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today's leftovers

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  • OpenGL 4.5 Is Not The End Of The Road For OpenGL
  • Intel Starts Supporting The Quark X1000 SoC With Coreboot

    Well, this is interesting. The Intel Quark X1000 SoC now has very basic support within Coreboot.

    The Quark X1000 SoC has been available for more than two years already as a single-core 400MHz x86 processor designed for wearable devices and other tiny, low-power applications. The Intel Galileo developer board is one of the many public devices utilizing an X1000. Back in 2014 we shared some Quark X1000 Linux benchmarks and Intel Edison benchmarks for those interested.

  • Endless Is The Latest Company To Join GNOME's Advisory Board

    Endless Computer, the company designing Linux-powered computers -- and using a modified GNOME desktop -- for emerging markets, has joined the GNOME Advisory Board.

    Endless develops "computers designed for the entire world" with their Endless PC retailing for $189 USD and The Endless Mini for $79 USD. The Endless Mini is ARM-powered while the more expensive unit features an Intel Celeron CPU.

  • Incoming! Fleet Commander 0.7

    We’ve just released the 0.7 series which should be the first version that is somewhat stable to use (think of it as alpha) and as we speak is under review for inclusion with Fedora 24.

    For the last year I have been massaging the prototype we had at GUADEC in Strasbourg into a reliable product, and recently Oliver Gutierrez has joined the team to help with the web development affairs, I would like to summarize some of my work here so that you guys know what’s all about and what are the future plans.

  • Zorin OS 11 Core and Ultimate Editions Out Now for Windows Refugees - Screenshot Tour

    On February 3, the Zorin OS team was excited to announce the release and immediate availability for download of the Zorin OS 11 operating system, which is currently being distributed as Core and Ultimate editions.

  • Linux Lite 2.8 - Screencast and Screenshots
  • Linux Lite 2.8 Released With Linux Kernel 3.19, BTRFS Support And More

    Linux Lite known is a simple, sleek and stable Linux distribution based on Ubuntu's Long Term Support (LTS) releases. Linux Lite is especially for Windows users. It aims to fulfill everyday computing needs by providing the complete set of applications. Jerry Bezencon and the team recently announced Linux Lite 2.8, the final release of 2.0 series. Let's see what is new in this release.

  • Opensuse 13.1 has gone evergreen
  • First X-Apps, openSUSE Board, Faces of FOSS

    Today in Linux news "openSUSE 13.1 has gone Evergreen" and Bryan Lunduke was elected to its board. Clement Lefebvre reported on the first two Mint X-Apps and Dedoimedo found a distribution he likes. Rory Dear argued today against migrating to Linux and FOSS Force is back with their most difficult quiz yet.

  • Ubuntu Community Calls All Artists to Contribute Wallpapers to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

    Today, Ubuntu project member Nathan Haines has informed the Ubuntu community that the Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase contest is open to submissions from artists who want to contribute their awesome artwork to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

  • PSA: Support for Ubuntu 15.04 Ends Today

    After nine months swinging in the wild, the sun finally sets on official support for the Vivid Vervet.

    Ubuntu 15.04 desktop users will receive no more security notices, critical fixes, or updated packages from the main Ubuntu archives as of February 4th, 2016.

  • ODROID-C2 64-bit dev board coming soon for $40

    Hardkernel’s next single-board computer features a quad-core ARM Coretx-A53 64-bit processor, 2GB of RAM, and Gigabit Ethernet.

  • Developer: Video – Tizen Native Geocode API

    The Geocode API can be used as an add-on to your apps, that allows developers to create Tizen 2.3 or 2.4 native applications that can send your location and also receive co-ordinates from a server. You need to add permissions in your Tizen project for the app to use your phone’s map service, Internet and network.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition Sold with $100 Discount to Make Way for New Model

    The Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition is a very successful laptop that tends to sell really well. Only a limited number of units are made each year, and they also ship with Ubuntu.

