.

  • Linux / UNIX: Check If File Is Empty Or Not Using Shell Script
  • How to install a TIG stack on Ubuntu 18.04
  • How to install LDAP Account Manager on Ubuntu 18.04
  • How to install Winbox on Ubuntu and Linux Mint
  • How to install Webmin on Ubuntu 18.04 /16.04 LTS server
  • MySQL GUI Tools for Windows and Ubuntu/Linux: Top 8 Free & open source
  • How to install MySQL workbench on Ubuntu
  • Christmas Maps

    It´s been ages since I last shared any Maps news, so it´s probably about time…
    Some things have happened since the stable 3.30.0 release in September.

    First off we have a new application icon, courtesy of Jakub Steiner using the icon style for the upcoming GNOME 3.32

  • Calamares seeking translators

    Calamares, the Linux system installer for boutique distro’s, is translated into 50 or so languages. It’s not a KDE project, but uses a bunch of KDE technology like the KDE Frameworks and KPMCore. It doesn’t use the KDE translation infrastructure, either, but Transifex.

  • ROOT histograms

    In one of the previous blogs we introduced the new capability of LabPlot to calculate and to draw histograms. Given a data set, the user can calculate the histogram using different binning methods and to visualize the calculated histogram in the new plot type “histogram”. A different workflow is given when the histogram was already calculated in another application and the application like LabPlot is just used to visualize the result of such a calculation and to adjust the final appearance of the plot.

    Couple of weeks ago Christoph Roick contributed a new input filter for ROOT histograms. ROOT is a computational environment developed at CERN that is used for data processing, statistical analysis and data visualization, mainly for purposes in the high energy physics community.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Director v1.6.0 is available

    Icinga Director v1.6.0 has been released with Multi-Instance Support, Configuration Baskets and improved Health Checks. We’re excited to announce new features that will help you to work more efficiently.

  • Fedora Looks To Build Firefox With Clang For Better Performance & Compilation Speed

    Following the move by upstream Mozilla in switching their Linux builds of Firefox from being compiled by GCC to LLVM Clang, Fedora is planning the same transition of compilers in the name of compilation speed and resulting performance.

    FESCo Ticket 2020 laid out the case, "Mozilla upstream switches from gcc to clang and we're going to follow upstream here due to clang performance, maintenance costs and compilation speed. Tom Stellard (clang maintainer) has asked me to file this ticket to comply with Fedora processes."

  • Work in progress: PHP stack for EL-8
  • Sandwich-style SBC offers four 10GbE SFP+ ports

    SolidRun’s “ClearFog CX 8K” SBC is built around a “CEx7 A8040” COM Express Type 7 module that runs Linux on a quad -A72 Armada A8040. Features include 4x 10GbE SFP+ ports and mini-PCIe, M.2, and SATA expansion.

    In August, SolidRun updated its ClearFog line of Linux-driven router boards with a high-end ClearFog GT 8K SBC with the same 2GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A72 Marvell Armada A8040 SoC found on its MacchiatoBIN Double Shot Mini-ITX board. Now, the company has returned to the headless (no graphics) Armada A8040 with the ClearFog CX 8K.

    [..]

    It’s rare to see an Arm-based Type 7 module.

  • Watch Out: Clicking “Check for Updates” Still Installs Unstable Updates on Windows 10

    Microsoft hasn’t learned its lesson. If you click the “Check for Updates” button in the Settings app, Microsoft still considers you a “seeker” and will give you “preview” updates that haven’t gone through the normal testing process.

    This problem came to everyone’s attention with the release of the October 2018 Update. It was pulled for deleting people’s files, but anyone who clicked “Check for Updates” in the first few days effectively signed up as a tester and got the buggy update. The “Check for Updates” button apparently means “Please install potentially updates that haven’t gone through a normal testing process.”

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Mad Dog 21/21: Hat In Hand

    IBM’s acquisition of Red Hat is for Ginni Rometty as vital and significant as Lou Gerstner’s development of IBM’s services business in the 1990s. If IBM can properly integrate Red Hat, IBM’s legacy businesses and strategic initiatives will all be reinvigorated. This is not merely desirable, but absolutely necessary. Without the Red Hat acquisition, IBM is threatened with advancing torpidity and imminent decline. For IBM right now, it is Red Hat do or die.

    Red Hat’s Enterprise Linux operating system already contributes to the viability of IBM’s server offerings. But when an IBM hardware customer, let’s say a mainframe shop, installs RHEL it does so with other Linux alternatives on other platforms looming as contenders. Until now, those contenders could argue that IBM’s hardware is not the most prominent platform for RHEL, and therefore not the primary recipient of updates, security fixes and enhancements. That will no longer be the case. IBM will be able to assert its prominence in the Red Hat universe. A similar case can now be made for services arrangements that include the use of Red Hat products. When it comes to strategic initiatives, IBM will be able to combine its AI technologies including Watson related services, with Red Hat products and services. Basically, IBM’s position in competition with HP, Microsoft and Oracle will be enhanced, even if Red Hat continues to assert its independence and self-direction.

