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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Google is Now a Platinum Member of The Linux Foundation

    oogle is now a Platinum member of The Linux Foundation. A long-time member of the non-profit organisation, Google has chosen to increase the amount of money it donates to the foundation from $100k a year to a massive $500k.

  • Coming Up: GUADEC 2018, Annual Report 2017 & Release Video 3.30

    GUADEC is coming up and I’m super excited for it! My hand luggage will be packed with socks and I plan on becoming a red shirt again this year, as is tradition. I can recommend volunteering to anyone who has tried attending GUADEC before, it is an excellent way to get to know some fellow conference attendees.

  • Your Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure questions answered

    In mid-2017, Red Hat Inc. entered the HCI market with the Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure platform. Using the existing open source software in the Red Hat playbook, the company crafted a suite of products that enables customers to deploy HCI on existing hardware or hardware purchased specifically for a Red Hat HCI implementation.

    [...]

    One thing Red Hat has going for it is that its customer base is used to using open source software, including the company's own Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) OS. So, the benefit of easier management that comes with HCI appliances is less important than it might be to organizations not using Red Hat's products already.

  • Biz: How Red Hat's CEO's pay compares to his employees
  • Samsung Galaxy S9, Galaxy S8 & Note 8 Approved by the U.S. Department of Defense

    South Korean Samsung electronics company announced that several of its flagship devices have been recently approved by the Department of Defense (DoD) of the United States of America.

    The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) added the Samsung Galaxy S9, Samsung Galaxy S8, and Samsung Galaxy Note 8 smartphones running the Android 8.0 Oreo mobile operating system to the Approved Products List (APL), ensuring customers in the United States that these devices are safe to use for communication and everything else they need.

  • Firefox 61 for Android Fixes Recurring Crash on Samsung Galaxy S8 with Android 8

    Mozilla released the Firefox 61 web browser this week for desktops, including Windows, Linux, and Mac computers, but also for Android devices to bring better browsing for those who are always on the go.

    Firefox 61 for Android isn’t a major release, but a small maintenance update that brings a couple of performance improvements like faster scrolling by implementing a new functionality that treats touch event listeners as passive by default, and better page rendering times by improving the Quantum CSS component.

  • Deploy a VM in Amsterdam
  • Three Things Exciting Clear Linux Developers With GCC 8

    While Intel's Clear Linux platform has already been making use of GCC 8.1 since shortly after its release in early May, one of their developers has now published a blog post highlighting three performance and security features enjoyed and that helps benefit their performance-oriented Linux distribution.

    Victor Rodriguez Bahena of Intel wrote a blog post this week outlining three GCC 8 compiler improvements he finds important. Those features include improvements to interprocedural optimizations, Intel Control-flow Enforcement Technology (CET), and changes to loop nest optimization flags. The first and last items benefit the GCC performance of generated binaries while CET helps with security.

  • Rediscovering blindness products

    While in the early 2000s, cell phones were still mainly made accessible by specialized software, for example Talks or MobileSpeak for the Nokia S60 platform, or special devices such as the PAC Mate were created to bring mainstream operating systems onto special hardware with a screen reader added, the advance of iPhone and Android devices in the late 2000s brought a revolution for blind and visually impaired people. For the first time, accessibility was being built into the platform, and no special software or hardware was needed to operate these devices.

    [...]

    All good, or what? Well, I thought so, for a long time, too. I even sold some blindness-related products such as my first generation Victor Reader Stream by Humanware because I thought my iPhone and iPad could now fulfill all my needs. And for the most part, they do, but at a cost.

    And that cost is not, in most cases, technical in nature, but rather has to do with the sheer fact that the device I am running the app on is a mainstream device. Many of these problems are, in one form or another, also applicable to people who aren’t blind, but might impact them less than they do me.

    [...]

    One other problem that keeps me always on the edge when using mainstream devices are screen reader inconsistencies and inaccessible apps or websites. Any update to an app can break accessibility, any update to the OS can break certain screen reader behavior, or web content I might need or have to consume at a particular moment can prove to be inaccessible, requiring me to either fiddle around with screen reader tricks to kick it into obedience, or simply not being able to get something done at all. Yes, despite all web accessibility efforts, this is still more often the case in 2018 than any of us could want.

  • New macOS Cyberattack Focuses on Cryptocurrency Investors

    Digital criminals who are using a piece of macOS-based malware called OSX.Dummy seem to be targeting a group of cryptocurrency investors who use Discord as well as those who use Slack. OSX.Dummy isn’t a particularly sophisticated piece of software, but it does seem to allow arbitrary code execution on machines that it can get embedded into.

  • #BetaNews20 Giveaway: System76 Linux computer seller swag kit

    Today is July 1, meaning BetaNews' month-long birthday celebration is officially over. We still have some active giveaways, however -- be sure to use the below links to enter them.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Microsoft quietly cuts off Win7 support for older Intel computers

    If you have a Pentium III, for example, you may no longer be able to install Win7 Monthly Rollups or Security-only patches, in spite of Microsoft's promise to support you until January 2020. It’s all about SSE2 and some retroactively fudged documentation. Will anybody notice?

  • Tracy Rosenberg on ICE’s Corporate Collaborators, Patty Lovera on the Undercovered Farm Bill

    This week on CounterSpin: “As a company, Microsoft is dismayed by the forcible separation of children from their families at the border,” the global tech company declared in a statement. “Family unification has been a fundamental tenet of American policy and law since the end of World War II.” The same Microsoft bragged a few months ago about ICE’s use of its Azure cloud computing services to “accelerate facial recognition and identification” of immigrants, though the post has since been altered to omit the phrase “we’re proud to support this work with our mission-critical cloud.”

