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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Flock 2017, Cape Cod, Masschusetts, USA
  • ReactOS 0.4.6 Fixes Dual Boot Issues, NFS Driver Added

    ReactOS 0.4.6 is now available as the latest version of this "open-source Windows" operating system still striving for API/ABI compatibility.

  • Oracle Finally Killed Sun

    The news from the ex-Sun community jungle drums is that the January rumours were true and Oracle laid off the core talent of the Solaris and SPARC teams on Friday. That surely has to mean a maintenance-only future for the product range, especially with Solaris 12 cancelled. A classic Oracle “silent EOL”, no matter what they claim.

  • Colorado to study open source materials to lower textbook costs

    A statewide council is looking at how to increase the use of open educational resource materials in colleges to address the high cost of textbooks.

    The council plans to create a digital repository of open educational resources for colleges and to determine how those resources are used in college classrooms across the state. It will make recommendations about how to increase their use.

  • Open Source Barbot Needs Only Two Motors

    [Lukas Šidlauskas’s] Open Source Barbot project uses only two motors to actuate nine bottles using only a NEMA-17 stepper to move the tray down along the length of the console and a high-torque servo to trigger the Beaumont Metrix SL spirit measures. These barman’s bottle toppers dispense 50 ml when the button is pressed, making them (along with gravity) the perfect way to elegantly manage so many bottles. Drink selection takes place on an app, connected via Bluetooth to the Arduino Mega running the show.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Journal September 2017
  • NetMarketShare: Linux doubles market share since December 2015 [Ed: This according to a Microsoft-connected firm]

    According to the latest stats on NetMarketShare, Linux now accounts for 3.37% of the operating system market. It has more than doubled its share since December 2015 and has seen a drastic rise over the last couple of summer months. Since 2015, Windows has largely stayed around the 90% mark while macOS has dropped from a high of 8% in October 2015 down to 5.94% in August.

    NetMarketShare’s stats include data on Windows, macOS, Linux, FreeBSD and OpenBSD; it’s presumed that Chrome OS factors into the Linux statistics because it runs the Linux kernel. Suppose that Chrome OS is included, this would explain why there has been such a bump for Linux in the month of August: It’s probably due to students or schools buying Chromebooks in time for the school year.

  • FLOSS Weekly 448: Hiawatha Web Server
  • It Doesn't Look Like A Ryzen/EPYC Thermal Driver Will Make It For Linux 4.14

    While the Ryzen CPUs have been available for a few months now and the higher-wattage Threadripper and EPYC processors are now available too, the Linux thermal driver remains missing in action and it's looking less likely that it will materialize for Linux 4.14.

    The Linux 4.14 merge window should open this weekend, unless the Linux 4.13 cycle is unexpectedly stretched by an additional week.

  • Realtek RTL8822BE Support Coming To Linux 4.14

    For those with a system containing the new Realtek RTL8822BE wireless chipset, initial support for it will be found with the upcoming Linux 4.14 LTS kernel.

    The RTL8822BE is a new ASIC from Realtek supporting 802.11ac, MU-MIMO, and Bluetooth 4.1. There are USB and PCI Express versions of this wireless adapter.

  • GNOME 3.26 Removes the Legacy System Tray — But Will You Miss It?

    GNOME 3.26 removes the legacy tray area still used by some desktops apps. We ask whether this decision is really as big of a deal as it sounds.

  • Prepare For Firefox +57 With These 10 Web Extensions

    Mozilla Firefox browser is moving to “web extensions” and is dropping support for the legacy XPCOM & XUL add-ons. This means that every single add-on you have on your browser won’t work with Firefox +57 unless it was rewritten using this new technology.

    This is bad news for a lot of us. Thousands of add-ons won’t be used anymore because of this. A lot of developers do not plan to invest more time in porting their add-ons into the new technology. However, things have to move on. Mozilla’s point of view is that it’s time to drop this legacy technology and move into more modern ways of creating add-ons.

  • The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 5.4.1 “fresh” and LibreOffice 5.3.6 “still”

    The Document Foundation (TDF) announces LibreOffice 5.4.1, the first minor release of the new LibreOffice 5.4 family, which was announced in early August, and LibreOffice 5.3.6, the sixth release of the mature LibreOffice 5.3 family, which was announced in January 2017.

