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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • “Top Notch” Android Phones Are Utterly Stupid And I Feel Sorry For Them

    I’m not going to dive deep and rant about all the “courageous” paths taken by Apple that I didn’t like. I’m not going to discuss why Apple ditched the 3.5mm headphone jack or why it chose to push proprietary connectors and standards. However, since this article is all about notches and Android device manufacturers are hellbent on copying Apple, changes brought in iPhone X can’t be ignored.

  • Days of Future_Open
  • [Podcast] PodCTL #31 – Reviewing Kubernetes 1.10

    Like clockwork, a new release of Kubernetes comes out every quarter. And with the arrival of Spring comes Kubernetes 1.10. Stability, Security, Networking and Storage are front of center of the new release. This week we dig into the 1.10 release and highlight some of the features that we believe will have the biggest impact on customers being able to deploy more applications on Kubernetes (and ultimately OpenShift).

  • Qubes Version 4.0 Released, Purism Laptops Shipping Quickly, New Rust Version 1.25.0 and More

    Purism announces that its Librem laptop orders are now shipping within a week—in other words, on average, the company now can fulfill orders within five business days. See the Purism blog for more information on this milestone.

  • GDC 2018 Videos Now Available, Including Khronos/Vulkan Talks

    If you are looking for some deep technical content to watch this weekend, the video recordings from this month's Game Developers Conference 2018 (GDC 18) are now available.

  • The ways of the GNOME people

    Hidden away in the farthest corner of the planet, its slopes covered in mist and darkness and its peaks lost in the clouds, stands the formidable Mount GNOME. Perched atop the mountain is a castle as menacing as the mountain itself – its towering walls made of stones as cold as death, and the wind howling through the courtyard like a dozen witches screaming for blood.

    Living inside the imposing blackness are a group of feral savages, of whom very little is known to the world outside. The deathly walls of the castle bear testimony to their skull-crushing barbarism, and their vile customs have laid waste to the surrounding slopes and valleys. Mortally fearful of invoking their mad wrath, no human traveller has dared to come near the vicinity of their territory. Shrouded in anonymity, they draw their name from the impregnable mountain that they inhabit – they are the GNOME people.

  • Leak Hunting and Mutter Hacking

    Last week, when I upgraded to GNOME 3.28, I was sad to notice an extremely annoying bug in Mutter/GNOME Shell: every once in a while, a micro-stuttering happened. This was in additions to another bug that was disappointing me for quite a while: the tiling/maximize/unmaximize animations were not working on Wayland too.

  • openSUSE Elections Postponed

    The elections for the openSUSE Board have been postponed until April 15.

    The postponement will extend Phase 1 of the elections and give candidates more time to campaign and engage with the community. The voting phase (Phase 2) will start April 15.

today's leftovers

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  • Will Schools Buy $300 iPads Over $200 Chromebooks?

    I get what Apple is trying to do here. But this is still a really expensive pitch. Sure, the iPad cost “only” $300. But the pencil costs $100 more, and you’re probably going to want a keyboard so kids can actually type on the thing.

  • Purism at FestiĞ1 and the Librem as a Digital Hardware Wallet

    Two weeks ago, I attended an event in Toulouse, France, where I was kindly invited by the organizers, who offered me a booth to present Purism and the Librem line.

    Purism, utilizing a hardware security element in our Librem Laptops as well as our upcoming Librem 5 phone will be addressing the serious issue of securing crypto-currencies in hardware wallets with secure offline backups.

    The FestiĞ1 was a special event to celebrate the first anniversary of the Ğ1 (pronounce “June”) libre crypto currency based on the free software Duniter.

  • Arch Linux Install By Example

    Arch Linux is a rolling release Linux distribution. What that means is, you get the most up to date packages on Arch Linux. Arch Linux always keeps its software repository updated with the latest software packages as soon as they are released and you never have to reinstall Arch Linux if an update is released. You can do a full system upgrade whenever you want and keep your Arch machine up to date. Arch Linux gets security patches and bug fixes as soon as they are released as well.

