Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Misc

today's leftovers and howtos

Filed under
Misc
HowTos
  • Shadow Icons Looks Great With All Themes, Install in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Shadow icon theme is a new comer for Linux desktop, it looks beautiful with all kind of themes. It is meant to be modern clean and customizable, the primary color of this set most likely bluish and many apps icons are in round shape. So basically this theme is mixture of round and normal (square) shape icons, lets see where this theme will head in the future, it should choose shape what users asks. As creator mentioned this icon theme is his first so please bare any bugs or missing icons. You can report bugs or suggest new icons to include in this set via this link. You can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool to change themes/icons.

  • Obsidian Icon Theme Based On Faenza And It Revives Desktop

    Obsidian icons are based on Faenza icon theme which is around from some years but the development of Faenza is almost stopped, hope creator again give some time to his popular icons. Obisidian-1 icon theme offers icons for panels, toolbars and buttons and colourful squared icons for devices, applications, folder, files and menu items, there are two version included to fit with light or dark themes. It is in active development which means if you find any missing icon or problem with this icon set then you can report it via linked page and hopefully it will be fixed in the next update. Arc theme suite used in the following screenshots and you can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool to change themes/icons.

  • Input Updates Submitted For Linux 4.13 Kernel

    Dmitry Torokhov submitted the input subsystem updates today for the Linux 4.13 kernel merge window.

  • [Video] Qubes OS Part 1: Overview and Features
  • Success

    In November 2012 I started running an irregular rebuild of all Mageia packages on x86_64, discarding the built packages, to just detect build breakages.

    At first it was running a few times a month, now once a week, except before releases where I run it twice a week.

  • How to install Debian+LXDE on ANY Android Tablet

    Running a linux distro on android devices is a hot topic these days, and why not? After all, android is already based on linux kernel, but a pretty much locked-down and dumbed-down version of it. The OEM doesn’t give you root and in most cases, not even an open source bootloader and/or kernel. That way, its good for maybe the most average user who doesn’t care about the OS and just want to use their phones. But for a power user, that’s not enough.

  • Not So Fast, Slick or Why Did it Take Devuan Two Years to Replace Systemd?

    Recently, a guy asked me two questions: If it is so easy to uninstall and switch init systems why did it take devuan 2 years to figure it out? Why are so many struggling to make something so easy work?

  • Some Extra Game Tests Showing AMDGPU+RadeonSI Improvements Since Ubuntu 17.04

    In yesterday's Windows 10 Radeon Software vs. Ubuntu 17.04 + Linux 4.12 + Mesa 17.2-dev comparison I tested both Ubuntu 17.04 out-of-the-box and then upgraded it to the Linux 4.12 kernel and Mesa 17.2-dev. Here are some complementary tests I did with a larger set of Linux games.

    These results show the stock Linux 4.10 + Mesa 17.0.3 performance of Ubuntu 17.04 compared to the same system upgraded to Linux 4.12 + Mesa 17.2-dev for showing the bleeding-edge Linux gaming experience.

  • Privileged Ports Cause Climate Change

    I'm thirty seven years old, which is like ninety nine in programmer years. I'm old enough to remember the earliest days of the public Internet and the first boutique Internet service providers. My first online account was via one called Internet Access Cincinnati (IAC). It provided dialup modem access to a Sun SparcStation 10 where users could run such venerable old terminal applications as elm (a mail client), emacs, lynx (text-mode web browser), and of course IRC.

    Later they added the ability to dial into a CSLIP (predecessor to PPP) terminal server and connect your own Linux or Trumpet WinSock equipped Windows system directly to the Internet with a real bona-fide IP address.

    [...]

    This is all probably water under the bridge. Chances are the path forward will be to develop true secure container multi-tenancy and to achieve with containers what should have been achieved by extending the Unix permission model to networking in user space.

    The purpose of this post is to show how small decisions that nobody really thinks about can have dramatic effects on the future evolution of technology (and society). The 1970s decision to use port numbers as an in-band signaling mechanism to implement cross-system security validation might have been, in retrospect, a trillion dollar mistake that pushed the evolution of the Unix platform down a path of significantly greater complexity, resource use, and cost.

