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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Canonical Shaky On Sharing

    Remember Canonical, the company that produces the distribution Ubuntu GNU/Linux? They have a hard time even mentioning “Linux” on their website yet they manage to customize the Linux kernel for their distro without actively contributing the modifications to kernel.org.

  • AMD's GPUOpen HIP Project Made Progress Over The Summer

    The HIP project has made good progress over the summer. HIP from AMD's GPUOpen project is part of the puzzle for converting CUDA to portable C++ code. That source code can then run on AMD GPUs while having little to no performance impact, at least according to AMD.

  • A Unity developer is teasing the Vulkan API in the Unity engine [Ed: but it brings in Microsoft Mono]
  • 4 Weeks Left to Gentoo Miniconf

    4 weeks are left until LinuxDays and Gentoo Miniconf 2016 in Prague.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2016
  • New Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk Drone Development Kit Makes Use of Ubuntu Snappy and ROS

    Dubbed Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk, the new development kit is here to help developers create obstacle avoidance and autonomous robots and drones that use the slimmed-down version of the popular Ubuntu Linux distribution designed for embedded and IoT (Internet of Things) devices, Ubuntu Snappy Core, as well as ROS (Robot Operating System).

    "Parrot developed S.L.A.M.dunk to be as easy and user-friendly as possible for developers, researchers, integrators, and academics," reads the press release. "All Ubuntu functionalities and benefits from ROS (Robot Operating System) framework are embedded in the Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk making it user-friendly. The HDMI port makes it possible to develop directly on the product."

  • Enabling Geocode API for Tizen apps with Tizen studio and Here Maps

    If you’re a deveoper working on the Tizen platform with apps that require location access, then the new Tizen Studio’s Native Geocode API is just what you should be looking for. The API provides coordinates data to your app which can be achieved by following a fairly simple process.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Allwinner A33 DRM Support Coming In Linux 4.9

    Maxime Ripard of Free Electrons has sent in the Allwinner DRM driver pull request that will ultimately land for the Linux 4.9 kernel merge window.

    New to report on for the young Allwinner DRM driver is support in the sub4i-drm code for the Allwinner A33 SoC. Aside from the Allwinner A33 SoC, there are various other bug fixes and updates.

  • ZeMarmot monthly report for August 2016

    We went to the GUADEC conference, which was our first time there. Have a look to our reports in English and in Korean.

  • Bodhi 4.0 Linux OS Gets a Second Alpha Build, Remains Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

    Bodhi Linux developer Jeff Hoogland is pleased to announce on September 11, 2016, the release and immediate availability of the second Alpha development snapshot of his upcoming Bodhi 4.0.0 GNU/Linux distribution.

    Bodhi 4.0.0 Alpha 2 remains based on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, and it looks like it brings an up-to-date Bodhi Builder tool that the developer uses to build his Ubuntu derivative. Moreover, the latest security and software versions pushed upstream in the Xenial repos have also been imported in the Bodhi 4.0.0 distribution, which uses the most stable release of the Moksha desktop environment.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Zombie Processes [comic]
  • Identity: Our Last Stand

    By that I mean every corporate cathedral you can shake a mouse at is full of Linux, yet Linux has not yet enabled a free and open marketplace for every business and every customer. Instead, every human being on the commercial net remains trapped in corporate cathedrals, many of which are ravenous for the blood of personal data, most of which is acquired by surveillance. In fact, nearly our entire existence in the commercial world is inside cathedrals where we have near-zero autonomy and great exposure to whatever those running the cathedrals wish to know about us.

    The wide-open bazaar—the open public marketplace—where we can roam free, as anonymous or selectively know-able as we please, still doesn't exist online. And it should, because the internet protocol was built to support it. Just because it isn't there yet doesn't mean we shouldn't build it. Hell, commercial activity has existed on the internet only for 21 years so far. (Starting on April 30, 1995—that's when the NSFnet, the last of the internet backbones that forbade commercial traffic, stood down.)

  • Bundling Redux

    What is it with courts to accept the status quo instead of recognizing fundamental principles of law and justice? Are they on the payroll of monopolists? What’s wrong with giving consumers choice? Nothing. This court has blundered like so many others.

