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today's leftovers

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  • FLOSS Weekly 397: CoreOS Update
  • SJVN Talks FOSS, Linux, Microsoft & More…

    The official Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols LinkedIn page says, “I’ve written over 9,000 articles on business and technology subjects. Highlights include the first popular news story about the web and the first Linux benchmarks. My articles range from features to reviews to OpEd to news reporting.”

    A large percentage of those articles have been about Linux and FOSS, so it was logical for us to ring up SJVN (as he is commonly known) and ask him what’s the biggest news about FOSS so far in 2016, and what we can expect in the rest of the year.

  • GSoC Update: Tinkering with KIO

    Secondly, the ioslave is now completely independent from Dolphin, or any KIO application for that matter. This means it works exactly the same way across the entire suite of KIO apps. Given that at one point we were planning to make the ioslave fully functional only with Dolphin, this is a major plus point for the project.

  • Linux Top 3: Network Security Toolkit, Untangle NG Firewall and IPFire

    There is no shortage of Linux distributions that provide a platform for security researcher to conduct various security research. Among them is the Network Security Toolkit (NST), which was recently updated to version 24-7977. The 24 is a referenced to Fedora, which NST is based on.

    Aside from simply integrating existing tools, NST goes a step further and provides a number of innovative capabilities including a new Multi-Traceroute (MTR) networking tool.

  • Tally ERP 9 on Linux

    Recently we implemented Tally ERP 9 solution for Antico Pumps. That itself is not interesting, the interesting part is they are using LTSP Fat client system on openSUSE. They have only one server from which all their client computers boot over the network, the clients do not have hard disk, client OS with all softwares they need including wine(Tally is Windows only software), as well as users’ data resides on the server. Once the client boots all the local resources are used so single low power server can be used to serve many clients.

  • Onion brings Omega2: a $5 Linux powered IoT board
  • $5 Omega2 Linux Mini PC Designed For The Internet Of Things And More (video)

    Electronics enthusiasts looking for a small Linux powered mini PC for Internet of Things projects might be interested in the new Omega2 which has been created by Onion and is priced at just $5.

  • Zipt free voice calling app selected as Marquee app for Tizen

    Popular international communication app Zipt developed by ZipTel Ltd has been called up by Samsung to be the Marquee app for Tizen. With the launch of the next Tizen based smartphones happening possibly as early as next month, Samsung might be gearing up for a major announcement for the Tizen platform which until now has been deficient of apps that are easily available on rival platforms like Android and iOS. The Zipt negotiation could possibly be a part of this announcement. Ziptel are now working with the finest of Tizen Developers to get their app into the Tizen platform.

today's leftovers

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  • Google play store playing with GPS?

    Microsoft broke my father's computer: it made him update to Windows 10, when Windows 10 can not use two of 3 USB ports. Ouch.

  • Persistent storage patterns for Docker in production
  • IBM Announces Blockchain Cloud Services on LinuxOne Server

    A new cloud environment for business-to-business networks announced by IBM last week will allow companies to test performance, privacy, and interoperability of their blockchain ecosystems within a secure environment, the company said. Based on IBM’s LinuxONE, a Linux-only server designed for high-security projects, the new cloud environment will let enterprises test and run blockchain projects that handle private data for their customers.

    The service is still in limited beta, so IBM clients will not be able to get their hands on it just yet. Once it launches, however, the company said clients will be able to run blockchain in production environments that let them quickly and easily access secure, partitioned blockchain networks.

  • An honorary degree for Alan Cox

    Congratulations are due to Alan Cox, who was awarded an honorary degree by Swansea University for his work with Linux. "Alan started working on Version 0. There were bugs and problems he could correct. He put Linux on a machine in the Swansea University computer network, which revealed many problems in networking which he sorted out; later he rewrote the networking software. Alan brought to Linux software engineering discipline: Linux software releases that were tested, corrected and above all stable. On graduating, Alan worked at Swansea University, set up the UK Linux server and distributed thousands of systems."