    LibreOffice 5.4.1 represents the bleeding edge in term of features, and as such is targeted at technology enthusiasts and early adopters, while LibreOffice 5.3.6 is targeted at conservative users and enterprise deployments.

today's leftovers: Jobs, Kolab, Ocado, DH2i, Benchmark, Games and Linux Lite 3.6

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Misc
  • Employers Seek Open Source Expertise -- But You Should Already Know That

    The latest insight about demand for open source expertise among employers comes from the 2017 Open Source Jobs Report, which was sponsored by the Linux Foundation. Most previous iterations of the report were called the Linux Jobs Report, but they focused on the same themes.

  • Kolab for Open Power

    Among a variety of deliberations concerning the security and transparency of a little Kolab thing running anywhere — at home, rented space or hybrid cloud — this post is about the transparency of the hardware layer, and our ongoing efforts to make that so.

    We have said what, why and how on LWN, at events like FOSDEM (with a supplemental interview), at FSFE Summits, various other occasions, and perhaps your next opportunity to get acquainted with the message is at the OpenPOWER Summit in Barcelona — when I say “we”, I mean one of our most widely respected and prominent people, Georg Greve.

  • Ocado Technology's Kubermesh

    Instead of relying on servers concentrated in one large data center, the new Kubermesh is designed to simplify data-center architectures for smart factories by elegantly and cost effectively leveraging a distributed network of computing nodes spread across the enterprise. Developed by Ocado Technology, a division of Ocado (the world's largest online-only supermarket), the Kubermesh package uses container-based technology and the Kubernetes system to implement an on-premises private cloud architecture in which desktop computers can be configured as nodes supporting the compute or storage functionality typically delivered by high-performance servers in a data center.

  • DH2i Embraces Linux Containers as Enterprise Market Evolves

    DH2i is adding support for Linux-based containers to its traditionally Windows-centric container management platform, citing increased demand from enterprise customers.

    The company’s software is basically a container-as-a-service (CaaS) platform that now includes support for a broader range of container hosts. That expanded platform uses a unified interface to support various Linux-based permutations along with Microsoft container services.

  • Power Use, RAM + Boot Times With Unity, Xfce, GNOME, LXDE, Budgie & KDE Plasma

    One of the first follow-on requests from this morning's Razer Blade Stealth Linux testing was for on top of all the other data-sets shared in that article to also look at the RAM usage, battery power draw, and boot times for the different desktop options on Ubuntu 17.04. As the request came in from a Phoronix Premium supporter, I jumped on that and here are some of those numbers.

  • And Now for Something Completely Different: Broforce
  • F1 2017 reviewed: Weeks of fun for the racing fan
  • Linux Lite 3.6 Lightweight Distro Released With New Features — Download Now

    Linux Lite is often cited as one of the favorite newcomers in the overcrowded world of Linux distributions. It’s known to deliver a lightweight Linux desktop experience, coupled with a beginner-friendly working environment.

    Earlier this year in April, developers shipped Linux Lite 3.4 with Ubuntu 16.04.2 base and Linux kernel 4.4. Now, after five months of development work, Linux Lite 3.6 has been released.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Re-encoding DebConf17 videos

    Feedback we received after DebConf17 was that the quality of the released videos was rather low. Since I'd been responsible for encoding the videos, I investigated that, and found that I had used the video bitrate defaults of ffmpeg, which are rather low. So, I read some more documentation, and came up with better settings for the encoding to be done properly.

  • Internationalization, part five: documentation and release!

    This concludes all the tasks outlined by my Outreachy project, but of course not my involvement to LTSP Manager. I’ll keep using it in my schools and be an active part of its ecosystem. Many thanks to Debian Outreachy and to my mentors for the opportunity to work on this excellent project!

  • LXD Weekly Status 12
  • Bodhi Linux 4.3.0 Lightweight Operating System Released In 3 Flavors — Download Here

    The developers of Bodhi Linux have released Bodhi 4.3.0. Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, this release is powered by Linux kernel 4.11. Please note that this isn’t a feature release and the existing users don’t need to perform a re-installation. The new users can visit the project’s website and choose from 3 flavors.