  • Black Lab Linux 8 "Onyx" Beta 2 Has Full exFAT Support, Based on Ubuntu 14.04.5

    Black Lab Software's CEO Robert J. Dohnert informs Softpedia today about the availability of the second Beta development milestone of the upcoming Black Lab Linux 8 "Onyx" operating systems.

    Black Lab Linux 8 "Onyx" Beta 2 is here approximately three weeks after the launch of the first Beta build and it adds a few local applications, among which we can mention the Abiword word processor, Gnumeric spreadsheet editor, Rhythmbox music player, Totem video player, GIMP image editor, Chromium web browser, and Thunderbird e-mail and news client. OpenJDK 8 (Java support) is available as well.

  • Sweet SUSE! HPE snags itself a Linux distro

    Before HPE spun out its software assets in a deal with Micro Focus, the UK-based business was best known for its soup-to-nuts support of COBOL. What most people missed is the deal also made HPE the first major, old-school technology company to give preference to Linux distributor SUSE.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • ext4 encryption incompatible with grub
  • I can’t stop thinking big. In a world where I feel so small.

    Returned from GUADEC and again it was a wonderful time. Big kudos to the organizing team putting together a great conference! For me to meet everyone is such a adrenaline rush, and I always feel so pumped when I come back.

    Speaking of conferences, I spent a lot of time volunteering to understand the mechanics of running a local conference since you know, I have one of my own that is coming up in a few short weeks. Libre Application Summit presented by GNOME or LAS GNOME conference.

  • Frugalware Linux 2.1 KDE Screenshot Tour
  • Stock-research Ratings: Liberty Broadband Corporation (NASDAQ:LBRDK), Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Analyze the Analyst’s Considerable Ratings: Nokia Corporation (NYSE:NOK) , Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Heroes of Fedora (HoF) – F24 Alpha

    As is usual with the release of a new version of Fedora, it’s time to reflect on the stats revolving around what it took to get the latest-and-greatest out the door. With the recent push of F24, the numbers are in, so without further delay, let’s check ’em out!

  • Debian CI updates for September 2016

    That is it for now. If you want to contribute to the Debian CI project and want to get in touch, you can pop up on the #debci channel on the OFTC IRC network, or mail the autopkgtest-devel mailing list.

  • Porn Sites Feel Exposed by Flash, Get It on With HTML5

    Soon, Google Chrome will phase out full support for Flash, meaning that, on most sites, users will have to manually activate the aging software if necessary. The move is largely for security reasons: Researchers regularly find dangerous vulnerabilities in Flash.

    On Tuesday, porn site Pornhub said it would be ditching all Flash content from its site, opting instead for HTML5, the most recent version of the web language that offers more support for multimedia content. Since hackers have had a number of successes at compromising porn sites, it’s notable that one of the largest is taking this step, albeit when Flash is already on its last legs.

    “It was just a matter of time until we switched, as HTML5 is becoming the standard across platforms. Now makes the most sense as Google and Firefox are slowly pushing Flash support out of their browsers. Plus HTML5 has improved security, better power consumption and it’s faster to load,” Corey Price, vice president of Pornhub, told Motherboard in an email.

  • Free Isn't Freedom: How Silicon Valley Tricks Us

    Small business owners have long complained of the Google's frequent and mysterious adjustments to its search algorithm, which effectively punishes them for violating one of the search engine’s mostly obscure criteria.

    Even some of the world's largest companies live in constant "fear of Google"; sudden banishment from search results, YouTube, AdWords, Adsense, or a dozen other Alphabet-owned platforms can be devastating.

  • Google given more time to reply to EU antitrust charge on Android [Ed: Microsoft started this attack. This is well documented.]

    Alphabet's Google has been given two more weeks to counter EU antitrust charges that it uses its dominant Android mobile operating system to block competitors, the European Commission said on Thursday.

    The EU competition enforcer in April accused the U.S. technology giant of harming consumers because of its demand that mobile phone makers pre-install Google Search and the Google Chrome browser on their smartphones to access other Google apps.

    Google was initially given until July 27 to respond to the charges but asked for an extension to Sept. 7.

  • Samsung Galaxy Tab S 8.4 Gets Android Marshmallow
  • Google squashes another Mediaserver bug in Android

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Sony wins battle over preinstalled Windows in Europe’s top court [more comments]

    The sale of a computer equipped with pre-installed software isn't an unfair commercial practice because most customers prefer to buy a laptop they can use straight away, Europe’s top court has ruled in a victory for Sony.