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Announced As a Modular Operating System for Businesses

    SUSE announced the release of the long-anticipated SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 operating system for businesses and organizations of all sizes, bringing new features, updated components, and state-of-the-art GNU/Linux technologies.

  • Fedora To Deprecate YUM in Fedora 29 Release

    Many Linux users familiar with Fedora, CentOS, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux are familiar with YUM, but are oblivious to its origins in the much lesser known Yellowdog Linux, a now discontinued PowerPC variant of CentOS. And now, it seems, YUM is heading in the same direction.

  • Fourth GSoC Report

    As announced in the last report, i started looking into SSO solutions and evaluated and tested them. At the begining my focus was on SAML integration, but i soon realized that OAuth2 would be more important.

    I started with installing Lemonldap-NG. LL-NG is a WebSSO solution writting in perl that uses ModPerl or FastCGI for delivering Webcontent. There is a Debian package in stable, so the installation was no problem at all. The configuration was a bit harder, as LL-NG has a complex architecture with different vhosts. But after some fiddling i managed to connect the installation to our test LDAP instance and was able to authenticate against the LL-NG portal. Then i started to research how to integrate an OAuth2 client. For the tests i had on the one hand a gitlab installation that i tried to connect to the OAuth2 providers using the omniauth-oauth2-generic strategy. To have a bit more fine grained control over the OAuth2 client configuration i also used the python requests-oauthlib module and modified the web app example from their documentation to my needs. After some fiddling and a bit of back and forth on the lemonldap-ng mailinglist i managed both test clients to authenticate against LL-NG.

  • Automation & Risk

    Linaro created the LAVA (Linaro Automated Validation Architecture) project in 2010 to automate testing of software using real hardware. Over the seven years of automation in Linaro so far, LAVA has also spread into other labs across the world. Millions of test jobs have been run, across over one hundred different types of devices, ARM, x86 and emulated. Varied primary boot methods have been used alone or in combination, including U-Boot, UEFI, Fastboot, IoT, PXE. The Linaro lab itself has supported over 150 devices, covering more than 40 different device types. Major developments within LAVA include MultiNode and VLAN support. As a result of this data, the LAVA team have identified a series of automated testing failures which can be traced to decisions made during hardware design or firmware development. The hardest part of the development of LAVA has always been integrating new device types, arising from issues with hardware design and firmware implementations. There are a range of issues with automating new hardware and the experience of the LAVA lab and software teams has highlighted areas where decisions at the hardware design stage have delayed deployment of automation or made the task of triage of automation failures much harder than necessary.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Investors Jumping Ship on Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Callon Petroleum Company (CPE)
  • Thrivent Financial For Lutherans Trimmed Its Red Hat INC (RHT) Holding as Valuation Rose
  • Today’s Brokerage Rating: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Visa Inc. (V)
  • Microsoft has another crack at fixing Chrome problems in Windows 10

    The Windows 10 April 2018 Update (aka 1803) broke Google's Chrome browser in some configurations and while subsequent patches stabilised the troubled operating system, issues have lingered on.

  • A MongoDB Secret Weapon: Aggregation Pipeline

    MongoDB is best known for creating a document database that Web and mobile developers love to use. But developers and analysts alike may be interested in a little-known MongoDB feature called the aggregation pipeline. What’s more, the aggregation pipeline just got easier to use with MongoDB 4.0.

    The aggregation pipeline presents a powerful abstraction for working with and analyzing data stored in the MongoDB database. According to MongoDB CTO and co-founder Eliot Horowitz, the composability of the aggregation pipeline is one of the keys to its power.

  • eLife Trialing Radical New Approach To Peer Review

    eLife, an online publisher of research in the life and biomedical sciences, is trialing a radical new approach to peer review to increase editorial transparency and promote more efficient access to innovative new research.

    According to the eLife website, “Having free and open access to the outcomes of research helps make achievements more visible, accessible and usable – ultimately accelerating discoveries and their applications.”

  • To stop another Ebola outbreak, science went open source (How science beat Ebola)

    I sat still watching a stranger die. She was just 27; her breathing became erratic, nearing a standstill, her head flopped over to look at me, her eyes glazed over and her stare became distant. She died alone, at an isolation unit known as Ebola Treatment Centre (ETC) in Sierra Leone. I could not reach out to hold her hand. With no hope, no vaccine, no effective treatment, no cure, I was overwhelmed, beaten and felt desperately hopeless, spending my time helping people to die more comfortably.

    That was three years ago. Working as a medical doctor during the West African Ebola virus epidemic of 2013–2016, it was my first encounter with this virus. Ebola is one of the deadliest viruses in the world – a haemorrhagic fever known for its bloody symptoms and mortality rate of up to 90 per cent. That outbreak was the most widespread in history the history of the virus, with 28,000 known cases and more than 11,000 deaths.

  • Open Source at Coaxial Arts

    On June 19, 2018, Coaxial Arts was the venue for a program of noise, experimental music and sound. The snug downtown Los Angeles location filled up with a congenial crowd of the knowledgeable and the curious for a concert presented by the wulf titled Open Source: Anderson, Hutson, Shiroishi, Smith. An impressive array of cables, synthesizers, mixing boards, computers and radios was spread over several tables, including a large reel-to-reel tape loop. Casey Anderson, William Hutson, Stephanie Cheng Smith and Patrick Shiroishi were on hand to bring it all to life.

