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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • How to dual-boot Linux and Windows

    Even though Linux is a great operating system with widespread hardware and software support, the reality is that sometimes you have to use Windows, perhaps due to key apps that won't run under Linux. Thankfully, dual-booting Windows and Linux is very straightforward—and I'll show you how to set it up, with Windows 10 and Ubuntu 18.04, in this article.

    Before you get started, make sure you've backed up your computer. Although the dual-boot setup process is not very involved, accidents can still happen. So take the time to back up your important files in case chaos theory comes into play. In addition to backing up your files, consider taking an image backup of the disk as well, though that's not required and can be a more advanced process.

  • Weather Forecasting Gets A Big Lift In Japan

    This is a lot more compute capacity than JMA has had available to do generic weather forecasting as well as do predictions for typhoons, tsunamis, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions – the weather forecasting alone is predicted to run 10X faster, according to Cray.

  • Bitwarden Password Manager Adds Command Line Vault

    Bitwarden, the secure, open source password manager we talked about recently, added a command line tool to its list of apps you can use to access your passwords.

    Bitwarden CLI is currently in public beta testing, and according to its documentation, it includes all the features available in other Bitwarden client applications, like the desktop or browser extension.

  • GSoC’18 Week 1

    The first week of the coding period was great and I got to learn a lot of new things. My mentors help me on every stage and the work is going on as planne

    [...]

    Improvement in the overall UI is still in progress. Other than this, I have been working on refactoring the current code for this activity and breaking the whole code into various elements. For the next week, my main task is to complete the overall UI of this activity and add more geometries for drawing.

  • Time to Test Plasma 5.13 Beta

    The forthcoming new release of Plasma 5.13 will have some lovely new features such as rewritten System Settings pages and Plasma Browser Integration. But we need testers.

    Incase you missed it the Plasma 5.13 release announce has a rundown of the main features. If you are an auditory learner you can listen to the Late Night Linux Extra podcast where Jonathan “great communicator” Riddell talks about the recent sprint and the release.

  • GSoC students are already hacking!

    We always enjoy that new people join openSUSE community and help them in their first steps. Because of that, openSUSE participates again in GSoC, an international program in which stipends are awarded to students who hack on open source projects during the summer. We are really excited to announce that this year four students will learn about open source development while hacking on openSUSE projects. The coding period started last week, so our students are already busy hacking and they have written some nice articles about their projects. Wink

  • CryptoFest a openSUSE Conference již tento víkend v Praze
  • openSUSE Conference a CryptoFest 2018
  • Aaeon reveals two rugged, Linux-ready embedded PCs

    Aaeon unveiled two Linux-friendly embedded systems: an “AIOT-IP6801” gateway equipped with an Apollo Lake-based UP Squared SBC with WiFi and LoRa, and a “Boxer-8120AI” mini-PC with an Nvidia Jetson TX2 module and 4x GbE ports.

    Aaeon announced that three of its Linux-ready embedded systems have won Computex d&j awards, including two previously unannounced models: an Intel Apollo Lake based AIOT-IP6801 gateway based on Aaeon’s community-backed UP Squared board, as well as a Boxer-8120AI embedded computer built around an Arm-based Jetson TX2 module.

  • Last Call for Purism's Librem 5 Dev Kits, Git Protocol Version 2 Released, LXQt Version 0.13.0 Now Available and More

    Purism announces last call for its Librem 5 dev kits. If you're interested in the hardware that will be the platform for the Librem 5 privacy-focused phones, place your order by June 1, 2018. The dev kit is $399, and it includes "screen, touchscreen, development mainboard, cabling, power supply and various sensors (free worldwide shipping)".

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Openlab: what it is and why it matters

    Six months on from its announcement at Openstack Summit Sydney in late 2017, community testing project OpenLab is in full swing.

    OpenLab was initially formed by Intel, Huawei and the OpenStack foundation as a community-led project for improving SDK support and also introducing other platforms like Kubernetes and Cloud Foundry to the Openstack environment. Ultimately the idea is to improve usability in hybrid and multi-cloud environments.

    Melvin Hillsman sits on the governance board along with Dr Yih Leong Sun of Intel and Chris Hoge from the Foundation. Hillsman moved from Rackspace to Huawei to work specifically on the project.

