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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • How Linux Frustrated Me Into Loving It

    I have been very interested in Linux since my entry into the Wonderful World of Unix in 2006. I found Ubuntu and installed it on a crappy Dell desktop computer I was given when I was doing online schooling. The computer originally came with Windows, and one day while I was browsing, I decided to search for “alternative to Windows.” Linux popped up right away. I had never heard of Linux before, but after voraciously reading article after article, I decided Linux was the path for my future.

  • HP Chromebook 13 is a business-focused Chrome OS laptop with USB-C

    In the grand scheme of things, Chrome OS is hardly a major player from a desktop market share perspective -- for now. With that said, the Linux-based operating system has captured the hearts and minds of many consumers. It has matured quite a bit too, becoming a viable Windows alternative for home users. Actually, it is a great choice for some businesses too -- depending on needs, of course.

  • Summary: Linux Scheduler: A decade of wasted cores - Part 1 - What is NUMA ?

    Last month, a research paper with title 'The Linux Scheduler: a Decade of Wasted Cores' was trending on the front page of HN. As an individual who is interested in Systems, I thought it would be good idea to read this 16 page research paper. I spent a good amount of time learning about different topics which were involved in it. This is the first post in the series in which I will try to summarize the paper.

  • Vulkan 1.0.12 Specification Update Adds VK_AMD_rasterization_order
  • GTK+ 3.22 Is Working On An OpenGL Renderer & Scene Graph

    Matthias Clasen of Red Hat has written an update about changes to GNOME's GTK+ tool-kit for the 3.20 cycle but he also mentions some of the exciting work that's brewing for GNOME/GTK+ 3.22.

    Clasen's latest blog post covers some of the recent internal changes to GTK+ CSS, theme changes, various changes facing application developers, and more. Those interested about the GTK+ tooling changes can read the blog post.

  • Bunsenlabs Rc2
  • April is almost gone

    The second one was the release of pre-release isos of Mageia 6 and OpenMandriva Lx 3. I must say that both distros are doing a great job; the systems performed so well that they did not seem beta versions to me.

    I did not like Plasma 5, though... I am sure the KDE team is doing a great work, but I truly do not see what the point of this tablet-ready interface is. After all, KDE missed the tablet train (the Vivaldi tablet never saw the light of the day) and tablets are already in decline...

  • New BlackArch Linux version released, now provides 1400 pentesting tools

    BlackArch Linux version 2016.04.28 released for ethical hackers and security researchers with 1400 pentesting tools

  • Manjaro 16.06 - third preview released

    It took us almost another month to prepare this third preview of our upcoming stable release we call Daniella.

    The Xfce edition remains our flagship offering and has received the attention it deserves. Few can claim to offer such a polished, integrated and leading-edge Xfce experience. We ship Xfce 4.12 with this release of Manjaro. We mainly focused on polishing the user experience on the desktop and window manager, and on updating some components to take advantage of newly available technologies such as switching to a new theme called Maia, we already using for our KDE edition.

  • IoT Past and Present: The History of IoT, and Where It's Headed Today [Ed: just devices with a network stack. Nothing new.]
  • 1btn – an Open Source Dash

    The availability of cheap radios, omni-present WiFi and powerful web services means the IoT wave is here to stay. Amazon got into the act with its “do only one thing” Dash button. But a more interesting solution would be an IoT “do it all” button.

  • No Time to Panic as One Quarter Shows Minor Dip in Smartphone Sales - Total Smartphone Market Will Grow This Year (and here's why)

    We now have the Q1 numbers from Strategy Analytics and IDC, the two last remaining of the classic four big smartphone industry analyst houses we used on this blog to calculate the industry average of the total market size, back when the 'smartphone bloodbath' started six years ago. And both SA and IDC are in exceptional, near-perfect agreement on the exact size of the market, we get a total smartphone market for Q1 at 334.8 Million units. That is down 18% from the Christmas sales Quarter (normal that Q1 is down) but for the first time ever in this industry, the YEAR-ON-YEAR comparison of Q1, so the January-March quarter last year 2015 vs now, is down. This has not happened in the smartphone industry in any YoY period. And some are now talking about 'peak smartphone'. That number COULD be a signal that smartphone industry growth has stalled and now peaked and smartphone sales will either plateau flat, or decline into the next year(s).

