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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Vulkan Cracks 2,500 Projects On GitHub

    After cracking 2,000 projects referencing Vulkan on GitHub earlier this year, this week it passed the milestone of having more than 2,500 projects.

    Granted, some of these projects referencing Vulkan are still in their primitive stages, but of the 2,500+ projects are a lot of interesting Vulkan-using projects from RenderDoc to countless game engine initiatives, various code samples, the AMDVLK driver stack, and countless innovative efforts like GLOVE for OpenGL over Vulkan to Kazan for a Rust-written CPU-based Vulkan implementation and a heck of a lot more.

  • GNOME's Geoclue 2.5 Brings Vala Support, WiFi Geolocation For City-Level Accuracy

    GNOME's Geoclue library that provides a D-Bus service for location information based on GPS receivers, 3G modems, GeoIP, or even WiFi-based geolocation has been baking a lot of changes.

  • Geoclue 2.5.0

    Here is the first release in the 2.5 series.

  •  

  • Wine-Staging 3.18 Released With Some New Patches While Other Code Got Upstreamed

    It has been a very exciting weekend for Linux gamers relying upon Wine for running Windows titles under Linux... There was the routine bi-weekly Wine 3.18 development release on Friday but yesterday brought transform feedback to Vulkan and in turn Stream Output to DXVK to fix up a number of D3D11 games. Today is now the Wine-Staging 3.18 release.

    Wine-Staging 3.18 doesn't incorporate any changes around the Vulkan code (there is a Wine patch needed by DXVK for this new functionality), but does include a lot of other stuff. Wine-Staging 3.18 implements more functions in the user32 code, including cascade windows, GetPointerType, and others. On the Direct3D front are a few additions to WineD3D, including the ability for the Direct3D 10 support to work with the legacy NVIDIA Linux driver. There is also a kernel fix for allowing Steam log-ins to work again with Wine Staging.

today's leftovers

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  • [Older] Cockpit 180

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 180.

  • Destination Linux EP91 – CoC A Doodle Do

    On this special episode of Destination Linux, we are joined by a friend of the show, Liam from GamingonLinux.com to discuss the hottest topics in Linux Gaming! We also cover some interesting discussion topics about Security, Linus’s response to the community reactions, big mistakes we’ve made as Linux users, and Sir Tim Berners-Lee’s new project Solid. Then we’ll end the show with our Tips, Tricks and Software Spotlight picks. All that and much more!

  • Impressions From The Road: Linux Foundation And Its Role In Network Transformation
  • Kiwi TCMS team updates

    I am happy to announce that our team is steadily growing! As we work through our roadmap, status update here, and on-board new team members I start to feel the need for a bit more structure and organization behind the scenes. I also wish for consistent contributions to the project (commit early, commit often) so I can better estimate the resources that we have!

    I am also actively discussing Kiwi TCMS with lots of people at various conferences and generate many ideas for the future. The latest SEETEST in Belgrade was particularly fruitful. Some of these ideas are pulling into different directions and I need help to keep them under control!

  •  

  • How to disable IPv6 through GRUB in Linux
  • The future of AlternateTab, and why you need not worry

    Any time someone publishes a “The top n GNOME Shell extensions” article, there’s a fair chance that it will include the AlternateTab extension.

    That is a bit sad to be honest. Not because it would be wrong for users to prefer a more traditional switcher, mind you, but because the actual functionality has been built-in for years — all the extension does is intercept one keyboard shortcut and pretend that it was a different keyboard shortcut.

  • GDA 6.0 progress

    GDA project has released 5.2.5 and tagged 5.2.6, with some improvements, but the real work is on master.

    Master is targeting 6.0, a new ABI/API release, providing better GObject Introspection support and code modernization.

    A new Meson build system is on the way to replace Autotools. Meson helped to implement, fix and test all changes in less time. Like on multi-threading, where is more easy to produce multiple parallel tests, helping to expose issues to fix. Master have big improvement on that matter.

  • MakuluLinux LinDoz New Build is Live

    The Latest ISO of Makulu Lindoz is now available for download, This build mainly addresses issues some users had with installing Lindoz onto a Virtual machine. Previously we had Squashfs problems when booting live mode on Virtual machines, this bug has now been fixed.