    "The reason we think Openlab is important is, basically, Openstack for some time has been very specific about testing and integration for Openstack services, focusing only on the projects started at Openstack," Hillsman tellsComputerworld UK at the Openstack Vancouver Summit. "It's been working very well, it's a robust system. But for me as a person in the user community - my getting involved in Openstack was more on the operator-user side.

  • Open source innovation tips for the customer-driven economy

    New technologies, ranging from big data and blockchain to 3D printing, are giving rise to new opportunities and challenges for companies today. To stay competitive, organizations need to become more intelligent, customer-centric, and increasingly agile to cope with changing business demands.

    The worry for many companies which are trying to innovate is that while the speed and scope of applications are expanding rapidly, the variety and complexity of technology is increasing simultaneously, putting pressure on their IT infrastructure.

    Speaking at the SUSE Expert Days 2018 held in Singapore recently, Dr Gerald Pfeifer, VP of Products and Technology Program, SUSE, told attendees that these prevailing trends have come together to make Open Source the primary engine for business innovation.

  • Qualcomm is able to release the Snapdragon 845 source code in 6 weeks

    Qualcomm‘s latest high-end system-on-chip, the Qualcomm Snapdragon 845, was announced at the Snapdragon Tech Summit back in December. The chipset offers 4 Kryo 385 (A75 “performance”) and 4 Kryo 385 (A55 “efficiency”) CPU cores, the latest Adreno 630 GPU, the Spectra 280 ISP, the Hexagon 685 DSP, the Snapdragon X20 LTE modem, and a new Secure Processing Unit (SPU). The Snapdragon 845 SoC is a powerhouse in benchmarks and it is already available in devices like the Samsung Galaxy S9/S9+, Xiaomi Mi Mix 2S, and the OnePlus 6. Developers on our forums have been itching to get their hands on a device with Qualcomm’s latest and greatest, but there’s just one thing that has made some developers worry about the future of development on the platform: The lack of publicly available source code for the kernel, HALs, framework branches, and more on the CodeAurora Forums.

  • Kata Containers 1.0 Released, Formerly Intel Clear Containers

    Back in December was the announcement of Intel's Clear Containers being spun into a new project called Kata Containers in collaboration with other organizations. Kata Containers has now reached their version 1.0 milestone.

    Kata Containers 1.0 is now available for this container technology designed for offering a secure and scalable container experience built atop Intel VT technology.

  • What's new in OpenStack?

    As OpenStack Foundation Chief Operating Officer Mark Collier referenced in his opening keynote, the uses which OpenStack is seeing today expand far beyond what most who were involved in the early days of the project could have ever imagined. While OpenStack started out primarily in the traditional data center and found many large-scale users, particularly in the telecommunications industry, who were using it to manage huge installations of traditional x86 server hardware, the flexibility of OpenStack has today allowed it to thrive in many other environments and use cases.

    Today, we see OpenStack powering everything from academic and research projects to media and gaming services, from online retail and e-commerce to manufacturing and industrial applications, and from finance to healthcare. OpenStack is found in all of these different places not just because it is cheaper than using the public cloud, not just because it makes compliance with various regulations easier, but because its open source code makes it flexible to all sort of different situations.

  • Should Red Hat Buy or Build a Database?

    For a decade, at least, observers of the company have speculated about whether Red Hat would or should enter the database market. The primary argument, one made in this space eight years ago, has historically been that Red Hat is de facto leaving potential dollars on the table by limiting itself to operating platform and immediately adjacent markets. In a more recent piece, analyst Krishnan Subramanian adds that Red Hat is at risk because databases represent a control point, one that the company is effectively ceding to competitors such as AWS or Microsoft.

  • Tidelift Raises $15M Series A From General Catalyst, Foundry, & Others

    This morning Tidelift, a startup focused on helping developers work with open source technology, announced that it has closed a $15 million Series A round of funding co-led by General Catalyst, Foundry, and Matthew Szulik, the former CEO of Red Hat, a public open source-centered technology company.

