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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Hardware Review - The ZaReason Virtus 9200 Desktop
  • Chrome OS 76 will disable Crostini Linux backups by default

    Essentially, this is still a work in progress feature. And I shouldn’t be terribly surprised by that, even though in my experience, the functionality hasn’t failed me yet.
    That’s because we know that the Chromium team is considering on a way to backup and restore Linux containers directly from the Files app on a Chromebook. That proposal is targeted for Chrome OS 78, so this gives the team more time to work that out, as well as any other nits that might not be quite right with the current implementation.

  • Andrei Lisita: Something to show for

    Unfortunately along with the progress that was made we also encountered a bug with the NintendoDS core that causes Games to crash if we attempt to load a savestate. We are not yet 100% sure if the bug is caused by my changes or by the NintendoDS core itself.

    I hope we are able to fix it by the end of the summer although I am not even sure where to start since savestates are working perfectly fine with other cores. Another confusing matter about this is that the Restart/Resume Dialog works fine with the NintendoDS core and it also uses savestates. This led me to believe that perhaps cores can be used to load savestates only once, but this can’t be the problem since we re-instantiate the core every time we load a savestate.

    In the worst case we might just have to make a special case for the NintendoDS core and not use savestates with it, except for the Resume/Restart dialog. This would sadden me deeply since there are plenty of NintendoDS games which could benefit from this feature.

  • OSMC's June update is here with Kodi v18.3

    Team Kodi recently announced the 18.3 point release of Kodi Leia. We have now prepared this for all supported OSMC devices and added some improvements and fixes. Here's what's new:

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Google to Abandon Tablets in Favor of Chrome OS Laptops

    One reason that Google is moving away from tablets has to do with the fact that they are just not selling all that well.

  • Support for Jupyter notebooks has evolved in Cantor

    Hello everyone, it's been almost a month since my last post and there are a lot of changes that have been done since then.

    First, what I called the "minimal plan" is arleady done! Cantor can now load Jupyter notebooks and save the currently opened document in Jupyter format.

    Below you can see how one of the Jypiter notebooks I'm using for test purposes (I have mentioned them in previous post) looks in Jupyter and in Cantor.

  • Will Thompson: Rebasing downstream translations

    At Endless, we maintain downstream translations for an number of GNOME projects, such as gnome-software, gnome-control-center and gnome-initial-setup. 

    [...]

    Whenever we update to a new version of GNOME, we have to reconcile our downstream translations with the changes from upstream. We want to preserve our intentional downstream changes, and keep our translations for strings that don’t exist upstream; but we also want to pull in translations for new upstream strings, as well as improved translations for existing strings. Earlier this year, the translation-rebase baton was passed to me. My predecessor would manually reapply our downstream changes for a set of officially-supported languages, but unlike him, I can pretty much only speak English, so I needed something a bit more mechanical.

    I spoke to various people from other distros about this problem.1 A common piece of advice was to not maintain downstream translation changes: appealing, but not really an option at the moment. I also heard that Ubuntu follows a straightforward rule: once the translation for a string has been changed downstream, all future upstream changes to the translation for that string are ignored. The assumption is that all downstream changes to a translation must have been made for a reason, and should be preserved. This is essentially a superset of what we’ve done manually in the past.

    I wrote a little tool to implement this logic, pomerge. Its “rebase” mode takes the last common upstream ancestor, the last downstream commit, and a working copy with the newest downstream code. For each locale, for each string in the translation in the working copy, it compares the old upstream and downstream translations – if they differ, it merges the latter into the working copy.

  • GNOME 3.33.3 Released, Kernel Security Updates for RHEL and CentOS, Wine Developers Concerned with Ubuntu 19.10 Dropping 32-Bit Support, Bzip2 to Get an Update and OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Now Available

    GNOME 3.33.3 was released yesterday. Note that this release is development code and is intended for testing purposes.

