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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Greens 'bewildered' by kerfuffle over Microsoft's Protected cloud status

    The Australian Greens say they are "bewildered" at the way the Australian Signals Directorate has handled Microsoft's application for Protected cloud certification and the subsequent departure of a top female officer from the agency's ranks.

    Protected cloud is the highest security classification for vendors and allows a company to apply for contracts to store top-secret Australian Government data.

    In response to queries from iTWire, Greens' digital communications spokesperson Senator Jordon Steele-John said: "A staffer within the Australian Signals Directorate dared to refuse an application from foreign multinational company, Microsoft.

    "This application ensured secure cloud services receiving protected certification. Approving this certification meant that Microsoft overseas employees could access secure information for government departments.

    [...]

    Microsoft has been allowed to have staff based abroad handle systems on which top-secret data is stored. For the other four Australian companies, only staff vetted by the ASD can administer these systems.

    "It seems that there is one rule for multinational corporations, and another rule for Australian businesses, who are yet to get a look in to providing Protected cloud services to the Australian Public Service," Senator Steele-John said.

    "Australians have a right to know that the corporate interest is not being put ahead of the the security of our data."

  • Container Adoption Starts to Outpace DevOps

    A new survey finds the number of organizations using containers is poised to pass the number of organizations employing DevOps processes in the months ahead. Less clear, however, is the degree to which adoption of containers will force organizations to embrace DevOps.

    The survey of 601 IT decision-makers conducted by ClearPath Strategies on behalf of the Cloud Foundry Foundation (CFF) finds that 32 percent of respondents have adopted containers and are employing DevOps processes. But the number of respondents who plan to adopt or evaluate containers in the next 12 months is 25 percent, while 17 percent are planning to adopt or evaluate DevOps processes. Overall, the survey finds that within the next two years, 72 percent of respondents either already are or expect to be using containers. That compares to 66 percent who say the same for DevOps.

  • MKVToolNix 25.0.0 Released, Linux AppImage Now Available

    MKVToolNix, the free and open source set of tools used for creating, editing, and inspecting Matroska files (MKV, MK3D, MKA, and MKS), was updated to version 25.0.0, bringing quite a few bug fixes along with a few enhancements. With this release, a Linux AppImage is available "which should run on any Linux distribution released around the time of CentOS 7/Ubuntu 14.04 or later".

  •  

  • Fixing issues with the “New Messages” divider

    Fractal is a Matrix client for GNOME and is written in Rust. Matrix is an open network for secure, decentralized communication.

  • Hartwell J M Limited Partnership Increased Red Hat (RHT) Stake By $682,420; Suburban Propane Partners LP (SPH)’s Sentiment Is 0.85
  • Returning to Growth and Value Creating: Stitch Fix, Inc. (SFIX), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Offering Potential To Outperform Peers? – Delta Air Lines, Inc. (DAL), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Top 10 Reasons Why Desktop Linux Failed

    1) Linux isn't pre-installed - No matter how much we may debate it, having Windows pre-installed on PCs means that's what people are likely to end up using. In order for someone to move over to Linux on the desktop, there must be a clear reason to do so. There is the problem. The only time I've personally seen users make the switch over to Linux from Windows comes down to frustration with Windows or a desire to advance their skills into an IT field.

    My own Linux story, for example, was a mixture of the two examples above. First off, I was just done with Windows. I had already been dabbling with Linux at the time I completely switched, but I become disenfranchised with the Microsoft way of doing things. So for me, the switch to Linux was based out of frustration.

    Had I not experienced any frustrations with Windows, I might not have ever thought to jump ship over to an alternative. Even when I built my own PCs myself, the OS offered at computer stores was Windows only. This is a huge hurdle for Linux adoption on the desktop.

    2) Linux freedom vs convenience - It's been my experience that people expect a user experience that's consistent and convenience. How one defines this depends on the individual user. For some, it's a matter of familiarity or perceived dependability. For more advanced PC users, a consistent convenience may mean a preferred workflow or specific applications.

    The greater takeaway is that when people are aware of other operating systems, they will usually stick with that they've used the longest. This presents a problem when getting people to try Linux. When using a desktop platform for a long time, you develop habits and expectations that don't lend themselves well to change.

  • How to be efficient and cost effective (or not)

    It's the mid-1990s, and this big corporation is working on a major development project to replace most of its critical systems, says a Unix admin pilot fish working there.