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Team Xecutor ‘Piracy’ Code Has DRM, Can Brick Your Nintendo Switch

     

    Hacking group Team Xecuter released a jail-breaking solution for Nintendo Switch earlier this month, opening the door to homebrew and piracy alike. However, according to a UK-based security researcher, the code contains DRM which can lock your Switch with a random password if there's an attempt to crack it for unauthorized distribution.

  • Kodi Embraces DRM to Invite Content Publishers

     

    In the present day and age, it's nearly impossible for a media distribution platform to be recognized by major content publishers without implementing DRM. This is one of the reasons why the popular Kodi media player has added "digital rights management" support in its most recent version. Several addons are already making use of this new feature, by bringing Netflix and Amazon to Kodi, for example.

  • Apple Engineers Its Own Downfall With the Macbook Pro Keyboard

    A titan of tech and industrial innovation has been laid low by a mere speck of dust. Last week, Apple quietly announced that they were extending the warranty on their flagship laptop’s keyboard to four years. As it turns out, the initial run of these keyboards, described by Jony Ive as thin, precise, and “sturdy,” has been magnificently prone to failure.

  • Apple’s Terrible Keyboards and Why Repairability Matters

    Apple is fixing busted MacBook keyboards for free, which is going to cost them money. This all could have been avoided if the keyboard were easy to repair or replace.

    As laptops become thinner repairability is compromised. Apple’s MacBook and MacBook Pro are prime examples, and the keyboard issues show why this is a problem.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Amazon Launches WorkSpaces Desktop for Linux 2

    Amazon Linux WorkSpaces Desktop is now available on Amazon Linux 2.

    Amazon has launched WorkSpaces on its own Linux server operating system that runs on Amazon Web Services (AWS).

    The Amazon Linux WorkSpaces Desktop is based on the MATE desktop environment where it uses traditional metaphors for Linux and Unix-like operating systems (OS).

  • Cooking with Linux (without a Net): Too Many Virtual Machines, i3 and ArcoLinux Redux

    On this week's "Cooking with Linux (without a Net)" show, Marcel learns, in as much as he can learn anything, that you can try to do too many things at once—especially when those things really don't all want to happen at the same time. Before I continue, let me point out that this is a recording of a live show that takes place every Tuesday at 12 noon, Eastern time. We cover lots of different ways to virtualize including VirtualBox, command-line kvm, the dangers of not getting permission, AQemu, GNOME boxes, virt-manager, Xen and lots more. We also give ArcoLinux another shot and in that process, bite off a desktop environment that Marcel knows nothing about, i3.

  • Episode 30 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we take a look at some Distro News with Peppermint 9, Devuan 2.0, GeckoLinux which is based on openSUSE Leap 15 and then we take a closer look at Linux Mint 19 which should release soon.

    New version of KDE Plasma with 5.13 and PulseAudio 12.0 have been announced. Later in the show we take a look at Ubuntu Report’s first look at the desktop metrics and a project to run WINE applications inside of Flatpaks.

  • Tencent is now a platinum member of the Linux Foundation

    Chinese tech and entertainment giant Tencent has become a platinum member of the Linux Foundation.

    Announced via a post on the latter's website, this apparently a sign of the firm's commitment to open source projects,. As part of this deal, Liu Xin, GM of Tencent's Mobile Internet Group, will be joining the organisation's board of directors.

  • Vapor IO, Packet, and the Linux Foundation Collaborate on "Open Glossary of Edge Computing"

    Vapor IO, the leading provider of edge computing infrastructure and colocation, along with Packet, the leading bare metal cloud for developers, have published the first Open Glossary of Edge Computing, and are collaborating with The Linux Foundation to create an open source project around it. Similar to Wikipedia, the Open Glossary of Edge Computing is a freely-licensed glossary, written collaboratively by the people who use it. Edge computing will play a substantial role in shaping the next-generation internet, and shared definitions will reduce confusion and accelerate innovation. By combining many viewpoints in a transparent process, the Open Glossary of Edge Computing project seeks to capture the fast-changing lexicon of edge computing, presenting it in a form usable by journalists, analysts, vendors and practitioners.

  • A few thoughts on GNOME usability

    I recently learned that GNOME developers have proposed moving the application menu off the "top black bar" and into the application window. The proposal is on the GNOME Wiki at App Menu Migration.

    The wiki has a few mockups of how the menus would appear. The top-level application menu would be presented as a "hamburger" icon, and any secondary menus would appear as a "three dots" icon.

    I have to say that I think this would improve usability. My previous usability testing shows that users prefer menus that are obviously part of the application (think "menu bar"). The application menu in the black top bar doesn't stand out as part of the application experience.

  • Suse Linux Enterprise 15 Bridges Traditional, Software-Defined Systems

    The company also released enhancements to Suse Manager 3.2, an open source IT infrastructure management solution for Linux, with improvements focused on lowering costs, improving DevOps efficiency, and easily managing large, complex deployments across IoT, cloud and container infrastructures.

    Suse Manager helps users meet management challenges created by technology advancements such as software-defined infrastructure, cloud computing and containers, according to the company.

