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today's leftovers

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  • Is it an upgrade, or a sidegrade?

    I went to a nearby store, looked at the offers... And, in part due to the attitude of the salesguy, I decided not to (installing Linux will void any warranty, WTF‽ In 2018‽). Came back home, and... My Acer works again!

  • How To Install KDE Plasma Mobile On Your Android Smartphone?

    New Linux-based mobile operating systems and hardware projects have been making numerous headlines in the recent months. Projects like postmarketOS, Plasma Mobile, Librem 5, etc., have managed to gain momentum and support of open source community.

    To give you a rough idea of how things are going on the Plasma Mobile land, its developers have shared two methods (Via: Softpedia) to test Plasma Mobile on an actual Android smartphone. In a previous post, they also shared virtual machine images of the OS.

  • A KDE Love Story: Translating Kalzium into Chinese

    When I was a high school student, chemistry was not my cup of tea. My grades in chemistry were not bad either, but I hated memorizing those organic compounds. Then, I decided to major in computer science at university, and from that moment, destiny tightly bonded me and Free and Open Source Software.

  • Last week in Kube
  • fwupd now tells you about known issues

    That one little URL for the user to click on is the result of a rule engine being added to the LVFS. Of course, firmware updates shouldn’t ever fail, but in the real world they do, because distros don’t create /boot/efi correctly (cough, Arch Linux) or just because some people are running old versions of efivar, a broken git snapshot of libfwupdate or because a vendor firmware updater doesn’t work with secure boot turned on (urgh). Of all the failures logged on the LVFS, 95% fall into about 3 or 4 different failure causes, and if we know hundreds of people are hitting an issue we already understand we can provide them with some help.

  • I love free software… and Gentoo does! #ilovefs

    Some people care if software is free of cost or if it has the best features, above everything else. I don’t. I care that I can legally inspect its inner workings, modify and share modified versions. That’s why I happily avoid macOS, Windows, Skype, Photoshop.

  • Multiplexing Input or Output on a Raspberry Pi Part 1: Shift Registers

    A Raspberry Pi doesn't have that many GPIO pins, and neither does an Arduino Uno. An Arduino Mega does, but buying a Mega to go between the Pi and the keyboard kind of misses the point of scavenging a $3 keyboard; I might as well just buy an I2C or MIDI keyboard. So I needed some sort of I/O multiplexer that would let me read 31 keys using a lot fewer pins.

    There are a bunch of different approaches to multiplexing. A lot of keyboards use a matrix approach, but that makes more sense when you're wiring up all the buttons from scratch, not starting with a pre-wired keyboard like this. The two approaches I'll discuss here are shift registers and multiplexer chips.

  • Fanless, Linux-friendly Kaby Lake mini-tower drives seven 4K displays

    Compulab’s rugged “Airtop2” mini-tower runs Linux Mint or Win 10 on a Xeon E3-1275 or Core i7-7700 CPU with optional Nvidia Quadro P4000 graphics plus up to 64GB DDR4, a 6-drive NVMe/SATA subsystem, up to 7x display ports, and optional M.2 and FACE modules.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 2017 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Award Winners

    The polls are closed and the results are in. We once again had some extremely close races and the large number of new categories this year certainly kept things interesting. Congratulations to each and every nominee.

  •  

  • MATE 1.20 Released
  • Plasma 5.12 Brings Wayland to Leap

    This Tuesday KDE released the latest Long Term Support (LTS) version of the Plasma desktop 5.12.

    A key point in this new release is that Wayland support was extensively worked on and is now suitable as part of the Long Term Support guarantees. In particular, the Plasma session in Wayland now plays nicer with multiple screens, and has added support for screen rotation and touchscreen calibration. It also gained a new exclusive feature, Night Color, which removes blue light from the screen at night time in a similar fashion to Redshift, which only works in X11.

    This means that the upcoming openSUSE Leap 15 will offer a far more complete Wayland experience installed by default. It will just be a matter of selecting “Plasma (Wayland)” in the session list of the display manager before logging in. Nothing will change for Tumbleweed users, which had already a Wayland session available since Plasma 5.4.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Flickergate: Users Put Surface Pro in Freezer to Fix Issue Microsoft Ignores

    A screen flickering issue impacting Microsoft’s Surface Pro is pushing owners to some extreme workarounds, including putting their devices in freezers.