    The subscription-powered startup has an interesting business model which we’ll dive into shortly, but it’s worth noting that the open source space as a whole is quite active. It’s something that Crunchbase News covered last year, describing how startups working with open source software have enjoyed a dramatic rise in investor interest.

    That puts Tidelift in the midst of a trend.

  • Tidelift lands $15M to deliver professional open-source support

    Tidelift Inc. is raising $15 million as it looks to boost its unique open-source software model that sees companies pay for professional support of their favorite projects, allowing those that maintain them to get compensated too.

    The Series A round was led by the investment firms General Catalyst and Foundry Group, as well as former Red Hat Inc. Chairman and Chief Executive Matthew Szulik. The company was able to attract the investment after coming up with a novel idea for maintaining the most popular open-source software projects in a way that benefits both the users and those who help to create them.

    It works like this: Companies pay a subscription fee that entitles them to professional-grade support, similar to the kind of commercial subscriptions offered by firms such as Red Hat, Cloudera Inc. and Docker Inc. A part of these fees are then used to pay the developers who maintain the software. The net result, at least in theory, is that everyone is happy, as companies enjoy the benefits of professional support at lower rates than they might expect from an established firm, and the developers of the software are finally rewarded for their efforts.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftover

Filed under
Misc
  • The Prominent Changes Of Phoronix Test Suite 8.0

    With development on Phoronix Test Suite 8.0 wrapping up for release in the coming weeks, here is a recap of some of the prominent changes for this huge update to our open-source, cross-platform benchmarking software.

  • AMD AOCC 1.2 Code Compiler Offers Some Performance Benefits For EPYC

    Last month AMD released the AOCC 1.2 compiler for Zen systems. This updated version of their branched LLVM/Clang compiler with extra patches/optimizations for Zen CPUs was re-based to the LLVM/Clang 6.0 code-base while also adding in experimental FLANG support for Fortran compilation and various other unlisted changes to their "znver1" patch-set. Here's a look at how the performance compares with AOCC 1.2 to LLVM Clang 6.0 and GCC 7/8 C/C++ compilers.

  • More Roads And Faster Browsers

    And it's exactly what is happening with our Web pages. Browsers become more performant. So developers instead of using this extra performance to make the page extra-blazingly fast, we use it to pack more DOM nodes, CSS animations and JavaScript driven user experiences.

  • Firefox 61 Beta 6 Testday Results

    As you may already know, last Friday – May 18th – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox 61 Beta 6.

    Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place: gaby2300, Michal, micde, Jarrod Michell, Petri Pollanen, Thomas Brooks.

    From India team: Aishwarya Narasimhan, Mohamed Bawas, Surentharan and Suren, amirthavenkat, krish.

  • Lemonade Proposes Open Source Insurance Policy for All to Change, Adopt

    Technology-focused homeowners and renters insurer Lemonade Inc. has proposed an open source renters insurance policy that anyone can contribute to changing, even its rivals since Lemonade is not copyrighting it.

  • Security updates for Monday

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • ‘Crush Them’: An Oral History of the Lawsuit That Upended Silicon Valley

    The then-23-year-old giant, which ruled the personal computer market with a despotic zeal, stood accused of using monopoly power to bully collaborators and squelch competitors. Its most famous victim was Netscape, the pioneering web browser, but everyone from Apple to American Airlines felt threatened by late-’90s Microsoft. The company was big enough to be crowned America’s most valuable firm, bold enough to compare attacks on its domain to Pearl Harbor, and, eventually, bad enough to be portrayed as a (semifictionalized) cadre of hypercapitalist murderers in a major motion picture. The “don’t be evil” optics that colored the rise of today’s tech giants (and have recently lost their efficacy) were a direct response to Microsoft’s tyrannical rule.

  • Michał Górny: Empty directories, *into, dodir, keepdir and tmpfiles.d
  • FRAMED Collection, a noir-styled spy adventure where you rearrange comic tiles is now out

    It's actually a compilation of FRAMED and FRAMED 2, games that have been widely praised and previously only available on mobile platforms. It has you moving around slices of an animated comic book, to put the noir-styled spy adventure story together. It actually sounds hilarious, as it's not a basic "this one has to go here" type of game, as it changes what happens based on where you put the tiles creating some amusing sounding failures:

  • Paradox’s grand strategy titles will be getting more content soon

    At their annual convention, Paradox Interactive have announced new expansions for their current grand strategy titles. There’s a little bit of everything for fans of these games.

