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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • LinuXatUSIL – Previas 2 for #LinuxPlaya

    Damian from GNOME Argentina explained us some code based on this tutorial and the widgets in Glade were presented.

  • RancherOS v0.8.0 released! [Ed: and a bugfix release, 0.8.1, out today]

    RancherOS v0.8.0 is now available! This release has taken a bit more time than prior versions, as we’ve been laying more groundwork to allow us to do much faster updates, and to release more often.

  • The Technicals For Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Tell An Interesting Tale
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Released | New Features And Download

    Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus Beta 1 release is finally here. If you’re interested, you can go ahead and download the ISO images of the participating flavors, which are, Lubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio. Powered by Linux kernel 4.10, these releases feature the latest stable versions of their respective desktop environments. This release will be followed by the Final Beta release on March 23 and final release on April 13.

  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Now Available to Download

    The first beta releases in the Ubuntu 17.04 development cycle are ready for testing, with Xubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME and Ubuntu Budgie among the flavors taking part.

today's leftovers

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  • [elementaryOS] AppCenter: Funded

    A few moments ago, we hit 100% funded for our AppCenter campaign on Indiegogo. Thank you, backers! More than 300 people backed us over just two weeks to help bring our pay-what-you-want indie app store to life.

  • Linux Lite To Have These New Features In The Next Release Linux Lite 3.4

    ...we contacted the creator of the Linux Lite “Jerry Bezencon” and enquired the upcoming new features in the latest version of the Linux Lite. We have also done a review of the latest available distro i.e. 3.2 (32 bit) so that the readers can understand easily where are the new features headed towards.

  • Buy or Sell? What Analysts Recommends: CMS Energy Corporation (CMS), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • What Does The Chart For Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Tell Us Presently?
  • LEDE-17.01 is coming [Ed: it has actually just come out, just like LWN's paywall]

    For some years, OpenWrt has arguably been the most active router-oriented distribution. Things changed in May of last year, though, when a group of OpenWrt developers split off to form the competing LEDE project. While the LEDE developers have been busy, the project has yet to make its first release. That situation is about to change, though, as evidenced by the LEDE v17.01.0-rc1 release candidate, which came out on February 1.

    Many of the changes made in LEDE since the 2015 OpenWrt "Chaos Calmer" release will not be immediately visible to most users. The core software has been updated, of course, including a move to the 4.4.42 kernel. There are a number of security-oriented enhancements, including a switch to SHA256 for package verification, the disabling of support for several old and insecure protocols, compilation with stack-overwrite detection, and more. There is support for a number of new devices. Perhaps the most anticipated new feature, though, is the improved smart queue management and the WiFi fairness work that has been done as part of the bufferbloat project. It has been clear for some time that WiFi should work far better than it does; the work that has found its way into the LEDE release candidate should be a significant step in that direction.

    Your editor decided that it was time to give LEDE a try, but there was some shopping to be done first. Getting the full benefit from the bufferbloat and airtime fairness work requires the right chipset; most of this work has been done on the Atheros ath9k driver. So the first step was to go out and pick up a new router with ath9k wireless. That is where the things turned out to be harder than one might expect.

  • Microsoft Faces European Privacy Probes Over Windows 10

    Microsoft Corp. faces a coordinated investigation by European privacy regulators after it failed to do enough to address their concerns about the collection and processing of user data with a series of changes to Windows 10 last month.

    European Union data-protection officials sent a letter to Microsoft saying they remain “concerned about the level of protection of users’ personal data,” according to a copy of the document posted by the Dutch watchdog Tuesday. Regulators from seven countries are concerned that even after the announced changes, “Microsoft does not comply with fundamental privacy rules.”

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Top Lightweight Linux Distributions To Try In 2017

    Today I am going to discuss the top lightweight Linux distros you can try this year on your computer. Although you got yourself a prettyLinuxle linux already but there is always something new to try in Linux. Remember I recommend to try this distros in virtualbox firstly or with the live boot before messing with your system. All distro that I will mention here will be new and somewhat differ from regular distros.

  • [ANNOUNCE] linux-4.10-ck1 / MuQSS CPU scheduler 0.152
  • MSAA Compression Support For Intel's ANV Vulkan Driver

    Intel developer Jason Ekstrand posted a patch over the weekend for enabling MSAA compression support within the ANV Vulkan driver.

  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 31

    As we announced in the previous report, our 31th Scrum sprint was slightly shorter than the usual ones. But you would never say so looking to this blog post. We have a lot of things to talk you about!