  • Dell will ship XPS 13 Developer Edition "Project Sputnik" Linux laptops with Skylake chips
  • Giving Silos Their Due

    One was Linux on the Desktop (LOTD). Around the turn of the Millennium, I predicted big successes for LOTD and Linux on the Laptop (LOTL)—and continued to do the same, annually, until I gave up.

  • This Wrong Command Could Brick Your Linux Laptop [Ed: avoid UEFI]
  • Little warning: Deleting the wrong files may brick your Linux PC

    Here's a friendly warning from El Reg: don't wipe the wrong directory from your Linux system, or you may end up bricking the computer. This has happened to people, we're told.

    The directory in question is /sys/firmware/efi/efivars which is a special filesystem that presents the configuration settings for the computer's underlying UEFI firmware to the user. These configuration variables are used to control the way the motherboard firmware starts up the system and boots your operating system. Changing the files in this directory therefore changes these respective variables in the firmware.

  • Kids can refurbish computers for others at Kramden

    I’ve learned a lot from my time at Kramden, but what I love most is that the computers we refurbish go to underprivileged kids who would not otherwise be able to afford a computer of their own. I've realized that not all children have the resources they need to learn about technology, which will limit their future potential, but with Kramden’s refurbished computers, more kids will get access to computers in their homes.

  • Most Reliable Hosting Company Sites in January 2016

    As it did through the entirety of 2015, Linux has once again dominated as the most commonly used operating system amongst the top ten hosting company websites. The only two companies in January’s table not using Linux to host their websites are Swishmail (FreeBSD) and EveryCity (SmartOS).

  • deepin 15.1 - Screencast and Screenshots
  • Manjaro Devs Patch Zero-Day Linux Kernel Vulnerability with the Latest Update

    Today, Manjaro project leader Philip Müller has announced the general availability of the sixth update for the stable Manjaro Linux 15.12 (Capella) series of operating systems.

    The February 2 update for Manjaro Linux 15.12 is here to mainly patch a zero-day vulnerability in the Linux kernel packages that the distro currently supports. Among them are Linux 3.10.96, Linux 3.12.53 LTS, Linux 3.13.11.33, Linux 3.14.60 LTS, Linux 3.16.7.23, Linux 3.18.26 LTS, Linux 3.19.8.13, Linux 4.1.16 LTS, Linux 4.2.8.2, Linux 4.3.4, Linux 4.4.0, and Linux 4.5 RC1.

  • Arch Linux 2016.02.01 Available for Download, Still Powered by Linux Kernel 4.3

    It's the first day of February, so guess what? A new ISO image for the powerful and highly customizable Arch Linux operating system is now available for download via the official channels.

    Arch Linux 2016.02.01 was released just a couple of hours ago for those of you who would like to deploy the independent Linux kernel-based operating system on new machines.

  • I hate benchmarking

    Among development tasks, one of my least favorite is benchmarking and I tend to procrastinate on it (by writing blog posts, for example). Allow me to enumerate some reasons why I hate doing benchmarking.

  • Canonical Is Looking for Participants in "Ubuntu Apps in Unity 8" Research Study

    Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu Linux, the world's most popular free operating system, announced just a few minutes ago on their Twitter, Google+ and Facebook accounts that they're running a new user research study.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Flip Your Desktop Over to Boot Linux

    The Linux sleeve could only slide on if the computer was flipped upside down. So he needed to detect when it was in this state. To do this he wired a switch into one of the com ports of his computer, and attached it to the top of the case mod. He modified the assembly code in the MBR to read the state of the switch. When the Linux sleeve is on (and therefore the computer is flipped over) it boots Linux. When the sleeve is off, Windows. Neat. It would be cool to put a small computer in a cube and have it boot different operating systems with this trick. Or maybe a computer that boots into guest mode in one orientation, and the full system in another.

  • February 2016 Issue of Linux Journal

    I love my job. I teach Linux by day and write about Linux at night. It's easy to fall in love with your work when the things you do align with your passions.