  • Why OpenShift Is The New OpenStack For Red Hat
  • Help the Debian kernel team to help you

    I gave the first talk this morning at Mini-DebConf Hamburg, titled "Help the kernel team to help you". I briefly described several ways that Debian users and developers can make it easier (or harder) for us to deal with their requests. The slides are up in on my talks page, and video should be available soon.

  • UbuCon Europe 2018: Analysing a dream [English|Spanish]

    The idea of organising the Ubucon in Xixon, Asturies was set two years ago, while participating in the European Ubucon in Essen (germany). The Paris Ubucon took place and in those days we uderstood that there was a group enough of people with the capacities and the will to hold an European Congress for Ubuntu lovers. We had learnt a lot from German and French colleagues thanks to their respective amazing organizations and, at the same time, our handicap was the lack of s consolidated group in Spain.

  • 19-year-old Developer at the Forefront of TRON (TRX) Opensource Wallet DApp
  • 19-years-old German developer Spearheads TRON (TRX) Opensource Wallet DApp

    No doubt that Tron community is preparing for mainnet launch, with different ideas coming in from all roads. As part of its readiness, Tron has unveiled its Opensource Wallet DApp developed by 19-year old German developer, Marius Gill, who has been programming since 13 years old.

    The DApp is an outcome of Project Genesis, which was launched in March 2018 purposely to encourage TRON’s community engagement in bringing in new things into Tron ecosystem. The project provides a bonus pool of 2 billion dollars for active members around the world have lent their hands in implementing ideas for the community.

  • Collabora and GStreamer spring in Sweden

    Earlier this month, a few of us from Collabora, Olivier Crête, Nicolas Dufresne, George Kiagiadakis and I attended the GStreamer Spring Hackfest in Lund, Sweden. Hosted by Axis Communications (who uses GStreamer in their surveillance cameras for many years now), it was a great opportunity for the GStreamer community to touch base and work on open bugs and pet projects.

    [...]

    As for myself, I mainly worked on (or rather started to work on) split-field interlacing support in GStreamer, adding relevant formats and modes in the GStreamer video library. In addition, as a Meson developer (Nirbheek Chauhan) was present, I took the opportunity to discuss with him the last bit of porting build system of Geoclue to Meson, a side project I've been working on. It helped me get it done faster but also helped Nirbheek find some issues in Meson and fix them!

    All in all, my first GStreamer hackfest was an awesome experience (even though I was not feeling well). It was also very nice to hangout and socialize with old and new friends in the GStreamer community after a long time. Many thanks again to Axis for hosting us in their offices! See you at the GStreamer Conference this fall!

  • Reality Redrawn Opens At The Tech

    The Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose was filled on Thursday with visitors experiencing new takes on the issue of fake news by artists using mixed reality, card games and even scratch and sniff cards. These installations were the results of Mozilla’ Reality Redrawn challenge. We launched the competition last December to make the power of misinformation and its potential impacts visible and visceral. Winners were announced in February.

  • Tangerine UI problems

    I've been a big fan of Tangerine for a while, it's a bank that doesn't charge fees and does what I need to do. They used to have a great app and website and then it all went a bit wrong.

    It's now a HTML app for Desktop and mobile. This isn't the fault of the tools used, but there's some terrible choices in the app across both.

    [...]

    The overall feel of the app is that its full of spinners, far too cluttered and just to confusing. Hey not everything I've built is perfect, but even I can spot some real problems with this app. I pretty sure Tangerine can do better than this.

    And yes, I'm writing this while drinking a beer I recently bought, as shown on my transaction page.

  • Majority of software plagued by vulnerabilities as open source adoption soars [Ed: More of Black Duck's FUD]
  • SiFive Releases 'Expansion Board' to Build Interest in RISC-V Processor
  • FreeBSD 11.2 Beta 2 Available For Testing, Brings PTI Optimization

    The second beta release of FreeBSD 11.2 is now available for weekend testing.