  • How Open Policy Agent Works to Secure Cloud-Native Workloads

    A core element of IT security is having proper policies in place that define what is and what isn't allowed for a given process or entity.

    In the cloud-native world, where there are multiple distributed elements that can live in different deployment modalities, the challenge of defining and implementing policy is nontrivial, but that's the challenge that the Open Policy Agent (OPA) project is looking to solve. In a session at the DockerCon Europe 2018 event in Barcelona, Spain, this week, Torin Sandall, software engineer at Strya, and Justin Cormack, software engineer at Docker, outlined how OPA can help to create and enforce security.

  • QtWS post (-scriptum)

    This week I was briefly in Berlin for the Qt World Summit, or QtWS for short. I was there to run the KDE booth as part of the exposition at the summit, rather than to do any talks (or, for that matter, watch any). First, a bunch of thanks are in order: to Sari and Milja from Moodboard for organising most of the things, to Katica from the Qt Company for doing PR on the show floor, to Kai and Roman from KDE for standing at the booth with me, and to the 700-or-so attendees for listening to us when we talk about KDE as a community, about KDE Frameworks and Plasma in laptops, tablets, phones and embedded. Thanks also to Paul and kde-promo for getting us some nice source material for stickers and shirts.

  • Fedora 30 To Finally Use GnuPG 2 As The Default

    While many Linux distributions have moved past GnuPG 1 and some no longer even packaging it, Fedora Linux continues using GnuPG 1 as the default gpg, but that is likely to change with Fedora 30.

  • Please test GnuTLS 3.6 in experimental

    GnuTLS 3.6.x has been marked stable with release 3.6.5. Binary packages are available in experimental. - Please test! FWIW I have rebuilt all reverse build-dependencies without finding GnuTLS-triggered build errors.

  • Two printers with one Rpi?

    Last time I tried printing with the raspberry pi I had only one machine to try with now I have two. Lets see if the Pi can handle two instances of AtCore and control two 3d printers at the same time. This is a follow up to AtCore takes to the pi. So please read that for more about the RPi setup. This post is in video form, please enjoy.

  • Arch Linux ARM on the Allwinner NanoPi A64

    I've obtained two NanoPi A64's a long while ago and recently thought of setting them up as a HA cluster as an exercise. Since setting it up with real hardware is a lot more fun then with VM's or containers. And I wanted to try out aarch64 and see how well that fares on mainline Linux.

  • Electron and the Decline of Native Apps
  • Phoronix Test Suite 8.4.1 Released For Better BSD Support, RHEL7 Bug Workaround

    Phoronix Test Suite 8.4.1 is now available as a minor but important update to last month's Phoronix Test Suite 8.4-Skiptvet release.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Chromebook file sharing with Linux feature pushed back to Chrome OS 73

    Well, this is a bummer, although I understand the reasoning. Last month, a new feature arrived in the Dev Channel of Chrome OS 72 to support sharing local files with Project Crostini, the function that brings Linux app support to Chromebooks. That feature is now disabled in the latest Dev Channel version, which landed today Don’t worry, it’s coming back with Chrome OS 73, or at least that’s the plan.
    What’s the reason? It’s pretty simple really. According to the Chrome bug tracker, the “backend features are not yet ready for M72.”

  • Blender Lands Support For NVIDIA RTX Turing / CUDA 10

    This week the Blender 3D modeling software finally picked up support for CUDA 10 in order to support the latest NVIDIA RTX "Turing" graphics cards.

    It took a while but on Blender Git master as well as the branched Blender 2.80 code there is now the support for CUDA 10.0 for Cycles and NVIDIA Turing GPU support.

  • Finding insecure network connections

    One obvious aspect of KDE’s privacy goal is eliminating all network connections that are not using transport encryption. That’s however not as straightforward to ensure as it may sound, it’s easy to have a long forgotten HTTP link in a rarely used dialog that should have been changed to HTTPS many years ago already. How do we find all these cases?

  • Antergos 18.12 XFCE Run Through
  • Lintian Brush

    With Debian packages now widely being maintained in Git repositories, there has been an uptick in the number of bulk changes made to Debian packages. Several maintainers are running commands over many packages (e.g. all packages owned by a specific team) to fix common issues in packages.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Episode 9: Humanity, Magic, and Glitter

    Katherine Druckman and Doc Searls talk to Bryan Lunduke about Linux and humanity.