  • Google’s ARCore brings augmented reality to millions of Android devices

    Google is taking a second swing at augmented reality with a new SDK called "ARCore." The SDK is available for download today (Google should have a blog post here) along with a set of ARCore demos. After experimenting with Project Tango, an AR initiative launched in 2014 that loaded a smartphone up with custom sensors, Google's AR reboot brings most of that functionality to regular old Android phones through the magic of software. If you're drawing mental comparisons to Apple's ARKit, you're on the right track.

    We're not just working off the blog post here, as I was lucky enough to have this project explained to me by some of the Googlers in charge of it. Let's start with the basics.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Distributed Systems Are Hard

    A lot of the traditional mechanisms for recovering from failure may make things worse in a distributed environment. Brute force retries may flood your network, restores from backups are not straightforward. There are design patterns for addressing all of these issues but they require thought and testing.

    If there were no errors, distributed systems would be pretty easy. That can lull optimists into a false sense of security. Distributed systems must be designed to be resilient by accepting that all possible errors are just business as usual.

  • Run your Xen VMs on the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server

    While SLES does offer a specific installation pattern to make a server a Xen host, it's mainly a DYI configuration, where the installation is like any other Linux installation. There is, for instance, no notion of a storage pool easily connected to external storage; the administrator who uses all default choices ends up with locally stored VM images.

  • [elementaryOS] AppCenter & The Future of The Universe

    About 3 months ago, we launched a new version of elementary OS and a new service that we call AppCenter Dashboard. In that time, we’ve helped developers publish nearly 40 new apps.

  • Asus Tinker Board – TinkerOS_Debian V2.0.1 (Beta version)

    The Asus Tinker Board seeks to offer a good user experience for two different types of users, catering for both Linux and Android enthusiasts. While the latest Android release is no longer labelled a beta release, it still has some serious omissions. In particular, the lack of Google Play Store and a normal Android upgrade path. But on balance, I’m satisfied that Asus has met their objective of offering an attractive user experience for Android users. What about Linux users?

  • Tizen Experts Weekly News Recap – 27th Aug
  • OSNEXUS and Pogo Linux Announce Hybrid Cloud Storage Solution for Microsoft Azure

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Future Proof Your SysAdmin Career: Embracing DevOps

    Sysadmins are increasingly looking to expand their skillsets and carve out new opportunities. With that in mind, many sysadmins are looking to the world of DevOps. At lots of organizations, DevOps has emerged as the most effective method for application delivery, including in the cloud.

  • Pinebook

    Anyhow, DHL also takes a fee for providing the service of paying the taxes for me. I can clear the taxes myself with customs (although they are taxes, not custom), but strangely I still have to pay the same fee to DHL. That adds another 60€ to the grand total.

    So we started with 110€ for the laptop itself plus extra storage, and have now arrived at a grand total of 213€! That certainly puts a damper on things, esp. considering that the hardware has been designed two years ago and hardly compares with even the cheapest netbooks (that can be gotten for a similar price) of 2017.

  • Review: VMware’s Photon OS shines for Docker containers

    VMware provides its own Yum-compatible repositories for managing packages, and signs packages with GPG (GNU Privacy Guard) signatures. This helps make the system secure by default

  • conjure-up dev summary: you like LXD? we like LXD. Put your floaties on and step up to the Helm!

    We've taken some preliminary steps in providing the user better feedback when wanting to deploy onto the localhost provider. If conjure-up isn't able to talk to the same API endpoints Juju can then our probability of success is next to none.

  • Twilio Voice to Pagerduty alert using Python Flask, Zappa, AWS Lambda & AWS API Gateway

    My SaaS product DevOps team at Quest Software uses several monitoring services to notice problems (hopefully before end users see them), and raises alerts for our team using PagerDuty. We also frequently need to integrate with existing company and partner products, for example our internal helpdesk and customer-facing technical-support processes. In this case, the helpdesk team wanted to have a phone number they could call to raise an alert to our team. The first suggestion was to simply put my name down as the 24×7 on-call contact, and make it my problem to alert the right people. I scoffed. We already had PagerDuty in place – why couldn’t we use that too? Simply because we didn’t have a phone number hooked up to PagerDuty. So, lets fix that.