    "Failure to indicate the price of each item of pre-installed software" isn't misleading, the Court of Justice of the European Union added in its ruling (PDF) on Wednesday.

  • Writing GStreamer Elements in Rust (Part 2): Don’t panic, we have better assertions now – and other updates
  • Linux Top 3: Porteus Kiosk 4.1, 4MLinux 19 and TrueOS
  • feren OS 2016.2 Screenshot Tour
  • SwagArch 16.09.1 Alpha 4 Screenshot Tour
  • Mozilla, systemd, compiler update in Tumbleweed

    QtCon, Akademy and VideoLAN Dev Days in Berlin this past week kept many developers busy, but openSUSE’s rolling release kept going forward.

    Tumbleweed had one new snapshot since that last article was published and more is expected this week.

    Snapshot 20160901 provided Mozilla updates for both Firefox and Thunderbird in the repositories. Firefox updated to version 48.0.2 and Thunderbird to version 45.3.0.

  • Spark Comparison: AWS vs. GCP [Ed: False dichotomy, as if giving all your processing, bandwidth data etc. to the US government is inevitable]

    There’s little doubt that cloud computing will play an important role in data science for the foreseeable future. The flexible, scalable, on-demand computing power available is an important resource, and as a result, there’s a lot of competition between the providers of this service. Two of the biggest players in the space are Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Google Cloud Platform (GCP).

  • Arduino Open Source Platform Fuels IoT and Farming’s Future

    Arduino, the world’s leading open-source software and hardware ecosystem, is being used to power Farmbot, the revolutionary farming robot that is built fully on open source. Farmbot is a computer numerical control (CNC) farming machine and software package for small scale, hyper local, DIY food production. It is controlled by and Arduino RAMPS stack and connected to the Internet using Raspberry Pi 2. The platform is designed to be simple, scalable, hackable, and easily made.

    “The applications that are fueling the IoT market are astonishing, and open source technology is playing a big role in it,” said Federico Musto, CEO of Arduino S.r.L. “Predicted to become a $6 trillion market by 2021, the IoT market is starting to take shape with advancements in wearables, healthcare, smart homes and cities, law enforcement, automotive, and, of course agriculture. We are proud to be a part of Farmbot, and look forward to continuing to fuel IoT deployments.”

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Purism announces the creation of its Advisory Board

    Purism is pleased to announce the creation of its Advisory Board, comprised of top-tier experts from the Free Software community: Kyle Rankin, Matthew Garrett, Aaron Grattafiori, and Stefano Zacchiroli. Together, they bring their vision—with decades of experience in cybersecurity, privacy protection, and digital freedom—to Purism’s product development, as the company continues to create products that finally address privacy and digital rights by default, rights that 86% of computer users cite as a concern.

  • Microsoft made 'em do it: The latest Kaby Lake, Zen chips will support only Windows 10
  • Linux Journal September 2016
  • September 2016 Video Preview
  • IBM links Blockchain with AI in new Industry Platforms business unit

    IBM has underscored how seriously its taking Blockchain technology with the creation of a new business unit centered around it. The new business, called Industry Platforms, will be led by Global Business Services chief, Bridget van Kralingen.

    IBM’s entire blockchain leadership team will transition to the new business, which was first announced last year.

    As well as working on Blockchain technology, the Industry Platforms business will also work to promote its Watson artificial intelligence platform in the financial services sector.

    “The Industry Platforms business will bring clients radically optimized processes and marketplaces that leverage Watson, IBM Cloud, IBM Systems, blockchain, deep domain expertise and ecosystems of partners and developers,” said IBM CEO Ginni Rometty.

  • Habitat: Automating Applications, Minus Platform and Infrastructure Hassles

    Remember the days when technology platforms sat in silos and our fierce allegiance to them did too? “We’re a Mac shop,” admins would announce. “We’re all in on Windows,” another might say.

    Those days are quickly fading, along with the barriers that used to separate platform and infrastructure technologies. Instead, we are moving toward a world of containers, multiple instances of virtual machines, and multiple operating systems working in tandem. This is especially true in data centers, and open source tools are helping to drive the trend.