  • FlightGear Flight Simulator 2018.3 Released with New Features

    FlightGear 2018.3 was finally released with many exciting new features, enhancements and bugfixes including usability improvements to the launcher, better visuals for AI and MP aircraft.

  • Linux Rabbit Attacks IoT Devices to Secretly Mine Monero [Ed: Nothing to do with "Linux". Relies on open ports with weak passwords, unlike Windows, which just has intentional back doors.]

    The global cryptocurrency mining malware trend isn’t coming to an end anytime soon. A newly discovered malware strain specifically targets Linux and IoT devices. This is a different approach as most of these attacks focus on Windows devices. Researchers are concerned this new mining software will only make cryptojacking an even bigger problem. Known as Linux Rabbit, this software kit packs quite the punch.

  • Linux Rabbit and Rabbot Malware Leveraged to Install Cryptominers [Ed: They even called it “Linux Rabbit”; could just call it "WeakPassword Rabbit”]

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Avouch Linux 0.1.0 Beta 1 Gnome Run Through
  • My Free Software Activities in November 2018

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • How to harness big data for maximum business value

    Despite most businesses understanding the power and competitive advantage they could gain from harnessing their big data more effectively and leveraging it more efficiently, it’s not an easy goal to achieve.

    That’s why we’ve partnered with Spicule to co-present, ‘How to harness big data for maximum business value’, a webinar dealing with the challenges of gathering and processing data.

  • The Intel Linux Discrete GPU Driver Updated -- For Their Two Decade Old i740

    While we are all super anxious to learn more about the Intel discrete graphics card offerings planned for their initial debut in 2020, in representing the beauty of open-source, there was an open-source Linux display driver update on Thursday for their "original" discrete card: the Intel740.

    Yesterday marked the xf86-video-i740 1.4.0 driver release, the open-source X.Org driver that supports the original Intel 740 display hardware as Intel's only released discrete graphics chip up to this point. That was two decades ago, but in showing the possibilities by open-source software, there's this new display driver release.

  • 3.5-inch SBC features Intel Coffee Lake chips

    Commell’s 3.5-inch “LS-37L” SBC showcases Intel’s 8th Gen Core CPUs with triple displays, up to 16GB DDR4, 2x GbE, 2x SATA, 4x USB 3.1, 6x serial, and a mini-PCIe slot.

    In August, Commell launched the LV-67X, one of the first industrial Mini-ITX boards with Intel’s 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” CPUs. Now, it has followed up with a Coffee Lake based 3.5-inch LS-37L board. The SBC has the same FCLGA1151 socket, supporting up to 6-core, 65W TDP Coffee Lake S-series processors such as the 3.1GHz/4.3GHz Core i5-8600.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Chrome OS to get Firebase App Indexing for Android apps and keyword search for Linux apps

    One of the key features of Chrome OS is its built-in search capabilities (Google is a search engine company, after all), which can show you web results in addition to matching apps. Now this Chrome OS search box is getting two improvements to make Android apps more dynamic thanks to Firebase App Indexing and make finding your installed Linux apps easier.

    As of today, the Chrome OS search box is extremely capable, showing a healthy mixture of web results, local files, apps, and some other nifty tricks that web search can do like unit conversion. Combined with handy Assistant support, rolling out soon to “all Chromebooks,” Chrome OS tries to have everything you could ever need right at your fingertips, but there will always be room for improvement.

  • The Linux Foundation to Launch New Tooling Project to Improve Open Source Compliance

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announces the formation of the new Automated Compliance Tooling (ACT) project. Using open source code comes with a responsibility to comply with the terms of that code’s license, which can sometimes be challenging for users and organizations to manage. The goal of ACT is to consolidate investment in, and increase interoperability and usability of, open source compliance tooling, which helps organizations manage compliance obligations.

    ACT also welcomes two new projects to be hosted at The Linux Foundation as part of the initiative, in addition to two existing Linux Foundation projects that will become part of the new project. The new projects are complementary to existing Linux Foundation compliance projects such as OpenChain, which identifies key recommended processes to make open source license compliance simpler and more consistent, and the Open Compliance Program, which educates and helps developers and companies understand their license requirements and how to build efficient, frictionless and often automated processes to support compliance.

  • mesa 18.3.0-rc6

    The sixth release candidate for Mesa 18.3.0 is now available.

    With no more bugs blocking the release, this will be the final release candidate and Mesa 18.3.0 final is expected tomorrow around 18:00 GMT.

  • Mesa 18.3 Expected For Release Tomorrow

    The sixth and final release candidate of Mesa 18.3 is now available for last minute testing of this quarterly Mesa3D update.