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #41 – Dissecting Kubernetes Surveys

    In a world of open source projects, privately funded companies, one-off cloud services and a mix of public companies, it can often be difficult to determine hype from trends from real usage.

  • PodCTL Podcast #38 – A Beginner’s Guide to Kubernetes
  • Optimizing a Python application with C++ code

    I’ve been working lately in a command line application called Bard which is a music manager for your local music collection. Bard does an acoustic fingerprinting of your songs (using acoustid) and stores all song metadata in a sqlite database. With this, you can do queries and find song duplicates easily even if the songs are not correctly tagged. I’ll talk in another post more about Bard and its features, but here I wanted to talk about the algorithm to find song duplicates and how I optimized it to run around 8000 times faster.

    [...]

    An obvious improvement I didn’t do yet was replacing the map with a vector so I don’t have to convert it before each for_each call. Also, vectors allow to reserve space in advance, and since I know the final size the vector will have at the end of the whole algorithm, I changed to code to use reserve wisely.

    This commit gave the last increase of speed, to 7998x, 36680 songs/second and would fully process a music collection of 1000 songs in just 13 seconds..

  • How A KDE Developer Used C++17 & Boost.Python For About A 8,000x Speed-Up

    Open-source developer Antonio Larrosa who contributes to KDE and openSUSE has been developing a command-line music manager called Bard. He's written an interesting post about how he sped up some of his operations by around eight-thousand times faster.

    In particular, Antonio was focused on speeding up the process of finding song/music duplicates in the user's local music collection. What started out as Python code was morphed into optimized C++ code. Little surprise, the C++ code once tuned was immensely faster than Python -- but the blog post is interesting for those curious about the impact of the various steps he took for tuning this implementation.

  • GLib 2.58 Is Looking Good With Portability Improvements, Efficient Process Launching

    The GLib low-level GNOME library while being quite mature is seeing a significant update with its version 2.58 release due out this September for GNOME 3.30.

    Two of the biggest GLib 2.58 changes we have covered up to now on Phoronix has been the new generic reference counting API and more efficient app launching. The reference counting API has been in the works for 6+ years to help GLib's bindings/integration with languages utilizing automatic memory management / garbage collection. The more efficient process launching via the use of posix_nspawn() is also exciting for better performance, particularly on systems suffering from memory pressure.

  • Taiwan Travel Blog - Day 2 & 3

    My Taiwan Travel blog continues! I was expecting the weather to go bad on July 10th, but the typhoon arrived late and the rain only started around 20:00. I'm pretty happy because that means I got to enjoy another beautiful day of hiking in Taroko National Park.

    I couldn't find time on the 10th to sit down and blog about my trip, so this blog will also include what I did on the 11th.

  • Canonical Releases Minimal Ubuntu, Optimised for Multicloud

    Canonical, the company behind popular Linux system Ubuntu, has released Minimal Ubuntu, a pared-back, significantly faster iteration of its server operating system (OS).

  • Nokia signs billion-euro network tech deal with China Mobile

     

    Nokia said over the one-year framework agreement it will deliver mobile radio access, fixed access, IP routing and optical transport systems as well as other services to the Chinese mobile operator.  

  •  

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Shippable's Software

    What's interesting is that Shippable isn't targeting developers for the Internet of Things or smartphones, ARM's typical base, but is betting that the reduced instruction set architecture is on its way to having a big impact in data centers.

  • Cloud Computing in HPC Surges [Ed: No, it doesn't. They just came up with this buzzword. These are still just servers.]

    According to the two leading analyst firms covering the high performance computing market, the use of the cloud for HPC workloads is looking a lot more attractive to users these days.

  • Clear Linux Now Supports Kata Containers

    At the end of last year the Intel Clear Linux project's Clear Containers initiative morphed into OpenStack's Kata Containers. Clear Linux now supports the resulting Kata Containers.

    Clear Containers had been the Intel / Clear Linux project focused on providing performant Linux containers as well as greater security through Intel VT-d and other engineering improvements. Kata Containers took that foundation and has evolved it under the stewardship of OpenStack and participation from many different organizations.