    Arch Linux is a little harder to install for people who are new to Linux or people who don’t have much idea about how Linux works in general.  In this article, I will show you how to install Arch Linux on your computer. Let’s get started.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • DXVK 0.40 Brings Initial Direct3D 11.1 Bits, Other Improvements

    The DXVK project that is implementing Direct3D 11 atop of Vulkan for the benefit of Wine gamers is out this weekend with a new release.

    DXVK continues rapidly advancing in allowing more D3D11 games on Wine to run with better performance than Wine's stock D3D11-to-OpenGL translation layer. The latest release this Sunday is DXVK 0.40.

  • Advanced DRI Configurator Now Supports PRIME GPU Setups

    As a more modern and feature alternative to the DriConf configuration program for tweaking Mesa driver settings, a few months back we featured ADRICONF as the Advanced DRI Configuration. Recently this GUI program has picked up a few more features.

    The author of ADRICONF, Jean Hertel, wrote into Phoronix this weekend to share some of the recent development work. Most notably, there is now initial support for PRIME multi-GPU setups within the program. The basics should be in there but the developer is willing to receive bug reports about any missing features and is encouraging those with PRIME laptops/systems to give ADRICONF a whirl to see how it does.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 8.0 M2 Released With Continued Windows Improvements
  • Confessions of a Brogue junkie

    Roguelikes. The term is everywhere these days, and every bit as played-out as “zombies” or “the Dark Souls of…”. We see it so much on game descriptions that we’re sick of it.

  • LG Open Sources WebOS

    The new webOS Open Source Edition (OSE) GitHub account contains 85 different repositories that use the Apache 2.0 License to make code change and distribution easier. To build an image of webOS OSE, you can clone the build-webos repository, which is a top-level repo that aggregates the various layers of code required to build a complete image.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Sony May Owe You $65 for Your Old PS3

    If you own an old PlayStation 3, the original “fat” one before it slimmed down, then Sony could owe you up to $65. Unfortunately, there are a few hurdles to jump through, and you only have until April 15, 2018 to stake your claim for compensation.

  • Nouveau Is On The Verge Of Having Basic Compute Support

    Karol Herbst, who is a long-time Nouveau contributor who joined Red Hat at the end of last year, along with other hat-wearing Linux developers continue working on Nouveau compute support for this open-source NVIDIA driver.

    Karol has been ironing out the Nouveau NIR support that is a critical element to get SPIR-V support going for the Nouveau driver, which is the common IR to Vulkan and OpenCL. Meanwhile there is also the work to get SPIR-V support for Gallium3D's Clover state tracker.

  • Intel OpenGL Driver Performance On Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu vs. Clear Linux

    When having the Microsoft Windows 10 Professional x64 installation on the Core i7 8700K "Coffee Lake" system this week I also took the opportunity to run some fresh OpenGL benchmarks on Windows compared to Linux.

    Due to the UHD Graphics 630 not being too practical for Linux gamers, for this quick round of benchmarking were just some standard OpenGL games and tests across all supported platforms. The latest drivers were used on each platform, including a secondary run on Ubuntu when switching to the Linux 4.16 Git kernel.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux More Popular than Windows in Stack Overflow's 2018 Developer Survey

    Stack Overflow, the largest and most trusted online community for developers, published the results of their annual developer survey, held throughout January 2018.

    More than 100,000 developers participated in this year's Annual Developer Survey, which included several new topics ranging from ethics in coding to artificial intelligence (AI). The results are finally here and reveal the fact that some technologies and operating systems have become more popular than others in the past year.

  • History of containers

    I’ve researched these dates several times now over the years, in preparation for several talks. So I’m posting it here for my own future reference.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E03 – The Three Musketeers - Ubuntu Podcast
  • Best Desktop Environment

    Thanks to its stability, performance, feature set and a loyal following, the K Desktop Environment (KDE) won Best Desktop Environment in this year's Linux Journal Readers' Choice Awards.

  • Renata D'Avila: Pushing a commit to a different repo

    My Outreachy internship with Debian is over. I'm still going to write an article about it, to let everyone know what I worked on towards the ending, but I simply didn't have the time yet to sit down and compile all the information.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Locking down Data with Open Source Code

    The single most noteworthy quality of Linux is that it is one of the few open source working frameworks, and among the most broadly created. Confining open source programming as secure justifiably befuddles individuals, however, a closer look discloses why that is valid. At the point when source code is distributed on the web, it could enable an aggressor to find shortcomings. In any case, by and by it enables numerous more eyewitnesses to distinguish and uncover bugs to the engineers for fixing. Since Linux is an entirely open source OS, for all intents and purposes each scrap of code running on your equipment is subjected to this crowdsourced examination.