    As weird as this may sound, this solution solves the problem temporarily, removing the flickering completely and returning the display to normal.

    A group of Surface Pro owners launched a website called “Flickergate” to explain the issue in detail and to emphasize that Microsoft has until now ignored all reports despite hundreds of post being published on its very own forums. One such thread on Microsoft Community has no less than 140 pages of users complaining about the issue since early 2017.

  • Containers from user space

    In a linux.conf.au 2018 keynote called "Containers from user space" [...]

    Frazelle started by noting that she has recently moved to Microsoft — "selling out has been amazing"...

  • Too many lords, not enough stewards

    For anyone who has followed Daniel Vetter's talks over the last year or two, it is fairly clear that he is not happy with the kernel development process and the role played by kernel maintainers. In a strongly worded talk at linux.conf.au (LCA) 2018 in Sydney, he further explored the topic (that he also raised at LCA 2017) in a talk entitled "Burning down the castle". In his view, kernel development is broken and it is unlikely to improve anytime soon.

    He started by noting that this talk would be a "rather more personal talk than others I give". It is his journey from first looking in on the kernel in high school to learn how operating systems work. The kernel developers were his heroes who created this awesome operating system by discussing things out in the open.

    Eventually he started scratching his own itch in the graphics subsystem, which led to him getting hired to work on Linux graphics professionally on a small team. He got volunteered to be the kernel maintainer for that team, which grew from three to twenty people in a year or two. In that time he learned the tough lesson that "leading teams is leading people". But he has learned that the way kernel maintainers work is making developers unhappy, including him. The talk would be a look at how he learned just how broken things are.

  • Media Subsystem Changes Head Into Linux 4.16: NVIDIA Tegra Decoder, Xbox One TV Tuner

    While the Linux 4.16 merge window is nearing the end of the line, there still are some feature updates still being sent in, including a big batch of media subsystem changes sent in on Tuesday.

  • RadeonSI VCN Encode Now Supports HEVC Main

    More video acceleration related commits landed in the Mesa 18.1-dev Git tree this week.

    The code that was merged on Monday by AMD's Boyuan Zhang allows for HEVC/H.265 GPU-accelerated video encoding when using the VCN block. The "Video Core Next" hardware is initially just found on Raven Ridge APUs but almost certainly coming to next-generation discrete GPUs.

  • How to set up LXD on Civo (new UK VPS provider)
  • CodeWeavers has Released CrossOver 17.1.0 for Linux and MacOS

    I am delighted to announce that CodeWeavers has just released CrossOver 17.1.0 for both macOS and Linux. CrossOver 17.1.0 has many improvements to the core Windows compatibility layer and also specific enhancements for several popular applications.

  • Quarter Window Tiling Support added to the MATE Desktop

    Support for quarter window tiling has been added to the MATE desktop. The feature is one of several improvements shipping in the latest stable release of the ‘retrospective’ desktop environment, which was forked from GNOME 2 back in 2011. Specifically its MATE’s window manager Marco that’s been gifted support for ‘quadrant window tiling’.

  • MATE 1.20 Released With HiDPI Abilities, Global Menu Support

    After nearly one year in development, lead MATE developer Martin Wimpress has announced version 1.20 of this GNOME2-forked desktop environment.

  • Updates on the Endless App Center / GNOME Software

    The great majority of my work at Endless is to (try to) tame GNOME Software and apply the changes that make it what we simply call “the App Center” (repo here) in the Endless OS.
    This is a lot of work and usually I’d love to share more often what I am doing but end up neglecting the blog due to the lack of time. So here’s a summary of what I have done the past few months.

  • Manjaro XFCE Linux Review – For The Record

    Manjaro XFCE Linux Review. Today I take a look at Manjaro XFCE and I must say, there’s a lot to like about it. I also share some tidbits that I like about this release in addition to some issues I didn’t quite understand as well.

  • Kali Linux 2018.1 Released For Ethical Hackers — Download ISO And Torrent Files Here

    In 2016, Offensive Security–the developer of Kali Linux ethical hacking distro–decided to switch to a rolling release model. However, from time to time, they keep releasing the Kali snapshots with all the latest patches, fixes, and updates. Following the same tradition, the developers have pushed the first snapshot for 2018.

