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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Top 3: Fedora 24, Peppermint 7 and Solus 1.2

    Perhaps the biggest release of last week was Fedora 24, the first major milestone release from Red Hat's community Linux platform so far in 2016. On the desktop Fedora 24 including the GNOME 3.20 desktop and now supports the Flatpak application packaging approach. The promise of Flatpack much like Ubuntu's Snappy is a single package that can run across multiple Linux distributions.

  • LinuxQuestions.org Turns Sixteen

    I'm proud to announce that over the weekend LQ turned 16! I’d like to once again thank each and every LQ member for their participation and feedback. While there is always room for improvement, that LQ has remained a friendly and welcoming place for new Linux members despite its size is a testament to the community.

  • The ARM64 Race

    At a recent talk SoftIron gave a talk about ARM64 versus x86 servery, it was emphasized that comparisons are often apples v oranges. Given the right race, ARM64 is competitive today, say, in storage servery. That’s because smaller cores distributed with lots of storage hanging on each is a better match to the workload. Further, ARM64 is becoming competitive in its 1st generation while x86 is on its umpteenth generation. With the large cast of developers and interest from large customers, growth/maturity could come very rapidly.

  • OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Beta 2 Released
  • It's HackWeek @SUSE Again!

    This is our fourteenth HackWeek at SUSE already. HackWeek is a SUSE way of Hackathon

  • UEFI for QEMU now in Fedora repositories

    I haven’t seen any announcement, but I noticed Fedora repositories now contain edk2-ovmf package. That is the package that is necessary to emulate UEFI in QEMU/KVM virtual machines. It seems all licensing issues having been finally resolved and now you can easily run UEFI systems in your virtual machines!

  • Issue 98, HyperKitty, Fedora-Apps

    Last week I also did a heuristics evalaution on Hyper Kitty which a django based archiver for the mailman suite allowing the users to starts new threads, reply to mails and mark them as favorites, I focused on analysing the wesbite with regards to the principles that we have been taught in class. I will be updating the heuristics in a separate blog post.

  • I’m switching from git-annex to Syncthing

    I wrote recently about using git-annex for encrypted sync, but due to a number of issues with it, I’ve opted to switch to Syncthing.

  • DebConf16 schedule available

    DebConf will open on Saturday, 2 July 2016 with the Open Festival, where events of interest to a wider audience are offered, ranging from topics specific to Debian to a wider appreciation of the open and maker movements (and not just IT-related). Hackers, makers, hobbyists and other interested parties are invited to share their activities with DebConf attendees and the public at the University of Cape Town, whether in form of workshops, lightning talks, install parties, art exhibition or posters. Additionally, a Job Fair will take place on Saturday, and its job wall will be available throughout DebConf.

  • DebCamp16 day 3

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Installing Arch Linux. Part 1

    Arch Linux is often rather challenging or scary when it comes to a newbie's first Linux experience. Some reasons you may want to go with Arch would be the Pacman package handler, or the fact that it comes with no bloat software that will allow you to truly make it your own. In the installation process, there is no GUI or "Press Next to Continue" to hold your hand. This usually drives people away. I also found the forums to have lots of impatient people who expect you to magically know what you're doing. Here I will try to provide an in depth guide on how to install and setup your own Arch Linux computer.

  • openSUSE News: openSUSE Conference Day 2

    Frank Karlitschek, founder of Nextcloud and ownCloud, talked about the importance of federation infrastructure and reaching the critical mass. He pointed out that Free Open Source Software projects that offer similar applications to those that are proprietary fail to gain mainstream acceptance. One of the reasons he gave was trying to balance the balance between privacy and openness. He suggested that more projects should work with one another on a cloud-sharing standard and perhaps there should be a Global User Directory. Users could manage their privacy data that is shared or visible on a GUD as an answer to sharing personal cloud-based content with users running different applications or services.