  • TenFourFox FPR15b1 available

    In honour of New Coke's temporary return to the market (by the way, I say it tastes like Pepsi and my father says it tastes like RC), I failed again with this release to get some sort of async/await support off the ground, and we are still plagued by issue 533. The second should be possible to fix, but I don't know exactly what's wrong. The first is not possible to fix without major changes because it reaches up into the browser event loop, but should be still able to get parsing and thus enable at least partial functionality from the sites that depend on it. That part didn't work either. A smaller hack, though, did make it into this release with test changes. Its semantics aren't quite right, but they're good enough for what requires it and does fix some parts of Github and other sites.

  • Cloudflare's random number generator, robotics data visualization, npm token scanning, and more news

    Is there such a thing as a truly random number? Internet security and services provider Cloudflare things so. To prove it, the company has formed The League of Entropy, an open source project to create a generator for random numbers.

    The League consists of Cloudflare and "five other organisations — predominantly universities and security companies." They share random numbers, using an open source tool called Drand (short for Distributed Randomness Beacon Daemon). The numbers are then "composited into one random number" on the basis that "several random numbers are more random than one random number." While the League's random number generator isn't intended "for any kind of password or cryptographic seed generation," Cloudflare's CEO Matthew Prince points out that if "you need a way of having a known random source, this is a really valuable tool."

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Important, but obscure, sysadmin tool osquery gets a foundation of its own

    But users think osquery's founder, Facebook, has been neglecting osquery. Going forward, Facebook has turned osquery over to The Linux Foundation. There, engineers and developers from Dactiv, Facebook, Google, Kolide, Trail of Bits, Uptycs, and other companies invested in osquery, will support it under the new foundation: The osquery Foundation.

    That's a good thing because while you may not have heard of osquery, many major companies, such as Airbnb, Dropbox, Netflix, Palantir, Etsy, and Uber, rely on it. This project needed a new lease on life.

    How does it work? Osquery exposes server operating system as a high-performance relational database. This allows you to write SQL-based queries to explore operating system data and low level system information. In osquery, SQL tables represent abstract concepts such as running processes, loaded kernel modules, open network connections, browser plugins, hardware events or file hashes.These are kept in a SQLite DBMS.

  • Running Ubuntu on the One Mix Yoga 3 mini laptop (video)

    The One Mix Yoga 3 is a small laptop that features an 8.4 inch touchscreen display and a convertible tablet-style design. It ships with Windows 10, but one of the first things I tried doing with the tablet was to boot a GNU/Linux distribution.

    I posted some notes about what happened when I took Ubuntu 19.04 for a spin on the One Mix 3 Yoga in my first-look article, but plenty of folks who watched my first look video on YouTube asked for a video… so I made one of those too.

  • Cockroach and the Source Available Future [Ed: The proprietary software giants-funded pundits like PedMonk on the openwashing agenda ("Source Available"... like "Shared Source" or "Inner Source"). What a crock.]

    Earlier this month, the database company Cockroach Labs relicensed its flagship database product. This is notable for two reasons. Most obviously, the company is following in the footsteps of several of its commercial open source database peers such as Confluent, Elastic, MongoDB, Redis Labs and TimescaleDB that have felt compelled to apply licenses that are neither open source nor, in most cases, traditionally proprietary.

    But the relicensing of CockroachDB is also interesting because this isn’t the first time the company has applied such a license.

    In January of 2017, Cockroach Labs announced the introduction of what it called the CockroachDB Community License (CCL). To the company’s credit, in the post announcing this new license, it took pains to make it clear that the CCL, while making source code available, was not in fact an open source license because it restricted redistribution. The CCL essentially enforced a two tier, open core-type business model, in which a base version of the database was made available under a permissive open source license (Apache) while certain enterprise features were made available under the CCL, which essentially requires users of these premium, enterprise-oriented features to pay for them.

    With its recent relicensing, the original dual core model has been deprecated. Moving forward, CockroachDB will be made available under two non-open source licenses – which, as an aside to Cockroach, presumably means that section 1B of the CCL probably needs to be updated. The CCL will continue to govern the premium featureset, but the original open source codebase will moving forward be governed by the Business Source License (BSL). Originally released by MariaDB, the BSL is a source available license; a license that makes source code for a project available, but places more restrictions upon its usage than is permitted by open source licenses.