    There is a pronounced need for ways to run applications on multiple types of infrastructure, ranging from bare metal to virtual machines to containers to the cloud. That’s where Habitat comes in. It’s an open source project focused on “automation that travels with the application.” It has pedigree, too. Habitat comes from the makers of the venerable configuration management and automation platform Chef, which, like Puppet, has helped to optimize many heterogeneous technology environments.

  • KDE Arrives in Berlin, Elects Thomas Pfeiffer to the e.V. Board

    Today KDE has been arriving in Berlin for Akademy, our annual meeting, which is year is part of the larger QtCon conference. This year we are teaming up with KDAB to gather together with the wider community of Qt developers for the first time, which is a major opportunity to share experiences between the open source and the commercial worlds. Also at the gathering are the VLC developers. VLC is one of the most successful open source projects successfully reaching out to users on all platforms and is a project we have long cooperated with. And the Free Software Foundation Europe will be brining the important political edge to our talks.

  • Kubuntu-16.04 and updates

    I installed kubuntu-16.04 in April. Although I don’t use it much, I occasionally boot into it to check a few things. Whenever I booted into Kubuntu, I looked to see if the update applet was notifying me of updates. I left the system running for an hour or more, to give it plenty of time to find out.s

  • GTK Developers Continue Firming Up Their Long-Term Toolkit Plans

    Earlier this summer at a hackfest of GTK+ developers they came up with a plan for GTK4 and beyond with reworking how they'll do long-term stable releases. With GNOME/GTK+ 3.22 approaching, they are firming up their plans.

    Being published today via the GTK+ blog is Versioning and long term stability promise in GTK+. Hit that up if you want all the details about it.

  • Nautilus 3.22 Adds Batch File Renaming, Native Compression Features

    There are plenty of new and improved features to enjoy in Nautilus 3.22, which is on course to ship as part of GNOME 3.22 late next month.

  • Tumbleweed Enhances Encryption, has Massive Updates

    openSUSE users are at no loss for getting new software as this week the rolling distribution Tumbleweed had several snapshot releases and there was a beta release for openSUSE Leap 42.2.

    openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed, which was originally created by Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman, had six snapshots two weeks ago and four last week. This week we will look at another six snapshots.

  • Red Hat Takes Aim at VMware With RHV

    Although VMware and Red Hat might have seemed to be best buddies at last week's LinuxCon, this week it's become obvious that Red Hat is locked and loaded and has VMware in its sites. During a week when the suits at the virtualization company would doubtlessly like attention focused on Las Vegas and its VMWorld 2016 users' conference, Red Hat has been stealing the headlines on just about every major tech site with news of its own virtualization products.

  • Crash test dummy? Love the excitement of breaking an OS? Fedora 25 Alpha has landed

    If you're a chronic complainer and nit-picker with a spare machine and a willingness to suffer multiple crashes, weird screen artefacts and possible data loss: Fedora 25's alpha has landed ahead of its anticipated November 2016 release.

    If you want to help the developers by breaking stuff, don't risk dual-boot on OS X if you've got live data, because this known bug is a treat:

    “The installer appears to support volume shrink for OS X volumes (Apple Core Storage) by offering a Shrink button and sizing slider in Automatic partitioning; and likewise allow numeric resizing in Manual partitioning. However, setting the installer to resize these volumes and proceeding with installation will result in complete data loss of the volume. Resize the volume in OS X's Disk Utility to create free space before proceeding with the installation of Fedora.”

  • Linaro Announces First Development Board Compliant with 96Boards TV Platform Specification

    Linaro Ltd, the collaborative engineering organization developing open source software for the ARM® architecture, today announced support for the HiSilicon ‘Poplar’ board – the first development board compliant with the 96Boards Enterprise Edition TV Platform specification. The board is the latest addition to the 96Boards family, the open specification defining a platform for the delivery of low-cost 32-bit and 64-bit ARM ecosystem developer boards. It is available to purchase for under $100 from Tocoding Technologies.

  • HiSilicon's Poplar Is The First Linaro 96Boards EE TV Platform

    Linaro has announced the first development board that supports their 96Boards' Enterprise Edition TV Platform specification.