    But hey, maybe it's not a done deal yet. There's over a dozen Linux distributions and most of them are doing more or less the same things with a slightly different spin. Implementing something like this would be an interesting way for one of them to differentiate. The first step would be to implement networking permissions something like what was discussed above and to propose it as a kernel patch. For backward compatibility you could make it something enabled via a sysctl setting, or maybe a module (if modules can make changes that deep).

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Still Working Towards Video Acceleration, Unity 7 Woes

    Will Cooke of Canonical has shared another weekly status update for the work going into the GNOME desktop for Ubuntu 17.10 and their other efforts this cycle.

  • Tidbits from Smartphone Wars - Carl Zeiss, HTC, Sammy and look out for Huawei vs iPhone next two quarters.
  • How to fix IPMI KVM JAVA BMCMD5withRSA and is treated as unsigned error
  • How to Handle a Hi-Dpi Screen in Linux
  • Accessing your Linux server from within Microsoft Windows

today's leftover

Filed under
Misc
  • The changing face of the hybrid cloud

    Depending upon the event you use to start the clock, cloud computing is only a little more than 10 years old. Some terms and concepts around cloud computing that we take for granted today are newer still. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) document that defined now-familiar cloud terminology—such as Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS)—was only published in 2011, although it widely circulated in draft form for a while before that.

  • Choose the best Linux distribution for your enterprise Xen environment

    Ubuntu, Red Hat, SUSE and Oracle provide some level of enterprise support, but you should review these options carefully to determine the best fit.

  • S10E18 – Piquant Abnormal Yard

    This week we make a green screen webcam, mention upcoming laptop reviews from Entroware and Dell and reveal an Entroware laptop competition is coming soon. Then we discuss the death of the Linux desktop, this weeks command line love is using ffmpeg to create “high quality” animated .gifs and we go over your feedback.

  • Features For OpenSUSE Leap 42.3

    OpenSUSE Leap 42.3 has the finish line in sight and it's scheduled to cross that line by the last week of July. Here's a look at the new features.

  • Ubuntu 16.10 Yaketty Yak Support Ends on July 20: Canonical

    It has already been nine months since Ubuntu 16.10 was released, marking the end of support cycle. Ubuntu’s parent company Canonical has announced that it won’t be providing any support for the users of Yakkety Yak after the nine-month period expires in July.

  • Mistral Solutions' 820 Nano SOM

    Application development on the 820 Nano SOM is facilitated on Android Nougat and embedded Linux using a feature-rich carrier board that enables quick prototyping. Mistral further offers optional adaptor boards, such as LCD, camera, sensors and battery charger for increased ease of development around the 820 Nano SOM.

  • Stray animals now receives medical services from Samsung’s community service group
  • Samsung Z4 Tizen 3.0 now available on RTL, developers test your apps

today's leftovers and howtos

Filed under
Misc
HowTos
  • TUXEDO Computers to Develop Own Ubuntu-Based Linux Distro Using Xfce Desktop

    Vinzenz Vietzke of TUXEDO Computers announced today that the German electronics manufacturer, which is known for selling laptops and desktop computers that ship pre-loaded with Linux, created their own distro.

    The news comes just a week after System76 computer reseller announced Pop!_OS as their own GNU/Linux distribution based on Ubuntu and the GNOME desktop environment, and it now looks like TUXEDO Computers follow suit and announce TUXEDO Xubuntu, their own Xubuntu-based distro, which will power all of their computers in the near future.

  • Developer Replaces His MacBook Pro with a Raspberry Pi 3 Computer for One Week

    Node.js expert and backend software engineer Pierre-Gilles Leymarie has recently lost his precious MacBook Pro in a taxi in Paris, and since he didn't have any other computer at home, he decided to give Raspberry Pi a try.

    MacBook Pro is a powerful computer, running Apple's state-of-the-art macOS operating system, yet Pierre-Gilles Leymarie was using it for coding on his Gladys home assistant based on a Raspberry Pi single-board computer using software like VS Code, Node.js and MySQL, along with some other developer-related tools.