  • GhostBSD 10.3 Alpha Released With ZFS File-System Support, MATE 1.12

    The first alpha release was made available this weekend of GhostBSD 10.3 Alpha 1, a desktop focused operating system built atop FreeBSD 10.3.

  • 3D Printer Crowdfunding projects

    Like every Kickstarter project, there is a risk. But I think that Trinus appears to be a good project, we need to wait to the launch and review a real machine to know if it worth it. Also, the Youtube Channel Maker’s Muse, made a review of the project and the company Konama, creators of Trinus, sent him a the 3d printer and he currently makes the review of this printer that pledged more then 1 million dollars on KickStarter.

  • Refactoring the open-source photography community

    Generally speaking, most free-software communities tend to form around specific projects: a distribution, an application, a tightly linked suite of applications, and so on. Those are the functional units in which developers work, so it is a natural extension from there to focused mailing lists, web sites, IRC channels, and other forms of interaction with each other and users. But there are alternatives. At Libre Graphics Meeting 2016 in London, Pat David spoke about his recent experience bringing together a new online community centered around photographers who use open-source software. That community crosses over between several applications and libraries, and it has been successful enough that multiple photography-related projects have shut down their independent user forums and migrated to the new site, PIXLS.US.

  • DIY recycling, UCONN's open source chemistry book, and more news

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Fresh Mesa 11.3-devel RadeonSI Tests On Ubuntu 16.04 vs. NVIDIA's 364.19 Driver

    For some end-of-month benchmarks and while having a number of graphics cards out prior to being let down by Tomb Raider's Linux benchmark, here is a fresh round of OpenGL tests while using the newest Mesa 11.3-devel code on RadeonSI with AMDGPU/Radeon DRM from Ubuntu 16.04 and then compared to various Kepler/Maxwell graphics cards with the newest NVIDIA Linux driver.

  • Oracle Releases VirtualBox 5.0.20 with Fixes for Linux Kernel 4.5, Small Changes

    Today, April 28, 2016, Oracle has announced the release of VirtualBox 5.0.20, yet another maintenance version of its acclaimed open-source and cross-platform virtualization software.

  • pcp+grafana scripted dashboards

    Our previous work gluing Performance Co-Pilot and Grafana together has made it possible to look at a networkful of systems' performance stats and histories with just a few clicks on a web browser, and no auxiliary software (databases, web servers, etc.) other than PCP itself.

    Many people probably stopped at the most basic use of the technology: with the grafana dashboards provided.

  • How to build your own IRC Server with InspIRCd and Anope
  • How To Install Linux Mint Alongside Windows 10 (UEFI)
  • Tails 2.3 Screenshot Tour
  • openSUSE announces Community Release Team

    The openSUSE Board announced today a call to action for a Community Release Team to assist with tasks associated to the development of the next Leap version 42.2.

  • Mele introduces a $70 Ubuntu stick PC

    The Meizu Pro 5U smartphone puts Ubuntu in your pocket, but you can’t use it as a desktop computer. Fortunately you’ve got other pockets, and you can stuff the Mele PCG02U into one them.

    The PCG02U is an HDMI stick PC, and if you hadn’t guessed from the U at the end of its name or that unmistakable orange color (or, more obviously, the title of this post) it is indeed powered by Ubuntu — Ubuntu 14.04 to be precise. It’s on sale now, and you can pick one up for just $70.

