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today's leftovers and howtos

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Misc
HowTos
  • Project curl governance

    Over time, we've slowly been adjusting the curl project and its documentation so that we might at some point actually qualify to the CII open source Best Practices at silver level.

    We qualified at the base level a while ago as one of the first projects which did that.

    Recently, one of those issues we fixed was documenting the governance of the curl project. How exactly the curl project is run, what the key roles are and how decisions are made. That document is now in our git repo.

  • How to install OwnCloud 10 on CentOS 7 and RHEL 7
  • How to Get Google Camera Port for Asus ZenFone Max Pro M1
  • How to check your CentOS Version
  • 5 Practical Examples of chgrp command in Linux
  • Trinity Desktop R14.0.5 Brings Modern Compiler Support and Security Fixes

    Trinity Desktop, the Linux desktop environment which is forked from KDE 3, has just released an update bringing Trinity Desktop to version R14.0.5.

    Because Trinity Desktop is a “traditional desktop” based on KDE 3 and focuses on function rather than a lot of special effects, its benefits are typically things like increased battery life on laptops, and just overall efficiency for the user.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 32

    I’m back from Akademy, and I can’t wait to share some of the cool stuff that happened there over the past week. I’m going to post the video of my talk as soon as it’s up. But first, I know what you’re all really waiting for: this week’s Usability & Productivity update. Though we were all quite busy, somehow everyone managed to accomplish an enormous amount of work, too!

  • Reminder: Shotwell Facebook publishing no longer working

    As announced earlier, since August 1st, 2018 Shotwell cannot publish to Facebook any more. The API that Shotwell used for that was removed and it is currently not clear to me how developers that do not use Android, iOS or Facebook’s web SDKs should provide similar functionality.

  • Gentoo on Integricloud

    Integricloud gave me access to their infrastructure to track some issues on ppc64 and ppc64le.

    Since some of the issues are related to the compilers, I obviously installed Gentoo on it and in the process I started to fix some issues with catalyst to get a working install media, but that’s for another blogpost.

    Today I’m just giving a walk-through on how to get a ppc64le (and ppc64 soon) VM up and running.

  • Industrial Mini-ITX board pumps up with Coffee Lake

    Commell’s “LV-67X” Mini-ITX board runs on 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” processors, with up to 32GB DDR4, 3x SATA, triple 4K displays, USB 3.1, and PCIe x16 and mini-PCIe expansion.

    The LV-67X, which shares some of the layout and feature set of its Intel Apollo Lake based LV-67U board, is the first industrial Mini-ITX board we’ve seen with Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake CPUs. (Going forward, we’ll likely use the caffeinated nickname rather than “8th Gen” because Intel also applies the 8th Gen tag to the transitional and similarly 14nm Kaby Lake-G chips as well as the new, 10nm Cannon Lake processors.)

  • Unofficial OpenGApps for Android Pie 9.0 Released for ARM and ARM64 Platforms

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E23 – Twenty-Three Tales - Ubuntu Podcast

    We’ve been upgrading RAM and tooting in the fediverse. We discuss Hollywood embracing open source, a new release of LibreOffice, pacemakers getting hacked and fax machines becoming selfaware and taking over the planet. We also round up the community news and events.

  • How to install InvoicePlane on Ubuntu 18.04
  • What is your favorite Linux window manager?

    While many Linux users have a strong preference for a window manager of choice, for those just making their way over from Windows or Mac, it may be hard to understand what a window manager is, or that it's even something you have a choice in. A window manager is the part of your system that dictates how individual application windows look, and how you can interact with, control, and arrange them.

    There are many choices, some more popular than others. Yesterday, we wished the GNOME Project a happy twenty-first birthday and launched a cheat sheet for interacting with GNOME 3's windows via hotkeys. But others are popular too; our article on "5 reasons the i3 window manager makes Linux better" was last week's most-read article.

  • Elive 3.0 to be released in a month

    For those of us who have been following this stunningly beautiful distro, the 8-year waiting seems to be finally coming to an end.

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  • Android 9 Pie Digital Wellbeing: Here Is Everything You Need to Know

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • libinput's "new" trackpoint acceleration method

    This is mostly a request for testing, because I've received zero feedback on the patches that I merged a month ago and libinput 1.12 is due to be out. No comments so far on the RC1 and RC2 either, so... well, maybe this gets a bit broader attention so we can address some things before the release. One can hope.

    [...]

