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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • New Issue is Out! Linux Journal October 2018: Programming
  • Mesosphere User Survey Says Hybrid Deployments Top Cloud-Only for the First Time
  • The Current Performance Of Virgl3D, Future Plans

    Last week at XDC2018 in Spain, Elie Tournier of Collabora presented on the current state of the Virgl effort for allowing OpenGL acceleration provided by a host's system within a QEMU/VirtIO-GPU virtual machine environment.

    For the most part the information is what most Phoronix readers should be already familiar with if you stay up to date with our news coverage... In recent months Virgl has gone from only supporting OpenGL 3.0 to now supporting OpenGL 4.3 and OpenGL ES 3.2, assuming the host driver supports the necessary bits too. The OpenGL ES support has required some workarounds to get it working.

  • 4MLinux 27.0 BETA released.

    4MLinux 27.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages.

  • openSUSE to have Summit at Southern California Linux Expo

    The openSUSE Project will have a summit at the 17th annual Southern California Linux Expo (SCaLE) at the Pasadena Convention Center in Pasadena, Calif., March 8, 2019.

    The openSUSE Summit at SCaLE 17x will take place on a Friday during the beginning of SCaLE 17x, which takes place March. 7-10, 2019. The community hosted summit will have its own full-day schedule and talks for the openSUSE Summit at SCaLE 17x need to be submitted through events.opensuse.org rather than SCaLE’s CfP tool. SCaLE attendees and community members are encouraged to submit a talk for the summit. The call for papers for the openSUSE Summit at SCaLE 17x is open until January 10, 2019.

  • Training Day in Embedded Linux and Security completes successfully

    Providing detailed hands-on training, it was targeted at embedded engineers looking for an introduction to key embedded Linux and Security topics.

    For example, there was a look at the anatomy of an Embedded Linux system, and it covered a wide range of tracing and profiling tools which can help to understand performance issues and also investigate bugs and unexpected behaviours. There was also consideration of coding standards and defensive programming techniques.

  •  

  • How Much RAM Does An Android Phone Really Need?
  • Google Maps is Getting Better Commute Features, Music Player Integration
  • Google begins rolling out the big Wear OS update for everyone
  • Sync your teeth into power browser Vivaldi's largest update so far [Ed: This is a proprietary Web browser and there's no reason to use it]

    This week the Vivaldi browser received its biggest update, adding secure sync across devices and making many operations speedier.

    Vivaldi supremo Jon von Tetzchner, who co-founded Opera, the browser which invented many features taken for granted today, told us encrypted sync was the most requested feature. But it's one of around 1,500 tweaks and improvements to Vivaldi 2.0. Version 1.0 was launched three years ago.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • How to Install R on Debian 9
  • Ethereum Mining on Ubuntu 18.04 and Debian
  • Ashes 2063, an impressive total conversion for Doom II, has released its first episode

    Placing you in control of a scavenger in a world that was transformed by a massive war, Ashes 2063 plays homage to all of those films and games that you might already be envisioning in your mind. I played a brief amount and I was blown away by how massive the changes are. Mind you, I don’t really follow the very active Doom modding community, but still I think it’s worth pointing out what the mod has accomplished.

  • Rumu, a narrative adventure about a sentient robot cleaner, has gotten a Linux port

    Rumu [Official Site] has you take control of a small autonomous vacuum cleaner unit in a smart home full of integrated gadgets and that has its own AI. Gameplay consists of point and click puzzles that reveal more about the home’s occupants and the things that they’d rather keep secret. This narrative-focused experience also allows you to befriend (and hack into because that’s what friends do, right?) other appliances in the home and learn more about them.

  • gnome-software mini hackfest

    I am in London this week visiting Richard Hughes. We have been working out of his home office and giving some much needed love to GNOME Software.

  • A short note about posting links to facebook

    Just a short note to everyone out there that posts links to facebook pages or posts: Something you may not realize is that for those of us that do not have or want to use a facebook account the experience is pretty subpar.