    Since Pierre-Gilles Leymarie was very familiar to Raspberry Pi, as it own a few of them at home to hack on his Gladys project, setting up a Raspberry Pi 3 SBC and convert it into a full-featured desktop PC was quite easy to do by installing Raspbian Jessie, an old wireless mouse, a very old USB keyboard, and a 22-inch HDMI LCD.

  • Post-mortem: Extended Deployment time on June 30, 2017

    On June 30, 2017 we had an extended deployment time of roughly 45 minutes for our reference server because of a couple of problems with one of the data migrations. We implemented a new feature, user notifications via RSS, that included a migration of data in our database. This migration was broken, causing this deployment to go terribly wrong.

    The frontend team afterward met to do a post-mortem to identify the problems, solutions and possible take aways for the future. This is the first post-mortem meeting we held, hopefully but not likely the last. Here goes the report.

  • Life full-time at Red Hat

    I had been talking with my manager, Paul Frields, for some time about transitioning to full-time after college. Long story short, the timing so happened to work out that I could be brought on slightly before I'm officially done with college. To that end, I am planning to finish college out part-time from here on out. I still have to take an Ethics course to finish my computer science degree, and I still have some math classes left, for my math degree. I plan on going <= 6 credit hours per semester until I am done, however long that takes.

  •  

  • No coding required: Node-RED on a Raspberry Pi

    Node-RED is a programming tool that lets you quickly connect hardware devices using a browser-based editor. It comes with a wide range of nodes that can be used to build flows in a drag-and-drop manner, significantly reducing your development time. Node-RED is installed with Raspian Jesse for Raspberry Pi, and there is also an option to download Node-RED separately.

  • KDE’s Promising New Email App Has a New Release

    We mentioned KDE Kube, a promising KDE email and PIM suite, earlier this year — and we’re pleased to report that there’s a brand new release available for testing.

  • Episode 54 - Turning into an old person

    Josh and Kurt talk about Canada Day, Not Petya, Interac goes down, Minecraft, airport security and books, then GDPR.

  • Having mouse issues in The Long Dark? Here's a quick fix for now

    The Long Dark [Steam, Official Site] is a beautiful survival game from Hinterland Studio. It's a good game, but it does suffer from one really annoying and game breaking issue on Linux.

  • SKIP grep, use AWK
  • GSoC Week 5: Tests, fallbacks and politics
  • Two great uses for the cp command
  • Attempt to verify patch for "metadata service PicklingError" on TripleO QS Master (Pike) via HA overcloud deployment

today's leftovers and howtos

Filed under
Misc
HowTos

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Fifteen new devices from Technoethical now RYF-certified to respect your freedom

    "We are excited that Technoethical has brought out such an impressive collection of hardware whose associated software respects user freedom. RYF certification continues to gain speed and momentum, thanks to companies like them. Users now have more options than ever when it comes to hardware they can trust, and I'm looking forward to what Technoethical will do next, " said the FSF's executive director, John Sullivan.

  • LinuxQuestions.org Turns Seventeen

    I'm proud to announce that over the weekend LQ turned 17! I’d like to once again thank each and every LQ member for their participation and feedback. While there is always room for improvement, that LQ has remained a friendly and welcoming place for new Linux members despite its size is a testament to the community.

  • 2 New Linux Laptops Unveiled by Entroware

    Two powerful new Linux laptops have been announced by UK-based computer company Entroware.

    The Entroware Apollo is a 13.1-inch notebook made from aluminium, while the Entroware Hybris is a 17.3-inch desktop replacement goliath.

  • Vulkan 1.0.53 Released With New Extensions
  • Nvidia Releases Updated Linux Vulkan Driver with Support for New Extensions

    Nvidia released a new version of its Vulkan graphics driver for both GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows operating systems adding support for new Vulkan and OpenGL extensions, as well as various performance improvements and bug fixes.

    Nvidia 381.10.10 Linux and Nvidia 382.68 Windows Vulkan drivers are now available, and they come improved interoperability with the latest Vulkan API by adding support for the VK_EXT_blend_operation_advanced and VK_NV_framebuffer_mixed_samples extensions.