    Because basically every trackpoint has different random data ranges not linked to anything easily measurable, libinput's device quirks now support a magic multiplier to scale the trackpoint range into something resembling a sane range. This is basically what we did before with the systemd POINTINGSTICK_CONST_ACCEL property except that we're handling this in libinput now (which is where acceleration is handled, so it kinda makes sense to move it here). There is no good conversion from the previous trackpoint range property to the new multiplier because the range didn't really have any relation to the physical input users expected.

  • 15 Tips On How to Use ‘Curl’ Command in Linux
  • Disassembling JITed code in GDB
  • PSA: Workaround for a working MTP

    KDE Connect is awesome, we all know that. But sometimes you still want (or need) to acces the files on your Android phone via a good old USB cable. And to do so, you need a working implementation of the MTP protocol.

    Many people on bugzilla complain that the MTP support in Plasma is just broken. And indeed the MTP implementation we have has always been ignoring a fundamental limitation of MTP: the protocol doesn’t allow parallel operations, unlike the old Android USB mass storage did. In practice, if more than one process spawns an mtp ioslave, everything breaks.

  • Museum Day, or, the Benefit of Skiving Off

    Tomorrow, there’s the fund raiser training session. Given that we’ve been raising funds for Krita since time immemorial (our first fund raiser was for two Wacom tablets and art pens so we could implement support for them, the second to let Lukas Tvrdy work on Krita for a couple of months and after that, we’ve had the kickstarters), that might seem superfluous. But I’m still hoping to learn lots. After all, it’s not like we’re exactly awash in money.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Google’s New Chromebook Might Come With A Snapdragon 845 And A Detachable 2K Display

    It’s been sometime since we saw a Chromebook from Google. Although the Chromebook series didn’t do well with consumers, Google didn’t stop development on it.

    Multiple codes uploaded on Gerrit (web-based team code collaboration tool) on Chromium OS has given us a lot of information on the next Chromebook or the Pixelbook previously. The device is codenamed Cheza (As seen on the Code on 14th line).

  • Builder Session Restore

    People have asked for more advanced session restore for quite some time, and now Builder can do it. Builder will now restore your previous session, and in particular, horizontal and vertical splits.

    Like previously, you can disable session restore in preferences if that’s not your jam.

  • packer renamed to packer-aur

    The famous AUR helper `packer` has been renamed to `packer-aur` in favor of the Hashicorp image builder `packer` (community/packer)

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Dropbox plans to drop encrypted Linux filesystems in November

    Linux users are calling on Dropbox to reverse a decision to trim its filesystem support to unencrypted EXT4 only.

    The company's supported file system list, here, is missing some formats – including various encrypted Linux filesystems.

    Until that list was revised, Dropbox said it supported NTFS, HFS, EXT4, and APFS on Linux; as the new requirements makes clear, Linux users will only be able to run unencrypted EXT4.

  • MacBuntu 18.04 Transformation Pack Ready for Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver

    MacBuntu (Macbuntu Mojave/High Sierra/El Capitan/Yosemite) transformation pack is ready for Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver, we were constantly asked for this pack to be available on our site, so here it is for you guys. In this transformation pack we are featuring many themes for almost every desktop, so you don't have to worry about the desktop you are using whether it is Gnome Shell, Mate, Xfce, Cinnamon or any other desktop. You can simply install it in Ubuntu/Linux Mint or any other Ubuntu based distribution and make your desktop look like Mac OS X. The Unity desktop is still supported in case you are using unofficial version of Unity desktop. In this pack you will find plenty of light variants as well as dark versions, which is managed by different creators and I would like to thank all of them for contributing these themes (McOS-themes, macOS High Sierra, macOS 11, macOS High Sierra - ELBULLAZUL).  There are two themes for cursors, for dock we recommend you to install Plank dock and we are providing themes for it as well (credits: KenHarkey and erikdubois. Also we are including themes for Gnome Shell, for Cinnamon, and three icon packs in this transformation pack.

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  • TensorFlow Pi port is latest salvo in battle for edge analytics

    The recent port of TensorFlow to the Raspberry Pi is the latest in a series of chess moves from Google and its chief AI rival Nvidia to win the hearts and keyboards of embedded Linux developers.

    Google’s recent announcement that it had ported its open source TensorFlow machine intelligence (ML) library for neural networking to the Raspberry Pi was the latest in a series of chess moves from Google and its chief AI rival Nvidia to win the hearts and keyboards of embedded Linux developers. The competition is a part of a wider battle with Amazon, Microsoft, Intel, and others to bring cloud analytics to the edge in IoT networks to reduce latency, increase reliability, and improve security.