  • How Network Slicing, Microservices & Open Source Technologies Will Make 5G Services Profitable
  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Rises 4.37% for October 12
  • FPgM report: 2018-41
  • binb 0.0.3: Now with Monash

    The third release of the binb package just arrived on CRAN, and it comes with a new (and very crispy) theme: Monash. With that we are also thrilled to welcome Rob Hyndman as a co-author.

  • Google Summer of code at Debian Final Report

    Virtual LTSP server project automates installation and configuration of LTSP server with vagrant. It is the easiest way to create LTSP setup. We have developed the project to do the same for Linux mint 19 and Debian 9. We also created several scripts for testing, create ltsp client, manage accounts, etc. Also created packer scripts to create vagrant boxes that we will use in the project.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • AMDGPU DC Gets "PERF_TRACE" To Help With Performance Profiling

    Published on Wednesday was the latest batch of AMDGPU DC display code changes for its eventual inclusion into the AMDGPU DRM driver for mainline past the 4.20~5.0 cycle with that feature merge window being over. The most notable change with this latest AMDGPU DC haul is a new "PERF_TRACE" addition.

    The 26 patches sent out on Wednesday refactor the DCE clock code as well as the DC to SMU interface. Most interesting to us though is this PERF_TRACE feature on Linux. This PERF_TRACE functionality isn't to be confused with the perf subsystem nor the perf-trace user-space utility.

  • Removing my favorite feature

    So in a decision that was long overdue, I’m removing the real-time graph from Builder 3.32. I never did a great job of porting that code to optimal Wayland use anyway. It was really designed with Xrender/Xshm in mind where XCopyArea() was cheap and done on the GPU.

  • Debian/TeX Live updates 20181009

    During this update some color profiles (icc) that had unclear licenses have been removed, which for now creates problems with the pdfx package. So if you use the pdfx package, please explicitly specify a color profile. The next upload will again allow using pdfx without specifying a profile in which case a default profile is used. I have uploaded already a set of free profiles to CTAN and they arrived in TeX Live, but pdfx package isn’t updated till now.During this update some color profiles (icc) that had unclear licenses have been removed, which for now creates problems with the pdfx package. So if you use the pdfx package, please explicitly specify a color profile. The next upload will again allow using pdfx without specifying a profile in which case a default profile is used. I have uploaded already a set of free profiles to CTAN and they arrived in TeX Live, but pdfx package isn’t updated till now.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Add It Up: FaaS ≠ Serverless

    Using FaaS for isolated use cases or playing with it test environments does not require an organization to rethink the way it writes code or manages infrastructure. But, without re-factoring an application, FaaS can easily increase computing costs when scaled for production use. With many other challenges arising when FaaS moves into production, it is not surprising that almost all organizations with broad deployments are using unique architectures for serverless applications.

  • Cleaning up the Cruft in KDE’s Bugzilla

    We know this is a problem, and some steps have been taken recently to attempt to reduce this. Not long ago, Nate Graham proposed a cleanup of our plasma4 product, which closed 4,000+ bugs. Most of the bugs there were very old and no longer relevant, due to the introduction of Plasma 5 four years ago. While that was a good step in the right direction, we have many, many more products.

  • Usability testing with Outreachy

    I've volunteered with Allan and Jakub to mentor more GNOME usability testing in the next cycle of Outreachy, from December 4, 2018 to March 4, 2019. Outreachy expressly invites applicants from around the world who are women (both cis and trans), trans men, and genderqueer people.

    Interns will work with the GNOME team and mentor(s) to do usability testing on GNOME. The goal is to perform several cycles of usability testing on prototypes of new designs, and provide usability testing results and feedback to the GNOME team so a new iterative design can be updated based on those results. We would like to use a "test what you've got" approach where we set up a testing schedule, and the intern tests whatever prototype or model is ready at that time. So if "test day" is Thursday, we could nail down what to test by Monday, and have the intern post results on Friday or the weekend.