  • [Slackware] New set of Live ISOs

    The new liveslak version 1.2.0 has a couple of updates, most related to changes in package lists and work to keep the XFCE ISO below 700 MB, but there is one update that I should mention. I have added – but have not yet tested myself – the possibility to create a configuration file “/liveslak/slackware_os.cfg” and in that file, define some of the variables you would otherwise have to set through boot commandline parameters. Those variables are:

  • X server pointer acceleration analysis - part 5

    In this post I'll describe the X server pointer acceleration for trackpoints. You will need to read Observations on trackpoint input data first to make sense of this post.

    As described in that linked post, trackpoint input data varies wildly. Combined with the options we have in the server to configure everything makes this post a bit pointless as almost every single behaviour can be changed.

  • OpenBenchmarking.org Crosses 32 Million Test/Suite Benchmark Downloads
  • Next-gen interoperability: AI, blockchain, FHIR and open source analytics

    Interoperability is the ultimate goal of healthcare information systems. Software and cloud-based services need to be able to talk to one another, to exchange clinical and administrative data to enable complete access to a patient’s record and help clinicians deliver the best possible care.

    But health IT vendors and healthcare provider organizations still have a long way to go when it comes to attaining interoperability. In the years ahead, though, progress will be made and there will be various next-generation tactics and techniques that help advance this goal.

  • Historical inventory of collaborative editors

    As with any such list, it must start with an honorable mention to the mother of all demos during which Doug Engelbart presented what is basically an exhaustive list of all possible software written since 1968. This includes not only a collaborative editor, but graphics, programming and math editor.

  • Apple aims to appease customers with free MacBook keyboard repairs

     

    Apple has admitted that its MacBook and MacBook Pro laptop keyboards made since 2015 are susceptible to becoming stuck or breaking, and is promising to repair them for free.
     

    Following a litany of user complaints across support forums, specialist media, class action lawsuits and 31,000-strong online petitions, Apple said it had determined that a “small percentage of the keyboards” were affected by the issues.

  • DRM, the World Cup, and what happens when a red team plays a green team

     

    Less than a year later, the World Cup has demonstrated how DRM thwarts accessibility: the Saudi-Russia match featured green jerseys on red jerseys -- which, for millions of people, is just "grey jerseys versus grey jerseys."  

  • Disabilities vs DRM: the World Cup Edition

    When the Russian and Saudi teams squared off in a World Cup match on June 14, many fans were treated to an enthralling football match; but for a minority of fans with a visual disability, the match was more confusing than exciting.

    You see, the Russian team wears red jerseys and the Saudi team wears green jerseys, and red/green color-blindness ("achromatic vision") is the most common form of color-blindness, a hereditary condition that affects millions. For these people, the Saudi-Russia match was the red/green team versus the red/green team in a fight to the finish.

    The good news is that color-blindness is no match for digital video analysis. Simple apps like DanKam can shift the colors in any video on your device, replacing the colors you can't see with the colors you can. For people with color-blindness, it's a profound and moving experience.

    The bad news is that technologies designed to prevent you from making unauthorized uses of videos can't discriminate between uses that break the law (like copyright infringement) and ones that accomplish socially beneficial and legitimate ends like compensating for color-blindness.

    Less than a year ago, the World Wide Web Consortium published its controversial "Encrypted Media Extensions" (EME) for video, which indiscriminately block any unauthorized alterations to videos, including color-shifting. During the long and often acrimonious fight over EME, EFF proposed a covenant for W3C members that would make them promise not to pursue legal action against people who bypassed EME to adapt videos for people with disabilities, a proposal that was rejected by the major rightsholder and technology companies, who said that they and they alone should be the arbiters of how people with disabilities could use their products.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • LinuxQuestions.org Turns Eighteen

    I'm proud to announce that LQ turned 18 today! I’d like to once again thank each and every LQ member for their participation and feedback. While there is always room for improvement, that LQ has remained a friendly and welcoming place for new Linux members despite its size is a testament to the community.

    To say that feedback has been absolutely critical to our success is an understatement. As has become tradition, I'd like to use this thread to collect as much feedback as possible about LQ. What are we doing well and where can we improve? Where are we failing? What can we do to ensure long time members remain engaged and willing to help? What can we do to ensure new members feel welcome? What should we be doing differently?

    As part of our 18 year anniversary, we'll be randomly selecting 18 posts from this thread and upgrading that member to "Contributing Member" status for one year. Stay tuned, and thanks again for being a member. Together, I think we can make LQ even better.

    --jeremy
     

  • 5 open source puzzle games for Linux

    Gaming has traditionally been one of Linux's weak points. That has changed somewhat in recent years thanks to Steam, GOG, and other efforts to bring commercial games to multiple operating systems, but those games are often not open source. Sure, the games can be played on an open source operating system, but that is not good enough for an open source purist.

  • Weekly Roundup and News – weeks 24 & 25

    For the longest time our wiki main page has been very plain and simple; our own Zalappy has designed a new look, and the modifications are almost ready! Keep watching, because it’s looking really good! Thanks to Zalappy for his artistic flair, and to apb for his hard work making it happen.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 533

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 533 for the week of June 17 – 23, 2018. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Jolla's Sailfish OS Ported To The Gemini PDA

    While the popularity of Jolla's Sailfish OS seems to be waning, if you are interested in their Linux-based, partially open-source software stack, it's now available on the Gemini PDA device.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Stable channel support for Linux Apps delayed to Chrome OS 69
  • Oracle Linux now supported on 64-bit Armv8 processors

    Oracle’s announced that the version of its GNU/Linux for Arm processors is now generally available and signalled its intentions to help “build out a very viable server/cloud platform for Arm.”