    FreeBSD 11.2-BETA2 is now available with a variety of bug fixes, a fix to restore boot support for the Banana Pi ARM board, a context switch optimization for page table isolation (PTI), DTrace improvements, various build fixes, and a range of other system fixes.

  • Sony Is Working On AMD Ryzen LLVM Compiler Improvements - Possibly For The PlayStation 5

    One of Sony's compiler experts has taken to working on some tuning for the AMD Ryzen "znver1" microarchitecture support within the LLVM compiler stack. This begs the question why Sony is working on Ryzen improvements if not for a future product.

  • Popular YouTuber Says Apple Won't Fix His iMac Pro Damaged While Disassembled

    The damage resulted when they dropped the display while attempting to reattach it to the aluminum chassis. Towards the end of the video, Sebastian also says the iMac Pro requires a new logic board and power supply unit, suggesting there may have been a short circuit that caused damage to internal components as well.

  • Most dangerous new cyber security threats [iophk: "Windows TCO, yet neither Microsoft nor Windows get a mention"]

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Is systemd on Linux Evil – For The Record

    Is systemd on Linux Evil? How does it compare to alternatives like runit? I discuss some considerations with systemd and below are the links I reference in the video.

  • Linux Apps On Chromebooks – Unleaded Hangouts

    Linux Apps On Chromebooks. Does this present a compelling reason to buy a Chromebook or instead, is this too little too late for Google? We discuss.

  • A Remote KMS Linux Backend Is Being Worked On That Could Work With VNC

    Thomas Hellstrom of VMware who has worked on Mesa going back to the Tungsten Graphics days is developing a remote KMS back-end that could be transmitted over VNC or similar protocols.

    In essence this kernel mode-setting (KMS) kernel back-end would allow the display to be transmitted remotely over VNC or similar remote desktop sharing technologies. The current intention is on open-source VNC server support.

  • A Closer Look At The GCC 8 Compiler Performance On Intel Skylake

    In continuing with our recent benchmarks of the brand new GCC 8.1 compiler, here are more tests while using an Intel Skylake CPU and testing with -O2, -O3, and -O3 -march=native optimization levels while comparing the resulting binary performance of GCC 8.1 and GCC 7.3.

  • Vim 8.1 Adds Support For Running A Terminal In The Vim Window

    Vim 8.1 is out today as the latest stable feature update to this advanced cross-platform text editor.

  • Vim 8.1 released
  • Caprine Is A Privacy-Focused Facebook Messenger Desktop App

    Caprine is an Electron Facebook Messenger application that's focused on privacy. I know that Facebook and privacy shouldn't really be used in the same sentence unless they are accompanied by 'lack of', but Caprine tries to improve this, by preventing Facebook from tracking the links that you click.

    The application also ships with options to hide the last seen / typing indicator, and a way to quickly disable receiving desktop notifications.

  • Lubuntu 18.10 Officially Switching From LXDE To LXQt

    After working on Lubuntu-Next for a while in transitioning from the GTK-based LXDE desktop environment to the modern and maintained LXQt desktop environment that is powered by Qt5, the Lubuntu 18.10 will be the release that officially moves over to the LXQt desktop and pushes out LXDE.

    Walter Lapchynski of the Lubuntu project has confirmed that for the Ubuntu 18.10 "Cosmic Cuttlefish" cycle they are switching to LXQt for good.

  • Mozilla Firefox 60.0.1 Released with Many Improvements, Disables WebVR on macOS

    Mozilla released on Wednesday the first point release to the Firefox 60.0 web browser, version 60.0.1, which brings several improvements and fixes some annoyances reported by users lately.

    One of the annoyances that Mozilla resolved in the Firefox 60.0.1 release, which started rolling out to Linux, Mac, and Windows platforms, is the displaying of "Sponsored content" on the New Tab page. Mozilla says that it will now immediately disappear when the user disables the "Sponsored Stories" option in Preferences.

    With the Firefox 60.0.1 release, the web browser now avoids overly long cycle collector pauses with certain add-ons, improves momentum scrolling on non-zoomable pages for touchscreen devices, and restores language translations of the Preferences panels when using a language pack.