  • [antergos] ISO Refresh 2016.07.19
  • Video: Hardware hacking basics for Linux software devs

    In this interesting ELC video, Grant Likely, a Linux kernel engineer and maintainer of the Linux Device Tree, describes his sojourn into embedded hardware.

    Sometimes the best tutorials come not from experts, but from proficient newcomers who are up to date on the latest entry-level technologies and can remember what it’s like to be a newbie. It also helps if, like Grant Likely, the teacher is a major figure in embedded Linux who understands how hardware is ignited by software.

    At the Embedded Linux Conference, Likely — who is a Linux kernel engineer, and maintainer of the Linux Device Tree subsystem used by many embedded systems — described his embedded hardware journey in a presentation called “Hardware Design for Linux Engineers” — or as he put it, “explaining stuff I only learned six months ago.”

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  • Microsoft Releases Patch to Block Linux from Running on the Original Surface RT [Ed: but Microsoft loves Linux]

    The Register claims that MS16-094 fixes a loophole that allowed users to install other operating systems on Windows RT devices, including here Linux. With Windows RT becoming an OS with no future, many have looked into ways to install a different operating system on the Surface RT, but most attempts failed because of the locked bootloader and the other security systems that Microsoft put in place.

  • Hardware Design for Linux Engineers by Grant Likely

    At the Embedded Linux Conference, Grant Likely -- who is a Linux kernel engineer, and maintainer of the Linux Device Tree subsystem used by many embedded systems -- described his embedded hardware journey in a presentation called “Hardware Design for Linux Engineers” -- or as he put it, “explaining stuff I only learned six months ago.”

  • Hello!

    Machinery is a command line application for creating descriptions of Linux systems and working with them.

  • Opera Software’s $1.2 Billion Takeover by a Chinese Group Has Failed

    A $1.24 billion agreed takeover of Norwegian online browser and advertising company Opera Software by a Chinese consortium of internet firms has failed, Opera said on Monday, after warning last week the deal had yet to win regulatory approval.

    As an alternative, the consortium, which includes search and security business Qihoo 360 Technology and Beijing Kunlun Tech, a distributor of online and mobile games, will take over certain parts of Opera’s consumer business for $600 million, Opera said in a statement.

    Regulatory approval had not been received in time of a final deadline for the deal last Friday, the chairman of Opera Software said on Monday.

  • Opera sells open-source Chromium browser for $600m to Chinese bods
  • Opera agrees to sell its browser business to group of Chinese buyers for $600 million
  • Chinese takeover of Norway's Opera fails, alternative proposed
  • Chinese Consortium's $1.2 Billion Deal to Buy Opera's Ad Business Falls Through
  • Chinese US$1.2B takeover of Norway's Opera fails
  • Ten minute hacks: Hacking airplane headphones
  • And the winner is….

    We have completed the artwork contest and would like to extend our thanks to everyone that took part, there were some excellent pieces submitted and choosing the winners was a tough task.

    We would like to congratulate Jacques Daugeron on winning the background contest, the runners up will be available in the extra theme package as well.

    Here is the signature background for Mageia 6, it will be included in the next updates to the theme packages.

  • Breeze everywhere

    The first half of this year, I had the chance to work on icon and design for two big free-software projects.

    First, I’ve been hired to work on Mageia. I had to refresh the look for Mageia 6, which mostly meant making new icons for the Mageia Control Center and all the internal tools.

  • Ubuntu Demo Wireless Convergence on Bq M10 Tablet

    A video demoing wireless convergence on the Bq M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet has been shared by Canonical today.

    Ubuntu phone fans will know that wireless display technology was made available to users of the Meizu PRO 5 Ubuntu phone in last month’s OTA-11 update.

    But for its latest over-the-air update Ubuntu is bringing it to the Bq Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition slate, which went on sale earlier in the year.

    “Our latest OTA-12 has just landed and we’re excited that you can now wirelessly connect your M10 tablet to a monitor,” Canonical say in the description accompanying the video.

    OTA 12 is, at the time of writing, scheduled to begin phased roll out from July 27, so don’t panic if you don’t get the update just yet!