  • Compatibility and a Linux Community Server

    I recently added support for IPv6 to the Linux Users of Victoria server. I think that adding IPv6 support is a good thing due to the lack of IPv4 addresses even though there are hardly any systems that are unable to access IPv4. One of the benefits of this for club members is that it’s a platform they can use for testing IPv6 connectivity with a friendly sysadmin to help them diagnose problems. I recently notified a member by email that the callback that their mail server used as an anti-spam measure didn’t work with IPv6 and was causing mail to be incorrectly rejected. It’s obviously a benefit for that user to have the problem with a small local server than with something like Gmail.

  • Reproducible builds: week 40 in Stretch cycle

    54 reviews have been removed, 36 added and 17 updated in the previous week.

  • My Free Software Activities in January 2016

    My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donators (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • CoreOS Overview, Part One

    CoreOS is an important part of many container stacks. In this series of posts, we’re going to take a look at CoreOS, why it’s important, and how it works. If you don’t know anything about CoreOS already, don’t worry. We start at the beginning.

  • First Point Release of OpenELEC 6.0 Solves Issues for Raspberry Pi 2 Users

    The developers of the OpenELEC (Open Embedded Linux Entertainment Center) open-source and cross-platform media center operating system announced today, January 30, the release of OpenELEC 6.0.1.

  • Arch Linux Releases Pacman 5.0

    The Arch Linux crew has announced the release of their Pacman 5.0 package manager.

  • Ubuntu 16.04 Alpha 2 Released, Available to Download

    Today sees the second alpha release of the Ubuntu 16.04 development cycle made available to download.

    Alpha 2 arrives a day later than originally planned, and sees just three flavors release builds as part of the milestone.

    Xubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME and Kubuntu sit this alpha out. Why? To paraphrase a recent comment from a Kubuntu dev: “There’s simply nothing to test yet.”

  • Skype for Linux - A Good Microsoft App for Linux [Ed: very bad, very dangerous]

    Skype for Linux is a video chat and voice call application made by Microsoft that happens to have a Linux build as well. Let's take a closer look at what Microsoft is doing for Linux users.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Rio

    I was really pleased to see Endless, the little company with big plans, initiate a GNOME Design hackfest in Rio.

    The ground team in Rio arranged a visit to two locations where we met with the users that Endless is targeting. While not strictly a user testing session, it helped to better understand the context of their product and get a glimpse of the lives in Rocinha, one of the Rio famous favelas or a more remote rural Magé. Probably wouldn’t have a chance to visit Brazil that way.

  • Windows Phone is dead

    With Lumia sales on the decline and Microsoft's plan to not produce a large amount of handsets, it's clear we're witnessing the end of Windows Phone. Rumors suggest Microsoft is developing a Surface Phone, but it has to make it to the market first. Windows Phone has long been in decline and its app situation is only getting worse. With a lack of hardware, lack of sales, and less than 2 percent market share, it's time to call it: Windows Phone is dead. Real Windows on phones might become a thing with Continuum eventually, but Windows Phone as we know it is done. It won't stop Microsoft producing a few handsets every year as a vanity project, but for everyone else it's the end of the line. Farewell, Windows Phone.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Free Pathways to Running Linux Right

    If you're new or relatively new to Linux, you may be looking around for good educational resources and perhaps some tutorials. Whether you're new to Linux or looking to become a more advanced user, there are a lot of free online books and tutorials that can give you guidance. In this post, you'll find our newly updated collection of many good Linux reference guides and tools online--all available at no cost.

  • Build a better web server – Part 1

    Up your computing power with an upgraded or brand new server that you can build yourself

    While big business and big data may be utilising mainframes more of late, the concept of servers is not going away any time soon. Servers are an integral part of any system, however large your IT infrastructure is. Whether it’s inside the data centre or tucked away in your (well-ventilated!) cupboard at home, there are still a lot of uses for servers in 2015.

    For the office you may want to save a bit of money and create something perfect for your needs that you know exactly how to maintain. For home you may just want to enhance your setup and make the entire network more efficient. For both it’s a great way to separate certain aspects of your network to control it in a more efficient way.

    There are many components of a server that you need to keep in mind, but it boils down to an appropriate hardware selection and a good distro for the task at hand. In this tutorial, we are going to concentrate on file and web servers, two base server systems that can be expanded and modified in multiple ways to best fit the situation you are in.

