Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Heptio launches its Kubernetes ‘un-distribution’

    Heptio holds a special place in the Kubernetes startup ecosystem. Its co-founders, Craig McLuckie and Joe Beda, are, after all, also two of the co-founders of the Kubernetes project (together with Brendan Burns), which launched inside of Google. Heptio also raised $8.5 million when it launched in 2016 (and another $25 million last year), but it was never quite clear what the company’s actual business plan looked like beyond offering training and professional services. That’s becoming quite a bit clearer now, though, as the company today announced the launch of the Heptio Kubernetes Subscription.

  • CIOs buried under mounting IT complexity: survey

     

    A global survey of 800 chief information officers by digital performance management company Dynatrace has found that a little more than three-quarters fear that the complexity of IT setups in organisations would soon make the management of digital performance impossible.  

  • Karen Sandler Delivered Keynote at Linux.conf.au

    Director Karen Sandler delivered a keynote "Six Years Later, or Hey, did you ever get the source code to that thing in your heart?" In her first LCA keynote 6 years ago, Karen first told the people of LCA about her heart condition and the defibrillator that she needed to have implanted. This year she described her continued quest to receive the source code for the software running in her defibrillator, and how far she has been able to get in obtaining the source code that she's been requesting for over a decade now.

    Karen discussed the continued impact that non-free software is having and will have on society, as people entrust more of their lives to it, whether that be in their self-driving cars or the litany of home appliances they have that are all starting to talk to each other, and how we can help curtail some of these problems through legislation and promoting free software licenses like the GPL.

  • Behind The Scenes – Linux Skype Alternatives Parody (2016)

    How I made the Linux Skype Alternatives A-Team Parody (2016) video.

  • The Big DRM Update Lands In Linux 4.16: DC Multi-Display Sync, More Cannonlake

    dding to the list of big feature additions for Linux 4.16 is the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) pull request that has already been honored by Linus Torvalds.

    DRM subsystem maintainer David Airlie refers to DRM for Linux 4.16 as a "comparatively quieter merge window", but there still is a lot of stuff in here for improving these open-source GPU/display kernel drivers. It is quieter though for open-source NVIDIA users with this pull not having any Nouveau DRM updates for Linux 4.16.

  • Wine 3.1 is now available to kick off another development cycle

    The Wine team officially announced today the release of Wine 3.1 to kick off the start of another development cycle for what will eventually be Wine 4.0.

  • Massively multiplayer cooperative game 'Dead Maze' to release this month

    Dead Maze [Steam, Official Site] is a colourful and quite interesting free MMO that has Linux support. It's currently in a closed beta, but they've now announced the release date for everyone.

  • Get Sid Meier's Civilization VI (Mac and Linux versions) For 50% Off
  • This week in Discover, part 4

    In preparation for the impending release of Plasma 5.12, this was a big bug-squashing week in Discover thanks to lead Developer Aleix Pol, who knocked out a huge number of reliability and stability issues in Discover! We also got in a few UI polish and usability improvements, too.

  • GNOME 3.28 Beta Is Next Week Marking The Feature/UI Freeze

    The GNOME 3.28 beta (v3.27.90) is due to happen next week that also marks a number of freezes for the desktop components ahead of the official release next month.

    GNOME 3.27.90 components are due by end of day Monday for making the beta release. At that time it also marks a lock on the API/ABI, user-interface and feature freeze, string change announcement period, and the beginning of assembling the release notes.

  • Red Hat undertakes radically open brand evolution project

    This year, Red Hat is embarking on a collaborative journey to upgrade and modernize our logo and brand system. The Open Brand Project is a transparent, inclusive and widely collaborative effort, open to everyone with a stake in Red Hat’s identity.