  • Episode 31 | This Week in Linux

    Linux Mint 19 “Tara” was Released. Elementary releases a Developer Preview for their new version called “Juno”. Kdenlive issues a request to the community for beta testing of the next generation of Kdenlive. We do a follow up on the EU’s Copyright Reform Directive, this time it’s good news, at least for now. We discuss the SUSE acquisition by EQT. Ubuntu Studio created a cool guide to Audio Production on Linux. Later in the show we look at what is coming for Xubuntu 18.10 and also the latest release from Redcore Linux. All that and much more.

  • Arch Linux at FrOSCon

    Yet another shoutout for FrOSCon, which will be held 25th and 26th of August. Arch Linux will have a devroom with talks so far about Linux Pro Audio and our general Infrastructure / Reproducible build.

  • Dolphin-Emu under openSUSE Leap 42.3

    A day after I formally announced my game console emulator repository, the Dolphin Emulator guys decided to merge a patch that makes Qt 5.9 mandatory. That means Dolphin is no longer compatible with openSUSE Leap 42.3 which comes with Qt 5.6.

    I take pride in myself for having a high-quality product, even if it’s just free video game stuff. Therefore my plan is this instead of simply disabling 42.3 and calling it a day:

    I’ll pick the last commit before that patch and build that Dolphin revision. Then I’ll disable the 42.3 target and build the most recent version for the other distributions. That way the last 42.3-compatible binaries stay on the download server until I remove the 42.3 target entirely which will be either when Leap 15.1 gets released or maybe even earlier.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • GSoC 2018: Coding period (week 4-8)

    Since the last blogpost, the import of JSON files has been significantly improved, now this code is merged into the master branch. Previously, you could import data only from the field of the root object, whose name was specified manually. But then there was implemented the feature to overview the structure of JSON file that lets you import data by selecting an item in the file structure. To implement this, a QTreeView has been added to the ImportFileWidget. To fill it I used QJsonModel, which I and my mentor Alexander Semke improved a little for our needs:we made a display of icons for objects and arrays in the structure, added a display of the root element of the document and more.

  • GUADEC 2018

    Today, my first GUADEC experience has come to an end, and it was great! Kudos to the organizers for a very well-planned and executed event. Being a part of the volunteer team was a fantastic experience and thanks for the nice t-shirt!

    It was wonderful to meet the GNOME community in person, quite a surreal experience to say the least. The talks were a great opportunity to learn about everything going on at GNOME. I had amazing discussions with my mentors on various topics ranging from “Integrating AI in gnome applications” to “The big dilemma: Is a PhD really worth it?” and finally, some stuff about the GSoC project too.

  • GNOME's GLib Finally Has A Generic Reference Counting API

    Fulfilling a 6+ year desire, GNOME's GLib library now has a generic memory reference counting API.

  • My Free Software [Debian] Activities in June 2018

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • StarTech releases UVCHDCAP HDMI to USB-C Video Capture Device for Windows, Mac, and Linux

    While all desktops (and most laptops) have video outputs, having a video input is much more rare. The reason why is simple -- most people don't need such a thing. Quite frankly, outside of some business use, home users never really had much of a need. With the invent of video gameplay streaming on platforms like Twitch, however, this changed. Now, more and more home users want video capture devices to connect a game console to their PC.

  • Signage-oriented Mini-STX SBC taps Ryzen V1000

    Sapphire has launched a Linux-friendly “FS-FP5V” SBC starting at $325 that features an AMD Ryzen V1000 SoC, as well as SATA III, 2x M.2, 4x DP++, 2x GbE, and 4x USB ports including a USB 3.1 Type-C.

    Sapphire, which makes AMD-based graphics cards and motherboards, has launched a 147.3 x 139.7mm Mini-STX (5×5-inch) form factor SBC that runs Ubuntu 16.04 or Windows on AMD’s new Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC. AMD’s Ryzen V1000 is highly competitive on CPU performance with the latest Intel Core chips, and the Radeon Vega graphics are superior, enabling four 4K displays to run at once.

  • Elsevier Will Monitor Open Science In EU Using Measurement System That Favors Its Own Titles

        

    In other words, one of the core metrics that Elsevier will be applying as part of the Open Science Monitor appears to show bias in favor of Elsevier's own titles. One result of that bias could be that when the Open Science Monitor publishes its results based on Elsevier's metrics, the European Commission and other institutions will start using Elsevier's academic journals in preference to its competitors. The use of CiteScore creates yet another conflict of interest for Elsevier.