  • Progress report for period June 12th - June 25th

    During the coding period, I discovered that MetaDisplay, main GObject of Mutter had a lot of X11 specific fields, so I had to move them into something else, which we (mentors and myself) decided to call MetaX11Display. A lot of code had to be modified, and that had to be carefully approached, so nothing got broken in the process. The "coding" I had done was just moving stuff around, between files, adjusting for new structure fields, and so on. It was, I might say, a rather boring experience. But, someone had to do it, as it is a requisite for all of my future work. Note that even at the moment of writing, all of X11 specifics have not been ironed out. While trying to efficiently split MetaDisplay, I stumbled upon MetaScreen, a structure which previously used to contain reference to X Screen it was managing. The comments in the code pointed out that, while Mutter used to contain more than one X Screen, nowadays it manages only one. So, again, we realized that structure needs to be split somehow, since it contains (as expected) lot of X11 specifics, but also some code that can be used for Wayland environment. The decision was made to move the fields into MetaDisplay and MetaX11Display, depending in which environment it might be useful. Sadly, I did not get around to start disassembling the screen management code in this period. So, that's what my next adventure will be all about. All of the work that was done is available on my Github repository [1].

  • Distributions are becoming irrelevant: difference was our strength and our liability

    For someone that has spent the past thirteen years defining himself as a developer of a Linux distribution (whether I really am still a Gentoo Linux developer or not is up for debate I’m sure), having to write a title like this is obviously hard. But from the day I started working on open source software to now I have grown a lot, and I have realized I have been wrong about many things in the past.

    One thing that I realized recently is that nowadays, distributions lost the war. As the title of this post says, difference is our strength, but at the same time, it is also the seed of our ruin. Take distributions: Gentoo, Fedora, Debian, SuSE, Archlinux, Ubuntu. They all look and act differently, focusing on different target users, and because of this they differ significantly in which software they make available, which versions are made available, and how much effort is spent on testing, both the package itself and the system integration.

  • SUSE Expands Container Management and Deployment Capabilities

    Like most Linux vendors today, SUSE is keeping busy updating it portfolio to support the growing demand for container management and services. So far this month, SUSE has announced two different efforts to improve its container portfolio.

    On June 27, SUSE announced its SUSE Manager 3.1 update, which provides new capabilities for organizations to manage software across both container and cloud infrastructure. SUSE Manager has been part of the SUSE portfolio since 2011, when the company was still part of Novell.

    "SUSE Manager's new container management and compliance capabilities will enable customers to automate orchestration and provisioning of their container-based services while ensuring container compliance from the same tool they are already using to manage their Linux infrastructure," Mary Johnston Turner, research vice president for Enterprise System Management Software at IDC, said in a statement.

  • OECD: ‘Create incentives for reuse of open data’

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is urging Europe’s governments to create incentives for public sector organisations and others to use open data. A good way for governments to promote sharing and reuse of data, and to improve public administration, is the creation of data-driven eGovernment services, says Barbara Ubaldi, Head of Unit, Digital Government and Open Data at the OECD.

  • d2k17 Hackathon Report: Alexander Bluhm on Network Stack Improvements and more
  • Rust, C, and Binding

    Rust is designed to be interoperable with C interfaces. Currently it is not able to call C++ libraries directly.

  • Windows 10 Insiders can now get SUSE Linux distributions from the Store
  • What are the leading software platforms for NFV infrastructure?

    As service providers report a number of successful production deployments of network functions virtualization, it is important to consider the infrastructure beneath it all -- and the available options. The leading software platforms for NFV infrastructure are OpenStack and VMware's vCloud NFV. But service providers can choose from a number of OpenStack options, including sourcing from a supplier or open source internal development.

  • Stuck Stacks, the 7 year itch and the DevOps dilemma

    It is 7 years since OpenStack came into being...

  • Your Container Orchestration Needs: Kubernetes vs. Mesos vs. Docker Swarm

    If you’re going to use Mesos or Docker Swarm, it’s very easy to decide which version you can use, either the community supported version or the enterprise grade supported offering.