    Red Hat is a community-powered company. We depend on and serve the technologists who both build our products and use them. Upstream and downstream, people who work with us feel a sense of belonging, and their participation and collaborative partnership give them a sense of ownership. Our corporate logo is more than a trademark; it is a meaningful symbol closely tied to a powerful story. For us, our logo does more than represent our company;  a key part of our corporate identity is our commitment to software freedom. For many, the “secret agent” element of our logo, affectionately known as Shadowman, is an icon of the open source movement, as well as the personification of Red Hat’s unique culture.

  • Twin Capital Management Inc. Sells 38,579 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) registers a price change of -0.58% while Castlight Health, Inc. (CSLT)
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Holdings Trimmed by Twin Capital Management Inc.
  • Compact Denverton-powered security appliance rocks 6x GbE ports

    Aaeon unveiled an “FWS-2360” network security appliance based on Intel’s server-class Atom C3000 SoCs. The compact, fanless device offers 6x GbE ports, 1x SATA 6.0Gb/s, 2x USB3.0, up to 32GB ECC RAM, 16GB eMMC, and a 2.5-inch drive bay.

    The FWS-2360 network security appliance is the latest in a long line of Aaeon fanless desktop network appliances. Others we’ve encountered include the Apollo Lake-based FWS-2272, Braswell-powered FWS-2260, and Bay Trail-driven FWS-2251 and FWS-2250.

DRM Stories

Filed under
Misc
  • Catalog of Missing Devices Illustrates Gadgets that Could and Should Exist

    Bad Copyright Law Prevents Innovators from Creating Cool New Tools

    San Francisco - The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has launched its “Catalog of Missing Devices”—a project that illustrates the gadgets that could and should exist, if not for bad copyright laws that prevent innovators from creating the cool new tools that could enrich our lives.

    “The law that is supposed to restrict copying has instead been misused to crack down on competition, strangling a future’s worth of gadgets in their cradles,” said EFF Special Advisor Cory Doctorow. “But it’s hard to notice what isn’t there. We’re aiming to fix that with this Catalog of Missing Devices. It’s a collection of tools, services, and products that could have been, and should have been, but never were.”

  • Remove the DRM from iTunes movies with TunesKit

    Since then, I'm able to watch videos purchased through iTunes using any iOS video app I want to, on my computer or Android handset. If you're so inclined, you can still watch your videos and transfer them to your iPhone using iTunes, too. It's worth mentioning that the software works on content rented from iTunes as well. But removing the DRM from rented videos to keep after the rental period is up is theft, plain and simple. Do what's right for you.

  • Documentary on the DRM-breaking farmers who just want to fix their tractors, even if they have to download bootleg Ukrainian firmware to do it

    Motherboard's short documentary, "Tractor Hacking: The Farmers Breaking Big Tech's Repair Monopoly" is an excellent look at the absurd situation created by John Deere's position that you can't own your tractor because you only license the software inside it, meaning that only Deere can fix Deere's tractors, and the centuries-old tradition of farmers fixing their agricultural equipment should end because Deere's shareholders would prefer it that way.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Kubernetes in 2018: When the going gets good, the good get boring

    Backers of the open-source Kubernetes container-orchestration project could be forgiven for taking a victory lap this week at Kubecon 2017, given the growth in adoption and capitulation of competitive projects. But the path to ongoing success for this project now lies in making Kubernetes boring again, according to several keynote speakers.

  • Swing Trade Earnings Bullish Momentum With Options in Red Hat Inc
  • Purism Hopes To Default To GNOME On The Librem 5 Phone, But Still Supporting KDE

    Purism has been supporting both the GNOME and KDE projects with their mobile ambitions and looking to have both desktop environments feature their wares on the in-development Librem 5 smartphone. But as far as the default user experience/interface goes on the Librem 5, they are leaning towards GNOME.

    While KDE Plasma Mobile is a lot further along than GNOME on the mobile front, Purism is hoping to see the converged GNOME Shell working in time for the Librem 5 iMX-powered smartphone that will hopefully be shipping in early 2019.