  • Rugged, fanless computer runs Ubuntu on Haswell

    Perfectron’s rugged “SR10M” system offers a 4th Gen Core CPU, four GbE ports, stackable expansion, -40 to 70° operation, and MIL-STD-810G ruggedization.

    The SR10M is the latest in Perfectron’s Stackrack series of rugged, MIL-STD-rated stackable embedded computers equipped with Intel Haswell CPUs and designed primarily for military vehicles. The SR10M is built around an OXY5737A EBX form-factor single board computer (see farther below) equipped with the quad-core, 2.4GHz (3.4GHz turbo) Intel Core i7-4700EQ of the fourth “Haswell” generation of Core CPUs. It also offers an Intel QM76 chipset.

today's leftovers

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  • Microsoft blocks Linux installations

    Microsoft has closed a backdoor left open in Windows RT even though the OS is pretty much dead in the water as Vole can’t be bothered with it any more.

    This vulnerability in ARM-powered locked down Windows devices was left by Redmond programmers during the development process. Exploiting this flaw, a hacker could boot operating systems of his/her choice, including Android or GNU/Linux.

  • “Windows 10 Is A Failure” — According To Microsoft’s Own Metric [Ed: in spite of very dirty if not illegal tricks]

    Microsoft has accepted that Windows 10 has failed to perform as expected. The software giant hoped that by mid-2018, Windows 10 will be running on 1 billion devices. Now, this number seems far-fetched due the constantly shrinking PC market and poor performance of Windows 10 Mobile.

  • KDEPIM ready to be more broadly tested

    As was posted a couple of weeks ago, the latest version of KDE has been uploaded to unstable.

    All packages are now uploaded and built and we believe this version is ready to be more broadly tested.

  • Builder Happenings

    Over the last couple of weeks I’ve started implementing Run support for Builder. This is somewhat tricky business since we care about complicated manners. Everything from autotools support to profiler/debugger integration to flatpak and jhbuild runtime support. Each of these complicates and contorts the problem in various directions.

    Discovering the “target binary” in your project via autotools is no easy task. We have a few clever tricks but more are needed. One thing we don’t support yet is discovering bin_SCRIPTS. So launching targets like python or gjs applications is not ready yet. Once we discover .desktop files that should start working. Pretty much any other build system would be easier to implement this.

today's leftovers

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  • Wayland's Weston Now Working On Libweston-Desktop

    Wayland developers continue working on Libweston, which is aiming to make more of the Weston reference compositor reusable by other Wayland compositors. This library offers much of the boilerplate code around the Wayland protocols to allow more sharing by compositors and making it more straight-forward to get things up and running. The latest component is Libweston-desktop.

  • 6 Excellent Open Source Google Drive Clients

    Google Drive, formerly Google Docs, is a file storage and synchronization service created by Google. They are a multinational technology company specializing in Internet-related services and products that include online advertising technologies, search, cloud computing, and software.

    Google Drive allows users to store files in the cloud, share files, and edit documents, spreadsheets, and presentations with collaborators. Google Drive includes Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides, an office suite that permits collaborative editing of documents, spreadsheets, presentations, drawings, forms, and more. Google Drive lets you open and edit files from any device. Users get 15GB of free storage. This includes Google Drive, Google Photos, and Gmail. More storage can be purchased. Drive uses Google’s highly-secure, custom-built data centers.

  • FreeType 2.7 Bringing DirectWrite/ClearType-Like Rendering -- Much Better Looking Fonts On Linux

    FreeType 2.7.0 will be shipping with the v40 TrueType instructions interpreter enabled by default. This interpreter is going to "finally brings DirectWrite/ClearType-like rendering to the screen, or 'subpixel hinting' as some FreeType code calls it."

  • Solus 1.2.1 Releases Tomorrow

    We’re really excited to be releasing our last “traditional” release, Solus 1.2.1, tomorrow. We opted to delay by a day just to ensure we don’t push ourselves too hard after the recent Hackfest, as well as being able to take the time to do additional QA.