  • QupZilla Renamed, Ubuntu Feature Freeze, Fail2Ban, Librem 5 and more | This Week in Linux

    Coming up on This Week in Linux, we saw some new releases from GIMP, Fail2Ban, Audacious, Voyager Linux, and many more. Ubuntu has reached Feature Freeze, we'll talk about the latest changes before the freeze. QupZilla has chosen the new name of the browser. Updates from System76 on Pop!_OS as well as some news on some Linux Hardware. Then we'll check out this week's Linux Gaming news which there is a surprising amount that may require a Rapid Fire approach. All that and more on today's episode of This Week in Linux.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Solus 3, Ubuntu 17.10 News, Krita 3.2 & Lots of Gaming News | This Week in Linux

    Coming up on This Week in Linux, we saw some new releases from Solus, Krita, Ardour, feren OS and many more. Debian and GNOME both celebrated their Birthdays this week. We check out some cool software that lets you do Google Searches from the command-line and we'll take a look at this week's gaming news. All that and more on today's episode of This Week in Linux. I'm Michael Tunnell of TuxDigital with Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews.

  • Linux Plex Box Demo | For The Record

    In part 2 of my continuing series on reducing dependencies on streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Kindle books and more, today I talk about how I use Plex to make my local video content more accessible. This includes some TV shows and movies I have on DVD.

  • Preparing Patches
  • Real world Performance Comparison of Samsung 960 EVO M.2 NVMe SSD and Transcend 2.5″ SATA III SSD on Linux

    Recently I bought a Samsung 960 EVO 500GB SSD to replace my Transcend 128GB SSD360S 2.5″ SATA III. Earlier this PC had this 128GB SATA III SSD for OS and 1TB Seagate Barracuda drive for data. I had not really utilised this 1TB well – data was just around 300GB. So to get faster system at the cost of underutilised free space, decided to buy Samsung 960 EVO 500GB to have both OS and data (Having more free space helps for better performance in case of SSD. So I am planning to add another 500GB to free up a lot of space on this newly purchased 500GB). Here I try to compare my earlier system with SATA SSD with new NVMe SSD. The rest of the configuration of PC is same for both the cases. I use KDE Neon (Ubuntu derivative) Linux Operating System.

  • Give Your Desktop An Ancient Look With 'Ubo Icons'

    You will find very few icons theme where creator work really hard to pencil icons for your desktop to make elegant. Ubo icons a great icons set drawn with ballpoint pen, then scanned and colored in GIMP. Isn't it feels great to have such hand-crafted icons specially for your desktop, the icons are not glamorous, nor glossy finish but give a unique look to your desktop.

  • Ideal OS: Rebooting the Desktop Operating System Experience

    Consider the Raspberry Pi. For 35 dollars I can buy an amazing computer with four CPU cores, each running over a gigahertz. It also has a 3d accelerator, a gig of RAM, and built in wifi & bluetooth & ethernet. For 35 bucks! And yet, for many of the tasks I want to do with it, this Raspberry Pi is no better than the 66 megahertz computer I used in college.

  • Intro To Budgie Desktop 10.4: Now With Control Center & Flexible Panel

    The latest Budgie Desktop 10.4 released at 18 August 2017 and this is a short review.  The 10.4 brings huge changes on Budgie featuring new Desktop Settings, new Raven, more flexible panel for any position, ability to add new panel and change control buttons position, default bottom-left menu at bottom panel, and so on! This review is based on Solus OS 3 and not Ubuntu Budgie (because at this day no PPA available for 10.4 yet).

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  • Tales of an IT professional sailing around the Antarctic loop

    Of course, that kind of rerouting wasn’t an option. Instead, Pina i Estany accessed a remote server, downloaded and compressed all the e-mails to it, and then sent those compressed files to the ship using a piece of software called Rsync, which deals very well with unstable connections. He also wrote a script that meant if the program stopped downloading at any point, it would start again from the same place once a connection was re-established.