  • fridge 0.1

    Imagine something really cool, like a fridge connected to a powerwall, powered entirely by solar panels. What could be cooler than that?

    How about a fridge powered entirely by solar panels without the powerwall? Zero battery use, and yet it still preserves your food.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Fantastic kernel patches and where to find them

    I've griped before about kernel development being scattered and spread about. A quick grep of MAINTAINERS shows over 200 git trees and even more mailing lists. Today's discussion is a partial enumeration of some common mailing lists, git trees and patchwork instances. You can certainly find some of this in the MAINTAINERS file.

  • Sprint Joins ORAN Alliance and Linux Foundation Networking Fund

    Sprint is becoming a member of the ORAN Alliance, formerly known as the xRAN Forum, and it is also joining the LF Networking Fund (LNF).

    The two moves signal the operator’s commitment to the open source world. It’s making these inroads prior to its planned merger with T-Mobile. The two companies announced earlier last month that they will merge. The deal, if approved, will close in early 2019.

  • Vulkan 1.1.75 Released With Many Issues Resolved

    It's been almost one month since the Vulkan 1.1.74 debut but now that's been succeeded by Vulkan 1.1.75.

    The Khronos Group has put out Vulkan 1.1.75 this morning as the newest revision to this graphics/compute API. The Vulkan 1.1.75 update doesn't introduce any new extensions, but there are a wide number of issues resolved -- as usual, mostly document clarifications about intended behavior and some fixes.

  • FreeOffice 2018 Release is Seamlessly Compatible With MS Office on Linux

    A few months after the release of the premium SoftMaker 2018 office suite, SoftMaker has just released the latest version of its free office suite, SoftMaker FreeOffice 2018.

    SoftMaker is a premium productivity suite and one of the most viable alternatives to Microsoft Office. FreeOffice is a stripped down version of SoftMaker premium with fewer features than the premium version. You can read about the difference between the features of SoftMaker and FreeOffice here.

  • Colony building sim Maia has a fresh update with a ton of polish & new fancy exterior rendering

    Maia [Official Site], from developer Simon Roth has just been updated with a pretty big update. There's a lot of polish in this update, literally so with a new floor cleaning robot.

    I'll be honest, Maia is one of those games that I've always had a bit of a love/hate relationship with. Mainly because I love the simulation in it and the insane levels of detail, but it has previously been a little on the buggy side. Thankfully, the developer is massively dedicated and each update really has improved the game dramatically. This update is no different, it's made a world of difference.

  • The first stage of removing loot crates from Robocraft is now live

    Robocraft, the free to play, build and battle game just got updated with the first stage planned in a series of updates to remove loot crates.

    With this first initial update, you can no longer buy item crates and you don't get a daily login item crate bonus. While you still get them in other parts of the game, it's a great first step towards it, since the game is now a lot more geared towards having to play it to win it. There's still crates to be earned as you play, but they will remove them gradually with more updates.

  • Linspire Server 2018 Released, Based On Ubuntu 16.04 With Xfce Desktop

    Back in January was the news of Linspire (formerly known as "Lindows") making a comeback and this week marks the release of Linspire Server 2018.

    Linspire/Lindows had previously been focused on just a desktop offering, but PC/OpenSystems acquired the Linspire rights a few months back and now they are spinning up new products. The newly-announced Linspire Server 2018 is based on Ubuntu Server 16.04 and is available for free with a self-support license while the company is also selling commercial support for interested users.

  • openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018 Taiwan: Call for proposals is open

    openSUSE.Asia Committee calls for proposals of talks for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018 held at National Taiwan University of Science and Technology on August 11 and 12. We might have community day on 10th August before the summit.

    openSUSE.Asia Summit is one of the great events for openSUSE community (i.e., both contributors, and users) in Asia. Those who usually communicate online can get together from all over the world, talk face to face, and have fun. Members of the community will share their most recent knowledge, experiences, and learn FLOSS technologies surrounding openSUSE.

  • [Slackware] HandBrake 1.1.0 – now also in a patent-friendly package

    A new release of HandBrake, the video transcoder/ripper. The version 1.1.0 (released last month) comes with a load of enhancements, bug fixes and new features. Read the announcement to get all the details.