    Big Red revealed its efforts in November 2017 with the debut of an unsupported developer release of Oracle Linux 7 Update 3. Come February 2018 and the company updated the release to one based on Oracle Linux 7 update 4, again with dire warnings it was for play, not work, and had no support.

  • Lamps Plus Sheds Light On Modernization Integration

    Discussions about modernization continue to tie top management in knots. Questions about the time, the effort, and the risks to the business are difficult to answer with precision, so organizations habitually focus on obstacles rather than opportunities.

    “If you stay in that mindset, you will never move,” says Derrick Lindsey, a modernization project lead at Lamps Plus, the nation’s largest specialty lighting retailer and a leading manufacturer of lighting and home furnishings. “There’s a lot less risk in modernizing existing applications on the IBM i than migrating off of the IBM i platform to other platforms such as Unix, Linux, or Windows servers, and this approach has proved beneficial for us.”

    There’s been a modernization initiative at Lamps Plus for the past six years. It’s involved the use of service programs, exportable functions/procedures, SQL views and SQL global variables leading to modular programming with reusable business logic that’s decoupled from executable programs. It has no conclusion. No modernization initiative does. But it’s had and continues to have phases with goals for completion.

  • Open source jobs report: 3 hot skill areas now
  • Patches Revised Taking RadeonSI OpenGL Compatibility Profile To v4.0

    -
    After getting the RadeonSI OpenGL compatibility profile support to GL 3.3, Valve's Timothy Arceri has been working on OpenGL 4.4 compatibility profile support. However, with one of those extensions taking a while to wire up, for now he sent out the patches bumping the support to OpenGL 4.0 under this compatibility mode.

    See the earlier articles if you are unfamiliar with the OpenGL compatibility profile mode as an alternative to the OpenGL core context in order to make use of deprecated GL functionality while still using modern versions of OpenGL.

  • SDL2 Wayland Now Supports XDG Shell's XDG_WM_Base

    The SDL2 library has revised its XDG Shell unstable code into offering xdg-wm-base support from the stable XDG Shell protocol.

    The "xdg_wm_base" interface is for creating desktop-style surfaces with spinning Wayland surfaces (wl_surfaces) into windows in a desktop environment that can be dragged, resized, maximized, etc. It's documented in full via wayland-protocols.

  • FogChain’s RadJav Platform Provides Full Linux Support
  • Enea to Demo Unique Linux Real-Time Acceleration at Mobile World Congress Shanghai
  • Interview with Natasa

    First of all it has an Animation Studio included, I haven’t done 2D animation in years and now I can do it at home, on my PC. Yay! The brush engine is second to none quite frankly and yes I’ve tried more than Krita before I reach that conclusion. I love the mirror tools, the eraser system and that little colour pick up docker where you can attach your favorite brushes as well. Love that little bugger, so practical. Oh and the pattern tool.

  • Skrooge 2.14.0 released

    The Skrooge Team announces the release 2.14.0 version of its popular Personal Finances Manager based on KDE Frameworks.

  • Arch-Based Manjaro 18.0 Beta 3 Available For Testing

    For fans of the Arch-based Manjaro Linux distribution, the third beta of their next major update is now available for evaluation.

    Manjaro 18.0 Beta 3 in its default Xfce flavor is available as of today. This third beta offers updated themes, the latest Pamac, an updated version of the Calamares installer, and updated Xfce packages. Manjaro 18.0 is currently relying upon the latest point release of the Linux 4.16 kernel.

  • Debian 8.11 Has Been Released | The Last Maintenance Release For Debian 8 (Jessie)

    The last maintenance for the long term support release Debian 8.11 (Jessie) has been released. Debian 8.11 brings several bug fixes and resolved various security issues. Check the release notes and update instructions down below.

    Debian 8.11 received tons of updates addressing security issues for many packages such as Mozilla Firefox, Mozilla Thunderbird, Asterisk for VOIP services, curl, PHP 5, Bind 9, Exim, LibreOffice, Apache2, and more. Linux Kernel has been updated as well Linux 3.16.56-1. ClamAV definitions database have been updated.

    Debian 8 (Jessie) is expected to reach end of life by June 30, 2020 as per the long term support program and it could be support by the extended long term support program for commercial usage.

  • Canonical: Two-thirds of Ubuntu 18.04 users agreed to data collection

    IT APPEARS that there are still some tech companies that we trust.

    In the first report since Ubuntu first started requesting analytics, maker Canonical has revealed that most users have opted in - and the results are interesting.

    67 per cent have decided that Canonical is OK to collect their data from Ubuntu 18.04 LTE (desktop version only). Given that many people choose Linux to have more control over their privacy, this seems way high and we can only assume (barring a mistake) that Ubuntu users trust Ubuntu way more than Windows users trust Microsoft.

  • WhatsApp problem on Tizen Phones, here is the Fix to get you going

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Equus WHITEBOX OPEN: A Line Of Coreboot/LinuxBoot-Ready Xeon Scalable Servers

    Equus Compute Solutions has announced the release of their new WHITEBOX OPEN server platform that is intended to be cost-optimized and an open hardware platform.