  • 15 open source applications for MacOS
  • 6 Open Source Software Security Concerns Dispelled [Ed: White Source typically badmouths FOSS to sell its wares and services. Anat Richter, for a change, tries a more positive approach.]

    Used by developers around the world, open source components makes up 60%-80% of the codebase in modern applications. Open source components are downloaded thousands of times per day to create applications for organizations of varying sizes and across all industries.

    But despite the continuously growing adoption there are still myths to dispel and concerns to mitigate around the usage of open source components in commercial software. The following is a list of the top concerns associated with open source usage and how to overcome each one of these stumbling blocks:

How ProPublica Illinois Uses GNU Make to Load 1.4GB of Data Every Day

Filed under
GNU
Misc

I avoided using GNU Make in my data journalism work for a long time, partly because the documentation was so obtuse that I couldn’t see how Make, one of many extract-transform-load (ETL) processes, could help my day-to-day data reporting. But this year, to build The Money Game, I needed to load 1.4GB of Illinois political contribution and spending data every day, and the ETL process was taking hours, so I gave Make another chance.

Now the same process takes less than 30 minutes.

Here’s how it all works, but if you want to skip directly to the code, we’ve open-sourced it here.

[...]

GNU Make is well-suited to this task. Make’s model is built around describing the output files your ETL process should produce and the operations required to go from a set of original source files to a set of output files.

As with any ETL process, the goal is to preserve your original data, keep operations atomic and provide a simple and repeatable process that can be run over and over.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • VK_KHR_8bit_storage Gets Wired Into Intel's ANV Vulkan Driver, Patches Available

    One of three new Vulkan extensions introduced in this weekend's Vulkan 1.1.80 specification update is VK_KHR_8bit_storage for providing 8-bit types is now available in patch form for the Intel open-source "ANV" Vulkan Linux driver.

  • Arch monthly June

    The Arch Archive has been cleaned up, the discussion started in this mail thread. The archive server was running out of space and therefore needed some cleaning, all packages which are not required for reproducible builds where removed (and where from 2013/2014/2015). Packages from these years should also be available at the internet archive.

  • What Really Matters? – Darden Restaurants, Inc. (DRI), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)?
  • What is the most supported MIME type in Debian in 2018?

    Five years ago, I measured what the most supported MIME type in Debian was, by analysing the desktop files in all packages in the archive. Since then, the DEP-11 AppStream system has been put into production, making the task a lot easier. This made me want to repeat the measurement, to see how much things changed.

  • Raspberry Pi’s Own App Store Is The Newest Reason To Love This Mini Computer

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation keeps updating its Debian-based Raspbian operating system from time to time. The developers keep adding new features to make the device a more attractive option for beginners who wish to start learning programming or get into DIYing.

    The latest Raspbian update brings a bunch of new features and updates. First things first, this release ships with a new program called “Recommended Software”; the developers are calling it their version of Apple App Store.

  • Shared-Mode Executables in L4Re for MIPS-Based Devices

    I have been meaning to write about my device driver experiments with L4Re, following on from my porting exercises, but that exercise took me along various routes and I haven’t yet got back to documenting all of them. Meanwhile, one thing that did start to bother me was how much space the software was taking up when compiled, linked and ready to deploy.

    Since each of my device drivers is a separate program, and since each one may be linked to various libraries, they each started to contribute substantially to the size of the resulting file – the payload – needing to be transferred to the device. At one point, I had to resize the boot partition on the memory card used by the Letux 400 notebook computer to make the payload fit in the available space.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Dell Precision 7530 and 7730 Mobile Workstations with Ubuntu Preinstalled Now Available, Linux Ultimate Gamers Edition Launched Its 5.8 ISO, Feral's GameMode Coming Soon to Fedora, CentOS 6.10 Released, Security Upgrades for Ubuntu and More

    The Mobile Workstations are powered by the latest Intel Core or Xeon processors, and "feature blazing-fast RAM, professional AMD or Nvidia graphics cards, and are certified for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 operating system". Prices for the "world's most powerful 15" and 17" laptops with Ubuntu pre-installed" begin at $1,091.14 for the 7530 and $1,371.37 for the 7730.

  • Meet the founder of Linux Weekly News

    At the recent Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit, I sat down with Jonathan Corbet, the founder and editor-in-chief of LWN to discuss a wide range of topics, including the annual Linux kernel report.