    Mesa developers have cleared out the lingering blocker bugs while also fixing a few other bugs in this extended development period. Mesa 18.3.0-RC6 was issued today while barring any last minute issues the 18.3.0 release will come out by the end of day tomorrow.

  • Ancient Frontier: Steel Shadows Getting Linux Release

    Fair Weather has been developing the Ancient Frontier series for quite some time, and released the original game last year. It was a far-future turn-based tactical RPG with a heavy sci-fi influence. Anyone who loves Star Trek or Star Wars will get a kick out of the overall look of the game right away - but what set it apart was its gameplay. Using a hexagonal grid formation for combat, you battled enemy ships and forces to explore the vast frontiers of space and help those who need while damaging those who hurt others.

  • The chaos and action of Total War: Warhammer II makes for a gripping strategy title

    Whether it’s dealing with marauding pirates or stuck up elves, it’s fun to conquer the world in WARHAMMER II. There’s plenty to love here with vibrant and varied factions carrying the day. Here's my thoughts after dozens of hours spent fighting everyone.

  • Atcore / Atelier Dec ’18 Progress

    Since I find myself with a bit of down time. I have decided to update you all on the progress of atcore and atelier. We should hopefully be ready soon to start the process of releasing AtCore 2.0. I only have a few things I really want to get merged before I start that process. In the mean time here is what has been landed to AtCore since my last post.

  • Bodhi 3.11.3 released
  • GitKraken Released Official Snap package for Linux

    GitKraken Snap is containerised software package designed to work within most Linux desktop. It bundles its required dependencies and auto-updates itself once a new release package published.

  • Google unveils open source UI toolkit Flutter to speed app building for developers

    Google is aiming to ease cross-platform mobile application development with the Tuesday release of the Flutter toolkit, representing yet another attempt to create a standard to address all possible use cases. That said, Google's position as the creator of Android—and the developer of dozens of iOS apps—puts the company in a much better position to address the needs developers realistically face every day, compared to frameworks such as Apache Cordova.

    [..]

    Lastly, Google highlights the open source BSD-style license, which prevents any future uncertainty about the use of the toolkit. The tech giant has been embroiled in a years-long legal battle with Oracle, as that company claims that Android violates copyrights and patents due to how Android implements Java.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Liferea News Reader 1.12.6 Released (Ubuntu PPA)

    Liferea (Linux Feed Reader) 1.12.6 was released day. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.10.

  • Necuno is a New Open Source Smartphone Running KDE

    It’s been more than two years since Ubuntu’s dream of creating a Linux smartphone was shattered. But it hasn’t discouraged others from trying their own hands on a Linux-based smartphone.

    Librem 5, the privacy-focused Linux-based smartphone, should be arriving in 2019. Even Pine64 is aiming for a budget Linux smartphone.

  • My GUADEC 2018 presentation

    I just realized that I forgot to publish my presentation from this year's GUADEC. Sorry, here it is!

  • Proxmox VE 5.3 is available

    since almost half a year we have been constantly improving Proxmox VE and adding new features. Today, we are proud to announce the final release of the new Version 5.3.

    [...]

    Here are the highlights of the new version 5.3:

    Based on Debian 9.6 and Linux Kernel 4.15
    You can create CephFS and the Metadata servers (MDS) in the GUI
    Improved disk management: add ZFS raid volumes, LVM, and LVMthin pools
    ZFS over iSCSI storage plug-in can access LIO target in the Linux kernel
    LXC: nesting is enabled for containers - you can use LXC or LXD inside a container
    PCI passthrough and vGPUs via GUI
    Countless bugfixes
    and much more...

  • VyOS 1.2.0-rc10 is available for download

    We have a bunch of issues that need testing. Please tell us if the following features work for you, or help us figure out a reproducing procedure! We need to make sure they are resolved before we make a stable 1.2.0 release, but we are either unable to reproduce them because they are hardware-specific and we don't have required hardware anywhere; or we cannot reproduce them using the provided procedure, which may mean either that the procedure is incomplete, or that the bug is already fixed.

  • Nitrux 1.1.1 overview | Meet Nitrux, powered by Linux, KDE Plasma 5, Qt and Nomad Desktop.
  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 04 December 2018

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

  • Design and Web team summary – 04 December 2018

    Welcome to the latest work and updates from the design and web team.

  • Máirín Duffy: Fedora Design Team Meeting, 4 Nollaig 2018
  • Linux-friendly Type 7 modules take to the skies

    Congatec unveiled two rugged, up to 16-core COM Express Basic Type 7 modules for aircraft computers: a Xeon D 15xx and Pentium D-15xx based Conga-B7XD and an Atom C3xxx driven Conga-B7AC. There’s also a new Conga-X7EVAL Type 7 carrier.