  • Comparing Mobile Subscriber Data Across Different Sources - How accurate is the TomiAhonen Almanac every year?

    You’ll see that last spring I felt the world had 7.6 Billion total mobile subscriptions when machine-to-machine (M2M) connections are included. I felt the world had 7.2 Billion total subscriptions when excluding M2M and just counting those in use by humans. And the most relevant number (bottom line) is the ‘unique’ mobile users, which I felt was an even 5.0 Billion humans in 2015. The chart also has the total handsets-in-use statistic which I felt was 5.6 Billion at the end of 2015. Note that I was literally the first person to report on the distinction of the unique user count vs total subscriptions and I have been urging, nearly begging for the big industry giants to also measure that number. They are slowly joining in that count. Similarly to M2M, we also are now starting to see others report M2M counts. I have yet to see a major mobile statistical provider give a global count of devices in use. That will hopefully come also, soon. But lets examine these three numbers that we now do have other sources, a year later, to see did I know what I was doing.

Proprietary Traps and Openwashing

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Misc
  • Integrate ONLYOFFICE Online Editors with ownCloud [Ed: Proprietary software latches onto FOSS]

    ONLYOFFICE editors and ownCloud is the match made in heaven, wrote once one of our users. Inspired by this idea, we developed an integration app for you to use our online editors in ownCloud web interface.

  • Microsoft India projects itself as open source champion, says AI is the next step [Ed: Microsoft bribes to sabotage FOSS and blackmails it with patents; calls itself "open source"]
  • Open Source WSO2 IoT Server Advances Integration and Analytic Capabilities

    WSO2 has announced a new, fully-open-source WSO2 Internet of Things Server edition that "lowers the barriers to delivering enterprise-grad IoT and mobile solutions."

  • SAP license fees are due even for indirect users, court says

    SAP's named-user licensing fees apply even to related applications that only offer users indirect visibility of SAP data, a U.K. judge ruled Thursday in a case pitting SAP against Diageo, the alcoholic beverage giant behind Smirnoff vodka and Guinness beer.

    The consequences could be far-reaching for businesses that have integrated their customer-facing systems with an SAP database, potentially leaving them liable for license fees for every customer that accesses their online store.

    "If any SAP systems are being indirectly triggered, even if incidentally, and from anywhere in the world, then there are uncategorized and unpriced costs stacking up in the background," warned Robin Fry, a director at software licensing consultancy Cerno Professional Services, who has been following the case.

  • “Active Hours” in Windows 10 emphasizes how you are not in control of your own devices

    No edition of Windows 10, except Professional and Enterprise, is expected to function for more than 12 hours of the day. Microsoft most generously lets you set a block of 12 hours where you’re in control of the system, and will reserve the remaining 12 hours for it’s own purposes. How come we’re all fine with this?

    Windows 10 introduced the concept of “Active Hours”, a period of up to 12 hours when you expect to use the device, meant to reflect your work hours. The settings for changing the device’s active hours is hidden away among Windows Update settings, and it poorly fits with today’s lifestyles.

    Say you use your PC in the afternoon and into the late evening during the work week, but use it from morning to early afternoon in the weekends. You can’t fit all those hours nor accommodate home office hours in a period of just 12 hours. We’re always connected, and expect our devices to always be there for us when we need them.

  • Chrome 57 Will Permanently Enable DRM

    The next stable version of Chrome (Chrome 57) will not allow users to disable the Widevine DRM plugin anymore, therefore making it an always-on, permanent feature of Chrome. The new version of Chrome will also eliminate the “chrome://plugins” internal URL, which means if you want to disable Flash, you’ll have to do it from the Settings page.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Docker's tops for devops, AWS is the cloud king

    Docker is the king of devops tools, hybrid cloud is beating public-only and private-only clouds, and Microsoft Azure is making sizable headway in public cloud.

  • How input works – touch input

    Touch input is the new kid in the block concerning input events. It’s a technology which was created after X11 got created and thus it is not part of the X11 core protocol. On X11 this makes touch a weird beast. E.g. there is always an emulation to a pointer event. Applications which do not support touch can still be used as the touch events generate pointer events. Now this is actually a huge sacrifice for the API and means that touch feels – at least to me – as a second class citizen in X11.

  • Boot to Qt on embedded HW using Android 7.0 and Qt 5.8

    One can have real pain trying to create a demo setup or proof-of-concept for an embedded device. To ease the pain Qt for Device Creation has a list of supported devices where you can flash a “Boot to Qt” image and get your software running on the target HW literally within minutes.