  • Samsung Unveils New Artik Module Tools for IoT Developers

    A new Artik IDE development environment and the Artik Cloud give developers new capabilities with Artik modules.
    Samsung has given Internet of things developers several new tools to create and grow their ideas for new devices and concepts, including the Samsung Artik IDE (integrated development environment) and an IoT-focused Samsung Artik Cloud where developers can collect, store and access their data from any device or other cloud.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Where did we all go wrong? And why doesn't anyone remember?

    But we didn't pursue them. We replaced them with something cheaper -- with Unix machines, an OS only a nerd could love. And then we replaced the Unix machines with something cheaper still -- the IBM PC, a machine so poor that the £125 ZX Spectrum had better graphics and sound.

    And now, we all use descendants of that. Generally acknowledged as one of the poorest, most-compromised machines, based on descendants of one of the poorest, most-compromised CPUs.

    Yes, over the 40 years since then, most of rough edges have been polished out. The machines are now small, fast, power-frugal with tons of memory and storage, with great graphics and sound. But it's taken decades to get here.

    And the OSes have developed. Now they're feature-rich, fairly friendly, really very robust considering the stone-age stuff they're built from.

    But if we hadn't spent 3 or 4 decades making a pig's ear into silk purse -- if we'd started with a silk purse instead -- where might we have got to by now?

  • Your Beard Doesn’t Intimidate Me Anymore!
  • Understanding Your HPC Application Needs

    Many HPC applications began as single processor (single core) programs. If these applications take too long on a single core or need more memory than is available, they need to be modified so they can run on scalable systems. Fortunately, many of the important (and most used) HPC applications are already available for scalable systems. Not all applications require large numbers of cores for effective performance, while others are highly scalable.

  • 5 Container as a Service Tools You Should Know About

    In a previous article on next-generation cloud technologies, I mentioned Containers as a Service (CaaS), which provides a framework to manage container and application deployment.

  • Don't Worry About IBM's Mainframe Sales Collapse

    For those who know little about International Business Machines , the company's hulking System Z mainframe computers may seem like little more than a relic. The 42% year-over-year decline in System Z sales during IBM's first quarter would appear to offer proof that the mainframe business is struggling.

    But investors shouldn't worry about this mainframe sales collapse. It's happened before, and it will happen again. IBM's System Z product cycle, which sees new models introduced every few years, induces an extreme amount of sales volatility as clients rush to upgrade. While IBM doesn't report System Z sales numbers directly, the company does report year-over-year performance, and that allows us to see that the big drop in sales during the first quarter is nothing out of the ordinary.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • LAS At LinuxFest Northwest

    Just wrapped up another outstanding year at Linux Fest Northwest! Despite some technical hiccups, the guys over at Jupiter Broadcasting did a great job as always. Below, you can also see some former co-hosts that stopped by to chat with the guys at JB. Both myself and openSUSE’s Bryan Lunduke made appearances, however Bryan went a step further and took the show on a trip down memory lane.

  • 10 reasons for using multiple partitions

    Most Linux beginners content themselves with a single system partition and a swap drive. However, as they gain experience, they learn the advantages of dividing the system across several partitions.

  • Parted Magic 2016_04_26 Drops Chrome, Adds Support for Secure Erasing NVMe SSDs

    Today, April 26, 2016, Parted Magic LLC announced the release of the Parted Magic 2016_04_26 Live CD that users can use to do various system administration tasks.

    Parted Magic is a payed distribution, an independent commercial project based on popular open-source software projects, such as the widely used GParted partition editor, TestDisk partition recovery and file undelete tool, and, of course, the Linux kernel.

    Today's Parted Magic 2016_04_26 release of the commercial Live CD provides updated partitioning and data recovery tools, among which we can mention Linux kernel 4.5.2, TestDisk 7.1, AMDGPU (xf86-video-amdgpu) 1.1.0, OpenSSL 1.0.1s, OpenSSH 7.2p2, Mozilla Firefox 45.0.2, GNU ddrescue 1.21, NTFS-3G 2016.2.22, Mozilla NSS 3.23, and wimlib 1.9.0.