  • OSMC's January update is here

    OSMC's January update is ready with a wide range of improvements and fixes to keep your OSMC device running in tip-top shape.

  • ASU student named finalist for Red Hat’s 'Women in Open Source' award

    When a teenaged Nikki Stevens built her first website, she did not foresee the barriers she would encounter in pursuit of her newfound passion. Now a doctoral candidate with Arizona State University's School for the Future of Innovation in Society, she has founded two organizations, works a lucrative career as a technical architect and freelance software engineer and has been selected as a finalist for Red Hat’s “Women in Open Source Award.”

  • Investor Watch: Looking at the Numbers for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 06 February 2018

    Below is a summary of uploads to the development and supported releases.

  • LXD weekly status #33
  •  

  • Deal Alert! Get exclusive offers on Samsung wearables this Valentine

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • New open source platform for machine learning on Kubernetes hits

    Seldon.io has announced the release of a new open-source platform that enables data science teams to run and manage models in production at scale. Seldon Core focuses on solving the last step in any machine learning project to help companies put models into production, to solve real-world problems and maximize the return on investment.

     Traditional infrastructure stacks and devops processes don’t translate well to machine learning, and there is limited open-source innovation in this space, which forces companies to build their own at great expense or to use a proprietary service. Data engineers with the necessary multidisciplinary skillset spanning ML and ops are very scarce. These inefficiencies cause data scientists get pulled into quality-of-service and performance-related challenges that takes their focus away from where they can add the most value  -  building better models.

  • 3 Ways to Extend the Power of Kubernetes

    The ability to extend Kubernetes is its secret superpower, said Chen Goldberg, Director of Engineering at Google, speaking at the recent KubeCon + CloudNativeCon in Austin.

    In the race to build tools that help engineers become more productive, Goldberg talked about how she once led a team that developed a platform that did just that. Despite the fact the platform initially worked, it was not extensible, and it was also difficult to modify.

  • Dealing With Difficult Community Members (Interview on Late Night Linux)

    Difficult community members are something that every community struggles with from time to time. Whether abundantly obnoxious or merely a minor frustration, designing an environment where a multitude of personalities can work together is complicated and requires careful attention to detail.

  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #145

    39 package reviews have been added, 55 have been updated and 23 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues.

  • My Free Software Activities in January 2018

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • Ubuntu Snowsports & Friends Team
  • Building Slack for the Linux community and adopting snaps

    Used by millions around the world, Slack is an enterprise software platform that allows teams and businesses of all sizes to communicate effectively. Slack works seamlessly with other software tools within a single integrated environment, providing an accessible archive of an organisation’s communications, information and projects. Although Slack has grown at a rapid rate in the 4 years since their inception, their desktop engineering team who work across Windows, MacOS and Linux consists of just 4 people currently. We spoke to Felix Rieseberg, Staff Software Engineer, who works on this team following the release of Slack’s first snap last month to discover more about the company’s attitude to the Linux community and why they decided to build a snap.

  • Concurrent Real-Time Introduces RedHawk Linux for NVIDIA Jetson TX2
  • How To Get iPhone X-like Gestures On Any Android Smartphone Right Now?

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • SUSE polishes openSUSE Leap 15

    The development version of openSUSE Leap 15 has reached its beta phase builds and snapshots are available for testers.

    As a free and open source (FOSS) operating system, Leap is derived from the source code of SUSE Enterprise Linux (known not as SEL, but SLE) and so is positioned in much the same space as CentOS (from Red Hat) and Ubuntu (from Canonical).

  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) – Hot Stock in Focus
  • Skylake-based Nano-ITX SBC offers 4x GbE and 8x stackable PCIe

    ADL’s rugged “ADL120S” SBC runs Linux or Windows on 6th Gen Core CPUs, and offers dual 4K DP ports, 4x GbE ports, 4x USB 3.0 ports, and expansion via 2x M.2 slots and 8x stackable PCIe slots.

  • Block ads on your network with Raspberry Pi and pi-hole

    Got an old Raspberry Pi lying around? Hate seeing ads while browsing the web? Pi-hole is an open source software project that blocks ads for all devices on your home network by routing all advertising servers into nowhere. What's best is it takes just a few minutes to set up.