  • DebCamp16 day 0
  • GSoC-Journey till Mid term
  • Debian/TeX Live 2016.20160623-1

    About one month has passed since we did release TeX Live 2016, and more than a month since the last Debian packages, so it is high time to ship out a new checkout of upstream. Nothing spectacular new here, just lots and lots of updates since the freeze.

  • Raspberry Pi Stays on Top in Survey of 81 Open-Spec SBCs

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • XCOM 2 - Alien Hunters thoughts, prepare to get frustrated

    So I've been playing through XCOM 2 again, but now with the Alien Hunters DLC enabled and my god it's frustrating.

    To get this out of the way: I freaking love XCOM 2, I think it's an incredibly challenging game, that keeps me coming back for more. I like that it's challenging, I enjoy thinking up different strategies when I've failed numerous times.

  • The nostalgia of Windows is everyday Linux.

    A few days ago, I read a mailing list discussion about the advantages of running a computer in the 1980s. A few, like the lack of Digital Rights Management (DRM), were points well-taken. Others may have been tongue-in-cheek, but might also express personal preferences. However, most of the rest were advantages that I still enjoy (or could enjoy) as a Linux user thirty years later, partly because that is how Linux is designed, and partly because of my personal choices.

  • Kernel hacking workshop

    As part of our "community" program at Collabora, I've had the chance to attend to a workshop on kernel hacking at UrLab (the ULB hackerspace). I never touched any part of the kernel and always saw it as a scary thing for hardcore hackers wearing huge beards, so this was a great opportunity to demystify the beast.

  • More Banks Are Trying Out Ripple’s Blockchain For Fund Transfers

    The San Francisco-based financial technology company Ripple has signed up seven more banks to potentially use its blockchain for cross-border payments.

  • Puppy Linux 6.3.2 "Slacko" Gets New 64-Bit UEFI Boot Capability, F2FS Support

    Today, June 23, 2016, Barry Kauler, the creator of the Puppy Linux distribution, has proudly announced the release and immediate availability for download of Puppy Linux 6.3.2 "Slacko."

    Puppy Linux 6.3.2 "Slacko" appears to be a point release to the Puppy Slacko 6.3 series, and as usual, it has been built from the binary TXZ packages of the Slackware 64-bit 14.1 GNU/Linux operating system. However, it looks like the distro is now powered by a kernel from the Linux 3.14 LTS series, version 3.14.55.

  • openSUSE Conference – First Impressions of Day One

    Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016. Long awaited openSUSE Conference (oSC) finally started. I arrived half an hour before the keynote to join an impressive crowd at the reception desk. Upon registration, like all attendees, I received the beautiful oSC 2016 T-shirt.f

  • Preparing my Chikiticluster in Frankfurt to my presentation

    I am excited that I will give a poster presentation about my experiences with HPC at #ISC16 I was selected to do it as part of the Women HPC:)

  • I've bought some more awful IoT stuff

    Today we're going to be talking about the KanKun SP3, a plug that's been around for a while. The idea here is pretty simple - there's lots of devices that you'd like to be able to turn on and off in a programmatic way, and rather than rewiring them the simplest thing to do is just to insert a control device in between the wall and the device andn ow you can turn your foot bath on and off from your phone. Most vendors go further and also allow you to program timers and even provide some sort of remote tunneling protocol so you can turn off your lights from the comfort of somebody else's home.

  • IBM to deliver 200-petaflop supercomputer by early 2018; Cray moves to Intel Xeon Phi

    More supercomputer news this week: The US is responding to China’s new Sunway TiahuLight system that was announced Monday, and fast. First, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory is expected to take delivery of a new IBM system, named Summit, in early 2018 that will now be capable of 200 peak petaflops, Computerworld reports. That would make it almost twice as fast as TaihuLight if the claim proves true. (We had originally reported in 2014 that both Summit and Sierra would achieve roughly 150 petaflops.)