  • Best open source network monitoring tools
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  • PostgreSQL Begins Landing LLVM JIT Support For Faster Performance

    The widely-used PostgreSQL database software may soon become much faster thanks to a work-in-progress LLVM JIT back-end that has begun to land.

    A long-running project has been JIT-compiling SQL queries in PostgreSQL by making use of LLVM's just-in-time compilation support, rather than passing SQL queries through Postgres' interpreter. With the LLVM JIT'ed queries, more efficient code is generated by being able to make more use of run-time information and can especially help in increasing the performance of complex SQL queries.

  • GNU Parallel 20180322 ('Hawking') released

    GNU Parallel 20180322 ('Hawking') has been released.

  • LibrePlanet 2018: Last update!

    Advance registration is now closed, but you can register on-site at LibrePlanet 2018, starting at 09:00 on the ground floor of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Stata Center, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA. Admission is gratis for FSF Associate Members and students, and for all others costs $60 for one day or $90 for both days.

    If you are unable to attend, or know people who cannot attend LibrePlanet 2018 but want to participate, watch the livestream, which you can do using exclusively free software (an unfortunate rarity!)

    We want to alert you to a schedule change: unfortunately, keynote speaker Gabriella Coleman had to cancel her LibrePlanet talk. She will be sorely missed, but we are glad to announce that free software technologist, social scientist, and FSF board member Benjamin Mako Hill will fill in. Check out the full schedule here -- to read full descriptions of each talk, click "Expand all" at the top of the page.

  • AMD Confirms Newly-Found Security Flaws in Some of Its Chips, Fixes Coming Soon
  • This App Lets You Generate Two-Factor Authentication Codes on Linux

    Looking for a two factor authentication code generator for Linux? Well, you use the past tense, as we’ve gone and found you one.

    ‘Authenticator‘ is an aptly-named, native, and easy to use two-factor authentication app for the Linux desktop.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

  • Google Patches All Intel Chromebooks Against Spectre Variant 2 with Chrome OS 65

    Google released a new stable version of its Linux-based Chrome OS operating system for Chromebooks, build 65.0.3325.167 (Platform version: 10323.58.0/1) bringing the Meltdown and Spectre mitigations to more devices and a bunch of other improvements.

  • VIDEO: Cooking With Linux: Lots and Lots of Word Processors! The Tuesday Linux Journal Show
  • How to use netstat in GNU/Linux
  • Cutelyst 2 released with HTTP/2 support

    Cutelyst the Qt/C++ web framework just got a major release update, around one and half year ago Cutelyst v1 got the first release with a stable API/ABI, many improvements where made during this period but now it was time to clean up the mistakes and give room for new features.

  • Fedora 28 and GNOME 3.28: New Features for Eastern Europe

    This time this is not fake, edited, patched, nor a custom build from COPR but the real screenshots of the unmodified downstream Fedora 28 planned to be released on May 1 this year. Here is how the default calendar widget in GNOME Shell looks in Greek, Polish, and Ukrainian:

  • Stephen Smoogen: /usr/bin/whoami
  • Debian CEF packages

    I've created some Debian CEF packages—CEF isn't the easiest thing to package (and it takes an hour to build even on my 20-core server, since it needs to build basically all of Chromium), but it's fairly rewarding to see everything fall into place. It should benefit not only Nageru, but also OBS and potentially CasparCG if anyone wants to package that.

  • Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #151
  • Porting L4Re and Fiasco.OC to the Ben NanoNote (Part 1)

    For quite some time, I have been interested in alternative operating system technologies, particularly kernels beyond the likes of Linux. Things like the Hurd and technologies associated with it, such as Mach, seem like worthy initiatives, and contrary to largely ignorant and conveniently propagated myths, they are available and usable today for anyone bothered to take a look. Indeed, Mach has had quite an active life despite being denigrated for being an older-generation microkernel with questionable performance credentials.