  • 9 Android Pie Hidden Features: Best Android 9 Tricks You Might Have Missed
  • TicWatch Pro: Reviewing the 30-Day Battery Smartwatch

today's leftover

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  • Linux 4.18 Arrives With Some Big Changes
  • IBM S/390 Linux 4.19 Kernel Code Sees More Spectre Updates, Boot Code Rework

    The IBM System/390 "s390" architecture code has seen a number of improvements for Linux 4.19.

    Highlights of the s390 code updates sent in today for the just-opened Linux 4.19 kernel merge window include:

  • Hollywood Casts Open Source Software in Starring Role

    Amazing news out of Variety, the entertainment website, this weekend: Hollywood is going open source. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences — best known for ‘The Oscars’ award ceremony — has teamed up with the Linux Foundation to launch the Academy Software Foundation (ASWF).

  • SIGGRAPH 2018: OpenCL-Next Taking Shape, Vulkan Continues Evolving

    It's a busy week folks as besides the AMD Threadripper 2 performance embargo expiring, it is also SIGGRAPH 2018 week in Vancouver and as well the start of the Linux 4.19 kernel cycle... No longer under wraps are the Khronos announcements from this annual graphics conference. Continue reading to learn about the latest happenings for the various Khronos industry-standard APIs and efforts like Vulkan and OpenCL-Next.

  • Dropbox drops any file system but ext4 on Linux

    Come November 7, cloud storage and synchronization provider Dropbox will drop support for any file system on Linux but ext4.

    In fact, Dropbox announced that it will support only four file systems on desktop systems going forward. Company representative Jay revealed as much on the official Dropbox forum.

  • How to display data in a human-friendly way on Linux
  • Wine Had A Successful GSoC 2018, Better Direct3D Game Benchmarks

    The Wine project once again participated in Google Summer of Code (GSoC) for furthering their open-source agenda of better support for Windows programs on Linux and other operating systems.

    The projects achieved this year were for better automated game benchmarks and implementing a subset of the concurrency namespace. (There also was a project originally listed for implementing missing bits of the Direct3D API, but that doesn't seen to have panned out and is no longer listed.)

  • Congratulations: Hanno Böck and co-authors win Pwnie!

    Congratulations to security researcher and Gentoo developer Hanno Böck and his co-authors Juraj Somorovsky and Craig Young for winning one of this year’s coveted Pwnie awards!

  • Gentoo booth at the FrOSCon, St. Augustin, Germany

    s last year, there will be a Gentoo booth again at the upcoming FrOSCon “Free and Open Source Conference” in St. Augustin near Bonn! Visitors can meet Gentoo developers to ask any question, get Gentoo swag, and prepare, configure, and compile their own Gentoo buttons.

  • Official Debian testing OpenStack image news

    A few things happened to the testing image, thanks to Steve McIntire, myself, and … some debconf18 foo!

  • Remember Palm? They will be back with a 3.3-inch mini smartphone

    The device is still known as Pepito, but the smartphone seems to be almost ready for commercial debut. However, instead of embracing the modern large-display smartphone phenomenon, the revived Palm will stick to its core principles — smaller and pocketable phones. Therefore, if the leaks are to be believed, then the Palm Pepito will sport a 3.3-inch touchscreen display with 720p picture resolution. It will be powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 435 processor paired with 3GB of RAM and 32GB of internal storage.

  • Android Pie Smartphones List: Will My Phone Get Android 9 Update?

    Now that Android Pie is live, the first thing that comes to our mind is when my Android device will receive the new update. The exciting new features of Android P and the whole gesture navigation thing is not something anyone would want to miss.

  • Huawei Mate 20 Lite To Come With A 2K Display 6GBs Of Ram And Kirin 710 According to Leaks

    The Mate series have generally been Huawei’s flagship phablet series. The Mate 10 did great with consumers and reviewers alike. Infact Huawei also came out with the Mate 10 lite which had Huawei’s own Kirin 659 chip. The Kirin 659 chip at the time performed somewhat similar to the Snapdragon 625.