    Congatec has been slow to get into the COM Express Basic Type 7 “server-on-module” market but has made up for lost time by announcing two Linux- and Windows supported Type 7 models. Designed for “converged edge servers in aircrafts,” the Intel Xeon D and Pentium D based Conga-B7XD and the Intel Atom C3xxx based Conga-B7AC are the first aviation-focused Type 7 modules we’ve seen.

  • Rugged box PC series features PoE+ and smart hardware monitoring

    EFCO launched four Linux-ready “Eagle Eye” embedded machine vision computers with Intel 7th/6th Gen Core or Atom processors. The high-end systems support PoE+ IP cameras and EFCO’s AI-infused EKit hardware monitoring platform.

  • Flutter 1.0 Release Shows Google Is Serious About Project Fuchsia

    In Google’s quest to create a universal OS (project fuchsia), they also need the tools to make it a reality. A big part of Android’s success can be attributed to the open source nature of the OS and the excellent SDK support for developers. We know Flutter will run natively on Fuchsia, but it does bring notable benefits now.

  • Shell in a Handbasket | LINUX Unplugged 278

    We chat with a developer who's gotten Linux running on iOS devices, do a deep dive into Clear Linux, and discuss Xubuntu ending 32bit support.

    Plus why Android in the cloud, and a bunch of community news.

    Special Guests: Alan Pope, Martin Wimpress, and Theodore Dubois.

  • LHS Episode #262: RigPi Deep Dive

    Welcome to Episode 262 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, we have a special guest, Howard Nurse, W6HN, a longtime amateur radio operator and open-source enthusiast. He has developed the RigPi Station Server, a Raspberry Pi-based hardware and software rig control and operation solution that will be manufactured and sold by MFJ Enterprises.

  • Seattle’s Upbound introduces Crossplane, an open-source project to help companies manage applications across multiple public clouds

    Eventually Crossplane could help users automate deployment practices such as specifying which cloud provider — and which region inside that cloud provider’s network — should run a given application depending on how and where it is used. If it works as designed, this could make it much easier to manage a multicloud environment, which is an undertaking most companies do for strategic rather than practical reasons at the moment.

  • IBM and Red Hat want to become the leader in global hybrid and multicloud market

    When the news hit on October 29, 2018, that IBM had acquired Red Hat Inc., in a $34 billion deal, it stunned the technology world. And with good reason, as Red Hat’s merging with IBM was the biggest software acquisition ever achieved. But outside all of the hype, what will this actually mean for Red Hat going forward? To put it simply: global growth and worldwide leadership.

    “It puts us several years ahead of where we have been — or where we would have been, frankly — and ultimately … our intent is that with IBM, we’ll become the leading hybrid and multicloud provider in the world,” said Mike Ferris (pictured), vice president of technical business development and business architecture at Red Hat.

  • Quickly try Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud

    t’s been some time since I last talked with you about putting JBoss BPM Suite (now called Red Hat Process Automation Manager) into your cloud, and with the new release, it’s time to talk AppDev in the cloud again.

    It’s time to update the story and see how to put Red Hat Process Automation Manager in your cloud so you are set up with a standard configuration to start your first business rules project.

  • Red Hat leads the charge into remote site and edge computing with open source hyperconverged infrastructure

    Initially aimed at remote office/branch office (ROBO) deployment, more Red Hat customers have been looking for infrastructure solutions at the edge. In industries like energy, retail, banking, telecommunications, and the public sector, many organizations rely on business-critical applications that must be deployed with limited space, budgetary constraints, and a growing scarcity of specialized IT staff.  

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Microsoft Fails To Recognise Its Own Mobile Devices: Windows 10 Bug [Ed: When your platform is at less than 1%...]

    This simply means that Microsoft failed to recognize a windows device when used. This would naturally lead users to believe that the app doesn’t even exist for Windows devices, which is not the case. Sad to say that this shows how important smartphones are to Microsoft and how little they value them. It is very likely that this bug will go unfixed until after a long series of updates as usually is the case.

  • gamingdirectional: Create a next level scene for pygame project
  • Rawhide notes from the trail, the late November issue
  • Monthly News – November 2018

    Many thanks to all the people who help our project financially. Donations are up again, you were more than 500 to send us funds in October and we now have 129 patrons on Patreon.

    The BETA release for Linux Mint 19.1 will be out tomorrow. We’re counting on you to help us find bugs and to help us fix them, so that we can raise the quality of the release and get to stable before Christmas.

    Some of the new features were described here on this blog, others will be unveiled tomorrow. This is an exciting time for all of us and we hope you enjoy it and have fun with the new release.