    Pi-hole blocks over 100,000 ad-serving domains, blocks advertisements on any device (including mobiles, tablets, and PCs), and because it completely blocks ads rather than just hiding them, this improves overall network performance (because ads are never downloaded). You can monitor performance and statistics in a web interface, and there's even an API you can use.

  • Verizon Folds To Government Pressure To Blacklist Huawei Without A Shred Of Public Evidence

    Earlier this month, AT&T cancelled a smartphone sales agreement with Huawei just moments before it was to be unveiled at CES. Why? Several members of the Senate and House Intelligence Committees had crafted an unpublished memo claiming that Huawei was spying for the Chinese government, and pressured both the FCC and carriers to blacklist the company. AT&T, a stalwart partner in the United States' own surveillance apparatus was quick to comply, in part because it's attempting to get regulators to sign off on its $86 billion acquisition of media juggernaut Time Warner.

Systemd and Openwashing

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Misc
  • DistInst Updates, Boot Sequence Optimization (installer work), Misc. Upstream News

    Another interesting development that’s been coming along over the past two weeks is a conversation centered around an overhaul of the entire boot process. The goal is to reduce the amount of time we get to the desktop by optimizing the boot sequence from the moment you turn on your computer.  Instead of using grub to load the kernel and the initramfs on UEFI systems, we’re going to be using systemd-boot, the modern incarnation of gummiboot. But to make this work, we need a mechanism to copy the kernel and initramfs images to the EFI System Partition(ESP) where systemd-boot expects them to be in order for the boot to initiate. Since the Ubuntu kernels do not have an existing mechanism to these operations, we use kernelstub. Kernelstub, when it runs, copies the kernel image and initramfs image onto the ESP and configures systemd-boot with the entries for the copied files. If you need to change kernel parameters, kernelstub has a manual mode that will allow you to do so in case your machine needs additional parameters. The general use is that kernelstub can copy the kernel and the generated initramfs when a new kernel becomes available. This current work is still in the experimental phase and part of the new installer and initial login work that is ongoing.

  • System76's Pop!_OS Switching From GRUB To Systemd-Boot

    System76's Pop!_OS started off mostly as a re-branded spin of Ubuntu for the company's pre-loaded Linux laptops/desktops, but lately they have been venturing to more interesting changes at varying levels of the stack.

    Aside from various desktop and theming changes, they have been working on reworking the installation process, possible disk encryption by default, and better HiDPI support. The latest is they are planning to use systemd-boot as their bootloader.

  • Exploring the open source challenges Open Banking brings to incumbent firms

    Open Banking, which came about as a result of the result of the PSD2 rules around opening customer data, promises customers a better service experience. The concept has spread and is now a global trend, albeit in different guises. But as night follows day, Open Banking, with its emphasis on open source technologies, brings challenges.

    As financial firms position themselves for success in this rapidly evolving environment, open source technologies play a key role in industry organizations. According to Axel Winter, former global head of enterprise architecture at Standard Chartered Bank in Singapore and currently CTO at Thai business conglomerate Central Group.

  • Open source PowerShell not a straight swap for Windows PowerShell [Ed: Microsoft is just openwashing the malware writers' favourite shell to make it the 'standard']

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Worth Saving?

    A friend the other day casually called Linux Journal "the journal of record for the Open Source community". I think that's a good description of what we were for 23 years—because one sign of our "of record" status is how many people have told us that they have a collection of LJ issues going back many years.

    So I asked myself, what other magazines do people tend to keep, that might be models for Linux Journal as it grows into something much bigger in the world—while doing a better job than ever tending its Linux roots?

  • Poll: Best Linux Distribution

    e're working on 2018 Readers' Choice Awards. First poll... which do you consider to be the best distribution?

  • Linux Desktop Success – Unleaded Hangout

    Linux Desktop Success. What’s it going to take to get us there? Have we already hit the tipping point with ChromeOS? Perhaps instead, it’s a matter of greater OEM adoption? We discuss.

  • Portworx Delivers STORK as an Open Source Stateful Storage Project

    Acronym fans rejoice! Just weeks after releasing a wonderfully acronym-free reference configuration with Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE), Portworx unveiled an avian-based tag for a new open source stateful storage project.