    The HiSilicon Poplar development board is their first TV Platform compliant product and targets set-top box developers and hobbyists. The Poplar dev board is powered by a Hi3798C V200 SoC that packs in a quad-core 64-bit Cortex-A53 processor and Mali T720 for graphics. The Poplar board costs $79 USD or closer to $100 when factoring in shipping.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Bill Pollock Publishes Books About Linux and Open Source

    Meet Bill Pollock, founder, CEO and chief editor of No Starch Press, who loves to put out books about Linux and Open Source for reasons he explains in the interview. But No Starch also publishes books about Legos, security, and a lot of other, seemingly unrelated topics that fall at least broadly under the “geek interest” label. Interested in hacking cars, teaching electronics to kids or showing an older friend or relative how to use Facebook? No Starch has you covered. Want to write a book? Pollock doesn’t publish a lot of titles, but you never know. He’s open to almost anything interesting about Linux and Open Source — and interested, if less so (for reasons he explains in the interview) in titles about proprietary software. FYI, Pollock is a Linux user himself, and does most of his editing with LibreOffice, so he has unimpeachable personal Open Source credentials.

  • Multiload-ng 1.2.0 Released With Color Schemes Support, More

    Multiload-ng, a graphical system monitor for Xfce, LXDE, and MATE panels, was updated to version 1.2.0 recently, getting color schemes support, a redesigned preferences window, and more.

  • Installing BlackArch Linux on a Raspberry Pi
  • Jarvis, Please Lock the Front Door
  • Jose Dieguez Castro's Introduction to Linux Distros (Apress)
  • Some Quick Basic Gaming Tests With Wine/Wine-Staging vs. Linux vs. Windows

    With having just wrapped up the Windows 10 vs. Linux Radeon Software Performance benchmarking roundabout, I decided to run some very quick tests with Wine and Wine-Staging while gauging interest to run a larger Wine comparison.

    After finishing up the AMD tests for the multi-OS/driver comparison, I installed Wine 1.9.17 followed by Wine-Staging 1.9.17 on the Ubuntu system while using the latest open-source Radeon driver (Linux 4.8 + Mesa 12.1-dev) and carried out some basic tests. Of the games I ran for the earlier article, I just chose The Talos Principle and Tomb Raider for now to gauge interest and because they ran cleanly out-of-the-box with Steam on Wine without having to deal with any hacks or extra steps... Tests were done with the Radeon R9 Fury.

  • Enlightenment 0.21.2 Desktop Environment Adds Wayland Support for EFL 1.18.0

    A new maintenance update of the lightweight Enlightenment open-source desktop environment has been released recently for Linux kernel-based operating systems, namely version 0.21.2.

    As you might have already guessed, Enlightenment 0.21.2 is the second point release in the stable 0.21 series of the graphical desktop environment used in various GNU/Linux distributions, and it promises to address more than 30 reported issues, but also to add various much-needed improvements to keep it stable and reliable. All the details about the new changes are available for your reading pleasure at the end of the article.

  • Fedora 25 Alpha Linux distro now available
  • First draft Norwegian Bokmål edition of The Debian Administrator's Handbook now public
  • My work for Debian in August
  • DANE and DNSSEC Monitoring

    At this year's FrOSCon I repeted my presentation on DNSSEC. In the audience, there was the suggestion of a lack of proper monitoring plugins for a DANE and DNSSEC infrastructure that was easily available. As I already had some personal tools around and some spare time to burn I've just started a repository with some useful tools. It's available on my website and has mirrors on Gitlab and Github. I intent to keep this repository up-to-date with my personal requirements (which also means adding a xmpp check soon) and am happy to take any contributions (either by mail or as "pull requests" on one of the two mirrors). It currently has smtp (both ssmtp and starttls) and https support as well as support for checking valid DNSSEC configuration of a zone.

  • Next-gen TV STB platform runs Android on quad-core Cortex-A53

    The “Poplar Board,” based on HiSilicon’s quad-core Hi3798C V200 SoC, is the first SBC to implement Linaro’s “96Boards Enterprise Edition TV Platform” spec.