  • Android 9.0 Developer Preview 1 Might Be Almost Ready For Release

    In a digital puzzle dropped last week, Google hid the date of the Google I/O conference, which is now known to happen between May 8 and May 10. One of the prominent hot topics for the developer conference is Android 9.0.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 80 - GPS tracking and jamming
  • How to add a repository on your Linux machine
  • Modify SVG using GSVGtk: First Repor

    GSVGtk is a library to provide GTK+ widgets you can use to access SVG files. It is powered by GSVG, in a way it can access each shape and its properties using a GObject API based on W3C SVG 1.1 specification.

    Currently, GSVGtk uses Clutter to encapsulate SVG shapes, render them inside Clutter Actors, through librsvg, and maps events to source SVG in order to eventually modify original definitions, like its position.

    In the following video, you can see GSVGtk’s Container based on Clutter, loading an SVG file, take some shapes from it to show on the scene.

  • logo.png for default avatar for GitLab repos

    I added a logo.png to GNOME Tweaks at GNOME and it automatically showed up in Salsa when I imported the new version.

  • What’s New in Peppermint OS 8 Respin

    Peppermint OS 8 respin is the latest release of Peppermint OS Linux Distribution. This release based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), powered by linux kernel 4.10 series, using LXDE desktop environment with new “Pepirus” xfwm4, GTK+ and icon themes. Also, brings 64 bit and 32 bit installation images. The 64 bit release provides complete support for UEFI systems and secure boot.

  • Imagine the world's biggest Kanban / Scrumboard

    Imagine a Kanban board that could aggregate issues from multiple backends, including your CalDAV task list, Bugzilla systems (Fedora, Mozilla, GNOME communities), Github issue lists and the Debian Bug Tracking System, visualize them together and coordinate your upstream fixes and packaging fixes in a single sprint.

    [...]

    If you'd like to see this or any of the other proposed projects go ahead, you don't need to be a Debian Developer to suggest ideas, refer a student or be a co-mentor. Many of our projects have relevance in multiple communities. Feel free to get in touch with us through the debian-outreach mailing list.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Torvalds Releases Linux 4.15 With Improved Meltdown, Spectre Patches

    CPU security issues required the longest Linux kernel development cycle since 2011, as Linus Torvalds releases Linux 4.15

    Linus Torvalds released the first new Linux kernel of 2018 on Jan. 28, after the longest development cycle for a new Linux kernel in seven years.

    During the release Linux Kernel release cycle, Torvalds typically issues a release candidate once a week, with most cycles including six to eight release candidates.

  • Microsoft Hyper-V Guests Get PCID Support With Linux 4.16

    With the in-development Linux 4.16 kernel there is now support for PCID with Microsoft Hyper-V virtualization guests.

  • AT&T plans to accelerate White Box adoption by releasing dNOS into open source

    AT&T has announced  that it will open source its Disaggregated Network Operating System (dNOS) project and that it will soon be hosted by the Linux Foundation. The dNOS project provides a software framework to speed the adoption and use of white boxes in a service provider’s infrastructure. The idea is that telcos, software developers, cloud providers, hardware makers and networking application developers can quickly create new white box infrastructure to meet evolving carrier requirements – and, perhaps just as importantly, do it in a more cost-effective way.

  • PodCTL #23 – Microservices with Istio
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)- Stocks Hammered on Sluggish Data
  • Webmail and whole class of problems.

    I am sure some people would suggest either Emacs or alpine or some other tool which works and I’m sure it worked right out of bat for them, for me I wanted to have something which had a GUI and I didn’t have to think too much about it. It also points out the reason why Thunderbird was eventually moved out of mozilla in a sense so that community could do feature and bug-fixing more faster than either mozilla did or had the resources or the will to do so.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Dockah! Dockah! Dockah!

    I have been dabbling with docker for quite sometime, to be honest when it was introduced to me I didn’t understand it much but as time passed and I started experimenting with it I got to know the technology better and better. This made me understand various concepts better. I understood virtualization, containerization, sandboxing and got to appreciate how docker solves the problem of works on my machine.