  • A bit more on privacy respecting health monitor / fitness tracker

    A few days ago, I wondered if there are any privacy respecting health monitors and/or fitness trackers available for sale these days. I would like to buy one, but do not want to share my personal data with strangers, nor be forced to have a mobile phone to get data out of the unit. I've received some ideas, and would like to share them with you. One interesting data point was a pointer to a Free Software app for Android named Gadgetbridge. It provide cloudless collection and storing of data from a variety of trackers. Its list of supported devices is a good indicator for units where the protocol is fairly open, as it is obviously being handled by Free Software. Other units are reportedly encrypting the collected information with their own public key, making sure only the vendor cloud service is able to extract data from the unit. The people contacting me about Gadgetbirde said they were using Amazfit Bip and Xiaomi Band 3.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Apps Are Now Available on More Chromebooks Powered by Intel Braswell CPUs

    It looks like Google is taking support for Linux apps very serious lately by recently enabling its integrated virtualization machine for running Linux apps on Chrome OS to support Chromebooks powered by Intel Braswell CPUs.

  • The Academy launches open-source foundation for media developers

    The idea is to enable them to share resources and collaborate on technologies for image creation, visual effects, animation and sound.

    “We are thrilled to partner with The Linux Foundation for this vital initiative that fosters more innovation, more collaboration, more creativity among artists and engineers in our community,” said Academy CEO Dawn Hudson. “The Academy Software Foundation is core to the mission of our Academy: promoting the arts and sciences of motion pictures.”

  • GSoC’18 Phase-3

    For this phase, I started with implementing Stamps feature in the Drawing activity. This feature allows users to use different stamps images in their beautiful arts. For now, I have added images from solar activity to use as stamps.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 31

    This week we’re all at Akademy–KDE’s yearly gathering of developers, designers, system administrators, and users. I’m giving a presentation later today about how we can make KDE Software irresistible!

    As such, it as a bit of a lighter week for the Usability & Productivity initiative, what with all the preparation and conference-going, but we still managed to get quite a bit done. And all the in-person interactions are setting the stage for many more good things to come.

  • Something Happened to My OpenMandriva Lx OS

    Yesterday I booted my laptop with OpenMandriva Lx and went to look for a book. When I returned to the machine, a kernel panic was waiting for me on the screen.

    Apparently, something went very wrong with the updates that I performed last week, but I did not notice.

    This has happened before, though. As the laptop boots seven OSs (OpenMandriva, Mageia, PCLinuxOS, Pisi, Elive, Fedora, and PicarOS), when I install a system that changes the OMV-controlled GRUB2, OpenMandriva gets a panic.

    I do not have the expertise to rectify things other than by performing a re-install. So, I reinstalled OpenMandriva, updated it (the process did not last more than an hour or so) and, sure enough, the OS was bootable again.

    [...]

    Maybe it is time for me to start experimenting with BSD, Haiku, or something.

  • Google Pixel 3 XL Leak Reveals 6.7-inch Screen With Triple Camera Setup
  • Intel has no chance in servers and they know it

    Intel is flying press to an Analyst day to discuss their impending server meltdown. SemiAccurate has been detailing this impending catastrophe for over a year now, it is now time for the details.

  • Journeys

    This would be a long blog post as I would be sharing a lot of journeys, so have your favorite beverage in your hand and prepare for an evening of musing.

    Before starting the blog post, I have been surprised as the last week and the week before, lot of people have been liking my Debconf 2016 blog post on diaspora which is almost two years old. Almost all the names mean nothing to me but was left unsure as to reason of the spike. Were they debconf newcomers who saw my blog post and their experience was similar to mine or something, don’t know.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • PGP Clean Room 1.0 Release

    After several months of work, I am proud to announce that my GSoC 2018 project, the PGP/PKI Clean Room, has arrived at a stable (1.0) release!

  • Review: The Binary Times Podcast

    I recently authored a detailed review of the Linux podcast scene, grilling 25 podcasts targeted at Linux and open source enthusiasts. Like any roundup of this type, it’s almost inevitable that a few podcasts missed my radar. One of these is The Binary Times Podcast. Apologies to the hosts of the show.

    To rectify matters, here’s my take on The Binary Times Podcast.

    This review is incorporated into my detailed review, so you can see where they rank among their peers.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E22 – Catch-22 - Ubuntu Podcast

    It’s Season 11 Episode 22 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope and Mark Johnson are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Conference Report: Fullstack 2018 London

    I recently attended Fullstack 2018, “The Conference on JavaScript, Node & Internet of Things” with my colleagues from the Canonical Web Team in London. Fullstack attempts to cover the full spectrum of the JS ecosystem – frontend, backend, IoT, machine learning and a number of other topics. While I attended a broad range of talks, I’ll just mention those that I think are most pertinent to the work we are doing currently in the web team.