  • The ASUS ROG Phone Wants To Be Your Game Console And PC, Too

    This massively powerful Android phone was announced way back in June, but it’s going up for pre-order in the US on October 18th. The $900 price tag sounds ridiculous, or at least it would have a couple of years ago, before Apple, Google, and Samsung decided that the ceiling on phone prices was more like a stratosphere. If you’re wondering, “ROG” stands for “Republic of Gamers,” ASUS’ dedicated gaming sub-brand a la Dell’s Alienware.

  • The Next Essential Phone Will Be AI Powered, Smart Enough To Email, Book Appointments And Text

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 3 areas to drive DevOps change

    Pain avoidance is a powerful motivator. Some studies hint that even plants experience a type of pain and take steps to defend themselves. Yet we have plenty of examples of humans enduring pain on purpose—exercise often hurts, but we still do it. When we believe the payoff is worth the pain, we'll endure almost anything.

    The truth is that driving large-scale organizational change is painful. It hurts for those having to change their values and behaviors, it hurts for leadership, and it hurts for the people just trying to do their jobs. In the case of DevOps, though, I can tell you the pain is worth it.

  • Red Hat (NYSE:RHT) Price Target Cut to $160.00 by Analysts at Stifel Nicolaus
  • California Public Employees Retirement System Sells 28,032 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Red Hat (NYSE:RHT) Rating Lowered to Positive at OTR Global
  • Fedora 29 Upgrade Test Day 2018-10-08

    Monday, 2018-10-08, is the Fedora 29 Upgrade Test Day!
    As part of this planned change for Fedora 29, we need your help to test if everything runs smoothly!

  • My LTS work in September
  • SQL tutorial: Learn SQL on PostgreSQL

    PostgreSQL is an open-source, object-relational (also called extended relational) database management system. Modern relational database features in PostgreSQL include complex queries, foreign keys, triggers, updatable views, transactional integrity, and multi-version concurrency control. Users can extend PostgreSQL with new data types, functions, operators, aggregate functions, index methods, and procedural languages.

    With more than 20 years of development and deployment behind it, PostgreSQL is a solid open-source database that rivals even commercial relational databases in many respects. You can install it on Linux (all recent distributions), Windows (Windows 2000 SP4 and later), FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, MacOS, AIX, HP/UX, and Solaris. You can also find a hosted high-performance version of PostgreSQL in Amazon Aurora, and a wire-compatible distributed implementation in CockroachDB.

  • SQL tutorial: Learn SQL on PostgreSQL

    PostgreSQL is an open-source, object-relational (also called extended relational) database management system. Modern relational database features in PostgreSQL include complex queries, foreign keys, triggers, updatable views, transactional integrity, and multi-version concurrency control. Users can extend PostgreSQL with new data types, functions, operators, aggregate functions, index methods, and procedural languages.

    With more than 20 years of development and deployment behind it, PostgreSQL is a solid open-source database that rivals even commercial relational databases in many respects. You can install it on Linux (all recent distributions), Windows (Windows 2000 SP4 and later), FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, MacOS, AIX, HP/UX, and Solaris. You can also find a hosted high-performance version of PostgreSQL in Amazon Aurora, and a wire-compatible distributed implementation in CockroachDB.

  • This tech investor had a killer week thanks to two big open-source deals

    Mike Volpi of Index Ventures started investing in open-source software companies when it wasn't clear if they could make much money. This past week — more than any before it — has validated his conviction that they can.

    On Wednesday, Hortonworks, a big-data software company backed by Volpi, announced that it was merging with competitor Cloudera. Two days later, another one of Volpi's companies, Elastic, started trading on the New York Stock Exchange and doubled in value in its debut.

    It was a whirlwind few days for Volpi, who left San Francisco early in the week for meetings in London and Paris with Index's limited partners and other investors. On Thursday, shortly after the Cloudera-Hortonworks deal was made public, he flew to New York, where he and other Elastic board members met for three hours to price the software company's IPO and allocate shares.

  • IOTA Has Issued Grants To Three Open-source Projects

    About $354,000 USD were allocated for this second cohort of grantees

    The IOTA Foundation, via its granting program called Ecosystem Development Fund, is supporting three open-source projects to be developed on its network, according to an announcement via its official blog.