    “So I left this program running for eight or nine hours and then opened this huge file using Thunderbird,” he said. “With that, I was able to get all the wanted e-mails, including the permits we needed.”

  • Serverless May Kill Containers [Ed: Mac Asay is not technical. So he says a buzzword will "kill" something that's a real, working implementation. That's like saying containers will "kill" containers, only you lose control over them.]

    Kubernetes, the darling of the container world, seems set to dominate the next decade of container orchestration. That is, if containers last that long.

    While it seems obvious that containers, the heir apparent to virtual machines, should have a long shelf life, the serverless boom may actually serve to cut it short. Though serverless offerings from AWS and Microsoft are built on the backs of containers, they eliminate the server metaphor entirely (and, hence, the need to containerize that server).

  • IT Professionals Largely Unfazed by Cloud Outages
  • Harvey: Hurricane Preparation Tips for Data Center Managers

    As Hurricane Harvey bears down on the Texas coast, expected to make landfall around Corpus Christi either tonight or Saturday morning as a dangerous Category 3 storm, the men and women who work in data centers in the area are undoubtedly earning overtime as they prepare for the storm’s onslaught. Keeping data centers operational during natural disasters can be critical to the health and safety of the affected area’s residents, as they supply the lines of communications for many first responders and provide access to valuable information about weather conditions and the state of the area’s infrastructure.

    During pending disasters such as this, employees from Schneider Electric’s various data center divisions can often be found on the scene, offering their expertise to help data centers successfully get through the emergency. They’re good to have around, because as the old saying goes, they’ve been there and done that — countless times.

  • 35 Blockchain Startups to Watch

    There’s a reason that blockchain startups are hot. Technologies come and go over the years and raise their share of hype, but few can match the enthusiasm that has been shown for blockchain technology.

    Blockchain is the brainchild of Satoshi Nakamoto, who may or may not be real and may or may not be one person or a group of people. All that is known is that Nakamoto is also the brains behind Bitcoin. Blockchain is in fact the technology behind Bitcoin but the two are totally separate. Blockchain provides the means to record and store Bitcoin transactions, but the blockchain technology has many uses beyond Bitcoin.

  • IBM Debuts Secure, 'Enterprise-Ready' Blockchain Platform

    For IBM, there's no time like the present for enterprises looking to build their first of potentially many blockchain applications.

    Blockchain is ready to get to work with today's introduction of the "world's first enterprise-ready blockchain platform," Angel Diaz, vice president of Developer Technology and Advocacy at IBM, told Datamation. The IT giant today officially launched its IBM Blockchain Platform, enabling developers to harness the IBM cloud and the high-performance compute and end-to-end encryption capabilities provided System Z hardware running in its data centers to build and deploy secure blockchain applications for business.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Germans force Microsoft to scrap future pushy Windows 10 upgrades

    Microsoft sparked fury when it aggressively pushed its Windows 10 operating system onto people's PCs – from unexpected downloads to surprise installations.

    Now a consumer rights group has forced Redmond to promise it will never do it again, in Germany at least.

    In 2015, Microsoft offered existing Windows 7 and 8 users a free upgrade to its new cloud-friendly OS, and rapidly become increasingly ambitious about getting it onto machines. After bundling the upgrade alongside its monthly security patches and resorting to tricky tactics, loads of users found they were downloading gigabytes of unwanted Redmond code.

  • When Not to Use Docker: Understanding the Limitations of Containers

    Docker is a great tool. But Docker containers are not a cure-all. If you really want to understand how Docker is impacting the channel, you have to understand its limitations.

    Docker containers have become massively popular over the past several years because they start faster, scale more easily and consume fewer resources than virtual machines.

  • A Look At The Xeon Gold 6138 + Tyan GT24E-B7106 1U Linux Server Performance

    Last week I began testing the Tyan GT24E-B7106, a 1U barebones server designed for Intel's new Xeon Scalable processors. I am still carrying out many benchmarks of the Tyan GT24E-B7106 paired with two of the Xeon Gold 6138 CPUs, but for those curious about the Linux performance potential of this server when slotting in 96GB of DDR4-2666 RDIMMs and these two CPUs that yield a combined total of 40 cores / 80 threads, here are some initial benchmarks.