  • Dropbox Client Will Only Support Ext4 Filesystems On Linux Beginning November 7

    Beginning November 7, 2018, the Dropbox client will only support the Ext4 filesystem on Linux. The news, coming from the Dropbox forums, mentions that the only supported filesystems will be Ext4 for Linux, NTFS for Windows, and HFS+ or APFS for Mac.

  • Opera Wants to Be World's First PC Web Browser with a Built-In Crypto Wallet

    Opera Software announced that it plans to bring its famous crypto wallet used on the Opera for Android mobile web browser to the desktop on Linux, Mac, and Windows platforms, in an upcoming Opera for PC stable release.

    Opera was already the world's first web browser to introduce a built-in crypto wallet when Opera Software announced it for its Opera for Android mobile web browser, allowing users to do seamless transactions on the Internet while promoting the adoption of cryptocurrencies by the mainstream.

  • Opera opens its PC browsers to crypto

    - Opera to soon ship crypto wallet access with its PC browser

    - Opera PC browser will give users access to the built-in crypto wallet in Opera for Android

    - After strong interest in the private beta, Opera is opening the crypto wallet to a larger audience for testing.

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • What to expect from Tibco Now 2018

    Only Splunk comes forward with a real twist and calls its event .conf as a geeky nod to those that know a CONF file is a configuration or “config” file used on Unix and Linux based systems to stores settings used to configure system processes and applications.

  • Set the date: Qualcomm likely to announce next-gen wearable chipset for Wear OS on September 10

    If you’re curious about the future of Wear OS smartwatches, you’d want to mark this date, September 10, on your calendar. After a full two and a half years, Wear OS is finally getting a new chipset from Qualcomm.

  • Getting to know Grommet, an open source UI dev tool

    While Grommet has been around since 2016, it is not among the best-known open source development tools. The library of reusable UI components helps developers create web applications. This overview explains what Grommet can do, the problems it addresses, and what makes it appealing.

    It is time consuming and difficult to making web applications both beautiful and functional. The skills that make a programmer successful at building an application back end don’t always translate to good user interface (UI) design or creating an ideal user experience (UX). Even when developers get UI help from design specialists, creating the code to control how the software looks—its dialog boxes, information layout, the organization of application features—sometimes seems like a black art. Trying to make a beautiful page work quickly on every device with a consistent appearance seems nearly impossible.

  • Apple Might Ditch Lightning Connector After Pressure From The EU

    Apple might have to part ways with the lightning connector after the EU is planning to launch an investigation against the issue of different types of chargers present in the smartphone industry.

    In 2009, 14 companies including Apple, Samsung, Huawei, and Nokia signed a voluntary memorandum of understanding (MoU) in favor of bringing universal chargers for the smartphones coming into the market from 2011 onwards. The EU clearly directed companies to coordinate and come up with a universal type of charger; micro-USB was the mutually decided type then.

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More in Tux Machines

Qt/KDE: Qt for Python, Inkscape Dark Theme on KDE Plasma, Atelier at Maker Faire and QtCon 2018!

  • Python and Qt: 3,000 hours of developer insight
    With Qt for Python released, it’s time to look at the powerful capabilities of these two technologies. This article details one solopreneur’s experiences. [...] The big problem with Electron is performance. In particular, the startup time was too high for a file manager: On an admittedly old machine from 2010, simply launching Electron took five seconds. I admit that my personal distaste for JavaScript also made it easier to discount Electron. Before I go off on a rant, let me give you just one detail that I find symptomatic: Do you know how JavaScript sorts numbers? Alphabetically. ’nuff said. After considering a few technologies, I settled on Qt. It’s cross-platform, has great performance and supports custom styles. What’s more, you can use it from Python. This makes at least me orders of magnitude more productive than the default C++.
  • Inkscape Dark Theme on KDE Plasma
    On KDE Plasma, it's very easy to setup Inkscape Dark Theme. To do so, go to System Settings > Application Style > GNOME/GTK+ Style > under GTK+ Style: switch all themes to Dark ones and give check mark to Prefer Dark Theme > Apply. Now your Inkscape should turned into dark mode. To revert back, just revert the theme selections. This trick works on Kubuntu or any other GNU/Linux system as long as it uses Plasma as its desktop environment.
  • Atelier at Maker Faire and QtCon 2018!
    On the weekend of November 3 and 4, it happened on Rio de Janeiro the first Maker Faire of Latin America. And I was able to do a talk about Atelier and the current status of our project. The event hold more than 1.500 people on the first day, that saw a lot of talks and the exposition of makers of all over the country that came to Rio to participate in this edition of the Maker Faire.