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • 6WIND and Advantech Offer 40 Gbps NFV Test Drive Platform with Ubuntu OpenStack
  • Science and Tech museums' documents to be 'open by default' by fall, CEO pledges

    In a government town like Ottawa, where information has traditionally been jealously guarded, what Alex Benay is proposing could trigger a bout of cognitive dissonance.

    According to Benay, president and CEO of the Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation, almost all documents generated by the corporation’s three national museums – Science and Technology, Aviation and Space, and Agriculture and Food – will soon be available to the public through an online portal.

    “Our hope is by the fall, roughly 90 per cent of our information is available to the public in real time,” Benay said in an interview Monday, hours after tweeting that museum documents will be “open by default” by autumn.

    Not everything will be made public: cabinet documents and material dealing with such things as personnel matters or corporate planning will remain confidential.

    But after that, pretty much anything goes, Benay said, including early drafts of historical assessments, exhibition plans and schedules for travelling exhibitions.

  • Automating your Home with Home Assistant: Python’s Answer to the Internet of Things

    Paulus Schoutsen created Home Assistant in 2013 “as a simple script to turn on the lights when the sun was setting,” as he told attendees of his recent Embedded Linux Conference and OpenIoT Summit presentation, “Automating your Home with Home Assistant: Python’s Answer to the Internet of Things.”

  • How DevOps best practices improve team dynamics

    I've spent the past few months writing about the small, incremental behaviors that individuals can employ to be more successful. This month, I'd like to highlight team behaviors that I think are critical to having small successes at work. I spent time with one of the AtomicOpenShift (AOS) teams at Red Hat—the Cockpit project.

    Although I spend a significant amount of my time with the AOS teams, I rarely get the chance to work directly with Cockpit. I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to sit with them for a while when we were all in Brno earlier this year. From an outsider's perspective, the team has an ease of speaking with each other—both on technical topics and personal ones—that makes you take notice. In fact, you might have assumed they all work together in the same office. However, all five engineers and the designer on the team are spread out across Europe and the United States.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux 4.7-rc4 Kernel Released

    Linus Torvalds announced the release of the Linux 4.7-rc4 kernel on Sunday night.

    Linus explained in the announcement, "It's been a fairly normal week, and rc4 is out. Go test. The statistics look very normal: about two thirds drivers, with the rest being half architecture updates and half 'misc' (small filesystem updates,. some documentation, and a smattering of patches elsewhere). The bulk of the driver updates are usb and gpu, but there's iio, leds, platform drivers, dma etc)."

  • Oracle Releases Third Beta of VirtualBox 5.1 with 64-Bit Solaris and Qt5 Fixes

    Simon Coter, Principal Product Manager Oracle VM and VirtualBox, has announced the release of the third Beta build of the upcoming VirtualBox 5.1 open-source and cross-platform virtualization software.

    VirtualBox 5.1 promises to be a major release that will introduce a significant number of new features and improvements, among which we can mention a revamped installer based on the latest Qt5 technologies, and the ability to rebuild kernel modules without the Dynamic Kernel Module Support (DKMS) framework.

  • Monitor Linux With Netdata

    Netdata is a real-time resource monitoring tool with a friendly web front-end developed and maintained by FireHOL. With this tool, you can read charts representing resource utilization of things like CPUs, RAM, disks, network, Apache, Postfix and more. It is similar to other monitoring software like Nagios; however, Netdata is only for real-time monitoring via a web interface.

  • SoftMaker FreeOffice
  • RDO Triple0 QuickStart HA Setup - Work in progress
  • Qt 5.7 Consolidates Open Source, Commercial Versions Under New Licensing

    The Qt Company has released a new version of its namesake C++ cross-platform app dev tool, featuring new licensing that consolidates the open source and commercial versions of its Qt for Application Development offering.

  • KDE Desktop project finally fixes 13-year-old bug

    A bug in the KDE Desktop Environment, a popular desktop for Linux users, has been fixed after 13 years, according a post from one developer for the project.