  • What’s new in Solus 3 Budgie
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More in Tux Machines

Spaceman Shuttleworth Finds Earthly Riches With Ubuntu Software

He’s best known for being the world’s first “Afronaut,” but since returning to Earth from his 2002 trip on Russia’s Soyuz TM-34 rocket ship, Cape Town native Mark Shuttleworth set about with the conquest of a much more lucrative universe: the internet-of-things. Shuttleworth created Ubuntu, an open-source Linux operating system that helps connect everything from drones to thermostats to the internet. His company, Canonical Group Ltd., makes money from about 800 paying customers, including Netflix Inc., Tesla Inc. and Deutsche Telekom AG, which pay for support services. Its success has helped boost his net worth to $1 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index. “It’s destructive to be too focused on that,” Shuttleworth said of his wealth in an interview at Bloomberg’s office in Boston. “It’s just a distraction from whether you have your finger on the pulse of what’s next.” Read more Also:

  • Rocket.chat communication platform enables simplicity through snaps
    Created in Brazil, Rocket.Chat provides an open source chat solution for organisations of all sizes around the world. Built on open source values and a love of efficiency, Rocket.Chat is driven by a community of contributors and has seen adoption in all aspects of business and education. As Rocket.Chat has evolved, it has been keen to get its platform into the hands of as many users as possible without the difficulties of installation often associated with bespoke Linux deployments.
  • The Silph Road embraces cloud and containers with Canonical
    The Silph Road is the premier grassroots network for Pokémon GO players around the world offering research, tools, and resources to the largest Pokémon GO community worldwide, with up to 400,000 visitors per day Operating a volunteer-run, community network with up to 400,000 daily visitors is no easy task especially in the face of massive and unpredictable demand spikes, and with developers spread all over the world.With massive user demand and with volunteer developers located all over the world, The Silph Road’s operations must be cost-effective, flexible, and scalable. This led the Pokémon GO network first to cloud, and then to containers and in both cases Canonical ’s technology was the answer.

How to Install Arch Linux

Installing Arch Linux could be a tidious and tricky task. Here's how to do it the right way. Read more

Turi as FOSS

  • Fruit of an acquisition: Apple AI software goes open
    Apple's joined other juggernauts of the tech sector by releasing an open source AI framework. Turi Create 4.0, which landed at GitHub recently, is a fruit of its 2016 US$200 million acquisition of Turi. As the GitHub description explains, it targets app developers that want custom machine learning models but don't have the expertise to “add recommendations, object detection, image classification, image similarity or activity classification” to their apps.
  • Apple Releases Turi ML Software as Open Source
    Apple last week released Turi Create, an open source package that it says will make it easy for mobile app developers to infuse machine learning into their products with just a few lines of code. “You don’t have to be a machine learning expert to add recommendations, object detection, image classification, image similarity, or activity classification to your app,” the company says in the GitHub description for Turi Create. “Focus on tasks instead of algorithms.”

Security: Patch Management, Windows Keyloggers, and Fingerprinting MySQL

  • Open Source Patch Management: Options for DIYers [Ed: "Linux comes with patch management," it says, which defeats much of the point of this article...]
    CVE-2017-5638 is the code vulnerability that will long live in the corporate memory of Equifax, the credit ratings agency. A simple patch management system might have kept that vulnerability from turning into one of the most high-profile data breaches in recent memory. CVE-2017-5638 is a remote code execution bug that affects the Jakarta Multipart parser in Apache Struts, an open source application framework for developing Java EE web applications. Remote code execution bugs are generally extremely serious, and for that reason, when the vulnerability was discovered, the Apache Foundation recommended that any developers or users of affected versions of Struts upgrade to later versions that had been patched to close the vulnerability.
  • HP laptops found to have hidden keylogger

    HP said more than 460 models of laptop were affected by the "potential [sic] security vulnerability".

    [...]

    In May, a similar keylogger was discovered in the audio drivers pre-installed on several HP laptop models.

  • Fingerprinting MySQL with scannerl

    The goal here is to identify the version of MySQL running on a remote host.