    And its GTK+-3 based GUI still compiles on Slackware 14.2. The devs must have done something right. Thank you! Still, it is sad that I can not compile the HandBrake GUI on Slackware 14.1 – or older – due to the GTK+-3 requirement (how I wish that the Qt based GUI was still an option). You could still build the CLI-only variant I suppose. But it might also be a good idea to upgrade to Slackware 14.2 if you thought of running the graphical HandBrake program…

  • Video Channel Updates

    I’ll still keep uploading to YouTube, but ultimately I’d like to make my self-hosted site the primary source for my content. Not sure if I’ll stay with MediaDrop, but it does tick a lot of boxes, and if its easy enough to extend, I’ll probably stick with it. MediaDrop might also be a good platform for viewing the Debian meetings videos like the DebConf videos.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The desktop belongs to Electron

    I’ve been using a Pixelbook over the past week, checking out the new Linux application functionality. It’s not ready for prime time, but it’s a billion times better than the last time I tried to run Linux apps on Chrome OS.

  • P-State Powersave Improvements May Help Boost I/O Performance

    Those running Intel Skylake servers may soon see better I/O performance if using the P-State powersave governor that is often the default on many Linux distributions.

  • Free Webinar on Community-Driven Governance for Open Source Projects

    Topics such as licensing and governance are complex but nonetheless critical considerations for open source projects. And, understanding and implementing the requirements in a strategic way are key to a project’s long-term health and success. In an upcoming webinar — “Governance Models of Community-Driven Open Source Projects” — The Linux Foundation’s Scott Nicholas will examine various approaches for structuring open source projects with these requirements in mind.

  • Google Summer of Code, Porting Keyboard KCM to Qt Quick!

    I am Gun Park, and I’m excited to finally join the wonderful KDE community through this amazing opportunity called Google Summer of Code 2018. Thanks for all the people that have supported and led me to this journey!

  • Google Summer of Code with KDE
  • Announcing Board of Directors Elections 2018

    From 2016 to 2017, I was a director on the GNOME Foundation Board of Directors. This is a great opportunity for anyone working on the GNOME project. And because Board elections are coming up, I wanted to share the news.

  • How to connect Ubuntu 18.04 to your Google account
  • Have a Release Party, Promote openSUSE’s Newest Version

    There are just 9 days left for the release of openSUSE Leap 15 and the community can help spread the word of the release by having a release party and promoting the newest version of Leap.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, April 2018

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Truth is More Important Than Harmony

    Today I did a very silly thing, because it was the right moment and the right audience…

    No, it probably wasn’t! But I figured it was probably as close as it would get to one. Of course it will brand me further as a troublemaker, but that’s not entirely fair– I really wasn’t the one who started the trouble.

    Devuan’s structure is clearly built on the bazaar– when they find something unofficial that can help Devuan more than hurt it, they just offer the opportunity to be official.

    This is based on observation and it may not be true as a solid rule, but it happened with Devuan-live (and it’s one the best moves Devuan made– it helped me to believe they can make timely, great decisions) and it appeared to be happening eventually with vdev (unfortunately abandoned by its author) and it appears to have happened with the now-official Devuan forum: https://devuan.org/

  • Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU 32 released

    We've just released Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU 32. It's available from My Oracle Support Doc ID 2045311.1, or via 'pkg update' from the support repository at https://pkg.oracle.com/solaris/support .

  • Solaris 11.3 SRU 32 Released With Package Updates

    While waiting for Solaris 11.4 to be released, Oracle has today rolled out its thirty-second stable release update to Solaris 11.3.

    With this latest SRU to the two-year-old Solaris 11.3 is now Apache 2.4.33, OpenSSL 1.0.2o, Wireshark 2.4.6, Perl 5.22, Python 2.7.14, and a wealth of other package updates. There are also some new system calls for yielding better network performance, netstat providing more UDP socket statistics, and various other minor enhancements.

  • Telenav Open Sources Its AI Map-Making Technology to Improve OpenStreetMap and Announces $10,000-Prize Contest
  • Open source HarperDB database solution studio launched

    “With the release of the HarperDB studio, we are providing tools that the industry expects while at the same time taking it a step further and including analytical capabilities to shorten the data value chain and provide accessible, real-time actionability on big data for IoT and HTAP use cases,” said HarperDB CEO Stephen Goldberg.