  • GTK's Roadmap Updated, Here's What Is Coming For GNOME 3.22

    This past week the GTK+ road-map was updated during the GTK hackfest with more plans for the future, on top of their new vision for GTK+ 4.0 and beyond.

    The work that remains on the GTK roadmap for the GNOME 3.22 release this fall includes the (already completed) Wayland graphics tablet support along with plans for an image viewing widget, merging GSK, an image viewing widget, moving menu placement to GDK for Mir/Wayland, cleaning up display/screen/monitor code, GtkPathBar improvements, and more.

  • Progress so far
  • Solus 1.2 Linux Distribution Released
  • Solus 1.2 "Shannon" Officially Released, First OS to Ship with Arc Icon Theme

    Softpedia has been informed today, June 20, 2016, by Solus Project's Ikey Doherty, about the release and immediate availability for download of the Solus 1.2 "Shannon" operating system.

    We've talked a lot lately about Solus 1.2 and the fact that it is coming soon. Well, today is that day, the day when you can finally enjoy all the goodies that the great Ikey Doherty and the skillful team of developers behind the Solus Project have prepared for you during the past three months, since the release of Solus 1.1.

  • Handy 2.5 Screenshot Tour
  • Zenwalk 8.0 Is Just Around the Corner, Final Release Candidate Out for Testing

    Zenwalk developer Jean-Philippe Guillemin has informed users of the Slackware-based operating system that the final Release Candidate (RC) milestone of the upcoming Zenwalk 8.0 release is now available for public testing.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux plus CP/M plus assembly equals LASM

    The TRS-80 Model II support in Kermit is missing hardware flow control support however which means that it’s very prone to dropping characters. I started to look into what it might take to add hardware flow control and this sent me down a rabbit hole of trying to figure out how the TRS-80 hardware works, how the Z80 SIO works, learning Z80 assembly, and of course, how the heck you even build CP/M Kermit 4.11 from source.

  • TheAlternative.ch - LinuxDays FS16 - The Power of Linux
  • 30 days in a terminal: Day 0 — The adventure begins

    Last summer, I wrote an article series called "Kicking Google out of my life." It was an attempt to remove all Google services entirely from my daily usage for 30 days—a surprisingly daunting challenge for someone who had become deeply dependent on Google. I was mostly successful. I chronicled my experience—detailing how I approached replacing Google services with non-Google variants—and in the end, my life was better for it.

  • Deutsche Bank moves blockchain project out of proof of concept stage and voices concerns with the distributed ledger technology

    Deutsche Bank has moved its blockchain project out of the proof of concept stage, according to the bank’s head of disruptive technologies, who also warned that the distributed ledger blockchain technology is still five to ten years from widespread use.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Yearly EBIT At $288.0481 Millions
  • Share Performance Review for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Were Analysts Bullish Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) This Week?
  • Austin inadvertently promotes open-source ride-sharing

    The idea is to undermine the monopolies of companies like Uber, Lyft, Airbnb and the like with a genuinely cooperative, horizontal and P2P model directly controlled by the users themselves, and cut out the corporate middleman altogether. Advocates for this model have coined the term “Platform Cooperativism” for it (if you search the #PlatformCooperativism hashtag on Twitter, you’ll find links to a lot of great articles on it).

  • RFC: a new solution to Input Method + Keyboard Layout

    This is not related to KDE itself, but I’d like to hear some opinion from keyboard layout users, especially from those who use more than one keyboard layout.

    Right now I’m designing a new feature for fcitx (for people who doesn’t know it, it’s an input method framework under Linux), currently called “input method group”. The goal of this feature is to solve the conflict between keyboard layout and input method (mostly conceptually) . It can also solve some other problem, but the original goal is about keyboard layout.