    The Storage Orchestrator Runtime for Kubernetes, more fluidly known as STORK, uses the extensibility of Kubernetes to support stateful applications. This allows DevOps teams to run stateful applications – think databases, queues, and key-value stores – on Kubernetes.

  • Radeon Linux Graphics Stack, RadeonSI Shaders Update From FOSDEM 2018

    In addition to the Nouveau driver crew talking about their Vulkan plans and other open-source work, Nicolai Hähnle of AMD represented the company's work on their Radeon Linux graphics driver stack(s) and the work they have going on for improving their GPU driver support.

  • Some thoughts on The Lion’s Song, a narrative-rich adventure

    This point and click game meshes stories of people trying to create and discover new truths in prewar Vienna. I’ve completed the episodic series and have a few thoughts to share.

  • Looking for ways to spice up your gaming? Here’s a few games with awesome mods

    With the continuous stream of new releases, it’s sometimes hard to remember that there's still plenty of excuses to fire up games you already own. User-made modifications are one of the best things about being a PC gamer and so I’ve taken the time to make a very biased list of games that have great mods.

    For the uninitiated, a mod or modification is some sort of change that’s made to an existing game by fans and players. It can be anything from massive graphical overhauls, new story lines to simple interface tweaks or changing the game balance and difficulty. While not really limited to PC games anymore, it's still something that's predominantly with the platform.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 4

    This was a big week for Usability & Productivity. Before I get to the list of improvements we landed, I’d like to make an exciting announcement: we’re scoping out the work to add FUSE support to KIO for remote locations like Samba shares. This should vastly improve the experience of interacting with files on Samba and FTP locations (among others) when using non-KDE software with KDE Plasma. No timelines or promises yet, but it’s now on our radar screens.

  • The Real Reason Red Hat Is Acquiring CoreOS
  • TRUE Private Wealth Advisors Purchases New Holdings in Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT)
  • Fedora Red Team on ITProTV

    Back at BSidesDE — which was awesome, BTW — I was interviewed by ITProTV, and had the opportunity to discuss the Fedora Red Team.

  • Free software log (January 2018)

    The only sofware releases I got out this month were both for work: versions 0.4.0 and 0.4.1 of groupy, the client library for Merou, the authorization management system we use. We're not doing formal releases of the latter yet, just building from Git, and probably need to settle on a final public project name before we do.

    At some point I'll build proper software release pages for both of these, since I seem to be doing most of the release management for groupy.

  • January 2018 report: LTS

    I have already published a yearly report which covers all of 2017 but also some of my January 2018 work, so I'll try to keep this short.

  • January 2018 is gone

    It is not that there were not interesting topics to write about.  I could have posted, for example, about the release of the Elive beta 2.9.22, which promised Korean and Japanese support. However, I could not even get the release.

  • Nokia HMD Comeback? First Year Finishes with 8.5 Million Smartphones Shipped and 1.0% Market Share by Year-End

    I will still wait, in case any other analysts report any Nokia numbers. When we have all data in, I'll do a forecast for this year.

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Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • Debian XU4 images updated
    I've updated my Debian images for the ODROID XU4; the newest build was done before stretch release, and a lot of minor adjustments have happened since then.
  • Parrot 4.0 Ethical Hacking Linux Distro Released
  • FBI says Russians hacked [sic] hundreds of thousands of home and office routers

    The warning followed a court order Wednesday that allowed the FBI to seize a website that the hackers [sic] planned to use to give instructions to the routers. Though that cut off malicious communications, it still left the routers infected, and Friday’s warning was aimed at cleaning up those machines.

  • FBI tells router users to reboot now to kill malware infecting 500k devices

    Researchers from Cisco’s Talos security team first disclosed the existence of the malware on Wednesday. The detailed report said the malware infected more than 500,000 devices made by Linksys, Mikrotik, Netgear, QNAP, and TP-Link. Known as VPNFilter, the malware allowed attackers to collect communications, launch attacks on others, and permanently destroy the devices with a single command. The report said the malware was developed by hackers [sic] working for an advanced nation, possibly Russia, and advised users of affected router models to perform a factory reset, or at a minimum to reboot.