  • RandR Lease Support Appears Ready For AMDGPU X.Org Driver

    RADEON --
    Keith Packard doing his contract work for Valve to improve the Linux display infrastructure for VR head-mounted displays has been wrapping up his efforts with recently landing the Vulkan bits into Mesa and now the necessary xf86-video-amdgpu patches also are set to be merged there in the days ahead.

    The bits touching the xf86-video-amdgpu X.Org driver are for handling RandR lease support. The CRTC/output leases are handled through the modesetting DDX and is for allowing the SteamVR compositor (or other compositors) to have exclusive access to the display/output of the VR HMD without the conventional desktop compositors getting in the way. As part of the xf86-video-amdgpu patches is also the tracking of "non-desktop" properties such as is currently quirked in the kernel for the HTC Vive VR headset so it won't be setup as a conventional desktop output.

  • Best Easy To Use Linux Firewalls

    Have you ever wondered whether Linux is strong enough to secure your system? This is a frequently asked question especially for those starting out with Linux. The answer is yes. But the second consideration here narrows down to, what is your experience level with Linux if you can configure some of its firewalls or just the capability to use these firewalls which sometimes can be a nut to crack.

  •  

  • How to Run Windows Apps on Android with Wine

    Wine (on Linux, not the one you drink) is a free and open-source compatibility layer for running Windows programs on Unix-like operating systems. Begun in 1993, it could run a wide variety of Windows programs on Linux and macOS, although sometimes with modification. Now the Wine Project has rolled out version 3.0 which is compatible with your Android devices.

  • The latest Humble Monthly has The Escapists 2 and new games in the Humble Trove

    For those looking for some extra games to pass the time during the hot summer months, the new Humble Monthly once again has some Linux offerings.

  • GSoC :: Coding Period – Phase One (June 13th to July 7th): Font color implementation in Poppler and Okular

    As per the agreed timeline, I have patched the poppler-qt5 with the font color by introducing the ‘rg’ operator in the GooString which formats the font color in the RGB color model. The signature of setTextFont function is changed to pass both the QFont and the QColor arguments. In Okular, the font color chooser is introduced in the typewriter annotation setting dialogue which sets both the text annotation’s color and the engine color and hence colorize the typewriter icon color accordingly. The generator side and the doctype XML metadata for saving text color are also adapted. It is well supported in PagePainter too. The review comments (if any) from my mentor, Tobias Deiminger, is yet to come.

  • OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Is Approaching With DNF/RPM4, KDE Plasma 5.13, Linux 4.17~4.18

    It has been nearly two years since the debut of OpenMandriva Lx 3.0, but fortunately it's soon going to be succeeded by OpenMandriva Lx 4.0.

  • [Slackware] June/July Updates

    It's been a month since my last post about SBo DMCA Takedown, and i wanted to share some updates in the Slackware development progress. It has been an amazing progress and most of my wishlist (from one year ago) have been realized, while two remaining.

    The recent upgrade in Slackware brought GCC 8.1, the latest major release of GNU C Compiler. It brings new language features as well as better code optimizations, BUT it also comes with a stricter rules (which might affects scripts in the SBo projects). Amazingly Pat has stated that all packages have been tested for build failures against this new version of compiler.

  • AWS, HPE, Red Hat on 8 secrets of customer success with your SaaS vendor
  • Will you bet on these, Brighthouse Financial, Inc. (BHF), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • In which scenario Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) and Associated Banc-Corp (ASB) are Trading Now?
  • Snooping passwords from literally hot keys, China's AK-47 laser, malware, and more

    Canonical has issued a rash of new security patches for its Ubuntu GNU/Linux distribution – updates that should be installed as soon as possible.

    Not all of these fixes are alike. If you're running a system with an AMD processor, one patch removes an earlier update that was supposed to address the Spectre CPU vulnerability. That microcode-level mitigation left some AMD-powered systems unable to boot, and now has been given the boot from Ubuntu Linux computers.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Red Hat Reinforces Commitment to Asia Pacific Partner Ecosystem
  • Which Stock will you hold for a while, Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) or Chubb Limited (CB)
  • The Strategy to Trade Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in June 2018

    This month I accepted 166 packages and rejected only 7 uploads. The overall number of packages that got accepted this month was 216.