  • IPFire 2.19 - Core Update 109 released
  • [openSUSE] Review of the week 2017/07

    Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers,

    This week we ‘only’ delivered 5 snapshots. But at least it was big ones, so that makes up for it. The review covers the snapshots {0211..0215}.

  • Buy or Sell? Average Brokerage Ratings on Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), The Hershey Company (HSY)
  • Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS released -Find Out More

    Ubuntu 16.04.X segment line has gotten its' next maintenance and bug-fix update, Ubuntu 16.04.2, so basically it is the second point update after the release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS final for Desktop, Server, Cloud-based ones as well as the different flavored versions of Ubuntu like Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Mythbuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu Kylin, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu GNOME have also been availed with their updated images of 16.04.2 version.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • VC Investor Martin Casado on the Future of Software-Defined Networking

    Software-defined networking’s biggest accomplishment last year was achieving market traction and validation, says Martin Casado, a general partner at the venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz. But there are still many challenges ahead for the industry at large and the organizations that aim to drive SDN forward.

  • What is the best Linux distro for beginners?

    Abundance of choice is one of the biggest challenges faced by all Linux users, particularly those dipping their toe in the water for the first time. Choosing your first Linux distro can be incredibly daunting, especially when you don't even know what you're looking for.

    In Linux's early days, choosing a distro was simple: you went with the one you had heard about, or the one that someone you knew had experience with, or the one with some degree of documentation. Naturally, then, you were limited in choice to the likes of RedHat, Debian, or Slackware.

  • DEFT “Zero” Linux 2017.1 Lightweight Hacker Distro Available For Download
  • No, OpenSUSE and SUSE Downloads Haven’t Been Hacked

    Some inconsequential remnants of SUSE’s old relationship with Novell remain, however; both the domain names and the IP addresses used by SUSE/openSUSE are still listed as being owned by Novell. If I were SUSE, I think I’d take care of that and have both transferred to my name. There’s no need to remind people of a history that’s better left forgotten.

    All indications are that the defacer of the openSUSE News site, which operates as a subdomain of openSUSE.org, leveraged a widely reported vulnerability in WordPress that has recently been responsible for more than 2 million WordPress sites being hacked. The vulnerability was fixed in late January with the WordPress 4.7.2 update.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, January 2017

    In January, about 159 work hours have been dispatched among 13 paid contributors. Their reports are available:

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • "elementary OS Pay-What-You-Want App Store" - Lunduke Hour - Feb 8, 2017
  • Podcast Season 5 Episode 2

    In this episode: We’ve got a live recording from FOSDEM (thanks Mike!), lots of news, lots of Finds and an awesome Voice of the Masses.

  • Intel's Atom C2000 chips are bricking products – and it's not just Cisco hit

    Intel's Atom C2000 processor family has a fault that effectively bricks devices, costing the company a significant amount of money to correct. But the semiconductor giant won't disclose precisely how many chips are affected nor which products are at risk.

    On its Q4 2016 earnings call earlier this month, chief financial officer Robert Swan said a product issue limited profitability during the quarter, forcing the biz to set aside a pot of cash to deal with the problem.

  • PSA: Intel Atom C2000 Chips Flaw Bricking Routers/NAS/Firewall devices that are powered by Linux, pfSense and FreeNAS
  • Bored with ho-hum cloud backups? Use Usenet (yes, Usenet!) instead

    Cloud backups these days are all the rage—for good reason. Rather than dealing with shuffling physical media offsite, you can simply back up the data offsite, where it can be stored in one of many professionally monitored data centers.

    Unfortunately, this kind of service isn’t free, and the cost can be a barrier. However, there is a cost-effective way to store your cloud backups: Usenet. With access to a Usenet news server, you can simply upload your backup there, and it will be stored redundantly in news servers all over the world. Best of all, this approach typically costs considerably less than a cloud backup service.

  • Intel Core i3 2100 Sandy Bridge vs. Core i3 7100 Kabylake Performance

    As a reminder, the Core i3 7100 is a dual-core processor with Hyper Threading, has a 3.9GHz base frequency (no Turbo Boost), 3MB Cache, HD Graphics 630 @ 1.1GHz, and a 51 Watt TDP. The Core i3 2100 from the start of 2011 was a dual-core with Hyper Threading too and a 3MB cache but only a 3.1GHz clock frequency and HD Graphics 2000 running @ 1.1GHz. The i3-2100 CPU had a 65 Watt TDP for this 32nm CPU compared to the i3-7100 being on a 14nm process and TDP of just 51 Watts.