  • New SELinux shirts are available
  • Venerable Conficker Worm Survives on Obsolete Legacy Systems [Ed: Microsoft Windows.]

    he 8-year-old worm continues to infect in some corners of the Internet, highlighting the difficulty in eradicating more virulent programs.
    On Oct. 23, 2008, Microsoft revealed a critical flaw that could allow an attacker to remotely compromise and infect Windows XP, Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 systems.

    It took only a week for the Internet's seedier element to create the first malware based on the vulnerability. While initial attacks targeted specific companies and infected fewer than a dozen systems a day, the situation was much worse a month later when an unknown malware developer released a self-propagating worm.

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today's leftovers

  • Romp Home with these 21 Peerless ASCII Games
    Linux has a raft of open source games. The vast majority of these games are atheistically pleasing. Popular games often have full motion video, vector graphics, 3D graphics, realistic 3D rendering, animation, texturing, a physics engine, and much more. Computer graphics have been advancing at a staggering pace. At the current rate of progress, in the next 10 years it may not be possible to distinguish computer graphics from reality. Early computer games did not have these graphic techniques. The earliest video games were text games or text-based games that used text characters rather than vector or bitmapped graphics. Text-based games are often forgotten and neglected. However, there are many ASCII gems out there waiting to be explored which are immensely addictive and great fun to play. The developers' works featured in this article focus on content and fun gameplay.
  • GNOME's Mutter 3.21.91 Brings Wayland Improvements
    Florian Müllner announced the release today of Mutter 3.21.91, the near-final version of this compositing window manager and Wayland compositor for the upcoming GNOME 3.22 desktop.
  • Red Hat CEO: Taking Open Source Beyond the Data Center
    When Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst spoke at LinuxCon last week, he hardly mentioned RHEL or the company's stack. Instead, he focused almost entirely on Linux in general and the open source development model in particular. This wasn't a surprise, as there probably isn't an organization on the planet with a deeper understanding of open source methodology and its potential. It's how it built free software into a $2 billion business. Most people familiar with Red Hat know the company's broader vision for open source -- sometimes referred to as "the open source way" -- goes beyond software, so it also wasn't much of a surprise when Whitehurst's talk strayed from data centers and workstations and into areas not normally associated with IT at all.
  • Ubuntu 16.10 Wallpaper Contest Is Now Open For Entries
    Doors have opened on the Ubuntu 16.10 Wallpaper Contest. Few desktop operating systems offer amateur and professional illustrators, photographers and graphic designers the chance to have their artwork seen by millions of people around the world. But then, Ubuntu isn’t your average operating system!
  • Compact, rugged Skylake computer-on-module is big on PCIe
    Kontron’s Linux-ready “COMe-cSL6” COM Express Compact Type 6 module offers 10 PCIe lanes, up to 24GB RAM and 32GB eMMC, and industrial temperature support.
  • Credit card-sized module runs Linux on Braswell
    Axiomtek’s credit card-sized “CEM300” module runs Linux on Intel Braswell SoCs at 4-6W TDP and offers HD graphics, dual SATA III ports, and four PCIe lanes. Like Axiomtek’s Atom E3800 “Bay Trail” based CEM846 computer-on-module, its new CEM300 supports Linux and Windows, and uses the 84 x 55mm COM Express Type 10 Mini form factor. The CEM300 advances to 14nm Intel Braswell SoCs, which offer much improved Intel HD Graphics Gen8, while reducing TDPs to a 4W to 6W range. Supported models include the quad-core 1.6GHz (2.4GHz burst) Pentium N3700, the quad-core Celeron N3160, and the dual-core Celeron N3060.