    But one technological branch that has intrigued me for a while has been the L4 family of microkernels. Starting out with the motivation to improve microkernel performance, particularly with regard to interprocess communication, different “flavours” of L4 have seen widespread use and, like Mach, have been ported to different hardware architectures. One of these L4 implementations, Fiasco.OC, appeared particularly interesting in this latter regard, in addition to various other features it offers over earlier L4 implementations.

    Meanwhile, I have had some success with software and hardware experiments with the Ben NanoNote. As you may know or remember, the Ben NanoNote is a “palmtop” computer based on an existing design (apparently for a pocket dictionary product) that was intended to offer a portable computing experience supported entirely by Free Software, not needing any proprietary drivers or firmware whatsoever. Had the Free Software Foundation been certifying devices at the time of its introduction, I imagine that it would have received the “Respects Your Freedom” certification. So, it seems to me that it is a worthy candidate for a Free Software porting exercise.

  • Samsung Announces Galaxy Tab Active2, a Rugged Android Tablet for Mobile Workers

    Samsung announced today the Galaxy Tab Active2 rugged Android tablet designed for mobile workers conducting business outdoors in industrial locations, under harsh weather, and other difficult conditions.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Purchased a PlayStation 3 Between 2006 and 2010? You May Be Entitled to $65

    PS3 owners first qualified to receive compensation from Sony following the settlement of a lawsuit in 2016. That case dealt with the "OtherOS" feature that came with the console when it debuted. With OtherOS, Sony promised a new PlayStation that would operate like a computer, allowing users to partition their hard drive and install third-party operating systems like the open-source Linux software.

  • Moro – A Command Line Productivity Tool For Tracking Work Hours

    Keeping track of your work hours will give you an insight about the amount of work you get done in a specific time frame. There are plenty of GUI-based productivity tools available on the Internet for tracking work hours. However, I couldn’t find a good CLI-based tool. Today, I stumbled upon a a simple, yet useful tool named “Moro” for tracking work hours. Moro is a Finnish word which means “Hello”. Using Moro, you can find how much time you take to complete a specific task. It is free, open source and written using NodeJS.

  • Twenty years, 1998 – 2018

    curl 4.0 was just a little more than 2000 lines of C code. It featured 23 command line options. curl 4.0 introduced support for the FTP PORT command and now it could do ftp uploads that append to the remote file. The version number was bumped up from the 3.12 which was the last version number used by the tool under the old name, urlget.

  • What’s New in ArchLabs 2018.03

    ArchLabs 2018.03 is the latest release of Linux distribution based on Arch Linux featuring the Openbox window manager as the primary desktop interface. The project’s latest release ArchLabs 2018.03 brings a few fixes and improvements and improve the user.

    Powered by Linux kernel 4.15 series and based-on latest version of Arch Linux. LUKS and encryption is now working, for those security concious users out there you should be all go on the encryption side. There have been a few installer updates, base-devel is included at install time. Also the mirrorlist is optimised at the same time.

  • [Older] openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018: Call for Host

    The openSUSE.Asia organization committee is accepting proposals to host the openSUSE.Asia Summit during the second half of 2018. The openSUSE.Asia Summit is the largest annual openSUSE conference in Asia, attended by contributors and enthusiasts from all over Asia.

  • TidalScale Software-Defined Servers Now Support SUSE Linux Enterprise Server

    TidalScale, the leader in Software-Defined Servers, announced today that working in partnership with SUSE, the world’s first provider of Enterprise Linux, TidalScale has achieved SUSE Ready certification to ensure full compatibility with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server. TidalScale’s breakthrough scaling platform allows multiple industry standard servers to be combined into a single Software-Defined Server running a single instance of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server.

  • 8 Best Radio Apps For Android To Stream Online Music In 2018

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Zorin OS 12.3 Linux Distro Released: Download The Perfect Windows Replacement

    While listing out the best distros for a Linux beginner, the ease of use and installation are the most critical factors. Such qualities make distros like Linux Mint, Ubuntu, and Zorin OS the most recommended options. In case you’re also concerned about your privacy and security, a shift to the world of Linux becomes a more obvious option.