    For Kubernetes you have to decide which option or options is most likely the right one for your business, this could be somehow challenging, especially in some cases if you’re going to build a hybrid and federated environment, e.g. with OpenStack, AWS and OTC (Open Telekom Cloud).

  • Site Reliability Engineering for Cloud-Native Operations
  • Launched Just A Year Ago, Open-Source Scality S3 Server Gains Extraordinary Momentum As It Simplifies The Life Of Developers

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Manjaro Linux 17.0.2 Arch-based operating system is here with GNOME, KDE, and Xfce

    Many Linux snobs push the Arch operating system as the greatest thing since sliced bread. In fact, some members of the Arch community (not all of them) can be downright mean and unpleasant to non-users. Not using Arch? Ugh. Peasant! In reality, while Arch is a fine OS (stable and fast), it can be very hard to install and set up, and quite frankly, often not worth the hassle. People have lives to live, and sometimes it is easy to forget that an operating system and associated computer are tools -- not a religion.

  • [Older] Friends, syslog-ng, Package Hub, ARM: openSUSE conference 2017

    Being a long-time openSUSE user, I visit the openSUSE conference not only to present on one of its components – syslog-ng – but also to meet friends and learn about new technologies and the plans for the upcoming year. Some talks, like those about Package Hub, were very interesting and important also from a syslog-ng perspective. Of course, I also joined a few talks for my personal interest, like the one on the new ARM devices supported by openSUSE.

  • UK Army to Use Red Hat OS, Automation Platform for Private Cloud Needs
  • Linux-ready PC/104 board runs on 6 to 7 Watts

    Win Enterprises announced a “MB-83310” PC/104 SBC with a Vortex DX3 SoC, GbE, Fast Ethernet, SATA, M.2, and a -20 to 70°C operating range.

  • [Older] The Turtlebot 3 has launched

    If you’re familiar with ROS (Robot Operating System), chances are you’re also familiar with the Turtlebot. The first version of the Turtlebot was created back in 2010 to serve as an inexpensive platform for learning ROS. This was followed in 2012 by the Turtlebot 2, which has since become the reference platform for learning ROS. We have a number of them here at Canonical, and we love them, although we have one issue with them: they’re just a tad too big. Taking them on a plane requires one to decide what one loves more, one’s belongings, or the Turtlebot, and to check the other.

  • Ubuntu ranked as 2nd most used IoT OS by Eclipse Foundation survey
  • Conjure-up dev summary: Week 25

    We recently switched over to using a bundled LXD and with that change came a few hiccups in deployments. We've been monitoring the error reports coming in and have made several fixes to improve that journey. If you are one of the ones unable to deploy spells please give this release another go and get in touch with us if you still run into problems.

  • We're looking for Ubuntu 17.10 wallpapers right now!

    Submissions will be handled via Flickr at the Ubuntu 17.10 Free Culture Showcase - Wallpapers group, and the submission window begins now and ends on July 3rd.

  • Atollic TrueSTUDIO, the leading commercial GNU/Eclipse IDE for ARM devices is now available for use on Linux workstations

    Atollic TrueSTUDIO IDE has rapidly become the preferred Eclipse™/GDB/GCC-based software development environment for developers working with ARM-based devices. The Linux hosting announcement is expected to widely increase the popularity of this tool.

  •  

  • Security-Focused Purism Librem 13 & 15 Linux Laptops Go Mainstream with Qubes OS

    Purism, the social purpose corporation focused on designing and manufacturing privacy-conscious hardware and software products, announced the general availability of their security-focused Purism Librem 13 and 15 laptops.

    Until recently, both Purism Librem 13 and Librem 15 laptops were available only as made-to-order, which means that those who wanted to purchase either model would have to order it first and then wait a few months until the device arrived. And now, the company finally managed to scale the production to hold inventory of the laptops.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • EV3DEV Lego Linux Updated

    The ev3dev Linux distribution got an update this month. The distribution targets the Lego EV3 which is a CPU Lego provides to drive their Mindstorm robots. The new release includes the most recent kernel and updates from Debian 8.8. It also contains tools needed for some Wi-Fi dongles and other updates.