  • Manjaro Left Me Cold

    I had a short but intense affair with Manjaro that ended in our going our separate ways. It was not I who ended what seemed to be a promising relationship, though. Obviously, Manjaro had had enough of me after only 4 days and left me cold.

  • The year of the Linux desktop may never arrive

    Some Linux pundits and users have long awaited the year of the Linux desktop. But somehow it still hasn't arrived. A writer at Digital Trends thinks that the year of the Linux desktop is a myth that will never happen.

  • Intel Publishes Complete Source Code To The Arduino 101 Firmware

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • LFNW 2016 - Docker Must Die
  • The Linux Foundation’s Jim Zemlin To Keynote ITS America 2016 San Jose Day Two “Infrastructure of Things”
  • OBS Studio 0.14 Adds NVIDIA NVENC Video Encoding Support
  • The ‘Year of the Linux desktop’ never came, and it never will [Ed: Ignoring Chromebooks for self-fulfilling prophecies and FUD]

    Every culture has its myths and prophecies. For Linux users, it was “The Year Of The Linux Desktop.” The idea: someday in the future, likely soon, everyone is going to notice how great Linux is and just switch over, en masse.

  • RcppMgsPack 0.1.0

    Over the last few months, I have been working casually on a new package to integrate MessagePack with R. What is MessagePack, you ask? To quote its website, "It's like JSON, but fast and small."

  • Shotwell 0.23.0 Is the First Major Release in a Year, Comes with a Warning

    After informing the community two weeks ago that he picked up the maintenance of the well-known Shotwell open-source image viewer and organizer software, developer Jens Georg now released the first major version since Shotwell 0.22.0.

    It has been more than a year since Shotwell 0.22.0 was released, back on March 24, 2015, and on April 16, 2016, the new maintainer pushed a very small point release, version 0.22.1, updating some translations and making sure everything is OK for him to continue the development of the acclaimed software.

  • QRegion will be iterable in Qt 5.8

    Apart from providing a non-allocating, non-throwing way to inspect a region, there are other positive effects. Because no QVector is returned that needs to be destroyed by the caller, even in projects (such as QtGui) that are compiled with exceptions disabled, porting even a few loops to the new construct saves more than 1KiB in text size on optimized GCC 5.3 Linux AMD64 builds, not to mention countless memory allocations at runtime.

  • Starting KWin/Wayland on another virtual terminal

    So far when one started KWin/Wayland on a virtual terminal it took over this virtual terminal. This made it difficult to read the debug output and even more difficult to run the complete session through gdb.

    The reason for this behavior is that KWin interacts with logind and needs to take session control on the current logind session. This is needed to have logind open the restricted device files like /dev/dri/card0 or the /dev/input/event* files.

  • Google Summer of Code 2016

    Hello everyone! I am participating in the Google Summer of Code program for the second time with GNOME, this year working on Epiphany. I am one of the two students working on this product, the other person being a friend of mine. We are both excited to leave our mark with some serious contributions.

  • Black Lab Linux 7.6 Released

    Today we are releasing Black Lab Linux 7.6. Black Lab Linux 7.6 is the latest release of our stable 7.x series of OS's. Black Lab Linux 7.6 is supported long term until April 2019.

  • Pisi-Linux-2.0-Beta-KDE5

    After the last Pisi-Linux-Alpha 7 Release, the Team has work on a lot of bug fixes, to give you a good stable beta Pisi Linux.

  • openSUSE to Mentor Six Google Summer of Code Students

    Google made an announcement April 22 that 1,206 students were selected for the Google Summer of Code and six of those students will be mentored through the openSUSE Project, which is one of 178 mentoring organizations in this year’s GSoC.

  • Global Big Data Infrastructure Market 2016-2020 - Increasing Presence of Open Source Big Data Technology Platforms - Research and Markets
  • Which field of research would you like to see more collaboration in?
  • 10 SQL Tricks That You Didn’t Think Were Possible

    But once your database and your application matures, you will have put all the important meta data in place and you can focus on your business logic only. The following 10 tricks show amazing functionality written in only a few lines of declarative SQL, producing simple and also complex output.