    As we’re teaching you how to build a better web server, we will first take a quick detour to tell you what you should know if you want to upgrade your current server so that it can compete with the new tech.

  • Podcast Season 4 Episode 02

    In this episode: Good news from Qt and bad news for 32 bit Google Chrome users. The Linux Foundation ditches individual membership and Microsoft MITs more code. Plus loads of Finds, Neurons, Voices, Competition Prizes and An Important Announcement.

  • How many IoT devices do you own?

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is rapidly changing the way we interact with the world around us. A whole host of devices are becoming smarter, more connected, and better able to anticipate our needs. Whether in the form of wearables, home automation, connected cars, or business asset tracking, every day we are seeing a greater level of engagement between the physical world and the digital.

    While this enormous growth in IoT may seem inevitable, like any emerging technology, there are issues which have not yet fully sorted themselves out yet. How can we be sure that all of the devices we own can speak to one another in a language which they all understand, regardless of who manufactured them? How can we be sure we always have access to our data even if we end our relationship with the product's vendor? And how can we know that our data, which by its nature is often quite personal, is always safe and secure?

  • App: Audio Trimmer for Samsung Z3 in the Tizen Store

    Audio Trimmer, an app for the Samsung Z3, is an entertainment app which allows you to trim your songs down to your favorite parts, just like the name suggests.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Voice of the Masses: Should the Linux Foundation have community representation?

    According to their own website: “The Linux Foundation protects and promotes the ideals of freedom and generous collaboration established through the development of Linux, and shares these ideals to power any endeavor aiming to make the future a better place in which to live.” This is indeed a noble goal, and to assist it in this endeavor, many of the world’s largest technology companies pay tens and even hundreds of thousands of dollars. All this money is first stored in a Scrooge McDuck style silo before being used to pay the salaries of some kernel developers, passed on to projects improving security in open source, and used to promote Linux in a wide variety of ways.

  • IBM Adds Hybrid Cloud Capabilities To LinuxOne Mainframe Offering
  • IBM Enhances LinuxONE for Hybrid Cloud Environments
  • IBM boots Linux ecosytem with hybrid cloud capability
  • Time-lapse Video: Edison Supercomputer Moves to Berkeley
  • Yosembiance A Smooth and Sleek Theme Based On Ambiance

    Do you like Ambiance theme but also like flat themes? Yosembiance is smoothed and slightly flattened version of Ubuntu default theme Ambiance and it is modified by Brain Sundman, he tried to make this theme more beautiful and he succeeded, the Ubuntu's default theme Ambiance is also beautiful there is no doubt about it. The initial release of this theme was in 2014 and with the passage of time Brain also made this theme available for newer Ubuntu versions. There is blue version too, if you don't want to stick with orange one then you can choose blue for your desktop. I added this theme to PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial/15.10 Wily/15.04 Vivid/14.04 Trusty, and this theme is not tested on Linux Mint but hopefully it will work just fine, you can give it a shot and let us know in the comment below. You can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool or Ubuntu-Tweak to change themes/icons.

  • Linux Top 3: Kali Rolls, Gparted partions and Android x86 Mobilizes Linux

    As always there is no shortage of activity in the Linux distribution space and this week is no exception as multiple types of Linux distributions are out with updates.

  • ExTiX 16.1 Screencast and Screenshots
  • Jwm On Arch Linux Smile
  • All About Folder Sharing on OpenSUSE 42.1

    This is not the Brazilian dance guys. Samba is a free software licensed under the GNU General Public License and a re-implementation of the SMB/CIFS networking protocol which was originally developed by Andrew Tridgell. Samba is used for sharing files & folders between UNIX & Linux like system towards a Windows OS driven PC. Samba allows a non-Windows server to communicate with the same networking protocol as the Windows products and that’s the interesting part of it. Samba was originally developed for UNIX but now a days it can run on Linux, FreeBSD and other UNIX variants.The name Samba comes from SMB (Server Message Block). Samba works on the majority of modern operating systems available today.