  • LKML archives on lore.kernel.org

    We collected LKML archives going as far back as 1998, and they are now all available to anyone via a simple git clone. We would like to extend our thanks to everyone who helped in this effort by donating their personal archives.

  • PulseAudio 12 Open-Source Sound System Released with AirPlay, A2DP Improvements

    PulseAudio 12.0, a major version of its open-source sound server program designed to work on a wide-range of POSIX operating systems like Linux, BSD, macOS, and others, was released with numerous improvements and new features.

    Highlights of PulseAudio 12.0 include better latency reporting with the A2DP Bluetooth profile, which also improves A/V sync, more accurate latency reporting on AirPlay devices, the ability to prioritize HDMI output over S/PDIF output, HSP support for more Bluetooth headsets, and the ability to disable input and output on macOS.

  • Welcome Window Integration in Pitivi – Part 2

    In my last post (link), I gave an overview of Welcome window integration in Pitivi. I started working on this task from the first coding day of Google Summer of Code 2018, i.e. May 14, 2018 and after one amazing month of coding it finally got merged (commit) on June 19, 2018. Apparently it was a large change consisting of 702 additions and 329 deletions (link) involving 75 code-review discussions and 29 versions. A special thanks to my mentor aleb for giving constructive reviews on my code.

  • Laura Abbott: What's a kernel devel package anyway
  • Intel’s 7th Gen NUCs Are Now “Ubuntu Certified”

    If you’ve had your eye on an Intel NUC for dev work, IoT shenanigans, or to use as an entertainment hub in the living room, you’ll be pleased to know you can install and run Ubuntu 16.04 LTS without encountering any major issues.

    Yes: I did say Ubuntu 16.04 LTS there and not Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, the most recent long-term support release. Only the Xenial Xerus is currently certified for use on these device.

  • Ubuntu Suru Icon Theme Now Covers More Filetypes

    As you may know, developers plan to revamp the look and feel of Ubuntu for its next release by shipping the new Communitheme GTK and GNOME Shell theme and the new Suru icon set by default.

  • Toyota Research Institute supports development of open-source automated driving simulator

    Toyota Research Institute (TRI) is furthering its support of open source platforms by donating $100,000 to the Computer Vision Center (CVC) to accelerate its development of an open source simulator for automated driving, Car Learning to Act (CARLA).

    “Technological advances and growth are made possible through collaboration and community support,” said Vangelis Kokkevis, director of Driving Simulation at TRI. “Fostering the development of a common open simulation platform will allow TRI and its academic and industrial partners to better exchange code, information and data.”

  • Cryptocurrencies and Blockchain Technology will Propel “Open Source” Banking

    The banking system today is a closed-source banking system. It is one that recreates every function, competes with other banks, is accountable to governments, and are driven by quarters. An open-source banking system, on the other hand, shares every function, collaborates on standards, are verifiable by people, and are incentivized by tokens.

    Burton noted one of the most significant problems with the existing banking model is the misalignment of goals. The incentives are unclear because of “back-handers, sweetheart deals, and cheeky kickbacks.”

  • EOS (EOS): Resource Planner is live, know all about the open source tool

    EOS (EOS) announced on Medium that they started working on the EOS Resource Planner three months ago and finally the network is now live. They have finished with the MVP which can be found at https://www.eosrp.io/.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces Initial Keynotes for Open Networking Summit Europe

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the keynote speakers for Open Networking Summit Europe, taking place September 25-27 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

  • Rep of the Month – May 2018

    Please join us in congratulating Prathamesh Chavan, our Rep of the Month for May 2018!

    Prathamesh is from Pune, India and works as a Technical Support Engineer at Red Hat. From his very early days in the Mozilla community, Prathamesh used his excellect people skills to spread the community to different colleges and to evangelise many of the upcoming projects, products and Mozilla initiatives. Prathamesh is also a very resourceful person. Due to this, he did a great job at organizing some great events at Pune and creare many new Mozilla Clubs across the city there.

  • GitHub Coders to Microsoft: Cut Ties With ICE or We'll 'Take Our Projects Elsewhere'

    More than five dozen Github contributors on Thursday signed a letter threatening to abandon the website unless Microsoft canceled its Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) contract.

    Microsoft, which acquired GitHub, the internet’s largest source code repository, for $7.5 billion earlier this month, is one of several tech companies facing heat for its work on behalf of ICE as a result of the Trump administration policy of separating families at the U.S. border.

  • Moving On From Picasa

    The cross-platform, open-source GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) software is another versatile photo-editing program, but might be a little more technical than some entry-level applications. If it piques your interest, GIMP has an online user manual you can browse before downloading.

  • Bradley M. Kuhn: The Everyday Sexism That I See In My Work

    Back in 2014, Karen and I collaboratively talked about what role would make sense for her and me — and we made a choice together. We briefly considered a co-Executive Director situation, but that arrangement has been tried elsewhere and is typically not successful in the long term. Karen is much better than me at the key jobs of a successful Executive Director. Karen and I agreed she was better for the job than me. We took it to Conservancy's Board of Directors, and they moved my leadership role at Conservancy to be honorary, and we named Karen the sole Executive Director. Yes, I'm still nebulously a leader in the Free Software community (which I'm of course glad about). But for Conservancy matters, and specifically donor relations and major decisions about the organization, Karen is in charge.

    [...]