    The “under $100” Poplar Board is aimed primarily at Internet connected TV set-top box (STB) developers, but it also targets hobbyists and the open-source community, according to HiSilicon’s announcement. The SBC, which is the first to adopt Linaro’s “96Boards Enterprise Edition TV Platform” form-factor specifications, was developed for use in “Digital Home applications including Digital TV and Set Top Boxes,” says HiSilicon.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Romp Home with these 21 Peerless ASCII Games

    Linux has a raft of open source games. The vast majority of these games are atheistically pleasing. Popular games often have full motion video, vector graphics, 3D graphics, realistic 3D rendering, animation, texturing, a physics engine, and much more. Computer graphics have been advancing at a staggering pace. At the current rate of progress, in the next 10 years it may not be possible to distinguish computer graphics from reality.

    Early computer games did not have these graphic techniques. The earliest video games were text games or text-based games that used text characters rather than vector or bitmapped graphics.

    Text-based games are often forgotten and neglected. However, there are many ASCII gems out there waiting to be explored which are immensely addictive and great fun to play. The developers' works featured in this article focus on content and fun gameplay.

  • GNOME's Mutter 3.21.91 Brings Wayland Improvements

    Florian Müllner announced the release today of Mutter 3.21.91, the near-final version of this compositing window manager and Wayland compositor for the upcoming GNOME 3.22 desktop.

  • Red Hat CEO: Taking Open Source Beyond the Data Center

    When Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst spoke at LinuxCon last week, he hardly mentioned RHEL or the company's stack. Instead, he focused almost entirely on Linux in general and the open source development model in particular. This wasn't a surprise, as there probably isn't an organization on the planet with a deeper understanding of open source methodology and its potential. It's how it built free software into a $2 billion business.

    Most people familiar with Red Hat know the company's broader vision for open source -- sometimes referred to as "the open source way" -- goes beyond software, so it also wasn't much of a surprise when Whitehurst's talk strayed from data centers and workstations and into areas not normally associated with IT at all.

  • Ubuntu 16.10 Wallpaper Contest Is Now Open For Entries

    Doors have opened on the Ubuntu 16.10 Wallpaper Contest.

    Few desktop operating systems offer amateur and professional illustrators, photographers and graphic designers the chance to have their artwork seen by millions of people around the world.

    But then, Ubuntu isn’t your average operating system!

  • Compact, rugged Skylake computer-on-module is big on PCIe

    Kontron’s Linux-ready “COMe-cSL6” COM Express Compact Type 6 module offers 10 PCIe lanes, up to 24GB RAM and 32GB eMMC, and industrial temperature support.

  • Credit card-sized module runs Linux on Braswell

    Axiomtek’s credit card-sized “CEM300” module runs Linux on Intel Braswell SoCs at 4-6W TDP and offers HD graphics, dual SATA III ports, and four PCIe lanes.

    Like Axiomtek’s Atom E3800 “Bay Trail” based CEM846 computer-on-module, its new CEM300 supports Linux and Windows, and uses the 84 x 55mm COM Express Type 10 Mini form factor. The CEM300 advances to 14nm Intel Braswell SoCs, which offer much improved Intel HD Graphics Gen8, while reducing TDPs to a 4W to 6W range. Supported models include the quad-core 1.6GHz (2.4GHz burst) Pentium N3700, the quad-core Celeron N3160, and the dual-core Celeron N3060.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How fast is KVM? Host vs virtual machine performance!
  • Kernel maintenance, Brillo style
    Brillo, he said, is a software stack for the Internet of things based on the Android system. These deployments bring a number of challenges, starting with the need to support a different sort of hardware than Android normally runs on; target devices may have no display or input devices, but might well have "fun buses" to drive interesting peripherals. The mix of vendors interested in this area is different; handset vendors are present, but many more traditional embedded vendors can also be found there. Brillo is still in an early state of development.
  • Reviewing Project Management Service `Wrike` And Seems Interesting
    I have been testing some services for our project and found this amazing service, thought why not share it with you guys, it might be useful for you. Project management is a term that in some respects appears common, yet in practice still seems to be limited to large companies. While this may be true, the foundations of project management are actually rather simple and can be adopted by anyone, in any industry. One of the major requirements you need to consider when selecting a good project management software is the ability to run and operate it on the go via your mobile devices. Other factors include the ability to access the software from any platform whether it be Linux, Mac, or Windows. This can be achieved when the project management software is web-based. Wrike is a software that does of all this.
  • World Wine News Issue 403
  • OSVR on Steam, Unity drops legacy OpenGL, and more gaming news
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest 2016
    This November from Friday 25 to Sunday 27 was held in Berlin the GNOME Core Apps Hackfest. My focus during this hackfest was to start implementing a widget for the series view of the Videos application, following a mockup by Allan Day.
  • Worth Watching: What Will Happen to Red Hat Inc Next? The Stock Just Declined A Lot
  • Vetr Inc. Lowers Red Hat Inc. (RHT) to Buy
  • Redshift functionality on Fedora 25 (GNOME + Wayland). Yes, it's possible!
    For those who can't live without screen colour shifting technology such as Redshift or f.lux, myself being one of them, using Wayland did pose the challenge of having these existing tools not working with the Xorg replacement. Thankfully, all is not lost and it is possible even right now. Thanks to a copr repo, it's particularly easy on Fedora 25. One of the changes that comes with Wayland is there is currently no way for third-party apps to modify screen gamma curves. Therefore, no redshift apps, such as Redshift itself (which I recently covered here) will work while running under Wayland.
  • My Free Software Activities in November 2016
  • Google's ambitious smartwatch vision is failing to materialise
    In February this year, Google's smartwatch boss painted me a rosy picture of the future of wearable technology. The wrist is, David Singleton said, "the ideal place for the power of Google to help people with their lives."
  • Giving Thanks (along with a Shipping Update)
    Mycroft will soon be available as a pre-built Raspberry Pi 3 image for any hobbyist to use. The new backend we have been quietly building is emerging from beta, making the configuration and management of you devices simple. We are forming partnerships to get Mycroft onto laptops, desktops and other devices in the world. Mycroft will soon be speaking to you throughout your day.
  • App: Ixigo Indian Rail Train PNR Status for Tizen Smart Phones
    Going on a train journey in India? Ixigo will check the PNR status, the train arrival and departure & how many of the particular tickets are left that you can purchase. You can also do a PNR status check to make sure that your seat is booked and confirmed.