    Calling itself a replacement for Windows and macOS, Zorin OS has been established as a beginner-friendly option that offers a smooth ride while making the transition. The latest Zorin OS 12.3 release works to strengthen the basics of the operating system and polishes the whole experience.

  • Ramblings about long ago and far away

    I had originally run MCC (Manchester Computer Center Interim Linux) in college but when I moved it was easier to find a box of floppies with SLS so I had installed that on the 486. I would then download software source code from the internet and rebuild it for my own use using all the extra flags I could find in GCC to make my 20Mhz system seem faster. I instead learned that most of the options didn't do anything on i386 Linux at the time and most of my reports about it were probably met by eye-rolls with the people at Cygnus. My supposed goal was to try and set up a MUD so I could code up a text based virtual reality. Or to get a war game called Conquer working on Linux. Or maybe get xTrek working on my system. [I think I mostly was trying to become a game developer by just building stuff versus actually coding stuff. I cave-man debugged a lot of things using stuff I had learned in FORTRAN but it wasn't actually making new things.]

  • EzeeLinux Show 18.13 | Running Linux On Junk

    A talk about the advantages of running Linux on junk hardware.

  • Best 50 HD Wallpapers for Ubuntu

    Wallpapers are useful in many ways depending on the visual it contains for example if there is a motivational quote on it, it helps to motivate you. The images are the best type of wallpaper because they have an impact on the mind of a human being. So if you are a working professional and have to work continuously on a computer then your desktop cab be a source of inspiration and happiness.

    So today we are going to share 50 best HD Wallpapers for your Ubuntu which will keep your desktop fresh.

  • Ubuntu Tried Adding Synaptics Support Back To GNOME's Mutter

    GNOME developers previously dropped support for Synaptics and other input drivers from Mutter in favor of the universal libinput stack that is also Wayland-friendly. Canonical developers tried to get Synaptics support on X11 added back into Mutter but it looks clear now that was rejected.

    Canonical's Will Cooke reported in this week's Ubuntu happenings that they were trying to add upstream support for Synaptics to Mutter, complementing the libinput support. While it's great Canonical trying to contribute upstream to GNOME, Synaptics support was previously dropped as being a maintenance burden and with libinput support getting into rather good shape.

  • Long live Release Engineering

    y involvement in Fedora goes back to late 2003 early 2004 somewhere as a packager for fedora.us. I started by getting a few packages in to scratch some of my itches and I saw it as a way to give back to the greater open source community. Around FC3 somewhere I stepped up to help in infrastructure to rebuild the builders in plague, the build system we used before koji and that we used for EPEL(Something that I helped form) for awhile until we got external repo support in koji.

    I was involved in the implementation of koji in Fedora, I joined OLPC as a build and release engineer, where I oversaw a move of the OS they shipped from FC6 to F8, and laid a foundation for the move to F9. I left OLPC when Red Hat opensourced RHN Satellite as “spacewalk project” I joined Red Hat as the release engineer for both, after a brief period there was some reorganisation in engineering that resulted in me handing off the release engineering tasks to someone closer the the engineers working on the code. As a result I worked on Fedora full time helping Jesse Keating. When he decided to work on the internal migration from CVS to git I took over as the lead.

    [...]

    Recently I have accepted a Job offer to become the manager of a different team inside of Red Hat.

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Finally: First stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5

After almost exactly two years of being work-in-progress, the first stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5 has been published! You can grab the sources at your local KDE mirror. Some distributions like ArchLinux already ship binary packages. After one beta and one release candidate, now comes the final release. You may wonder why this release gets version number 0.8.1 but not 0.8 as expected. This is simply due to the fact that I noticed a bug in CMakeLists.txt when computing version numbers which did not work if the version number just had two fields, i. e. no ‘patch’ version. As the code and the tag of 0.8 was already pushed, I had no alternative than to fix the problem and increase the version number. Otherwise, the ChangeLog (alternative view) is virtually unchanged compared to the last pre-release. Read more

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Android Leftovers

Peppermint OS Version 9 Released With New Features

Ubuntu-based lightweight distribution, Peppermint has just released its version 9. Here’s a quick look at the changes in the new release. Read more