    “We are proud to announce another cohort of fantastic open-source projects the Ecosystem Development Fund will support for a total of $354,000 USD,” reads the publication.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Kubernetes for personal projects? No thanks!

     

    I have read multiple times this article about running Kubernetes to run small projects and thought I could share why I think that might not be a great idea.

  • I am gonna run retro server

    You probably know that I am fan of retro computers. Those from 80s, 70s and older ones. And for quite a time I told that I do not plan to run retro machines at home. But it has to change.

    Due to some work things I am going to run Mustang again. But where is retro in it someone may ask…

  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Shares Bought by Glenmede Trust Co. NA
  • KeyCorp Lowers Red Hat (RHT) Price Target to $180.00
  • That’s what we call, Keeping cards close to the chest : Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Red Hat (NYSE:RHT) Price Target Cut to $163.00
  • The Mid-Range, Unlocked Nokia 7.1 Makes An Impressive Entrance

    After spending years on life support, the revived Nokia brand is making some big moves in the mid-range Android phone market. The company unveiled its newest design, the 7.1, today.

    [...]

    Nokia’s going for a flagship look here, but there are a couple of corners cut to get the price down. Despite the glass body there’s no wireless charging, and the HDR on the screen probably won’t match the same feature on brighter, more vivid OLED panels. There’s also just one external speaker. But as an unlocked device that’s less than half the cost of the headline grabbing-phones from Apple, Google, and Samsung, it’s definitely worth consideration. The Nokia 7.1 will be available in the US directly from the manufacturer website, with retail sales in other markets.

  • GOG Celebrates 10 Years Of Competing With Piracy And Being DRM Free By Saying So

    It did indeed. In fact, the story of GOG's anniversary is the story of one platform successfully competing with free, with a much bigger competitor, and having to drag wary publishers that might be scared off of the anti-DRM stance along for the ride... for ten years. For a decade now, GOG has built a business that started and is still largely centered around retro-games that are easily pirated in the video game industry of all places, where customers are far more likely to know the methods for piracy than in other industries. And, yet, here they are, retelling how it filled the market for retro-games by assuming many people actually still wanted developers to be rewarded for great game-making.

  • The Global Multilateral Benefit-Sharing Mechanism: Where Will Be The Bretton Woods Of The 21st Century?

    Similar thinking has not transpired at any of the Conferences of the Parties (COP) to the 1993 United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), even though conservation is as economic as is finance. The problem lies in the language of the CBD. “Genetic resources” are defined as “material”, which is interpreted as matter [2].

    Were genetic resources instead interpreted as information, [3] economics would imply that “bounded openness” be the policy for “access to genetic resources” and “the fair and equitable sharing of benefits” (ABS), which is the third objective of the CBD [4]. But to so persuade the delegations to the COP, a willingness to be persuaded must first exist [5]. Bretton Woods is again instructive. The merciless destruction of Europe and Asia by both Axis and Allies prepared the psyche of the 44 nations who met in Bretton Woods. To prevent WWIII, concessions by the victors would be a small price to pay–a prescient insight that Keynes wrought from the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 [6]. The threat today of ecosystem collapse on land, air and sea should likewise persuade Users to concede benefits to Providers. However, as argued in the previous essays in this trilogy, concessions are not even necessary. Bounded openness is a Win-Win situation that can pay for itself through the emergence of biotechnologies which would have otherwise been stymied by Prior Informed Consent, Mutually Agreed Terms and Material Transfer Agreements (MTAs).

    Bretton Woods was a radical departure from the competitive devaluations and the restrictive trade policies that vexed the interwar years [7]. In a similar fashion, bounded openness departs from competitive MTAs and the restrictive measures of ABS Competent National Authorities. However, bounded openness is far less contingent on achieving first this and then that, than was Bretton Woods. One thinks of the establishment of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank Group. The execution of bounded openness will draw from existing institutions, and the system itself would become a means of financial support. The legal vehicle is Article 10 of the Nagoya Protocol (NP), titled “Global Multilateral Benefit-Sharing Mechanism” (GMBSM).

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • PulseAudio Lands Big Improvements For Its Meson Build System

    PulseAudio has been slower than some of the other prominent open-source projects at moving to the Meson build system, but as of last night it appears a bulk of that new build system is in place.