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More in Tux Machines

Debian and Derivatives

  • Montreal Bug Squashing Party - Jan 19th & 20th 2019
    We are organising a BSP in Montréal in January! Unlike the one we organised for the Stretch release, this one will be over a whole weekend so hopefully folks from other provinces in Canada and from the USA can come.
  • Debian Cloud Sprint 2018
    Recently we have made progress supporting cloud usage cases; grub and kernel optimised for cloud images help with reducing boot time and required memory footprint. There is also growing interest in non-x86 images, and FAI can now build such images. Discussion of support for LTS images, which started at the sprint, has now moved to the debian-cloud mailing list). We also discussed providing many image variants, which requires a more advanced and automated workflow, especially regarding testing. Further discussion touched upon providing newer kernels and software like cloud-init from backports. As interest in using secure boot is increasing, we might cooperate with other team and use work on UEFI to provide images signed boot loader and kernel.
  • Third Point Release of Univention Corporate Server 4.3-3
    With UCS 4.3-3 the third point release for Univention Corporate Server (UCS) 4.3 is now available, which includes a number of important updates and various new features.
  • Canonical Launches MicroK8s
    Canonical, the parent company of Ubuntu, has announced MicroK8s, a snap package of Kubernetes that supports more than 42 flavors of Linux. MicroK8s further simplifies the deployment of Kubernetes with its small disk and memory footprint. Users can deploy Kubernetes in a few seconds. It can run on the desktop, the server, an edge cloud, or an IoT device. Snap is a self-contained app package solution created by Canonical that competes with Flatpak, which is backed by Red Hat and Fedora. Snap offers macOS and Windows-like packages with all dependencies bundled with it. A snap package of Kubernetes means any Linux distribution that supports Snap can benefit from MicroK8s
  • Compiz: Ubuntu Desktop's little known best friend

OSS Leftovers

  • Android Open Source Project now includes the Fuchsia SDK and a Fuchsia ‘device’
     

    In a new commit posted today to Android’s Gerrit source code management, two Fuchsia-related repos have been added to the primary “manifest” for the Android Open Source Project. For the unfamiliar, this manifest is used to inform Google’s download tool “Repo” of what should be included when you download AOSP.

  • Google Fuchsia: Why This New Operating System Solves a Huge Coding Problem
     

    The mobile layout has been code-named “Armadillo” and the other view has been dubbed “Capybara,” reported 9to5Google. Both sides of Fuchsia will work together using a tab system that will make up a majority of the user experience.

  • Lessons in Vendor Lock-in: Shaving
    The power of open standards extends beyond today into the future. When my son gets old enough to shave, I can pass down one of my all-metal, decades-old antique razors to him, and it will still work. While everyone else in a decade will have to shave with some $20-per-blade disposable razor with three aloe strips, seven blades, and some weird vibrating and rotating motor, he will be able to pick any razor from my collection and find affordable replacement blades. This is the power of open standards and the freedom to avoid vendor lock-in.
  • Help us to make document compatibility even better
    The Document Liberation Project (DLP) is a sister project to LibreOffice, and provides many software libraries for reading and writing a large range of file formats – such as files created by other productivity tools. Thanks to the DLP, LibreOffice (and other programs) can open many legacy, proprietary documents, but there’s always room for improvement! Check out this short video to learn more:
  • GNU Guix: Back from SeaGL 2018
    SeaGL 2018 has concluded. Thank you to everyone in the local Seattle community who came to participate! As previously announced, Chris Marusich gave a talk introducing GNU Guix to people of all experience levels. Some very Guixy swag was handed out, including printed copies of this handy Guix reference card. The room was packed, the audience asked great questions, and overall it was tons of fun! If you weren't able to come to SeaGL this year, that's OK! You can watch a video of the talk below.