  • Welcoming the newest Collaborans!

    For many, June 21, day of the Solstice, is a day of celebrations. At Collabora, we're also celebrating, as we take a moment to welcome all the newest members of our engineering and administration teams who've joined over the last year!

    Comprised of some of the most motivated and active Open Source contributors and maintainers around the world, Collaborans share an enduring passion for technology and Open Source, and these new joiners are no different.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Episode 21: From Mac to Linux

    Katherine Druckman and Doc Searls talk to Linux Journal Editor at Large, Petros Koutoupis, about moving from Mac to Linux.

  • Delete Your Community | User Error 68

    Two #AskError specials in a row! Advice for our younger selves, leaving communities, our listening habits, and hoarding.

    Plus the most serious question that’s ever been asked on the show, and more.

  • 18 letters from readers that we loved

    In the news article titled ‘What's in a Name?’ in the November 2002 issue, Linux was addressed as “Linus Torvalds’ operating system” and you mentioned that Richard Stallman wants it to be ‘renamed’ as GNU/Linux. The OS we know today as Linux was born out of the GNU project, conceived by Stallman in 1984. It is very strange how Torvalds, who only contributed in creating the kernel, is today considered to be the creator of the entire Linux system. The whole ideology behind the Linux OS remains concealed from the users—that of software created free, by and for the masses. In that context, I think there is complete justification in calling the system GNU/Linux to give credit where it is due.

  • Finally, An Open Source Multimeter

    This build is based on the STM32F103 microcontroller, uses an old Nokia phone screen, and unlike so many other multimeters, this thing is small. It’s very small. More than small enough to fit in your pocket and forget about it, unlike nearly every other multimeter available. There’s one thing about multimeters, and it’s that the best multimeter is the one that you have in your hands when you need it, and this one certainly fits the bill.

  • The OS/2 Operating System Didn't Die… It Went Underground

    One problem with building things using state-of-the-art techniques is that sometimes those that look like they will be “the next big thing” turn out to be dead ends. Next thing you know, that hot new part or piece of software is hard to get or unmaintained. This is especially true if you are building something with a long life span. A case in point is the New York City subway system. Back in the 1990s the transit authority decided to adopt IBM’s new OS/2 operating system. Why not? It was robust and we used to always say “no one ever got fired for buying IBM.”

    There was one problem. OS/2 was completely eclipsed by other operating systems, notably Windows and — mostly — has sunk from the public view. [Andrew Egan’s] post covers just how the conversion to a card-based system pushed OS/2 underground all over the Big Apple, and it is an interesting read.

    The choice of OS/2 might seem odd today. However, you have to remember the operating system landscape back then. Unix wasn’t very commercial, for the most part, and the commercial versions like Xenix and SCO were often encumbered with odd and changing licensing arrangements. MSDOS was hardly suitable for any sort of reliable system, with a patchwork of hacks to get more memory, and multitasking including early versions of Windows which were little more than shells over MSDOS.

  • NZ’s Termius raises $2.7m in seed round backed by Silicon Valley VCs

    Termius has developed an SSH client system to allow secure login into a remote computer. The startup said its system is used by more than 11,000 network engineers and DevOps — from companies such as SpaceX, Disney, and Cisco — as they manage their IT infrastructure.

  • Facebook contributes open-source tech to boost web browser performance [Ed: Merely an API, not anything else]

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Marcus Lundblad: Midsomer Maps

    Since it's been kindof a tradition for me to do some blogging around midsomer, I thought we might as well keep with that tradition this year as well… And there's been some nice news in latest beta release of Maps, 3.33.3.

  • How to install Zorin OS on a computer from USB stick or DVD
  • Clear Linux Gets Questions Over Steam Integration, Other Plans For This High-Perf Distro

    Auke Kok of Intel / Clear Linux carried out the distribution's first ask-me-anything session today where he fielded questions ranging from Steam to under-served software projects. 