  • Purism Librem 13 / 15 Laptops Hit GA Status

    Purism has announced their privacy-minded Coreboot-friendly Librem laptops have reached a general availability state.

    Purism will now be holding an inventory of their Librem 13 and Librem 15 laptops for quicker shipping rather than everything being made-to-order.

    While this means users will no longer need to wait "months" when ordering a Librem 13/15 laptop, it still doesn't sound like it will be a very quick turnaround time. Their press release announcing the GA state says, "will now arrive in user’s hands a few weeks after purchase."

  • Linux is Running on Almost All of the Top 500 Supercomputers

    Linux is still running on more than 99% of the top 500 fastest supercomputers in the world. Same as last year, 498 out of top 500 supercomputers run Linux while remaining 2 run Unix.

  • Alioth moving toward pagure

    Since 2003, the Debian project has been running a server called Alioth to host source code version control systems. The server will hit the end of life of the Debian LTS release (Wheezy) next year; that deadline raised some questions regarding the plans for the server over the coming years. Naturally, that led to a discussion regarding possible replacements.

    In response, the current Alioth maintainer, Alexander Wirt, announced a sprint to migrate to pagure, a free-software "Git-centered forge" written in Python for the Fedora project, which LWN covered last year. Alioth currently runs FusionForge, previously known as GForge, which is the free-software fork of the SourceForge code base when that service closed its source in 2001. Alioth hosts source code repositories, mainly Git and Subversion (SVN) and, like other "forge" sites, also offers forums, issue trackers, and mailing list services. While other alternatives are still being evaluated, a consensus has emerged on a migration plan from FusionForage to a more modern and minimal platform based on pagure.

  • elementary + GitHub

    We’re excited to finally say that elementary has completed our move and now lives on GitHub! We’ve migrated over 70 repositories from Launchpad and bzr. So what does that really mean?

  • Ultimate Edition 5.4

    For those who like a visually enhanced form of Linux then Ultimate Edition 5.4 is for you. The graphics are extremely nice compared to other versions of Linux I have seen.

    With animated cursors and having a desktop called ‘Budgie’ the Operating System (OS) is visually pleasing.

  • Google Summer of Code day 16
  • Google Summer of Code day 17
  • Running virt-controller locally
  • How to install and use Monit on Ubuntu/Debian Linux server as process supervision tool
  • AMDGPU VRAM Improvements Could Help DiRT Rally, Dying Light

    A patch series posted on Friday could help games suffering from visible video memory pressure when using the AMDGPU DRM driver.

    Independent developer John Brooks has posted a set of nine patches for improving the driver's performance when limited CPU-visible video memory is under pressure.

  • Understanding Xwayland - Part 1 of 2

    In this week’s article for my ongoing Google Summer of Code (GSoC) project I planned on writing about the basic idea behind the project, but I reconsidered and decided to first give an overview on how Xwayland functions on a high-level and in the next week take a look at its inner workings in detail. The reason for that is, that there is not much Xwayland documentation available right now. So these two articles are meant to fill this void in order to give interested beginners a helping hand. And in two weeks I’ll catch up on explaining the project’s idea.

    [...]

    In the second part next week we’ll have a close look at the Xwayland code to see how Xwayland fills its role as an Xserver in regards to its X based clients and at the same time acts as a Wayland client when facing the Wayland compositor.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security: WPA2, Smartwatches, Google, NSA, Microsoft and Flexera FUD

  • WPA2 flaw's worst impact on Android, Linux devices

    The flaw in the WPA2 wireless protocol revealed recently has a critical impact on Android phones running version 6.0 of the mobile operating system and Linux devices, a security researcher says.

  • Why the Krack Wi-Fi Mess Will Take Decades to Clean Up

    But given the millions of routers and other IoT devices that will likely never see a fix, the true cost of Krack could play out for years.