Servers: Kubernetes, CNCF, Red Hat and More

  • ​Bitnami Kubernetes Production Runtime released
    If you want to use a safe third-party container, smart people know they should turn to Bitnami. This company packages, deploys, and maintains applications in virtually any format for any platform. Now, at KubeCon in Seattle, Bitnami announced its Kubernetes release: Bitnami Kubernetes Production Runtime (BKPR) 1.0, a production-ready open source project. So, with everyone and their cloud provider offering Kubernetes, why should you care? Well, first, BKPR provides built-in monitoring, alerting, and metrics automatically, thereby enabling developers to avoid reinventing the wheel when they rollout a Kubernetes application.
  • Why the Cloud-Native Market Is Expanding at KubeCon
    The KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America event is a beacon for news, with vendors showcasing their wares and making multiple announcements. KubeCon + CloudNativeCon runs here from Dec. 11-13 and has brought 8,000 attendees and more than 187 vendors into the exhibit hall. Kubernetes itself is part of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), which is also the home now to 31 open-source cloud projects. In this eWEEK Data Points article, we look at the major areas of innovation and new services announced at the conference.
  • Add It Up: Enterprise Adoption of Kubernetes Is Growing
    A recently updated user survey from monitoring software provider Datadog confirms an increase in Kubernetes adoption. We believe this is the result of three factors: 1) more organizations using containers in production; 2) Kubernetes has emerged as the leading orchestration platform; 3) organizations are choosing to adopt Kubernetes earlier in cloud native voyage. There is also some evidence that Kubernetes adoption is more likely among organizations with more containers being deployed. This article highlights findings from several studies released in conjunction with KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America, a Kubernetes user conference being held this week in Seattle. Cloud Foundry’s most recent survey of IT decision makers shows container production usage jumping from 22 percent in early 2016 to 38 percent in late 2018, with these deployments increasingly being described as “broad.” The Cloud Foundry report also found an increase in the number of containers being deployed — in 2016, only 37 percent of cont
  • Oracle Q&A: A Refresher on Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel
    Oracle caused quite a stir in 2010 when it announced its Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for Oracle Linux. We’ve checked in with Sergio Leunissen, Vice President, Linux and VM Development at Oracle, for an update on the ABCs of this important introduction as well as the company’s latest take on Linux.
  • Get the Skills You Need to Monitor Systems and Services with Prometheus
    Open source software isn’t just transforming technology infrastructure around the world, it is also creating profound opportunities for people with relevant skills. From Linux to OpenStack to Kubernetes, employers have called out significant skills gaps that make it hard for them to find people fluent with cutting-edge tools and platforms. The Linux Foundation not only offers self-paced training options for widely known tools and platforms, such as Linux and Git, but also offers options specifically targeting the rapidly growing cloud computing ecosystem. The latest offering in this area is Monitoring Systems and Services with Prometheus (LFS241). Prometheus is an open source monitoring system and time series database that is especially well suited for monitoring dynamic cloud environments. It contains a powerful query language and data model in addition to integrated alerting and service discovery support. The new course is specifically designed for software engineers and systems administrators wanting to learn how to use Prometheus to gain better insights into their systems and services.
  • Red Hat Container Development Kit 3.7 now available
  • CodeReady Workspaces for OpenShift (Beta) – It works on their machines too
    “It works on my machine.” If you write code with, for, or near anybody else, you’ve said those words at least once. Months ago I set up a library or package or environment variable or something on my machine and I haven’t thought about it since. So the code works for me, but it may take a long time to figure out what’s missing on your machine.
  • OpenShift & Kubernetes: Where We’ve Been and Where We’re Going Part 2
    The growth and innovation in the Kubernetes project, since it first launched just over four years ago, has been tremendous to see. In part 1 of my blog, I talked about how Red Hat has been a key contributor to Kubernetes since the launch of the project, detailed where we invested our resources and what drove those decisions. Today, that innovation continues and we are just as excited for what comes next. In this blog, I’d like to talk about where we are going and what we’re focused on, as we continue driving innovation in Kubernetes and the broader cloud native ecosystem and building the next generation of OpenShift.
  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform and making it easier to manage bare metal
    Bare metal is making a comeback. At Red Hat we have been observing an increase of the use of bare metal in general. And we aren’t the only ones. In 2017’s OpenStack User Survey there had been a growth of bare metal in production environments from 9% to 20% of the production deployments. The 2018 survey says that adoption of Ironic is being driven by Kubernetes, with 37% of respondents who use Kubernetes on OpenStack using the bare metal provisioner. And there are many reasons for this growth. A great blog post about Kubernetes on metal with OpenShift by Joe Fernandes described this growth in the context of containers on bare metal with Kubernetes as a driver for this growth. But, it doesn’t stop there - High-Performance Compute (HPC), access to hardware devices or scientific workloads such as AI/ML or data lake management are also contributing to this increase.
  • etcd finds new home at CNCF
    CoreOS has moved to secure the independence of etcd by donating the distributed key-value store to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. The project was started by Core OS – now part of Red Hat – in 2013 to handle coordination between container instances so that a system reboot was possible without affecting the uptime of applications running on top. Its name can be seen as an hint to the management of configuration files, which over the years have grown to be stored in /etc directory in Unix systems.