  • Coffee Lake module features shock and vibration resistance

    Adlink’s rugged “Express CF/CFE” COM Express Basic Type 6 integrates an 8th Gen Core or Xeon chip with up to 48GB RAM and loads of SATA, USB 3.1, and PCIe. There’s also a carrier board with a Live Linux USB stick.

  • How To Send SMS From Your PC Using Android Messages?
  • Google patents new AI-driven fitness feature for its Wear OS platform

    There's not much happening in the wearables market right now but that doesn't mean companies aren't working on something behind the scenes. A new patent by Google was unearthed giving us a sneak peek of what the tech giant is preparing for its future Wear OS release.

  • Using Android without Google: A (Kind of) Guide

    If you’re interested in using Android but don’t want all the Googly-ness of it, there are ways to go completely Google-free. With the right set of tools, you can have a truly open Android experience.

  • Reply: open data is 'intellectual infrastructure'

    According to Jason Hill, Executive Partner from Reply, open data is as it sounds – open and accessible data that is available to anyone.

    Hill further states that open data must be interoperable so it can be shared, adapted and reused with other datasets.

  • Open Source DIY Printers are Alive and Well: What We Saw At ERRF 18

    If you follow the desktop 3D printer market, it probably won’t surprise you to hear that nearly every 3D printer on display at the inaugural East Coast RepRap Festival (ERRF) was made in China. Even Printrbot CEO Brook Drumm had to admit that this was the year his company may finally bite the bullet and begin selling a branded and customized printer built overseas.

  • My First Clang Bug

    Part of the role of being a packager is compiling lots (and lots) of packages. That means compiling lots of code from interesting places and in a variety of styles. In my opinion, being a good packager also means providing feedback to upstream when things are bad. That means filing upstream bugs when possible, and upstreaming patches.

    One of the “exciting” moments in packaging is when tools change. So each and every major CMake update is an exercise in recompiling 2400 or more packages and adjusting bits and pieces. When a software project was last released in 2013, adjusting it to modern tools can become quite a chore (e.g. Squid Report Generator). CMake is excellent for maintaining backwards compatibility, generally accomodating old software with new policies. The most recent 3.12 release candidate had three issues filed from the FreeBSD side, all from fallout with older software.  I consider the hours put into good bug reports, part of being a good citizen of the Free Software world.

  • WordPress 4.9.7 Update Fixes a Pair of Security Vulnerabilities

    WordPress 4.9.7 was released on July 5, providing users of the popular open-source content management system with patches for a pair of security vulnerabilities.

    The security vulnerabilities are both arbitrary file deletion issues that could expose WordPress sites to risk. The first issue was publicly reported on June 26, by researchers at RIPS Tech, while the second was discovered by WordPress security firm WordFence on July 2. In addition to the two vulnerabilities, WordPress 4.9.7 provides fixes for 17 other bugs to help improve stability.

  • Keyboard Attack “Thermanator” Steals Your Passwords Using Body Heat [Ed: Likely BS. Here's why: 1) body might not be warm enough. 2) need big equipment. 3) don't know order of strokes. 4) already have physical access anyway. 5) more keystrokes after password entry.]

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • They grow up so fast: Spam magnet Hotmail turned 22 today

    The migration to Microsoft's platform took a while, with an impossibly young Andrew Orlowski writing in The Register at the end of 2001 that Hotmail still ran on Unix. Windows Server 2000 dealt with front edge duties.

    While Microsoft fiddled with Hotmail, competition arrived in the form of Yahoo! Mail in 1997 and the all-conquering GMail from Google in 2004. Hotmail, however, had other problems with which to contend.

  • Supercomputer Market Analysis by Type (Linux, Unix), by Application (Commercial Industries, Research Institutions), and Technological Growth Predication to 2023
  • OpenGL 4.5 Compat Being Worked On For RadeonSI, Helping Out No Man's Sky & Others

    What does Valve's Linux GPU driver developer Timothy Arceri do now that he took the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver up to OpenGL 4.4 in its compatibility profile mode? Work on OpenGL 4.5 compatibility profile support, of course.

    While the recent effort from taking the OpenGL compatibility profile mode in RadeonSI from OpenGL 3.1 to OpenGL 4.4 means a great deal of more games/applications are now working with this open-source Radeon GCN OpenGL driver, Arceri is working on OpenGL 4.5 support for this context that allows deprecated OpenGL features to still be mixed in with newer versions of OpenGL.