Software and Games: KStars, Opera, OpenStack, MariaDB and More

  • KStars 2.9.6 is Released!
    I'm glad to announce the release of KStars 2.9.6 for Windows, MacOS, and Linux. This is a minor bugfix release.
  • Opera 54 Browser Enters Beta with News on the Speed Dial, Update & Recovery Menu
    Opera has promoted its upcoming Opera 54 web browser to the beta channel, giving us a glimpse of what to expect from the final version, due for release sometime next month. Based on the open-source Chromium 67.0.3396.18 web browser, Opera 54 recently entered beta stages of development with a plethora of new features and improvements, among which we can mention a new Update & Recovery Opera menu page that makes it easier for users to update the web browser and reset it to its default state, including the ability to clear temporary data, such as cookies.
  • OpenStack at a Crossroads
    The OpenStack of a few years ago is dead, however. What has emerged from the hype cycle is a materially different foundation, mission and software stack, with a great deal of change still ahead of it.
  • The OpenStack Foundation grows beyond OpenStack
    The OpenStack Foundation has made a considerable change to its development process and governance structure by introducing two open source projects that are not part of the OpenStack cloud platform. This week, the organization launched version 1.0 of Kata Containers - a runtime system with an emphasis on speed and security, enabling users to boot a VM in as little as five seconds - and introduced a brand new project called Zuul, spinning out the software development and integration platform that has been used by the OpenStack community internally since 2012.
  • Oracle nemesis MariaDB tries to lure enterprise folk with TX 3.0
    Open-source database biz MariaDB has upped the ante in its war against Oracle, promising enterprise customers better compatibility with – and easier migration from – Big Red. The Finnish firm's latest offering, MariaDB TX 3.0, released for GA today, extends the number of use cases to include temporal processing and advanced data protection for sensitive and personally identifiable information, as well as Oracle compatibility. The broad aim is to tap into customers' grumbles over legacy vendor lock-in, while convincing the bigger customers that they can move to an open-source database without compromising performance.
  • The Humble Monthly Bundle just added two great Linux games
    For those that are interested, you can secure a copy of two great Linux games in the current Humble Monthly Bundle. Just added today are: Get Cook, Serve, Delicious! 2!! Ken Follett's The Pillars of the Earth
  • SC-Controller 0.4.3 Released, Support Steam Controller & Sony DS4 Over Bluetooth
    For those looking to manage your Steam Controller and other supported Linux gaming peripheral input devices outside of Steam, there is a new release of the independently-developed SC-Controller Linux user-space software. While Linux 4.18 is bringing the Steam Controller kernel driver, for those looking for a Steam Controller solution right now to enjoy this excellent gaming controller for now outside of Steam, SC-Controller fills that void.

Huawei, Fuchsia and More

  • Huawei will no longer allow bootloader unlocking (Update: Explanation from Huawei)

    "In order to deliver the best user experience and prevent users from experiencing possible issues that could arise from ROM flashing, including system failure, stuttering, worsened battery performance, and risk of data being compromised, Huawei will cease providing bootloader unlock codes for devices launched after May 25, 2018. [...]"

  • Fuchsia Friday: How ad targeting might be a hidden cost of Fuchsia’s structure
     

    Fuchsia, by its nature, comes with the potential for a handful of new opportunities for ad targeting. Let’s peer into the dark side of Fuchsia’s innovative features.

  • iPhone Quarter, ZTE Troubles, Facebook Troubles, Nokia Come-back
     

    So the past month or two? The Quarterly results cycle came in. The item often of great interest is the Apple iPhone performance. 52.2 million iPhones shipped and that gives roughly a flat market share compared to the year before, so about 14%-15%. I'll come and do the full math later of the quarterly data. That race is no longer in any way interesting.

    But two Top 10 smartphone brands ARE in the news. One who is facing imminent death and the other who is making a miraculous return-from-dead. So imminent death and current Top 10 brand first. ZTE. The Trump administration has put a massive squeeze on ZTE and the company is in serious trouble of imminent collapse. Then bizarrely, Trump reversed course and felt he needed to protect CHINESE employment (???) and after yet another typical Trump-mess, we now are at a Never-Neverland where Trump's own party Republicans are revolting against their President and well, ZTE may end up a casualty of this mess. We'll keep an eye on it.

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