  • ‘New’ Windows Security Flaw Runs Apps Without Admin Rights

    Newly discovered Windows security hole bypasses AppLocker and lets apps run without admin rights. Proof-of-concept code published.

  • HTTPS is Hard

    This blog post is the first in a regular tech series from the Yell engineering team looking at challenges they face and problems they solve across Yell’s various digital solutions.

    Here, Yell’s Head of Web Engineering, Steve Workman, looks back over Yell.com‘s seven-month transition to HTTPS, (a secure version of the HTTP protocol – which sends data between a browser and a website) to raise awareness of the issues with the move in the industry and to make the adoption process easier for other engineering teams.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Running Windows on System76

    By tonight, this laptop’s time as a Windows only machine will be over. As soon as I finish writing this, I plan to print a file copy of my return, which got mailed before last Monday’s deadline by the way, and also save a copy of the file that Tax Act created to a USB drive so I can move it to our desktop for safekeeping. Then I’ll be downloading the recently released Xubuntu 16.04 for a review, partitioning the hard drive to save Windows for next year’s taxes and then seeing what our new laptop can do running a real operating system.

  • Interview with Tomáš Marek

    I’m a GNU/Linux user and when I wanted to paint I always had to reboot to Windows to use Photoshop for painting, so with Krita I don’t have to use Windows at all.

  • Cinnamon 3.0 Desktop Environment Tagged for Linux Mint 18, Here's What's New

    Linux Mint project leader and Cinnamon lead developer Clement Lefebvre has tagged the Cinnamon 3.0.0 desktop environment as ready for release on the project's GitHub page.

    Therefore, we're happy to inform you today, April 25, 2016, that the development cycle of the Cinnamon 3.0.0 desktop environment has ended, and it should hit the stable repositories of various GNU/Linux operating systems, such as Arch Linux, in the coming days.

    Cinnamon 3.0 has been tagged as ready for deployment in the upcoming Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" distribution, which should hit the streets this summer, sometimes around June or July, but we should be able to get an early taste in the coming weeks as the developers will announce the RC (Release Candidate) version.

  • This Week In Solus – Install #27

    Welcome to the 27th installation of This Week in Solus and one I’m happy to say is actually being written and published on schedule.

  • Kali Sana New Look & Features - Cyber Security OS
  • Debunked! The CIA-Docker connection

    Some readers may have been alarmed to also learn that one of the companies that presented at a summit sponsored by In-Q-Tel was Docker. But Docker's involvement with In-Q-Tel appears limited to a government support contract for its software -- a wholly uncontroversial connection between Docker and the spy agency.

  • Preview of Stock’s Movement: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) , Workday, Inc. (NYSE:WDAY)
  • Delisa Alexander Sells 1,503 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT) Stock
  • Other Linux Distributions Begin Analyzing Clear Linux's Performance Optimizations

    Fedora developers appear to be among those analyzing Intel's Clear Linux distribution for the performance optimizations made.

    In case you haven't been following our many original performance tests in the past months, Intel's Clear Linux is surprisingly fast. Clear Linux just isn't fast for server/workstation/enterprise workloads but even for Intel graphics performance and other general workloads.

  • Bulldog: A surprisingly fast GPIO library

    One of the most interesting features of computers like the Raspberry Pi is the ability to interact with the physical world via GPIO (general purpose input/output) pins.

    GPIO pins can capture inputs from multiple sources—including data from temperature, humidity, or one-axis sensors—and write output, which can anything from turning on an LED to controlling DC motors, LCD displays, or D/A converters.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • This is why we can't have safe cancellation points
  • Gentoo on my Tesla
  • Lessons learned: Five years of colocation

    Back in 2011, I decided to try out a new method for hosting my websites and other applications: colocation. Before that, I used shared hosting, VPS providers (“cloud” wasn’t a popular thing back then), and dedicated servers. Each had their drawbacks in different areas. Some didn’t perform well, some couldn’t recover from failure well, and some were terribly time consuming to maintain.