    When I started using docker I use to just run few commands and I could get the server running, this I could access through browser that was more than enough for me. When I use to make changes to the code I could see it getting reflected in the way I am running the application and I was a happy man.

  • Intel SSD 760p 256GB NVMe SSD For $99 USD On Linux

    If the extremely fast Intel Optane SSD 900p is out of your budget with its 3D XPoint memory, this week Intel rolled out the SSD 760p series with 64-layer TLC 3D NAND memory. For less than $100 USD you can get the 256GB capacity Intel 760p SSD, which is what we are benchmarking today under Ubuntu Linux.

  • KDE-Focused Netrunner Rolling 2018.01 Released

    For those still in search of a KDE-focused Linux distribution that's rolling-release and desktop-friendly, Netrunner Rolling 2018.01 has been released.

  • Adventure platformer 'Celeste' from the creators of TowerFall has released with Linux support

    Good news for fans of tight adventure platformers, as Celeste [Steam, itch.io] from the creators of TowerFall released with same-day Linux support.

  • A summary of my 2017 work

    New years are strange things: for most arbitrary reasons, around January 1st we reset a bunch of stuff, change calendars and forget about work for a while. This is also when I forget to do my monthly report and then procrastinate until I figure out I might as well do a year report while I'm at it, and then do nothing at all for a while.

    So this is my humble attempt at fixing this, about a month late. I'll try to cover December as well, but since not much has happened then, I figured I could also review the last year and think back on the trends there. Oh, and you'll get chocolate cookies of course. Hang on to your eyeballs, this won't hurt a bit.

  • Opening up the GnuBee open NAS system

    GnuBee is the brand name for a line of open hardware boards designed to provide Linux-based network-attached storage. Given the success of the crowdfunding campaigns for the first two products, the GB-PC1 and GB-PC2 (which support 2.5 and 3.5 inch drives respectively), there appears to be a market for these devices. Given that Linux is quite good at attaching storage to a network, it seems likely they will perform their core function more than adequately. My initial focus when exploring my GB-PC1 is not the performance but the openness: just how open is it really? The best analogy I can come up with is that of a door with rusty hinges: it can be opened, but doing so requires determination.

  • Mycroft Mark II: Smart Speaker with an open source voice assistant (crowdfunding)

    And then there’s Mycroft. It’s a voice assistant platform that’s designed to work just like the others… but it’s an open source project that places an emphasis on privacy.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • prrd 0.0.2: Many improvements

    The prrd package was introduced recently, and made it to CRAN shortly thereafter. The idea of prrd is simple, and described in some more detail on its webpage and its GitHub repo. Reverse dependency checks are an important part of package development and is easily done in a (serial) loop. But these checks are also generally embarassingly parallel as there is no or little interdependency between them (besides maybe shared build depedencies). See the following screenshot (running six parallel workers, arranged in split byobu session).

  •  

  • DXVK Begins Working For Even More D3D11-Over-Vulkan Games On Wine

    The progress is stunning made by a lone developer on the DXVK project for mapping the Direct3D 11 graphics API on top of Vulkan for allowing better performance/support for D3D11 games on Wine.

    DXVK is only a few months old and the work of Philip Rebohle who has been working on it nearly daily. It was just a few days ago I wrote about DXVK Is Making Significant Progress In Implementing Direct3D 11 Over Vulkan while already more games are beginning to work.

  • openSUSE – Meltdown & Spectre Update – 26 Jan 2018

    This is an update to our current Meltdown and Spectre situation on openSUSE Leap and Tumbleweed.

    We have released kernels with initial Meltdown and Spectre mitigations begin of January.

  • Ruby, YaST, Plasma 5.12 Beta Get Updates in Tumbleweed

    A total of six snapshots arrived and brought new versions of Ruby, YaST, KDE’s Plasma 5.12 Beta and many others.