  • Slack didn’t kill email — and it might have made it stronger

    At many workplaces, if you’re at work, you’re also expected to be available on Slack. For some people, that means the thing that “replaced” email is something much more demanding.

  • Easy ARIA tip #8: Use aria-roledescription to selectively enhance the user experience
  • Gnome: execute a script at login
  • Kdenlive: "Test our beta, test the future"

    Apart from re-writing a lot of the internals to clean up the code and make Kdenlive more efficient and easier to stabilize, this beta adds a bunch of new and interesting features. For example, the video and audio from clips are now automatically separated when dropped in the timeline, the slow motion effect now works and insert/lift/overwrite should also work reliably. Another thing you can do is install new keyboard layouts with one click. This means that, if you are coming from another video-editing software and relied on its shortcuts, you can still be equally productive with Kdenlive. For a full list of the new features in Kdenlive 18.08 Beta 17, take a look at the article on the projects site.

  • Krita, GNOME Builder, FFmpeg Get Updates in Tumbleweed

    The four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week are trending quite stable as new major version packages have been updated this week.

    Among the packages updates this week were FFmpeg, KDE Plasma, GNOME Builder and Krita along with a kernel update.

    The most recent snapshot, 20180702, put out the first update ffmpeg 4.0 with a refresh of patches and an enablement for ffnvcodec when building with NVIDIA support. The snapshot brought about another 4.0 version with checkmedia upgrading from 3.8 to the new 4.0 version. The tools and libraries package to work with Extensible Firmware Interface variables, efivar, had a major update as well and adjusted its libefiboot-export-disk_get_partition_info.patch to work with the new 36 version. That wasn’t the last major version update either. The package for userspace components for the Linux Kernel‘s drivers/infiniband subsystem, rdma-core, updated to version 18.1; the new major version fixed compilations with recent glibc. Among the other packages in the snapshot there were updated were spec-cleaner 1.1.0, brotli 1.0.5 and System Security Services Daemon (sssd) 1.16.2.

  • Mageia Final Call for RMLL, the Wiki and a Roundup

    Final Call for RMLL volunteers RMLL/LSM

    Mageia will be present with a stand in at RMLL in Strasbourg, but we have very few volunteers who have put their names down for the stand: https://framadate.org/dbLxWJPnci6o6aqb If you’re going to be there, please go to that signup page and let us know – RMLL starts this coming Saturday, so we need you urgently!

  • Raphael Hertzog: My Free Software Activities in June 2018

    I write it for my donors (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

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Plasma 5.14.2

Today KDE releases a Bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.14.2. Plasma 5.14 was released in October with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. Read more Also: KDE Plasma 5.14.2 Desktop Environment Improves Firmware Updates, Snap Support

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

  • Red Hat: Creativity is risky (and other truths open leaders need to hear)
    Leaders are all too aware of the importance of invention and innovation. Today, the health and wealth of their businesses have become increasingly dependent on the creation of new products and processes. In the digital age especially, competition is more fierce than ever as global markets open and expand. Just keeping pace with change requires a focus on constant improvement and consistent learning. And that says nothing about building for tomorrow.
  • APAC Financial Services Institutions Bank on Red Hat to Enhance Agility
  • APAC banks aim to use open source to enhance agility
  • Huawei CloudFabric Supports Container Network Deployment Automation, Improving Enterprise Service Agility
    At HUAWEI CONNECT 2018, Huawei announced that its CloudFabric Cloud Data Center Solution supports container network deployment automation and will be available for the industry-leading enterprise Kubernetes platform via a new plug-in.
  • Redis Labs Integrates With Red Hat OpenShift, Hits 1B Milestone
    Redis Labs is integrating its enterprise platform as a hosted and managed database service on Red Hat’s OpenShift Container Platform. That integration includes built-in support for Red Hat’s recently launched Kubernetes Operator. The Redis Enterprise integration will allow customers to deploy and manage Redis databases as a stateful Kubernetes service. It will also allow users to run Redis Enterprise on premises or across any cloud environment.
  • Needham & Company Starts Red Hat (RHT) at Buy
  • Fedora Toolbox — Hacking on Fedora Silverblue
    Fedora Silverblue is a modern and graphical operating system targetted at laptops, tablets and desktop computers. It is the next-generation Fedora Workstation that promises painless upgrades, clear separation between the OS and applications, and secure and cross-platform applications. The basic operating system is an immutable OSTree image, and all the applications are Flatpaks. It’s great! However, if you are a hacker and decide to set up a development environment, you immediately run into the immutable OS image and the absence of dnf. You can’t install your favourite tools, editors and SDKs the way you’d normally do on Fedora Workstation. You can either unlock your immutable OS image to install RPMs through rpm-ostree and give up the benefit of painless upgrades; or create a Docker container to get an RPM-based toolbox but be prepared to mess around with root permissions and having to figure out why your SSH agent or display server isn’t working.
  • Fedora 28 : Alien, Steam and Fedora distro.