    This post will explain why I decided to try colocation and will hopefully help you avoid some of my mistakes.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/16

    Tumbleweed seems to have found its rhythm at around 4 snapshots per week. I will cover the snapshots 0414, 0415, 0416 and 0417. After that, it took unfortunately a bit of effort to get more stagings ready. This then lead now to the fact that the next snapshot (0422) will be rather large. I will mention more about this further down.

  • Kubuntu 16.04 LTS Arrives with New Plasma Discover Software Center, KDE Plasma 5

    The Kubuntu team was proud to announce the official release and general availability of the Kubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, which has been unveiled yesterday as part of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS launch.

    Just like its bigger brother, Kubuntu 16.04 is an LTS (Long Term Support) version that will receive critical security patches and software updates for a few more years than regular releases, such as Kubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) whose end-of-life support will be reached around July 2016.

  • Xubuntu 16.04 Screenshot Tour
  • This Teddy Bear Steals Your Ubuntu Secrets

    Ubuntu just came out with the new long-term support version of their desktop Linux operating system. It’s got a few newish features, including incorporating the “snap” package management format. One of the claims about “snaps” is that they’re more secure — being installed read-only and essentially self-contained makes them harder to hack across applications. In principle.

  • Just After EU Goes After Google For Antitrust, Microsoft Agrees To Drop All Antitrust Complaints About Google [Ed: Ballmer’s “F*ing kill Google!” mission accomplished, now trying to pretend to have nothing to do with the outcome]

    Back in 2011, Microsoft officially filed an antitrust complaint against Google in the EU. At the time, we noted how silly this was, given that the company itself had spent years battling EU antitrust regulations. It almost felt like a "well, if we had to go through that hellish process, let's put it on Google too..." kind of thing. Within less than a year, Google filed its own antitrust complaint back against Microsoft. As we noted at the time, both claims seemed kind of ridiculous and overblown -- and it bothered us greatly that these companies were resorting to stupid political games, rather than just competing in the market.

    So, now, just days after the EU officially took that ball and ran with it, Microsoft and Google have announced that they've buried the hatchet and agreed to drop all antitrust complaints against each other around the globe. They insist this has nothing to do with the EU's move earlier this week. In fact, the writing has been on the wall for some time here. The two companies had ended the patent battle last fall, with everyone dropping all complaints and lawsuits. And, just a couple of months ago there were reports that Microsoft was cutting back on supporting the very coalitions that it had put together and funded: ICOMP and FairSearch.

    It had always been obvious and well-known that both groups were Microsoft front groups, and now it's official... and over.

  • Bash on Windows: What Does It Mean?

    One discussion that I see a lot on the social network is whether “Ubuntu for Windows” is going to hurt desktop Linux in the long run. Currently, many Windows users need to dual boot with Linux or run it in VM to be able to use such tools. That need created a user base; it created a mind share.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Top 3: KaOS 2016.04, TurnKey 14.1 and pfSense 2.3

    KaOS is a KDE optimized Linux distribution that is now being updated, with the new Plasma 5.6.2 desktop environment. Additionally the distro benefits from the new Calamares installer framework which has been updated to version 2.2.1.

  • Simple Control Interface for Linux Computers: pyLCI

    It’s becoming increasingly clear to makers that single board computers and the DIY devices based on them need control interfaces that are simpler and faster to use than desktop peripherals or even full-on PCs. Pičugins Arsenijs believes he’s come up with a much simpler alternative.

  • Forking impressive, devs go nuts for Hazelcast

    Operational in-memory computing company Hazelcast -- known for its open source In-Memory Data Grid (IMDG) -- has shared its community growth numbers from the Github repository.

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