    Interestingly but disturbingly, these incidents teach how institutional sexism operates in practice. Every time I'm approached (which is often) with some subtle situation where it makes Karen look like she's not really in charge, I'm given the opportunity to pump myself up, make myself look more important, and gain more credibility and power. It is clear to me that this comes at the expense of subtly denigrating Karen and that the enticement is part of an institutionally sexist zero-sum game.

  • Goodman One is an Open-Source, 3D-Printed Analog Camera

    Dora Goodman, a maker of handcrafted cameras and straps, has released a new open source camera called the Goodman One that anyone can make if they have access to a 3D printer.

    Goodman tells PetaPixel that she has been working on the design of the Goodman One for the past two years, and she’s now working to share the camera with as many photography lovers as possible.

  • Security updates for Friday

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 6th Birthday of It’s FOSS: Win Linux Laptop, Stickers and more Gifts
  • Five Useful Features That Are On Their Way To The Chrome OS
  • HackUp is a Desktop Hacker News Client for Linux

    Avid readers of social news sharing site Hacker News might be interested in a new app recently added to Flathub.

    Called HackUp, it is a Hacker News desktop client written in Vala. It lets you browse and read Hacker News submissions without needing to open a web browser (which for a legendary procrastinator like me, is a good thing).

  • Why use Chef for automation and orchestration

    Chef has been a leading open source tool for automating the provisioning and configuration of servers for the better part of a decade. In recent years the company added InSpec and Habitat to the portfolio, open source projects that automate policy compliance testing and the deployment and configuration of applications, respectively. The company’s flagship commercial offering, Chef Automate, brings all of these pieces together.  

  • Xfdesktop 4.13.2 Released As Another Step Towards Xfce 4.14

    As another step towards the long-awaited Xfce 4.14 desktop environment release, Xfdesktop 4.13.2 is now available as the latest development release for this important piece of the Xfce desktop stack.

    Xfdesktop is the component that manages the desktop background, the pop-up list of applications, drawing icons on the desktop, etc. Xfdesktop 4.13.2 is the first development release since Xfdesktop 4.13.1 one year ago.

  • Monday Markdown

    I’ve spent the first portion of the coding period focused on improving the documentation browser for GNOME Javascript. In 2015/16 ptomato began porting GIR sources (the source of most GJS documentation) to [DevDocs.io], an open-source documentation browser, using g-ir-doc-tool in gobject-introspection. He did excellent work and produced a functioning product that now lives at [devdocs.baznga.org]. My goals were to take the current product and incorporate GNOME theming, fix issues with incorrect documentation, rebase the project on upstream, and reorient some of the project’s features to better serve an object oriented and GNOME model.

  • Refactor: Backend and UI

    Fractal is currently structured into two parts: The API part (fractal-matrix-api) and GTK part (fractal-gtk). The first one mostly just does the https calls to the Matrix server, the GTK part does everything else. This post will not talk about the API part since that will remain more or less the same (at least for now).

  • Open source board lets you analyze SPI connections on a USB-connected laptop

    Excamera Labs has launched an open source, $27 and up “SPIDriver” board on Crowd Supply for analyzing and testing SPI-connected displays, sensors, flash, and other components on a laptop or via a built-in color LCD display.

    Monitoring SPI devices such as LCD panels, LED arrays, sensors, and SPI flash may not be quite as gnarly as managing I2C gizmos, but either of these short-distance, serial data transfer protocols can be a hassle. While Arduino boards provide libraries for SPI monitoring, there’s still a lot of guesswork involved due to lack of real-time feedback about the SPI bus state.

  •  

  • Cooperative Learning

    I’ve got some under-utilised KVM servers that I could use to provide test VMs for network software, my original idea was to use those for members of my local LUG. But that doesn’t scale well. If a larger group people are to be involved they would have to run their own virtual machines, use physical hardware, or use trial accounts from VM companies.

    The general idea would be for two broad categories of sessions, ones where an expert provides a training session (assigning tasks to students and providing suggestions when they get stuck) and ones where the coordinator has no particular expertise and everyone just learns together (like “let’s all download a random BSD Unix and see how it compares to Linux”).

    [...]

    There is a Wikipedia page about Cooperative Learning. While that’s interesting I don’t think it has much relevance on what I’m trying to do. The Wikipedia article has some good information on the benefits of cooperative education and situations where it doesn’t work well. My idea is to have a self-selecting people who choose it because of their own personal goals in terms of fun and learning. So it doesn’t have to work for everyone, just for enough people to have a good group.

  • Chinese search giant Baidu creates an open-source A.I. for detecting cancer

    “We hope this open-sourced algorithm can serve as a high-quality baseline for future research in this area,” Li said. “The algorithm is only evaluated on a limited number of public datasets at this stage. However, the algorithm needs to be further assessed using much more clinically relevant data to prove it still maintains higher accuracy than experienced pathologists. Our team will continue improving the algorithm and collaborating with researchers with whom we can share new datasets.”

  • Fynd organizes Hackxagon Open Source Challenge for its Engineers

    As an initiative to give back to the open source community, Fynd, the unique fashion e-commerce portal had launched gofynd.io, a few months ago. This project enabled the engineers of the fashion e-commerce portal to learn new technologies, improve the core infrastructure and enhance the Fynd platform.

  • Netfilter Workshop 2018 Berlin summary

    Lots of interesting talks happened, mostly surrounding nftables and how to move forward from the iptables legacy world to the new, modern nft framework.