    Auke is a long-time Intel Linux developer and also one of the prominent contributors to Clear Linux going back to its early days. Among the highlights from Wednesday's "ask me anything" included: 

    - When asked about Fedora's flicker-free boot process, Auke pointed out that it's made possible in part through work spearheaded at Intel around the frame-buffer/fastboot code worked on by their graphics team. While it's great the shared work happening, from the Clear Linux perspective they are more focused on achieving lightning fast boot times over a slick boot process. But they may look into it in some aspect moving forward, but their priority is just to have a quick booting system.

  •  

  • Open Source Is Critical To Linode: Christopher Aker, Founder & CEO

    Linode is celebrating its 16th anniversary. Linode actually predates Amazon Web Services. We sat down with the founder and CEO of Linode, Christopher Aker, to talk about the history of Linode and how it enabled developers to reap the benefits of cloud before AWS came to exist.

Leftovers: IBM, Mozilla and SUSE

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Misc
  • What Is Razee, and Why IBM Open Sourced It

    The continuous delivery software that's been doing the heavy lifting on IBM's global Kubernetes platform is now open source.

  • View Source 5 comes to Amsterdam

    Mozilla’s View Source Conference is back for a fifth year, this time in Amsterdam, September 30 – October 1, 2019. Tickets are available now.

  • SUSE & SAP “A 20 years of Partnership”
  • SUSE on the IO500 List for HPC Storage

    If you haven’t been hanging around the Ceph world for a bit, you may not realize that Ceph was originally intended to provide a distributed file-system to service HPC clusters.  While this was the original intent, Ceph has taken a round-a-bout path to relevance in this space, especially given that we are only supporting multiple active MDS servers since the Luminous release.  The result is that we are, only now, really starting to see adoption in the HPC space, and mostly for the second tier storage needs.
    Enter, the science project.  Given an all-flash environment on SATA SSDS with a fast storage pool on Intel Optane for the metadata, would it be possible to provide a reasonable storage environment for HPC clusters?

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Panfrost Gallium3D Driver Continues Speeding Ahead For Open-Source Mali Graphics

    Panfrost only made its initial debut as part of the recent Mesa 19.1 release for providing open-source Arm Mali Bifrost/Midgard graphics driver support on Linux independent of Arm and their official binary driver. While the resources are limited, so far Panfrost is making stellar progress. 

    Panfrost continues making terrific progress for providing open-source Arm Mali graphics support. In part, this is made by possible by lead developer Alyssa Rosenzweig currently interning for the summer at Collabora where she appears to be primarily working on this currently OpenGL ES 2.0 class driver and continuing to strive for competitive performance with Arm's official Linux GLES driver.

  • The big Civilization VI "June 2019 Update" for Gathering Storm is now live

    Firaxis Games, Aspyr Media and 2K today put out a rather large update to Civilization VI, the June 2019 for Gathering Storm adds in some new features and comes with plenty of balance changes and bug fixes.

  • Free and open source software is being sold commercially in the Microsoft Store

    Ever since Microsoft, one of the original and squarely proprietary tech giants, pivoted from software to services some years back, its relationship with free and open source software seems to have improved.

    For one thing, Microsoft replies on such things as open source flagship Linux for its cloud infrastructure. And the company also made a series of moves indicating it was now a better, gentler version of its old self, seeking not only to use open source software but also contribute back to it.

  • The Best Free Photoshop Alternatives

    GIMP, or GNU Image Manipulation Program, is more than just a photo editor. It also has sophisticated image manipulation tools, which will appeal to pros as well as regular uers.  

    GIMP has the expected assortment of basic features, including cropping and straightening to adjusting brightness, contrast, and color balance to name a few. Plus it has more advanced tools, like layers, content rescaling, and animation, plus the ability to add blur, noise, and distortion, among other effects.

    In fact GIMP offers most of the features that Photoshop has, even if it is missing things like other color modes besides RGB and the capability for non-destructive editing. Even better, GIMP’s interface is very customizable, and its features are expandable. Since it is open source, GIMP community members can create plugins, and they often do, sharing them to the rest of the community for free.