Networking and Servers

  • How We Knew It Was Time to Leave the Cloud
    In my last infrastructure update, I documented our challenges with storage as GitLab scales. We built a CephFS cluster to tackle both the capacity and performance issues of NFS and decided to replace PostgreSQL standard Vacuum with the pg_repack extension. Now, we're feeling the pain of running a high performance distributed filesystem on the cloud.
  • Hype Driven Development
  • SysAdmins Arena in a nutshell
    Sysadmins can use the product to improve their skills or prepare for an interview by practicing some day to day job scenarios. There is an invitation list opened for the first testers of the product.

Desktop GNU/Linux

  • PINEBOOK Latest News: Affordable Linux Laptop at Only $89 Made by Raspberry Pi Rival, PINE
    PINE, the rival company of Raspberry Pi and maker of the $20 Pine A64, has just announced its two below $100-priced Linux laptops, known as PINEBOOK. The affordable Linux laptop is powered by Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 64-bit processor and comes with an 11.6" or 14" monitor.
  • Some thoughts about options for light Unix laptops
    I have an odd confession: sometimes I feel (irrationally) embarrassed that despite being a computer person, I don't have a laptop. Everyone else seems to have one, yet here I am, clearly behind the times, clinging to a desktop-only setup. At times like this I naturally wind up considering the issue of what laptop I might get if I was going to get one, and after my recent exposure to a Chromebook I've been thinking about this once again. I'll never be someone who uses a laptop by itself as my only computer, so I'm not interested in a giant laptop with a giant display; giant displays are one of the things that the desktop is for. Based on my experiences so far I think that a roughly 13" laptop is at the sweet spot of a display that's big enough without things being too big, and I would like something that's nicely portable.
  • What is HiDPI and Why Does it Matter?

Google and Mozilla

  • Google Rolls Out Continuous Fuzzing Service For Open Source Software
    Google has launched a new project for continuously testing open source software for security vulnerabilities. The company's new OSS-Fuzz service is available in beta starting this week, but at least initially it will only be available for open source projects that have a very large user base or are critical to global IT infrastructure.
  • Mozilla is doing well financially (2015)
    Mozilla announced a major change in November 2014 in regards to the company's main revenue stream. The organization had a contract with Google in 2014 and before that had Google pay Mozilla money for being the default search engine in the Firefox web browser. This deal was Mozilla's main source of revenue, about 329 million US Dollars in 2014. The change saw Mozilla broker deals with search providers instead for certain regions of the world.