    The latest snapshot, 20180124, switched the default for Ruby to version 2.5. Package improvements were made to the command line tool SUSEConnect 0.3.7. A change to cups-filters 1.19.0 in order to allow builds on systems without python2 was made with python3-cups rather than using python-cups. Enscript 1.6.6 fixed a handful of bugs and spec-cleaner 1.0.2 added groups for Rust and made the switch to pytest. Git, squid and perl-Encode also received minor updates in the snapshot.

  • Inside a Red Hat Open Innovation Labs Residency – Part 1

    This series takes the reader on a journey, taking a peek inside life in a Red Hat Open Innovation Labs residency. This is the top tier experience for any customer; exposing them to open collaboration, open technologies, and fast agile application delivery methods.

    This experience often escapes organizations attempting digital transformation. Through submersion in an Open Innovation Labs residency, Red Hat shares its experience in managing, developing, and delivering solutions with communities, open technologies, and open collaboration.

    Join me as I share experiences from inside a real life residency, watching Red Hat work intimately with a customer. This will expose new ways of working and leveraging open technologies using fast, agile application delivery methods and open collaboration.

  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Moving 2.15% in Session
  • Stock Alert: Red Hat Inc Stock Volatility Hits A Rock Bottom Low
  • A peek at the Snapcraft Summit

    The Snapcraft Summit, taking place in Seattle from January 29th to February 2nd, is a forward-thinking five day software hackathon being attended by major software vendors and snap developers working to move the industry forward with software delivery.

    In the style introduced by the famous BarCamps of old, the agenda is totally free-form and attendee-generated. Of course, that doesn’t mean we’ll sit down and relax! There are many things planned that need tackling. Every attendee already has a long laundry list of things to work on; as a group we will move forward and check things off the list as the days go by. We are going to be covering a wide range of technologies and domains, from GUI oriented electron based applications and its development stack to robotics, with a spice and language frameworks and command line tools for the cloud would be the few to mention.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS is Switching back to Xorg

    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will come with the Xorg display server enabled by default. Canonical cites stability and reliability concerns over Wayland as reason for the change.

  •  

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Unlocked PS4 consoles can now run copies of PS2 games

    Hackers seem close to publicly unlocking the Nintendo Switch
    After years of work, hackers have finally managed to unlock the PS4 hardware with an exploit that lets the system run homebrew and pirated PS4 software. In a somewhat more surprising discovery, those hackers have also unlocked the ability to run many PS2 games directly on the console, using the same system-level emulation that powers legitimate PlayStation Classics downloads.

  • What’s New in Nitrux OS 1.0.7

    Nitrux OS 1.0.7 is the latest release of Nitrux OS, it now available to download and install on your PC/laptop.  Nitrux is a Linux distribution based on Ubuntu suitable for laptops and desktop computers. Nitrux provides all the benefits of the Ubuntu operating system combined with a focus on portable, distributable application formats like AppImages.

    Nitrux OS uses the development branch of Ubuntu as a basis using only the core system and then slowly building up to ensure a clean user experience. Nitrux is suitable for newcomers to Linux as well as *nix experienced users. Nitrux uses KDE Plasma 5 featuring Nomad Desktop and the latest KDE Applications.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • X.Org Server 1.20 Gets Another XWayland Improvement: Prevents Overflowing

    There is yet another change for X.Org Server 1.20 that has now been in development for more than one year.

    The XWayland code within the xorg-server will now better safeguard against potentially overflowing the Wayland connection that could trigger the connection being aborted within the Wayland client library.

  • Etnaviv Working On Initial Bring-Up Of GC7000L/i.MX8M Graphics

    Prominent Etnaviv driver developer Lucas Stach for working on open-source, reverse-engineered Vivante graphics support has posted initial patches for the GC7000L support as found on the i.MX8M SoC.

    This bring-up is important especially with Purism hoping to use the i.MX8M for their Librem 5 smartphone and as part of that using the open-source Etnaviv graphics driver.