  • Nvidia and ARM join forces to eighty-six x86 supercomputers

    Team Green, which has a thing for making lunchbox-sized supercomputers, will be making its CUDA-X AI and high-performance computing (HPC) software work nicely with the ARM ecosystem, which means a load of processors based on CPUs and architectures coming out of the Cambridge chip designer.

  • When the Atari ST Was the Future of Computing

    The Atari 520ST was Atari's first 16-bit salvo in the personal computer wars of the 1980s. A

  • New vulnerabilities may let hackers remotely SACK Linux and FreeBSD systems
  • Linux Kernel Bug Knocks PCs, IoT Gadgets and More Offline
  • Oregon prisons ban dozens of technology and programming books over security concerns

    “There’s absolutely nothing in there that would pose a security risk. The books are written for consumers - people at home,” he said. “There’s very little about there in networking and there’s certainly nothing about breaking into networks.”

    Prison officials said the bans aren’t arbitrary or a blanket prohibition on technology-focused books. Instead, they’re a reflection of the resources available to inmates.

    “We allow our folks in custody to have a lot of access to computers,” said Kelly Raths, the department’s central mailroom administrator.

    Inmates in Oregon facilities can have USB drives, allowing them to store college papers or legal pleadings and transport them between computers, Raths said. Classrooms inside prisons have networked computers.

  • Slimbook Launches New "Apollo" Linux PC, First Beta for Service Pack 5 of SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Is Out, NVIDIA Binary Drivers for Ubuntu Growing Stale, DragonFly BSD v 5.6 Released and Qt v. 5.12.4 Now Available

    Slimbook, the Spanish Linux computer company, just unveiled a brand-new all-in-one Linux PC called the "Apollo". It has a 23.6 inch IPS LED display with a 1920x1080 resolution, and a choice between an Intel i5-8500 and i7-8700 processors. It comes with up to 32GB of RAM and integrated Intel UHD 630 4K graphics. Pricing starts at $799.

today's leftovers

Filed under
OSS
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux 5.3 Could Finally See FSGSBASE - Performance Improvements Back To Ivybridge

    The FSGSBASE instruction set has been present on Intel processors going back to Ivy Bridge processors and while there have been Linux kernel patches for this feature going on for years, it looks like with the Linux 5.3 kernel cycle is this support for merging. Making us eager for this support is the prospect of better performance, especially for context switching workloads that already have been suffering as a result of recent CPU mitigations. 

    The FSGSBASE instructions allow for reading/writing FS/GS BASE from any privilege. But the short story is there should be performance benefits from FSGSBASE in context switching thanks to skipping an MSR write for GSBASE. User-space programs like Java are also expected to benefit in being able to avoid system calls for editing the FS/GS BASE.

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium and thunderbird), Debian (php-horde-form, pyxdg, thunderbird, and znc), Fedora (containernetworking-plugins, mediawiki, and podman), openSUSE (chromium), Red Hat (bind, chromium-browser, and flash-plugin), SUSE (docker, glibc, gstreamer-0_10-plugins-base, gstreamer-plugins-base, postgresql10, sqlite3, and thunderbird), and Ubuntu (firefox).

  • Self-Audits | Roadmap to Securing Your Infrastructure

    As you can see, the security audit can be tailored based on any security controls you have/need. NIST provides the 800-53A (“A” is for audit or assessment) and provides different file formats to use. This is a great place to start creating your own audit document.

    To sum it up, embracing self-audits and the benefit they provide will reduce risk and save time. The longer a security control remains in a failed state, the more time threats have to exploit a vulnerability. Protect yourself and add security by prioritizing audits.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Calendar management dialog, archiving task lists, Every Detail Matters on Settings (Sprint 2)

    This was a long-time request, and something that I myself was missing when using To Do. Since it fits well with the product vision of the app, there was nothing preventing it from being implemented.

    Selecting this feature to be implemented during the week was a great choice – the task was self contained, had a clear end, and was just difficult just enough to be challenging but not more than that.

    However, I found a few issues with the implementation, and want to use the next round to polish the feature. Using the entire week to polish the feature might be too much, but it will give me some time to really make it great.