  • 'All wifi networks' are vulnerable to hacking, security expert discovers

    WPA2 protocol used by vast majority of wifi connections has been broken by Belgian researchers, highlighting potential for internet traffic to be exposed

  • Kids' smartwatches can be 'easily' hacked, says watchdog

    Smartwatches bought for children who do not necessarily need them can be hacked [sic], according to a warning out of Norway and its local Consumer Council (NCC).

  • John Lewis pulls children's smartwatch from sale over spying fears

    The Norwegian Consumer Council (NCC) revealed that several brands of children’s smartwatch, have such poor security controls that hackers [sic] could easily follow their movements and eavesdrop on conversations.

  • Google's 'Advanced Protection' Locks Down Accounts Like Never Before

    Google hasn't shared the details of what that process entails. But the CDT's Hall, whom Google briefed on the details, says it will include a "cooling-off" period that will lock the account for a period of time while the user proves his or her identity via several other factors. That slowed-down, intensive check is designed to make the account-recovery process a far less appealing backdoor into victims' data.

  • NSA won't say if it knew about KRACK, but don't look to this leaked doc for answers
    Given how involved the NSA has been with remote and local exploitation of networks, systems, devices, and even individuals, many put two and two together and assumed the worst. What compounded the matter was that some were pointing to a 2010-dated top secret NSA document leaked by whistleblower Edward Snowden, which detailed a hacking tool called BADDECISION, an "802.11 CNE tool" -- essentially an exploit designed to target wireless networks by using a man-in-the-middle attack within range of the network. It then uses a frame injection technique to redirect targets to one of the NSA's own servers, which acts as a "matchmaker" to supply the best malware for the target device to ensure it's compromised for the long-term. The slide said the hacking tool "works for WPA/WPA2," suggesting that BADDECISION could bypass the encryption. Cue the conspiracy theories. No wonder some thought the hacking tool was an early NSA-only version of KRACK.
  • You're doing open source wrong, Microsoft tsk-tsk-tsks at Google: Chrome security fixes made public too early [Ed: Says the company that gives back doors to the NSA and attacks FOSS with patents, lobbying etc.]
  • Why Open Source Security Matters for Healthcare Orgs [Ed: marketing slant for firms that spread FUD]
    Open source software can help healthcare organizations remain flexible as they adopt new IT solutions, but if entities lack open source security measures it can lead to larger cybersecurity issues. A recent survey found that organizations in numerous industries might not be paying enough attention to potential open source risk factors. Half of all code used in commercial and Internet of Things (IoT) software products is open source, but only 37 percent of organizations have an open source acquisition or usage policy, according to a recent Flexera report. More than 400 commercial software suppliers and in-house software development teams were interviewed, with respondent roles including software developers, DevOps, IT, engineering, legal, and security.

Games: JASEM, openage, Riskers, Rise to Ruins, Slime Rancher

The most promising linux distributions in 2017

Linux distributions have already gained recognition of its users and with every year new products appear in the market. Many of them focus on the certain tasks, so you can’t create a single list of the best ones. Here we have chosen several fields of Linux use and those distributions that have all chances to take the initial positions in their niche in 2017. Read more

Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) released

Codenamed "Artful Aardvark", Ubuntu 17.10 continues Ubuntu's proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technology into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. As always, the team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs. Under the hood, there have been updates to many core packages, including a new 4.13-based kernel, glibc 2.26, gcc 7.2, and much more. Ubuntu Desktop has had a major overhaul, with the switch from Unity as our default desktop to GNOME3 and gnome-shell. Along with that, there are the usual incremental improvements, with newer versions of GTK and Qt, and updates to major packages like Firefox and LibreOffice. Read more Also: Ubuntu 17.10 Debuts Officially with GNOME 3.26 on Top of Wayland, Linux 4.13 How to: Upgrade Ubuntu 17.04 to Ubuntu 17.10 Ubuntu 17.10 ISOs Officially Released 10 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 17.10 Ubuntu 17.10 Now Available to Download, This Is What’s New How to Enable Night Light on Ubuntu 17.10 Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark Released With New Features — Download Torrents And ISO Files Here Ubuntu Flavors, Including Ubuntu MATE 17.10, Are Available to Download Ubuntu 17.10 'Artful Aardvark' ditches Unity for Gnome