  • Tableau goes 'Hyper' on data ingestion & query

    Tableau 10.5 also introduces Tableau Server on Linux so that users can combine Tableau’s analytics platform with Linux’s enterprise capabilities.

    With identical end user functionality to Tableau on Windows, customers already using Linux in their IT environments can integrate Tableau Server into their processes and workflows.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Graphics: VC4 and AMDVLK Driver

  • VC4 display, VC5 kernel submitted
    For VC5, I renamed the kernel driver to “v3d” and submitted it to the kernel. Daniel Vetter came back right away with a bunch of useful feedback, and next week I’m resolving that feedback and continuing to work on the GMP support. On the vc4 front, I did the investigation of the HDL to determine that the OLED matrix applies before the gamma tables, so we can expose it in the DRM for Android’s color correction. Stefan was also interested in reworking his fencing patches to use syncobjs, so hopefully we can merge those and get DRM HWC support in mainline soon. I also pushed Gustavo’s patch for using the new core DRM infrastructure for async cursor updates. This doesn’t simplify our code much yet, but Boris has a series he’s working on that gets rid of a lot of custom vc4 display code by switching more code over to the new async support.
  • V3D DRM Driver Revised As It Works To Get Into The Mainline Kernel
    Eric Anholt of Broadcom has sent out his revised patches for the "V3D" DRM driver, which up until last week was known as the VC5 DRM driver. As explained last week, the VC5 driver components are being renamed to V3D since it ends up supporting more than just VC5 with Broadcom VC6 hardware already being supported too. Eric is making preparations to get this VideoCore driver into the mainline Linux kernel and he will then also rename the VC5 Gallium3D driver to V3D Gallium3D.
  • AMDVLK Driver Gets Fixed For Rise of the Tomb Raider Using Application Profiles
    With last week's release of Rise of the Tomb Raider on Linux ported by Feral Interactive, when it came to Radeon GPU support for this Vulkan-only Linux game port the Mesa RADV driver was supported while the official AMDVLK driver would lead to GPU hangs. That's now been fixed. With the latest AMDVLK/XGL source code as of today, the GPU hang issue for Rise of the Tomb Raider should now be resolved.

AMD Ryzen 7 2700X Linux Performance Boosted By Updated BIOS/AGESA

With last week's initial launch-day Linux benchmarks of the Ryzen 5 2600X / Ryzen 7 2700X some found the Linux performance to be lower than Windows. While the root cause is undetermined, a BIOS/AGESA update does appear to help the Linux performance significantly at least with the motherboard where I've been doing most of my tests with the Ryzen 7 2700X. Here are the latest benchmark numbers. Read more

GNU: The GNU C Library 2.28 and Guix on Android

  • Glibc 2.28 Upstream Will Build/Run Cleanly On GNU Hurd
    While Linux distributions are still migrating to Glibc 2.27, in the two months since the release changes have continued building up for what will eventually become the GNU C Library 2.28. The Glibc 2.28 work queued thus far isn't nearly as exciting as all the performance optimizations and more introduced with Glibc 2.27, but it's a start. Most notable at this point for Glibc 2.28 is that it will now build and run cleanly on GNU/Hurd without requiring any out-of-tree patches. There has been a ton of Hurd-related commits to Glibc over the past month.
  • Guix on Android!
    Last year I thought to myself: since my phone is just a computer running an operating system called Android (or Replicant!), and that Android is based on a Linux kernel, it's just another foreign distribution I could install GNU Guix on, right? It turned out it was absolutely the case. Today I was reminded on IRC of my attempt last year at installing GNU Guix on my phone. Hence this blog post. I'll try to give you all the knowledge and commands required to install it on your own Android device.
  • GNU Guix Wrangled To Run On Android
    The GNU Guix transactional package manager can be made to run on Android smartphones/tablets, but not without lots of hoops to jump through first.