Security: Updates, Systematic Evaluation of Transient Execution Attacks and Defenses, New IoT Security Regulations and GPU Side-Channel Attacks

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • A Systematic Evaluation of Transient Execution Attacks and Defenses

    [...] we present a sound and extensible systematization of transient execution attacks. Our systematization uncovers 7 (new) transient execution attacks that have been overlooked and not been investigated so far. This includes 2 new Meltdown variants: Meltdown-PK on Intel, and Meltdown-BR on Intel and AMD. It also includes 5 new Spectre mistraining strategies. We evaluate all 7 attacks in proof-of-concept implementations on 3 major processor vendors (Intel, AMD, ARM). Our systematization does not only yield a complete picture of the attack surface, but also allows a systematic evaluation of defenses. Through this systematic evaluation, we discover that we can still mount transient execution attacks that are supposed to be mitigated by rolled out patches.

  • New IoT Security Regulations
    Due to ever-evolving technological advances, manufacturers are connecting consumer goods­ -- from toys to light bulbs to major appliances­ -- to the Internet at breakneck speeds. This is the Internet of Things, and it's a security nightmare. The Internet of Things fuses products with communications technology to make daily life more effortless. Think Amazon's Alexa, which not only answers questions and plays music but allows you to control your home's lights and thermostat. Or the current generation of implanted pacemakers, which can both receive commands and send information to doctors over the Internet. But like nearly all innovation, there are risks involved. And for products born out of the Internet of Things, this means the risk of having personal information stolen or devices being overtaken and controlled remotely. For devices that affect the world in a direct physical manner -- ­cars, pacemakers, thermostats­ -- the risks include loss of life and property.
  • University Researchers Publish Paper On GPU Side-Channel Attacks
    University researchers out of University of California Riverside have published a paper this week detailing vulnerabilities in current GPU architectures making them vulnerable to side-channel attacks akin to Spectre and Meltdown. With their focus on NVIDIA GPUs, UCLA Riverside researchers demonstrated attacks both for graphics and compute by exploiting the GPU's performance counters. Demonstrated attacks included a browser-based attack, extracting passwords / keystroke logging, and even the possibility of exposing a CUDA neural network algorithm.

VirtualBox 6.0 Beta 2

  • Announcement: VirtualBox 6.0 Beta 2 released
    Please do NOT use this VirtualBox Beta release on production machines! A VirtualBox Beta release should be considered a bleeding-edge release meant for early evaluation and testing purposes. You can download the binaries here: http://download.virtualbox.org/virtualbox/6.0.0_BETA2 Please do NOT open bug reports at our public bugtracker but use our VirtualBox Beta Feedback forum at https://forums.virtualbox.org/viewforum.php?f=15 to report any problems with the Beta. Please concentrate on reporting regressions since VirtualBox 5.2! Version 6.0 will be a new major release. Please see the forum at https://forums.virtualbox.org/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=90315 for an incomplete list of changes. Thanks for your help! Michael
  • VirtualBox 6.0 Beta 2 Adds File Manager For Host/Guest File Copies, OS/2 Shared Folder
    Last month Oracle rolled out the public beta of VirtualBox 6.0 though didn't include many user-facing changes. They have now rolled out a second beta that does add in a few more features. VirtualBox 6.0 Beta 2 was released today and to its user-interface is a new file manager that allows the user to control the guest file-system with copying file objects between the host and guest. Also improved with VirtualBox 6.0 Beta 2 is better shared folder auto-mounting with the VBox Guest Additions. This beta even brings initial shared folder support to the guest additions for OS/2.

Thunderbird version 60.3.1 now Available, Includes Fixes for Cookie Removal and Encoding Issues

Thunderbird happens to be one of the most famous Email client. It is free and an open source one which was developed by the Mozilla Foundation back in 2003, fifteen years ago. From a very basic interface, it has come a long way to be what it is today in 2018. With these updates, a recent one into the 60.x series from the 52.x series was a significant one. While the 60.x (60.3.0) update started rolling out, Mozilla was keen to push out 60.3.1. This new version of Thunderbird had a few bugs and kinks here and there which needed to be addressed which Mozilla did, most of them at least. Read more