  • [Fedora] Marketing – Year in Review

    Fedora experienced a significant amount of growth and development over the last year. With the growth and recent changes, there were new challenges that Fedora and the Marketing team had to face. The Magazine went really well with significant growth concerning the overall traffic (many thanks to Paul, Ryan, Joe, Chris, Justin) and with more infrastructure stability (thanks to Chris again and Patrick). On the other hand, the institutional part of Marketing experienced difficulties in keeping current with the changes that 2015 brought.

  • BofA/Merrill downgrades Red Hat, cites international sales pressures
  • Warning: 37 new booby trapped onion sites

    In June I warned Tor users about the presence of hundreds of fake and booby trapped .onion websites [1].

  • Tails 2.0 Anonymous Live CD Officially Released, Based on Debian GNU/Linux 8

    The Tails development team proudly announced the immediate availability for download of the final Tails 2.0 build, the most promising release of the amnesic incognito live system.

  • Ubuntu Linux and open source play key role in Microsoft Azure Stack Technical Preview

    The current perceptions of Microsoft by some home users can be quite negative. This is likely due to privacy concerns with Windows 10, which is a legitimate issue.

  • The Pine A64 is about to become the cheapest ARM 64-bit platform to run Docker

    Last Saturday one of the more promising Kickstarter campaigns that piqued our curiosity ended after 44 days and was able to raise 1.7 million dollars. It was a campaign to fund the cheapest 64-bit ARM board that can currently be bought for money.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • GNOME Settings To Get a Major Design Overhaul

    The GNOME settings app is to get a major design overhaul, GNOME designers and developers have revealed.

    The new design proposals will see the utility switch from a grid layout with fixed window size to one using a sidebar list and resizeable window frame.

  • This Week in Solus – Install #19

    Alongside our crunch and focus for 1.1, we’ve also been continuing our campaign of bug crushing. We’ve crushed 22 bugs over the last week, ranging from long sitting bugs that have been resolved since the Budgie rewrite to recent ones that are related to inclusion of git-based patches for new software in the repo.

  • Zenwalk 8.0 Linux Distribution Now In Beta
  • Manjaro Deepin 15.12
  • Arch just works, Ubuntu is customizable

    Ever actually treid to make a package for Ubuntu? Understanding .deb takes a good couple of days of documentation until you get it down, every idiot can make a Pacman package because it's simpler, it "just works". The AUR's success is probably tied to that any idiot can make a Pacman package.

  • Red Hat, Inc. Analyst Rating Update

    As many as 16 brokerage firms have rated Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) at 1.5. Research Analysts at Zacks Investment Research have ranked the company at 3, suggesting the traders with a rating of hold for the short term. The stock garnered a place in the hold list of 3 stock Analysts. 2 analysts suggested buying the company. 11 analysts rated the company as a strong buy.

  • Brokerages Set Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) PT at $89.73

    Shares of Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) have been given a consensus rating of “Buy” by the thirty-four research firms that are covering the company, AnalystRatings.NET reports. Two equities research analysts have rated the stock with a sell recommendation, six have given a hold recommendation and twenty-five have given a buy recommendation to the company. The average twelve-month target price among brokers that have covered the stock in the last year is $89.73.

  • neovim-coming-to-debian

    Almost 9 months after I took ownership of the Neovim RFP, I finally tagged & uploaded Neovim to Debian. It still has to go through the NEW queue, but it will soon be in an experimental release near you.

  • Sailfish OS on Fairphone 2 - a community driven project

    European flagship phone with European operating system combines ethics and ideologies in the mobile industry

  • Samsung Gear Manager Updated to Version 2.2.16011842 for Tizen Smartwatches

    Today, Samsung have released an update to the Android Gear Manager app, taking it to version 2.2.16011842. We did once upon a time get quite regular updates to the Gear Manager App, but the last one was back in November, which took us to version 2.2.15111841.

  • The Dawn of Open Source Insulin

    Based on WHO (World Health Organization) reports on diabetes, in 2012, an estimated 1.5 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes and it is projected to be one of the leading causes of death in 2030. More than 80% of diabetes deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries.