Linux and Linux Foundation

  • Linux, Linus, Bradley, and Open Source Protection
    In a nutshell, this rather heated (and at times unnecessarily personal) debate has focused on when is the right time to defend the rights on the GPL. Bradley is of the view that these rights should be intrinsically defended as they are as important (if not more important) than the code. Linus is of the view that the practicalities of the software industry mean sending in the lawyers can potentially have an even more damaging effect as companies will tense up and choose to stay away.
  • Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework by Gregory Burns
  • 2016 LiFT Scholarship Winner Tetevi Placide Ekon: Learning Computer Science Online
    Tetevi Placide Ekon is a graduate student studying civil engineering at the 2iE Institute for Water and Environmental Engineering in Burkina Faso. He was one of 14 aspiring IT professionals to receive a 2016 Linux Foundation Training (LiFT) scholarship, announced this month. Since receiving his bachelor’s degree in water and environmental engineering and moving onto graduate school, he has nurtured a passion for computer science, and especially open source. Tetevi has completed free courses covering Linux, Apache big data systems and more, and he plans to use this scholarship to pursue more advanced training.
  • Raspberry Pi Zero Will Likely Be Supported On Linux 4.9
    It's looking like the Raspberry Pi Zero might be playing fine out-of-the-box with the upcoming Linux 4.9 kernel cycle. Eric Anholt posted his weekly VC4 driver status/changes. In there the Intel-turned-Broadcom developer commented, "Finally, I landed Stefan Wahren's Raspberry Pi Zero devicetree for upstream. If nothing goes wrong, the Zero should be supported in 4.9."
  • Running Caffe AlexNet/GoogleNet On Some CPUs Compared To NVIDIA CUDA
    With working on some Broadwell-EP Linux comparison benchmarks this weekend, as part of that onslaught of benchmarks I decided to run the CPU-only Caffe build on a few different Intel CPUs. For fun, afterwards I checked to see how the performance compares to Caffe with CUDA+cuDNN on a few Maxwell/Pascal GPUs.
  • A Slew Of RadeonSI Gallium3D Fixes To Kick Off The Week
    After already making a ton of improvements to the RadeonSI Gallium3D stack this month, Marek Olšák is looking to end the month on a high note with yet more fixes to the open-source AMD driver. What's more fun than seeing on a Monday morning [PATCH 00/20] Plenty of RadeonSI fixes. The 20 patches take care of a variety of RadeonSI fixes. Marek commented, "This series contains mostly fixes, i.e. for DCC, cubemaps, tessellation, texture views, Gather4, viewport depth range, etc. There are also some new HUD queries."

Leftovers: Software

  • A Quick Hands-On With Chatty, A Desktop Twitch Chat Client
    Chatty is a desktop Twitch Chat client for Windows, macOS and Linux written in Ja
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 Adds Support for Linux Mint 18, Fedora 24
    The open-source HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has been updated on August 29, 2016, to version 3.16.8, a maintenance update that adds support for new printers and GNU/Linux operating systems. According to the release notes, HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 adds support for new all-in-one HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro 6970, HP OfficeJet Pro 6960, HP OfficeJet 250 Mobile, HP DeskJet 3700, as well as HP DeskJet Ink Advantage 3700. Also new in the HPLIP 3.16.8 update is support for the recently released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and the upcoming KDE editions, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system, as well as the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" distribution. So if you're using any of these OSes, you can now update to the latest HPLIP release.
  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.20.0 Video Player Released with New Options and Commands
    The popular, open-source, and cross-platform MPV video player software received a new update, version 0.20.0, which comes only two weeks after the previous 0.19.0 maintenance release. MPV 0.20.0 is not a major update, and, according to the release notes, it only implements a couple of new options and commands, such as "--video-unscaled=downscale-big" for changing the aspect ratio. Additionally, the MPlayer-based video playback application also gets the "--image-display-duration" option for controlling the duration of image display, and a new "dcomposition" flag for controlling DirectComposition.
  • FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Now Available for Linux
    The major FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has received recently its third maintenance update, version 3.1.3, which brings updated components. FFmpeg 3.1 was announced two months ago, at the end of June, and it introduced a multitude of new features to make the popular multimedia backend even more reliable and handy to game and application developers. Dubbed Laplace, FFmpeg 3.1 is currently the most advanced FFmpeg release, cut from Git master on June 26, 2016.
  • GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released
    Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

today's howtos