  • [Cacti] Release Notes - 1.0.0
  • Dark Adwaita and HighContrast Themes for Qt

    One of our goals for Fedora Workstation is to run Qt applications in GNOME as seamlessly as possible. Their look should be as close to their GTK+ counterparts as possible, you shouldn’t have to set things on two different places just to make the change in both GTK+ and Qt applications.

  • Accelerated compositing in WebKitGTK+ 2.14.4

    WebKitGTK+ 2.14 release was very exciting for us, it finally introduced the threaded compositor to drastically improve the accelerated compositing performance. However, the threaded compositor imposed the accelerated compositing to be always enabled, even for non-accelerated contents. Unfortunately, this caused different kind of problems to several people, and proved that we are not ready to render everything with OpenGL yet.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2017/06

    This week we managed to get out 7 snapshots – I am going to review the snapshots {0203..0209}.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Arch Linux: A simpler kind of Linux?

    Arch Linux certainly has its share of fans, with some being quite passionate about their favorite distribution. Recently a writer at Linux.com wrote a post about Arch and considered it to be a “simpler kind of Linux.”

  • HDMI Audio Patches Posted For Raspberry Pi's VC4 Driver

    If these patches land soon, the Raspberry Pi could beat newer AMD graphics cards to having mainline HDMI audio support via their respective Linux kernel DRM drivers (with the AMDGPU audio support still being held up by DAL/DC mainlining efforts). Eric Anholt managed to finally put out the VC4 HDMI audio code for review.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 2016 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Award Winners

    Desktop Distribution of the Year - Slackware (16.03%)
    Server Distribution of the Year - CentOS (23.86%)
    Mobile Distribution of the Year - Android (68.24%)
    Database of the Year - MariaDB (41.29%)
    Office Suite of the Year - LibreOffice (89.60%)
    Browser of the Year - Firefox (51.74%)
    Desktop Environment of the Year - Plasma Desktop - KDE (28.57%)
    Window Manager of the Year - Openbox (24.04%)
    Audio Media Player Application of the Year - VLC (33.60%)
    Video Media Player Application of the Year - VLC (64.36%)
    Network Security Application of the Year - Wireshark (26.09%)
    Host Security Application of the Year - SELinux (36.62%)

  • TGSI On-Disk Shader Cache For Mesa: Caching Comes To R600g/RadeonSI

    Timothy Arceri of Collabora has sent out his latest patches to Mesa in regards to the ongoing work for shader caches. The 40 patches published over night do benefit RadeonSI and R600g.

    Up to now Arceri's GLSL shader cache has been about having a cache of the compiled shaders on-disk for the hardware being targeted and that focus up until recently was just for the Intel i965 driver. The shader cache effort being worked on now is adding support for caching of TGSI (Gallium3D's IR) for drivers with RadeonSI caching now on his radar. With the TGSI effort, basically allowing an on-disk cache of the intermediate representation that is then consumed by the Gallium3D hardware drivers for generating their hardware-specific code.

  • KDE Plasma 5.9.1 Released With Fixes

    For those that wait until point releases before upgrading your KDE desktop stack, Plasma 5.9.1 is now available.

    KDE Plasma 5.9.0 was released last week with a variety of new features while coming out today is the first point release.

  • QtWebKit Updated With WebGL Support, MinGW On Windows

    Qt WebEngine remains the primary module on modern Qt5 tool-kit versions for having web capabilities provided by Chromium. The migration from Qt WebKit to WebEngine happened around four years ago but there still are some developers pursuing out-of-tree support for Qt WebKit.

    In 2016 we covered a few times the work being done to revive Qt WebKit while coming out this week is a fresh "technology preview" release of the Qt WebKit code for those interested in this alternative to the Chromium-based Qt WebEngine.

  • Apt Update Indicator For GNOME Shell Keeps You Informed About Available Updates [Ubuntu GNOME / Debian]

    Apt Update Indicator is a GNOME Shell extension that keeps you informed about available updates in Ubuntu GNOME / Debian.

    Using it, you get a new icon on the GNOME Shell Top Bar which displays the number of package updates, while from its menu you can see exactly which updates are pending, apply the updates, and more.

  • OpenSUSE site hacked; quickly restored

    The openSUSE team acted quickly to restore the site. When I talked to Richard Brown, openSUSE chairman, he said that “the server that hosts ‘news.opensuse.org’ is isolated from the majority of openSUSE infrastructure by design, so there was no breach of any other part of openSUSEs infrastructure, especially our build, test and download systems. Our offered downloads remain safe and consistent and there was no breach of any openSUSE contributor data.”