Audiocasts/Shows: Cooking with Linux and This Week in Linux

Filed under
Misc
  • Cooking with Linux (Without a Net)

    It's Tuesday, and it's time for Cooking With Linux (without a net) where I do some live Linuxy and open source stuff, live, on camera, and without the benefit of post video editing therefore providing a high probability of falling flat on my face. Today, we're going back to WSL and trying to run X Windows and we're going to take a Linux distribution most people have never heard of out for a spin.

  • Episode 28 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, check out some big distro release news from Fedora, CentOS, CoreOS, KaOS and more. There’s new versions of Firefox, Kdenlive, GNOME and Cinnamon available. Lubuntu announces their switch to LXQt by default. If you’re interested in learning Python, Humble Bundle has a great Python Development bundle available. Ubuntu 18.10’s codename was announced and some of the Ubuntu Flavours might be dropping support for 32bit ISOs in the 18.10 cycle. Google confirmed that Linux Apps are coming to ChromeOS. Then later in the show we’ll look at some gaming news from Atari and Valve, also some mobile news from Puri.sm and Android. All that and much more!

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • New Technologies Lead to New Linux and Cloud Training Options
  • Everything You Need to Know about the Cloud and Cloud Computing, Part II: Using the Cloud [Ed: Latest cloudwashing by IBM/LJ; just call it what it is: servers being pushed back to a mainframe era -- companies controlling all the servers.]
  • Kakoune: A Better Code Editor Heavily Inspired by Vim

    It comes with numerous text editing/writing tools such as contextual help, syntax highlighting, auto-completion while typing, and supports many different programming languages. It also implements multiple selections as an essential procedure for interacting with your text.

    In addition, Kakoune’s client/server architecture allows for multiple clients to connect to the same editing session.

  •  

  • New in Qt 5.11: improvements to the model/view APIs (part 1)

    The Qt model/view APIs are used throughout Qt — in Qt Widgets, in Qt Quick, as well as in other non-GUI code. As I tell my students when I deliver Qt trainings: mastering the usage of model/view classes and functions is mandatory knowledge, any non-trivial Qt application is going to be data-driven, with the data coming from a model class.

  • Akademy 2019 Call for Hosts

    The organization of this year's Akademy is in full swing: the official conference program is out, we have had an insightful interview with one of the keynote speakers, another is coming soon, and attendees are already booking flights and accommodation. The #akademy IRC channel on Freenode and the Telegram group are buzzing with messages, advice and recommendations.

  • GNOME Is Removing the Ability to Launch Binary Apps from Nautilus

    Last year Nautilus lost the ability to show desktop icons — now GNOME developers plan to drop another familiar feature.

    According to a code commit on Gitlab the famous file manager is set to lose the ability to run binaries and launch apps directly.

    Or, to put it another way, you won’t be able to double-click on programs, scripts or apps to launch them using Nautilus.

  • Mageia Blog (English) : Issues with the Grand Update?

    This should not be needed, as 32-bit libraries should be able to co-exist on a 64 bit install, as they may be needed for third party applications.

    Bug 23016 has been reopened to study this a bit more. For now, we’re watching for reports, and giving you the workaround of uninstalling the 32 bit library.

    It’s not that 32-bit isn’t able to mix with 64-bit in all cases, just in some, where there are files in the lib package that should be in a different (non-arch specific) package. In these two cases, it’s the /usr/share/locale/ files are in both the 32 and 64 bit packages, with identical names and paths.

    The rpm package manager allows a file to be owned by more than one package, provided the attributes are identical, but it blocks updating with a new version, since it’s trying to update one of the packages, but until the other version is updated too, there is a conflict. We’re keeping a watch-out for these packaging errors.

    It’s possible that if you’ve used DNF to do the update, rather than urpmi, you won’t have this problem; as we gather more information, we’ll add it to roundups in the coming weeks.

    While all this Grand stuff has been happening, we’ve also been doing plenty of the usual things, including over 300 packages into Cauldron.

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