  • So you think offline systems need no updates?

    So, yes, security issues are harmful. They must be taken serious, and a solid and well designed security concept should be applied. Multiple layers, different zones, role based access, update often, etc.

  • Why the Sun 2 has the message “Love your country, but never trust its government”

    Alec figured that message was never supposed to be seen and suggested it was a kind of silent protest of someone in Sun against the US Government. I replied, saying I was pretty sure such a message anywhere in the Sun bootprom code must have originated by John Gilmore. So I asked John, and he did not disappoint. This is what I wrote me back...

  • Microsoft Surface blamed for NFL football playoffs meltdown

    "They're having some trouble with their Microsoft Surface tablets," announced CBS reporter Evan Washburn. "That last defensive possession the Patriots' coaches did not have access to those tablets to show pictures to their players. NFL officials have been working at it. Some of those tablets are back in use but not all of them. A lot of frustration that they didn't have them on that last possession."

today's leftovers

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DragonBox Pyra

  • DragonBox Pyra Goes Up For Pre-Order
    It's been a while since last hearing anything about the DragonBox Pyra as an open-source gaming handheld system and successor to OpenPandora...
  • Bitcoin is Now Accepted For DragonBox Pyra Pre-orders
    It is always good to see new merchants accepting Bitcoin payments, as it goes to show businesses want to attract an international clientele. DragonBox, a ship based in Germany, recently started accepting Bitcoin payments for their Pyra computer. A neat little device, which packs quite the punch.
  • DragonBox Pyra pre-orders begin (open Source handheld gaming PC)
    The DragonBox Pyra is a portable computer that looks like a cross between a tiny laptop and a Nintendo DX game console… and it kind of works like a cross between those devices as well. It’s got a 5 inch display, a QWERTY keyboard, the Debian Linux operating system that can handle desktop apps as well as games, and physical gaming buttons.

DragonBox Pyra pre-orders begin (open Source handheld gaming PC)

The DragonBox Pyra is a portable computer that looks like a cross between a tiny laptop and a Nintendo DX game console… and it kind of works like a cross between those devices as well. It’s got a 5 inch display, a QWERTY keyboard, the Debian Linux operating system that can handle desktop apps as well as games, and physical gaming buttons. It’s been under development for several years, and it’s expected to be available for purchase soon for about 500 Euros (plus VAT). But if you want to help fund the developers you can now place a pre-order for 330 Euros and up. Read more