    The team is still investigating the reason for the breach so I don’t have much information. The site ran a WordPress install and it seems that WordPress was compromised.

    This site is not managed by the SUSE or openSUSE team. It is handled by the IT team of MicroFocus. However, Brown said that SUSE management certainly doesn’t want any such incident to happen again and they are considering moving the site to the infrastructure managed by SUSE and openSUSE team.

  • Speak at The Linux Foundation’s Open Source Summit and Automotive Linux Summit in Japan

    More than 600 open source professionals, developers and operators will convene in Tokyo this year to collaborate, share information, and learn at Open Source Summit Japan. The technical conference will cover the latest in open source technologies, including Linux, containers, cloud computing, software-defined networking, and more.

    This year Open Source Summit Japan will also be co-located with Automotive Linux Summit, to be held May 31 - June 2 at the Tokyo Conference Center. Automotive Linux Summit gathers the most innovative minds from the automotive arena including automotive systems engineers, Linux experts, R&D managers, business executives, open source licensing and compliance specialists and community developers. The event connects the developer community with the vendors and users providing and using the code in order to drive the future of embedded devices in automotive.

  • What to know before jumping into a career as an open source lawyer

    Advising clients on open source issues is a ton of fun—you often get to do deep dives into the technology to understand how it works, you can have a huge impact on their products and bottom line, and you can also help build healthy communities of paid developers and volunteers who are creating better tech.

  • Oracle Policy Change Raises Prices on AWS

    News came last week that Oracle has, in effect, doubled the price for running its products on Amazon's cloud. It has done so with a bit of sleight-of-hand on how it counts AWS's virtual CPUs. It also did so without fanfare. The company's new pricing policy went in effect on January 23, and pretty much went unnoticed until January 28, when Oracle follower Tim Hall stumbled on the change in Big Red's "Licensing Oracle Software in the Cloud Computing Environment" document and blew the whistle.

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Today in Techrights

Software Freedom Conservancy Funding

  • Software Freedom Conservancy matching
    Non-profits that provide project support have proven themselves to be necessary for the success and advancement of individual projects and Free Software as a whole. The Free Software Foundation (founded in 1985) serves as a home to GNU projects and a canonical list of Free Software licenses. The Open Source Initiative came about in 1998, maintaining the Open Source Definition, based on the Debian Free Software Guidelines, with affiliate members including Debian, Mozilla, and the Wikimedia Foundation. Software in the Public Interest (SPI) was created in the late 90s largely to act as a fiscal sponsor for projects like Debian, enabling it to do things like accept donations and handle other financial transactions.
  • Clojars is Conservancy’s Newest Member Project
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Leftovers: Software

  • systemd 233 about to be released, please help testing
    systemd 233 is scheduled to be released next week, and there is only a handful of small issues left. As usual there are tons of improvements and fixes, but the most intrusive one probably is another attempt to move from legacy cgroup v1 to a “hybrid” setup where the new unified (cgroup v2) hierarchy is mounted at /sys/fs/cgroup/unified/ and the legacy one stays at /sys/fs/cgroup/ as usual. This should provide an easier path for software like Docker or LXC to migrate to the unified hiearchy, but even that hybrid mode broke some bits.
  • Keep : A personal shell command keeper
    Introducing a new command line tool which solves the issue of memorizing commands or storing them somewhere which is difficult to find. With the grep and run commands, one can easily find their long forgotten commands and use them them right away.
  • qutebrowser v0.10.0 released
    I'm happy to annouce the release of qutebrowser v0.10.0! qutebrowser is a keyboard driven browser with a vim-like, minimalistic interface. It's written using PyQt and cross-platform. I haven't announced the v0.9.0 release in this blog (or any patch releases), but for v0.10.0 it definitely makes sense to do so, as it's mostly centered on QtWebEngine!
  • GNOME Pomodoro: A Pomodoro Timer With AppIndicator And GNOME Shell Support
    GNOME Pomodoro is, like the name suggests, a Pomodoro timer for GNOME. The application website mentions that it's currently only for GNOME Shell, however, an AppIndicator is also available.
  • 7 Awesome Open Source Build Automation Tools For Sysadmin/DevOps/Developers
    Build automation is a vital tool for devops, sysadmins, and developers. It is nothing but scripting or automating the process of compiling source code into binary. Sysadmins can use build tools to manage and update config files. Following is a list of awesome open source and popular tools associated with automating build processes on Linux or Unix-like system.