  • Kubernetes etcd data project joins CNCF
    How do you store data across a Kubernetes container cluster? With etcd. This essential part of Kubernetes has been managed by CoreOS/Red Hat. No longer. Now, the open-source etcd project has been moved from Red Hat to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). What is etcd? No, it's not what happens when a cat tries to type a three-letter acronyms. Etcd (pronounced et-see-dee) was created by the CoreOS team in 2013. It's an open-source, distributed, consistent key-value database for shared configuration, service discovery, and scheduler coordination. It's built on the Raft consensus algorithm for replicated logs.
  • Welcome etcd to CNCF
    Etcd has been written for distributed systems like Kubernetes as a fault-tolerant and reliable data base. Clients can easily watch certain keys and get notified when their values change which allows scaling to a large number of clients that can reconfigure themselves when a value changes.
  • etcd: Current status and future roadmap
    etcd is a distributed key value store that provides a reliable way to manage the coordination state of distributed systems. etcd was first announced in June 2013 by CoreOS (part of Red Hat as of 2018). Since its adoption in Kubernetes in 2014, etcd has become a fundamental part of the Kubernetes cluster management software design, and the etcd community has grown exponentially. etcd is now being used in production environments of multiple companies, including large cloud provider environments such as AWS, Google Cloud Platform, Azure, and other on-premises Kubernetes implementations. CNCF currently has 32 conformant Kubernetes platforms and distributions, all of which use etcd as the datastore. In this blog post, we’ll review some of the milestones achieved in latest etcd releases, and go over the future roadmap for etcd. Share your thoughts and feedback on features you consider important on the mailing list: etcd-dev@googlegroups.com.
  • Red Hat contributes etcd, the cornerstone of Kubernetes, to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation
    Today Red Hat is thrilled to announce our contribution of etcd, an open source project that is a key component of Kubernetes, and its acceptance into the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), a vendor-neutral foundation housed under The Linux Foundation to drive the adoption of cloud native systems. The etcd project’s focus is safely storing critical data of a distributed system and it demonstrated its quality early on. It is most notably the primary datastore of Kubernetes, the de facto standard system for container orchestration. Today we're excited to transfer stewardship of etcd to the same body that cares for the growth and maintenance of Kubernetes. Given that etcd powers every Kubernetes cluster, this move brings etcd to the community that relies on it most at the CNCF.
  • Banks take next steps to digital refinement
    The financial services industry (FSI) has gotten the message: customer expectations have changed radically. They want to experience banking services through multiple digital channels, and they want those services to go well beyond the generic products that traditional banks typically offer. Customers are looking for personalization, are comfortable with service automation, and are eager to get what they need quickly and easily. As the value chain for financial institutions’ services expands along with the need to deliver new and relevant customer offerings, their dexterity is being put to the test, according to an article by The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU). To enable the flexibility and agility they need to support a dynamic environment, they’ve begun to create a culture of continuous delivery (CD). This allows for continuous cross-channel development, may allow deployment of features in hours rather than months, and lends support for performing system upgrades with zero downtime and without disturbing the customer experience.
  • CentOS 7-1810 "Gnome" overview | The community enterprise operating system
  • How to prepare for digital transformation with Red Hat Virtualization and Veeam
    Red Hat has a history of helping organizations reduce the cost of IT, from infrastructure to applications, while also helping to lay the foundation for open source digital transformation. More recently, Red Hat has sought to help organizations reduce the cost of virtualization, aiming to make it easier to accelerate their digital transformation journey through innovative technologies such as Red Hat Ansible Automation or Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, Red Hat’s comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes Platform.
  • Red Hat schedules stockholder meeting to vote on $34B IBM deal
  • INVESTIGATION NOTICE: Kaskela Law LLC Announces Shareholder Investigation of Red Hat, Inc.
  • Red Hat sets date for stockholders to vote on the merger with IBM
  • Arista Works With Red Hat and Tigera on Container Environments for Enterprises
    Arista Networks is working with Red Hat and Tigera to help enterprises adopt containers in both private and public clouds. The three companies are demonstrating a preview of their upcoming offering this week at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2018 in Seattle. The integrated product will include Arista’s containerized Extensible Operating System (cEOS) and CloudVision software along with Red Hat’s OpenShift Container Platform and Tigera’s Secure Enterprise Edition.
  • Knative Meshes Kubernetes with Serverless Workloads
    Google Cloud’s Knative initiative launched in July is expanding to include an updated version of Google’s first commercial Knative offering along with a batch of new distributions based on serverless computing framework. Knative is a Kubernetes-based platform for building and managing serverless workloads in which cloud infrastructure acts as a server for managing the allocation of computing and storage resources. It is being offered as an add-on to Kubernetes Engine used to orchestrate application containers.
  • Red Hat Steps Up with HPC Software Solutions at SC18
    In this video from SC18 in Dallas, Yan Fisher and Dan McGuan from Red Hat describe the company’s powerful software solutions for HPC and Ai workloads.
  • RedHat contributes etcd, a distributed key-value store project, to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon

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