    Back in June is when some initial bits of the Meson build system were merged to the PulseAudio sound server code base and then a few commits here and there pertaining to this Autotools alternative.

  • This week focuses on Slackware 14.2 packages

    The admins over there at slackbuilds.org have updated their version of the Qt5 build script (targeting Slackware 14.2) to 5.9.6, i.e. the latest version of the Long Term Support (LTS) for Qt5.

    That triggered me to provide the same service for my own package repository targeting Slackware 14.2. Since more and more software is depending on Qt5, a lot of people will have some qt5 package installed, either built from the SBo script or installed from my repository. In order to minimize breakage, I think it is good if SBo’s and mine are the same version so that it should not matter which one you have installed.

    So, I did a chained upgrade: libwacom (0.31), libinput (1.7.3), libxkbcommon (0.8.2), qt5 (5.9.6) and qt5-webkit (5.9.1) in that order to take care of dependencies. The latest releases of these packages are now available for Slackware 14.2. Note that for the 32bit Slackware 14.2, the libwacom package is a new dependency for both libinput and qt5. My repository contained a pretty old 32bit qt5 package (5.7.0) which was not built against libwacom.

  • What is agile?

    I know you are thinking, "Not another Agile 101 article!" We were, too. There are many resources that describe what agile is, talk about the history of the concept, and go into depth about why it is important. This article is not any of those things—rather, we would like you to forget everything you've been told; everything you've learned, read, or otherwise acquired via misuse of the term or misdeed in implementing it.

  • Stocks with Performance Valuation Turns Game Changers- Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Old Ceiling Or A New Floor? Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Red Hat Stumbles, Yet Again
  • What we learned building a Zuul CI/CD cloud

    Contributing to open source projects such as OpenStack traditionally involves individuals and companies providing code contributions that add new features and fix bugs. For nearly two years, I’ve been running one-off OpenStack clouds for demonstrations and labs at user group meetings across the US, using hardware donated from bare-metal service provider Packet. Six months ago, Packet asked how they could make a larger donation to the community, which brought us on our path to build a community cloud to support OpenStack.

    Each day, hundreds of code commits to the OpenStack code base need to be tested as part of the continuous integration system managed by Zuul, "a program that drives continuous integration, delivery, and deployment systems with a focus on project gating and interrelated projects." Each commit runs through a series of tests (or gates) before a human review, and the gates run again before a code merge. All of these gates run across a pool of virtual machines instances (more than 900 instances at peak times) donated by a number of public cloud providers. All of the OpenStack CI is dependent on donated computing resources. The OpenStack Infra team coordinates all of these cloud providers and served as our point of contact for donating these resources.

  • UN Panel Starts Consultations On Digital Cooperation: Philosophy and Practice

    There is a lot of energy and good dynamism, and some worries, too, about the immensity of the task ahead in the United Nations High Level Panel on Digital Cooperation, Jovan Kurbalija, executive director of Panel’s Secretariat, said after the first face-to-face meeting last week and subsequent virtual town hall on 1 October. According to the mandate, the panel shall in less than a year present recommendations on ways and means for cooperation on digital policies and digital risks.

  • Icestorm Tools Roundup: Open Source FPGA Dev Guide

    We like the ICE40 FPGA from Lattice for two reasons: there are cheap development boards like the Icestick available for it and there are open source tools. We’ve based several tutorials on the Icestorm toolchain and it works quite well. However, the open source tools don’t always expose everything that you see from commercial tools. You sometimes have to dig a little to find the right tool or option.

    Sometimes that’s a good thing. I don’t need to learn yet another fancy IDE and we have plenty of good simulation tools, so why reinvent the wheel? However, if you are only using the basic workflow of Yosys, Arachne-pnr, icepack, and iceprog, you could be missing out on some of the most interesting features. Let’s take a deeper look.

  • Thank you for participating in International Day Against DRM 2018!

    Thank you everyone for helping to make September 18th another successful International Day Against DRM (IDAD)! Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) is an issue we have to face every day. In rallying together for a single day against DRM, we sent a powerful message: DRM is just wrong and we can live in a society without it.