  • Open Source Answer To Dropbox And OneDrive: Meet Frank Karlitschek

    During the OpenSUSE Conference in Nurnberg (German), Nextcloud founder Frank Karlitschek appeared on “Let’s Talk’ to talk about the importance of fully open source file sync and storage solutions for enterprise customers. As one of the early contributors to desktop Linux he also talked about the reasons why desktop Linux has not succeeded.

  • Load-Bearing Internet People

    Some maintainers for critical software operate from a niche at a university or a government agency that supports their effort. There might be a few who are independently wealthy.

  • Robert Helmer: Vectiv and the Browser Monoculture

    So, so tired of the "hot take" that having a single browser engine implementation is good, and there is no value to having multiple implementations of a standard. I have a little story to tell about this.

    In the late 90s, I worked for a company called Vectiv. There isn't much info on the web (the name has been used by other companies in the meantime), this old press release is one of the few I can find.

    Vectiv was a web-based service for commercial real estate departments doing site selection. This was pretty revolutionary at the time, as the state-of-the-art for most of these was to buy a bunch of paper maps and put them up on the walls, using push-pins to keep track of current and possible store locations.

    The story of Vectiv is interesting on its own, but the relevant bit to this story is that it was written for and tested exclusively in IE 5.5 for Windows, as was the style at the time. The once-dominant Netscape browser had plummeted to negligible market share, and was struggling to rewrite Netscape 6 to be based on the open-source Mozilla Suite.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Hardware Review - The ZaReason Virtus 9200 Desktop
  • Chrome OS 76 will disable Crostini Linux backups by default
    Essentially, this is still a work in progress feature. And I shouldn’t be terribly surprised by that, even though in my experience, the functionality hasn’t failed me yet. That’s because we know that the Chromium team is considering on a way to backup and restore Linux containers directly from the Files app on a Chromebook. That proposal is targeted for Chrome OS 78, so this gives the team more time to work that out, as well as any other nits that might not be quite right with the current implementation.
  • Andrei Lisita: Something to show for
    Unfortunately along with the progress that was made we also encountered a bug with the NintendoDS core that causes Games to crash if we attempt to load a savestate. We are not yet 100% sure if the bug is caused by my changes or by the NintendoDS core itself. I hope we are able to fix it by the end of the summer although I am not even sure where to start since savestates are working perfectly fine with other cores. Another confusing matter about this is that the Restart/Resume Dialog works fine with the NintendoDS core and it also uses savestates. This led me to believe that perhaps cores can be used to load savestates only once, but this can’t be the problem since we re-instantiate the core every time we load a savestate. In the worst case we might just have to make a special case for the NintendoDS core and not use savestates with it, except for the Resume/Restart dialog. This would sadden me deeply since there are plenty of NintendoDS games which could benefit from this feature.
  • OSMC's June update is here with Kodi v18.3
    Team Kodi recently announced the 18.3 point release of Kodi Leia. We have now prepared this for all supported OSMC devices and added some improvements and fixes. Here's what's new:

OSS Leftovers

  • A comparison of open source, real-time data streaming platforms
    A variety of open source, real-time data streaming platforms are available today for enterprises looking to drive business insights from data as quickly as possible. The options include Spark Streaming, Kafka Streams, Flink, Hazelcast Jet, Streamlio, Storm, Samza and Flume -- some of which can be used in tandem with each other. Enterprises are adopting these real-time data streaming platforms for tasks such as making sense of a business marketing campaign, improving financial trading or recommending marketing messages to consumers at critical junctures in the customer journey. These are all time-critical areas that can be used for improving business decisions or baked into applications driven by data from a variety of sources.
  • Amphenol’s Jason Ellison on Signal Integrity Careers and His Free, Open Source PCB Design Software
    Ellison, Senior Staff Signal Integrity Engineer at Amphenol ICC, gives his insight on the importance of networking, giving to the EE community, and his open-source signal integrity project. How does signal integrity engineering compare to other EE fields? What are open-source resources worth these days? What makes for a good work life for an engineer? Learn this and more in this Engineer Spotlight! Jason Ellison started down the path to becoming an electrical engineer because someone told him it was "fun and easy if you're good at math." In this interview with AAC's Mark Hughes, Ellison—a Senior Staff Signal Integrity Engineer at Amphenol ICC—describes how his career has grown from these beginnings into the rewarding and diverse work of signal integrity engineering.
  • Cruise open-sources Webviz, a tool for robotics data analysis [Ed: Releasing a little tool that's part of proprietary software so that it 'feels' more "open"]
    Cruise, the self-driving startup that General Motors acquired for nearly $1 billion in 2016, generates an enormous amount of data by any measure. It orchestrates 200,000 hours of driving simulation jobs daily in Google Cloud Platform, spread across 30,000 virtual cars in an environment running on 300,000 processor cores and 5,000 graphics cards. Both those cars and Cruise’s fleet of over 180 real-world autonomous Chevrolet Bolts make thousands of decisions every second, and they base these decisions on observations captured in binary format from cameras, microphones, radar sensors, and lidar sensors.
  • EWF launches world’s first open source blockchain for the energy industry
    The Energy Web Foundation this week announced that it has launched the world’s first public, open-source, enterprise-grade blockchain tailored to the energy sector: the Energy Web Chain (EW Chain). More than ten Energy Web Foundation (EWF) Affiliates — including utilities, grid operators, and blockchain developers — are hosting validator nodes for the live network, according to the company.
  • Pimcore Releases Pimcore 6.0, Amplifying User-Friendly Digital Experiences Through Open Source
    Pimcore, the leading open-source platform for data and customer experience management, has released the most powerful version of the Pimcore platform, Pimcore 6.0. The updated platform includes a new user interface that seamlessly connects MDM/PIM, DAM, WCM, and digital commerce capabilities to create more advanced and user-friendly experiences quickly and efficiently.
  • VCV Rack reaches version 1.0.0: free and open-source modular synth gets a full release
    VCV Rack is a free, open-source modular software synth that’s been gaining ground for a couple of years, but only now has it reached the significant milestone of version 1.0. Designed to replicate the feeling of having a hardware modular synth on your desktop, VCV Rack enables you to add both free and paid-for modules, and now supports polyphony of up to 16 voices. There’s MIDI Output, too with CV-Gate, CV-MIDI and CV-CC modules enabling you to interface with drum machines, desktop synths and Eurorack gear.
  • Flying Above the Shoulders of Giants
    Thanks to open-source platforms, developers can stand on the shoulders of software giants to build bigger and better things. Linux is probably the biggest...
  • MIT Researchers Open-Source AutoML Visualization Tool ATMSeer
    A research team from MIT, Hong Kong University, and Zhejiang University has open-sourced ATMSeer, a tool for visualizing and controlling automated machine-learning processes. Solving a problem with machine learning (ML) requires more than just a dataset and training. For any given ML tasks, there are a variety of algorithms that could be used, and for each algorithm there can be many hyperparameters that can be tweaked. Because different values of hyperparameters will produce models with different accuracies, ML practitioners usually try out several sets of hyperparameter values on a given dataset to try to find hyperparameters that produce the best model. This can be time-consuming, as a separate training job and model evaluation process must be conducted for each set. Of course, they can be run in parallel, but the jobs must be setup and triggered, and the results recorded. Furthermore, choosing the particular values for hyperparameters can involve a bit of guesswork, especially for ones that can take on any numeric value: if 2.5 and 2.6 produce good results, maybe 2.55 would be even better? What about 2.56 or 2.54?
  • Open-Source Cybersecurity Tool to Enhance Grid Protection
    A revolutionary new cybersecurity tool that can help protect the electric power grid has been released to the public on the code-hosting website GitHub.
  • Quick notes for Mozilla Whistler All Hands 2019
  • Deeper into the data fabric with MongoDB
    However, to gain access to rich search functionality, many organisations pair their database with a search engine such as Elasticsearch or Solr, which MongoDB claims can complicate development and operations — because we end up with two entirely separate systems to learn, maintain and scale.

Raspberry Pi 4 is here!