today's leftovers

  • How Linux Frustrated Me Into Loving It
    I have been very interested in Linux since my entry into the Wonderful World of Unix in 2006. I found Ubuntu and installed it on a crappy Dell desktop computer I was given when I was doing online schooling. The computer originally came with Windows, and one day while I was browsing, I decided to search for “alternative to Windows.” Linux popped up right away. I had never heard of Linux before, but after voraciously reading article after article, I decided Linux was the path for my future.
  • HP Chromebook 13 is a business-focused Chrome OS laptop with USB-C
    In the grand scheme of things, Chrome OS is hardly a major player from a desktop market share perspective -- for now. With that said, the Linux-based operating system has captured the hearts and minds of many consumers. It has matured quite a bit too, becoming a viable Windows alternative for home users. Actually, it is a great choice for some businesses too -- depending on needs, of course.
  • Summary: Linux Scheduler: A decade of wasted cores - Part 1 - What is NUMA ?
    Last month, a research paper with title 'The Linux Scheduler: a Decade of Wasted Cores' was trending on the front page of HN. As an individual who is interested in Systems, I thought it would be good idea to read this 16 page research paper. I spent a good amount of time learning about different topics which were involved in it. This is the first post in the series in which I will try to summarize the paper.
  • Vulkan 1.0.12 Specification Update Adds VK_AMD_rasterization_order
  • GTK+ 3.22 Is Working On An OpenGL Renderer & Scene Graph
    Matthias Clasen of Red Hat has written an update about changes to GNOME's GTK+ tool-kit for the 3.20 cycle but he also mentions some of the exciting work that's brewing for GNOME/GTK+ 3.22. Clasen's latest blog post covers some of the recent internal changes to GTK+ CSS, theme changes, various changes facing application developers, and more. Those interested about the GTK+ tooling changes can read the blog post.
  • Bunsenlabs Rc2
  • April is almost gone
    The second one was the release of pre-release isos of Mageia 6 and OpenMandriva Lx 3. I must say that both distros are doing a great job; the systems performed so well that they did not seem beta versions to me. I did not like Plasma 5, though... I am sure the KDE team is doing a great work, but I truly do not see what the point of this tablet-ready interface is. After all, KDE missed the tablet train (the Vivaldi tablet never saw the light of the day) and tablets are already in decline...
  • New BlackArch Linux version released, now provides 1400 pentesting tools
    BlackArch Linux version 2016.04.28 released for ethical hackers and security researchers with 1400 pentesting tools
  • Manjaro 16.06 - third preview released
    It took us almost another month to prepare this third preview of our upcoming stable release we call Daniella. The Xfce edition remains our flagship offering and has received the attention it deserves. Few can claim to offer such a polished, integrated and leading-edge Xfce experience. We ship Xfce 4.12 with this release of Manjaro. We mainly focused on polishing the user experience on the desktop and window manager, and on updating some components to take advantage of newly available technologies such as switching to a new theme called Maia, we already using for our KDE edition.
  • IoT Past and Present: The History of IoT, and Where It's Headed Today [Ed: just devices with a network stack. Nothing new.]
  • 1btn – an Open Source Dash
    The availability of cheap radios, omni-present WiFi and powerful web services means the IoT wave is here to stay. Amazon got into the act with its “do only one thing” Dash button. But a more interesting solution would be an IoT “do it all” button.
  • No Time to Panic as One Quarter Shows Minor Dip in Smartphone Sales - Total Smartphone Market Will Grow This Year (and here's why)
    We now have the Q1 numbers from Strategy Analytics and IDC, the two last remaining of the classic four big smartphone industry analyst houses we used on this blog to calculate the industry average of the total market size, back when the 'smartphone bloodbath' started six years ago. And both SA and IDC are in exceptional, near-perfect agreement on the exact size of the market, we get a total smartphone market for Q1 at 334.8 Million units. That is down 18% from the Christmas sales Quarter (normal that Q1 is down) but for the first time ever in this industry, the YEAR-ON-YEAR comparison of Q1, so the January-March quarter last year 2015 vs now, is down. This has not happened in the smartphone industry in any YoY period. And some are now talking about 'peak smartphone'. That number COULD be a signal that smartphone industry growth has stalled and now peaked and smartphone sales will either plateau flat, or decline into the next year(s).
  • GhostBSD 10.3 Alpha Released With ZFS File-System Support, MATE 1.12
    The first alpha release was made available this weekend of GhostBSD 10.3 Alpha 1, a desktop focused operating system built atop FreeBSD 10.3.
  • 3D Printer Crowdfunding projects
    Like every Kickstarter project, there is a risk. But I think that Trinus appears to be a good project, we need to wait to the launch and review a real machine to know if it worth it. Also, the Youtube Channel Maker’s Muse, made a review of the project and the company Konama, creators of Trinus, sent him a the 3d printer and he currently makes the review of this printer that pledged more then 1 million dollars on KickStarter.
  • Refactoring the open-source photography community
    Generally speaking, most free-software communities tend to form around specific projects: a distribution, an application, a tightly linked suite of applications, and so on. Those are the functional units in which developers work, so it is a natural extension from there to focused mailing lists, web sites, IRC channels, and other forms of interaction with each other and users. But there are alternatives. At Libre Graphics Meeting 2016 in London, Pat David spoke about his recent experience bringing together a new online community centered around photographers who use open-source software. That community crosses over between several applications and libraries, and it has been successful enough that multiple photography-related projects have shut down their independent user forums and migrated to the new site, PIXLS.US.
  • DIY recycling, UCONN's open source chemistry book, and more news

Leftovers: Software