Raspberry Pi: Hands-on with the updated Raspbian Linux

wrote last week about the new Raspbian Linux release, but in that post I was mostly concerned with the disappearance of the Wolfram (and Mathematica) packages, and I didn't really do justice to the release itself. So now I have continued with installing or upgrading it on all of my Raspberry Pi systems, and this post will concentrate on the process and results from that. First, the new ISO images are available from the Raspberry Pi Downloads page (as always), and the Release Notes have been added to the usual text document. I have only downloaded the plain Raspbian images, I don't bother with the NOOBS images much any more - but the new ISO is included in those as well of course. Please note that the SHA-256 checksum for the images is given on the web page, so be sure to verify that before you continue with the file that you downloaded. If you prefer stronger (or weaker) verification, you can find a PGP signature (and an SHA-1 checksum) on the Raspbian images download page. Read more

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Release, Official Ubuntu 18.10 T-Shirt and Pop!_OS 18.10 Release

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 550
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 550
    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 550 for the week of October 14 – 20, 2018.
  • Ubuntu 18.10 is a Cosmic Cuttlefish of new Linux loveliness
    CANONICAL HAS announced the release of its bi-annual update to the Ubuntu operating system. Ubuntu 18.10, aka Cosmic Cuttlefish, is out now. It's not a long-term version so this is more aimed at individual users, as companies prefer to wait for an LTS to commit. So what's new in this build? Well, one of the biggest bugbears - graphics driver updating - has been addressed, so there'll be no more of all that sideloading the updates nonsense. Canonical has confirmed that this simpler process will get a graphical clicky interface, but not until (probably) version 19.x. But in the meantime, the way Ubuntu uses RAM for graphics has been given a kicking and should be a lot more efficient for migrating gamers.
  • Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish is now ready to download
    It’s October which means that we were due an Ubuntu release and Canonical hasn’t failed us this time around. Starting now, users who want to download Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish can do so. The latest version of the popular Linux distribution is only supported for nine months, until July 2019, with it being an inter-LTS release, therefore, you may want to consider sticking with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS on your mission-critical systems. Ubuntu 18.10 is no small release; out-of-the-box users will be greeted with a new theme dubbed Yaru and a new icon theme called Suru. It marks the first time that the distribution has received a significant overhaul since Ubuntu 10.10 when Canonical, the firm that makes Ubuntu, decided to throw out the brown colour scheme in favour of the purple, orange, and black theme we’re all now so used to.
  • You Can Now Buy an Official Ubuntu 18.10 T-Shirt
    The reverse of each 100% cotton tee bears the Ubuntu brand mark and text that reads “Cosmic Cuttlefish 18.10”. The shirt is both unisex and available in sizes small through quad XL. This should ensure there’s a comfy fit for virtually everyone (though, alas, not me – I’m an XS, and “small” is just too dang big). As well as making a great xmas gift idea an Ubuntu-loving loved one, the shirt is also a novel way to communicate your computing preferences to the wider world as you go about your shopping in Walmart, or as a certified conversation starter at tech conferences.
  • System76 releases Ubuntu-based Pop!_OS 18.10 Linux distribution
    System76 is making huge moves lately. The company used to just sell re-branded computers running Ubuntu, and while there was nothing wrong with that, it has much more lofty goals. You see, it released its own Ubuntu-based operating system called "Pop!_OS," and now, it is preparing to release its own self-designed and built open source computers. In other words, much like Apple, System76 is maintaining both the software and hardware aspects of the customer experience. While its new hardware is not yet available, the latest version of its operating system is. Following the release of Ubuntu 18.10, Pop!_OS 18.10 is now available for download. While it is based on Ubuntu, it is not merely Canonical's operating system with System76 branding and artwork. Actually, there are some significant customizations that make Pop!_OS its own.