  • GIMP and LibreOffice on Ubuntu Phone

    GIMP and LibreOffice on Ubuntu Phone - meizu MX4 ubuntu edition

  • Facebook Announces Open-Source Swift SDK Beta for iOS [Ed: Proprietary software company helps another proprietary software company with openwashing]

today's leftovers

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  • Now Microsoft Won’t Let You Install And Boot Linux On Locked-down Windows Computers

    Microsoft has released a security update that has patched a backdoor in Windows RT operating system.

  • This Week in Solus – Install #3

    Solus has always held the philosophy of a “stable core, updated apps”. To achieve the level of stability we desire, we have been utilizing the LTS branch of the Linux kernel, prioritizing stability in our graphics stack, and sticking to a specific GNOME release series for each major release of Solus. To be more precise, Solus 1.0 shipped with GNOME 3.18.x and the plan of using GNOME 3.22.x in Solus 2.0.

  • Work after DebConf

    First week after DebCamp and DebConf! Both were incredible — the debian project and it’s contributors never fail to impress and delight me. None the less it felt great to have a few quiet, peaceful days of uninterrupted programming.

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Linux User? The US Government May Classify You an Extremist

    Do you use decentralized, open source software? The US government considers you an extremist.

    According to leaked documents related to the XKeyscore spying program, the National Security Agency (NSA) flags as an “extremist” anyone who uses Tor or Tails Linux, or who subscribes to Linux Journal.

  • New Vivaldi Web Browser Snapshot Improves Proprietary Media Support on Linux

    Ruarí Ødegaard informs Softpedia today, July 14, 2016, about the availability of yet another snapshot towards the Vivaldi 1.3 cross-platform web browser, bringing more improvements to Linux support.

    According to Mr. Ødegaard, Vivaldi Snapshot 1.3.537.5 has been released only a few days after the previous snapshot, version 1.3.534.3, mostly to improve the broken HTML5 proprietary media support on Linux kernel-based operating systems, which was made more robust on the Ubuntu Linux distribution but now works on Slackware and openSUSE, SLES, and derivatives.

  • Next Slackware will use UTF-8 by default

    Besides taking security updates, Patrick already started minor changes in Slackware-Current which probably have big impact for users. The first one is enabling UTF-8 support by default in /etc/profile.d/lang.{csh,sh} script which are loaded by default and also in lilo dialog. It will not prompt you about UTF-8 anymore since it will use it by default and the kernel is already UTF-8 compliance. We will have less installation dialog in the next Slackware release Smile

    The second change is mesa upgrade to 12.0.1. This is requested in LQ, but surprisingly Patrick approved it. Normally, current will not be active for some time besides security updates.

  • Price Target Update: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • 5 Reasons I’m Excited By Nokia’s Upcoming Android Phones

    Nokia used to be the world’s biggest phone maker. When you thought of mobile phones you thought of Nokia. The brand was synonymous with mobile technology, just as Apple iand Samsung are right now.

  • Running Ubuntu on top of Windows 10 is a thing thanks to Bash [Ed: Microsoft sites continue to 'linuxwash' Vista 10 which is a piece of malware]
  • Photoshop vs. GIMP: Which Photo Editor Do You Need?

    Just about every image you encounter in the world has been manipulated or processed in some way. Headline images, fine art photography, and advertisements all rely to some extent on image editing software. Many of these manipulations are so subtle that they’re nearly imperceptible: Slight cropping, adjusting contrast, and color correction are all standard procedures. Others are more drastic, like altering shapes and removing (or inserting) certain elements.

  • Open-source Bluetooth sensor beacon offers "IoT for everyone"

    Finnish startup Ruuvi Innovations has successfully crowdfunded the first fully open-sourced Bluetooth Smart (Bluetooth 5 ready) sensor beacon. The device, RuuviTag, is claimed to be the only sensor beacon with a one kilometer open-air range and offers unlimited possibilities for makers, developers, Internet of Things (IoT) companies and educational institutions.

  • Security advisories for Thursday

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