    Hundreds of you around the world took action on IDAD: going out into your campuses, communities, and around the Web, and sharing your opposition to how DRM restricts your freedom as a user of software and media. The 17 participating organizations took their own actions, creating videos, releasing reports, and writing articles. Here in Boston, we visited the Apple Store and talked with shoppers about their digital rights and how Apple devices abuse those rights using DRM.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Open source communities unite around Cloud-native Network Functions

    Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), chiefly responsible for Kubernetes, and the recently established Linux Foundation Networking (LF Networking) group are collaborating on a new class of software tools called Cloud-native Network Functions (CNFs).

    CNFs are the next generation Virtual Network Functions (VNFs) designed specifically for private, public and hybrid cloud environments, packaged inside application containers based on Kubernetes.

    VNFs are primarily used by telecommunications providers; CNFs are aimed at telecommunications providers that have shifted to cloud architectures, and will be especially useful in the deployment of 5G networks.

    Some of the first working examples of CNFs will be seen in the third release of the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP), codenamed Casablanca and expected later this year.

  • Top Five Reasons to Attend Hyperledger Global Forum

    In just over two months, the global Hyperledger community will gather in Basel, Switzerland, for the inaugural Hyperledger Global Forum.

    [...]

    At its core, Hyperledger is a global community built on the belief you can do more to advance blockchain technologies by working together than by working in isolation.

    Hyperledger Global Forum is the first worldwide meeting of those invested in or intrigued by this community-based approach, so making connections, getting involved and sharing resources will be top of mind for everyone there. There’s no better way place to become part of the global team.

  • 10 Best Android Racing Games Of 2018 For Ultimate Driving Experience

    Welcome gamers, today we will be looking at some of the best Android racing games of 2018. I have looked at all the genre of Android racing games. From simulation-style racing games to boosting vehicles in water, we have a treat for every racer out there.

  • Z-Wave opens up with new public SDK and developer site

    New Z-Wave owner Silicon Labs has launched a public developer site for the Z-Wave home automation wireless standard with public documentation, a public Z-Wave SDK, a Raspberry Pi image, and a forum.

    Silicon Labs and its Z-Wave Alliance have further opened up their Z-Wave mesh networking standard by releasing the first public SDK and launching a Z-Wave Public Standard Developer Site for home automation developers. The new site also includes a developer forum and an image for experimenting with Z-Wave on a Raspberry Pi 3. Silicon Labs, which is known for its wireless modules, MCUs, and sensors, acquired the 100-employee Z-Wave business from Sigma Designs in April of this year for $240 million.

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Windows 10 October 2018 Update Performance Against Ubuntu 18.10, Fedora 29

As the latest of our benchmarks using the newly re-released Microsoft Windows 10 October 2018 Update, here are benchmarks of this latest Windows 10 build against seven different Linux distributions on the same hardware for checking out the current performance of these operating systems. For this latest Linux OS benchmarking comparison against Windows, the following platforms were tested: - The Windows 10 April 2018 release as the previous major milestone of Windows 10. - The newest Windows 10 October 2018 build as the latest Windows 10 build from Microsoft. - OpenSUSE Tumbleweed as the openSUSE rolling-release distribution that as of testing was on the Linux 4.18.12 kernel, KDE Plasma 5.14, Mesa 18.1.7, and GCC 8.2.1 atop an XFS home file-system with Btrfs root file-system (the default partitioning scheme). Read more

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Release of KDE Frameworks 5.51.0

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Linux 4.19-rc8

As mentioned last week, here's a -rc8 release as it seems needed. There were a lot of "little" pull requests this week, semi-normal for this late in the cycle, but a lot of them were "fix up the previous fix I just sent" which implies that people are having a few issues still. I also know of at least one "bad" bug that finally has a proposed fix, so that should hopefully get merged this week. And there are some outstanding USB fixes I know of that have not yet landed in the tree (I blame me for that...) Anyway, the full shortlog is below, lots of tiny things all over the tree. Please go and test and ensure that all works well for you. Hopefully this should be the last -rc release. Read more Also: Linux 4.19-rc8 Released With A Lot Of "Tiny Things"