The latest version of the Raspberry Pi—Raspberry Pi 4—was released today, earlier than anticipated, featuring a new 1.5GHz Arm chip and VideoCore GPU with some brand new additions: dual-HDMI 4K display output; USB3 ports; Gigabit Ethernet; and multiple RAM options up to 4GB. The Raspberry Pi 4 is a very powerful single-board computer and starts at the usual price of $35. That gets you the standard 1GB RAM, or you can pay $45 for the 2GB model or $55 for the 4GB model—premium-priced models are a first for Raspberry Pi. Read more

Open Data, Open Access and Open Hardware

  • DoD’s Joint AI Center to open-source natural disaster satellite imagery data set
    As climate change escalates, the impact of natural disasters is likely to become less predictable. To encourage the use of machine learning for building damage assessment this week, Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute and CrowdAI — the U.S. Department of Defense’s Joint AI Center (JAIC) and Defense Innovation Unit — open-sourced a labeled data set of some of the largest natural disasters in the past decade. Called xBD, it covers the impact of disasters around the globe, like the 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. “Although large-scale disasters bring catastrophic damage, they are relatively infrequent, so the availability of relevant satellite imagery is low. Furthermore, building design differs depending on where a structure is located in the world. As a result, damage of the same severity can look different from place to place, and data must exist to reflect this phenomenon,” reads a research paper detailing the creation of xBD. [...]

    xBD includes approximately 700,000 satellite images of buildings before and after eight different kinds of natural disasters, including earthquakes, wildfires, floods, and volcanic eruptions. Covering about 5,000 square kilometers, it contains images of floods in India and Africa, dam collapses in Laos and Brazil, and historic deadly fires in California and Greece.

    The data set will be made available in the coming weeks alongside the xView 2.0 Challenge to unearth additional insights from xBD, coauthor and CrowdAI machine learning lead Jigar Doshi told VentureBeat. The data set collection effort was informed by the California Air National Guard’s approach to damage assessment from wildfires.

  • Open-source textbooks offer free alternative for UC Clermont students
    Some UC Clermont College students are avoiding paying hundreds of dollars for textbooks — and getting the content for free — thanks to online open-source textbooks, a growing trend among faculty at the college and throughout higher education. UC Clermont Dean Jeff Bauer, who is also a professor of business, said the benefits of open textbooks are many. “All students have the book on the first day of class, it saves them a lot of money, and the information can be accessed anywhere, anytime, without carrying around a heavy textbook,” Bauer said. “They don’t need to visit the bookstore before or after each semester to buy or sell back books, either.”
  • Open Source Computer Controlled Loom Knits Pikachu For You
    The origin story of software takes us back past punch card computers and Babbage's Difference Engine to a French weaver called Joseph Marie Jacquard.
  • Successful open-source RISC-V microcontroller launched through crowdfunding
    X-FAB Silicon Foundries, together with crowd-sourcing IC platform partner Efabless Corporation, launched the first-silicon availability of the Efabless RISC-V SoC reference design. This open-source semiconductor project went from start of design to tape-out in less than three months employing the Efabless design flow produced on open-source tools. The mixed-signal SoC, called Raven, is based on the community developed ultra-low power PicoRV32 RISC-V core. Efabless has bench-tested the Raven at 100MHz, and based on simulations, the solution should operate at up to 150MHz.
  • Open Hardware: Open-Source MRI Scanners Could Bring Enormous Cost Savings
    Wulfsberg explore the possibilities of open source MRI scanning. As open-source technology takes its place around the world—everywhere from makerspaces to FabLabs, users on every level have access to design and innovation. In allowing such access to MRI scanning, the researchers realize the potential for ‘technological literacy’ globally—and with MRIs specifically, astronomical sums could be saved in healthcare costs. The authors point out that medical technology is vital to the population of the world for treating not only conditions and illnesses, but also disabilities. As so many others deeply involved in the world of technology and 3D printing realize, with greater availability, accessibility, and affordability, huge strides can be made to improve and save lives. Today, with so many MRI patents expiring, the technology is open for commercialization.