    In a nutshell, the Netfilter project, the FLOSS community driven project, has agreed to consider iptables as a legacy tool. This confidence comes from the maturity of the nftables framework, which is fairly fully-compliant with the old iptables API, including extensions (matches and targets).

  • Using W10Privacy To Boost Ubuntu WSL Performance On Windows 10
  • Get the latest in libre from the FSF Bulletin

    The biannual Free Software Foundation (FSF) Bulletin is now available online. We hope you find it enlightening and entertaining!

  • Introducing PyInstaller

    If you're used to working with a compiled language, the notion that you would need to have a programming language around, not just for development but also for running an application, seems a bit weird. Just because a program was written in C doesn't mean you need a C compiler in order to run it, right?

    But of course, interpreted and byte-compiled languages do require the original language, or a version of it, in order to run. True, Java programs are compiled, but they're compiled into bytecodes then executed by the JVM. Similarly, .NET programs cannot run unless the CLR is present.

    Even so, many of the students in my Python courses are surprised to discover that if you want to run a Python program, you need to have the Python language installed. If you're running Linux, this isn't a problem. Python has come with every distribution I've used since 1995. Sometimes the Python version isn't as modern as I'd like, but the notion of "this computer can't run Python programs" isn't something I've had to deal with very often.

  • Demoting multi-factor authentication

    Authentication was done via a Java applet, as there needs to be a verifiably(?)-secure way to ensure the certificate was properly checked at the client without transfering it over the network. Good thing!

    [...]

    Anyway I accepted, as losing so much time to grade is just too much. And... Yes, many people will be happy. Partly, I'm releieved by this (I have managed to hate Java for over 20 years). I am just saddened by the fact we have lost an almost-decent-enough electronic signature implementation and fallen back to just a user-password scheme. There are many ways to do crypto verification on the client side nowadays; I know JavaScript is sandboxed and cannot escape to touch my filesystem, but... It is amazing we are losing this simple and proven use case.

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More in Tux Machines

Vista 10: Embrace, Now Extend

  • WLinux: Windows 10 Gets Its Own Exclusive Linux Distro
    Ubuntu, Debian, and Kali are some of the popular Linux distros available out there for Windows Subsystem for Linux. But, most of these distros contain packages that are irrelevant to WSL and lack development tools. How about a distro that is optimized specially for Windows 10?
  • New Linux Distro Created Specifically for Windows 10
    The Windows Subsystem for Linux allows users to run Linux distributions on top of Windows 10, and at this point, there are already several choices for users who want to try out this feature. In addition to Ubuntu, Debian, and Kali, beginning today, Windows 10 adopters are provided with a new Linux distro that’s specifically optimized for the WSL. Called WLinux, this new Linux distro is focused on the packages that are relevant to WSL, as well as the customizations to take full advantage of this Windows 10 feature.

Review: Bodhi Linux 5.0.0

Sometimes when reviewing an operating system it is difficult to separate the question "Is this a good distribution?" from "Is this a good distribution for me?" Bodhi is one of those projects where the answers to these questions are quite different, mostly over matters of style rather than functionality. On a personal level, I don't think I would ever be inclined to use Bodhi myself because I don't like the Moksha/Enlightenment style of desktop. It does a lot of little things differently (not badly, just differently) from other open source desktops and its style is not one I ever seem to find comfortable. This, combined with the streamlined, web-based AppCenter and unusual settings panel, makes Bodhi a distribution which always feels a bit alien to me. Let's put aside my personal style preferences though and try to look at the distribution objectively. Bodhi is trying to provide a lightweight, visually attractive distribution with a wide range of hardware support. It manages to do all of these things and do them well. The distribution is paying special attention to lower-end hardware, including 32-bit systems, and maintains a remarkably small memory footprint given the amount of functionality and eye candy included. Most lightweight distributions sacrifice quite a bit visually in order to provide the lightest interface possible, but Bodhi does a nice job of balancing low resource requirements with an attractive desktop environment. Bodhi is pleasantly easy to install, thanks to the Ubiquity installer, has a minimal collection of software (in the main edition) that allows us to craft our own experience and, for people who need more applications out of the box, there is the AppPack edition. All of this is to say that, for me personally, I spent more time that I would have liked this week searching through settings, trying to get used to how Moksha's panel works, tracking down less popular applications and re-learning when to use right-click versus left-click on the desktop. But, objectively, I would be hard pressed to name another distribution that more elegantly offers a lightweight desktop with visual effects, or that offers such easy access to both legacy and modern hardware support. In short, I think Bodhi Linux is a good distribution for those who want to get the most performance out of their operating system without sacrificing hardware support or the appearance of the interface. There are a few little glitches here and there, but sothing show-stopping and, overall, Bodhi is a well put together distribution. Read more

Android Leftovers

5 ways to play old-school games on a Raspberry Pi

They don't make 'em like they used to, do they? Video games, I mean. Sure, there's a bit more grunt in the gear now. Princess Zelda used to be 16 pixels in each direction; there's now enough graphics power for every hair on her head. Today's processors could beat up 1988's processors in a cage-fight deathmatch without breaking a sweat. But you know what's missing? The fun. You've got a squillion and one buttons to learn just to get past the tutorial mission. There's probably a storyline, too. You shouldn't need a backstory to kill bad guys. All you need is jump and shoot. So, it's little wonder that one of the most enduring popular uses for a Raspberry Pi is to relive the 8- and 16-bit golden age of gaming in the '80s and early '90s. But where to start? Read more