  • Lucas Kanashiro: MicroDebConf Brasília 2018

    After I came back to my home city (Brasília) I felt the necessity to promote and help people to contribute to Debian, some old friends from my former university (Univesrity of Brasília) and the local comunnity (Debian Brasília) came up with the idea to run a Debian related event and I just thought: “That sounds amazing!”. We contacted the university to book a small auditorium there for an entire day. After that we started to think, how should we name the event? The Debian Day was more or less one month ago, someone speculated a MiniDebConf but I thought that it was going to be much smaller than regular MiniDebConfs. So we decided to use a term that we used sometime ago here in Brasília, we called MicroDebConf Smile

    MicroDebConf Brasília 2018 took place at Gama campus of University of Brasília on September 8th. It was amazing, we gathered a lot of students from university and some high schools, and some free software enthisiastics too. We had 44 attendees in total, we did not expect all these people in the begining! During the day we presented to them what is Debian Project and the many different ways to contribute to it.

    Since our focus was newcommers we started from the begining explaining how to use Debian properly, how to interact with the community and how to contribute. We also introduced them to some other subjects such as management of PGP keys, network setup with Debian and some topics about Linux kernel contributions. As you probably know, students are never satisfied, sometimes the talks are too easy and basic and other times are too hard and complex to follow. Then we decided to balance the talks level, we started from Debian basics and went over details of Linux kernel implementation. Their feedback was positive, so I think that we should do it again, atract students is always a challenge.

    In the end of the day we had some discussions regarding what should we do to grow our local community? We want more local people actually contributing to free software projects and specially Debian. A lot of people were interested but some of them said that they need some guidance, the life of a newcommer is not so easy for now.

  • Announcing the Ubuntu 18.10 Free Culture Showcase winners

    October approaches, and Ubuntu marches steadly along the road from one LTS to another. Ubuntu 18.10 is another step in Ubuntu’s future. And now it’s time to unveil a small part of that change: the community wallpapers to be included in Ubuntu 18.10!

    Every cycle, talented artists around the world create media and release it under licenses that encourage sharing and adaptation. This cycle we had some amazing images submitted to the Ubuntu 18.10 Free Culture Showcase photo pool on Flickr, where all eligible submissions can be found. The competition was fierce; narrowing down the options to the final selections was painful!

  • EPIC SBC taps dual-core G-Series LX with 4.5W to 15W TDPs

    IEI’s EPIC form factor “Nano-GLX” SBC runs on an AMD G-Series LX SoC and offers dual GbE ports, four USB ports, SATA and mini-PCIe expansion, and dual display support.

    AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V1000 is all the rage in embedded right now, but for lower-power IoT operations, the more affordable AMD G-Series SoC is probably the better option. IEI is keeping the G-Series flame alive with a 165 x 115mm EPIC form factor SBC called the Nano-GLX which uses the most recent and most power efficient G-Series: the dual-core G-Series LX family, which has TDP ratings as low as 4.5W.

  • Oppo Find X Will Be The World’s First Smartphone With 10GB Of Ram
  • Xiaomi Redmi Note 6 Pro Launched With 4 Cameras & Notch: Read Price, Full Specs Here

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E29 – The Rabbi and the Twenty-Nine Witches - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we’ve been networking and playing with Virtual Machines. Linux gets a code of conduct, Twitter has been leaking direct messages, Google Chrome 69 signs in to all the things and we round up community goings on and events.

    It’s Season 11 Episode 29 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Vince – A Stylish GTK Theme for Linux

    Vince is a beautiful modern GTK theme and it is compatible with all GTK3 and GTK2-based Desktop Environments including Xfce, Mate, Gnome, etc.

    It has 3 colour variants which are Materia, Materia-dark, and Materia-light and they all feature a minimalist UI with clean design elements and neat animation effects.

    It is based on the nana-4 Material Design theme (formerly Flat-Plat) which is based on GNOME’s Adwaita theme.

    This is not the first time a theme is what can be referred to as the 3rd-generation fork from another theme. Sometimes the “generation” count goes as high as 6. But this is open-source so more power to the developer.

  • New [Gentoo] copyright policy explained

    The policy aims to cover all copyright-related aspects, bringing Gentoo in line with the practices used in many other large open source projects. Most notably, it introduces a concept of Gentoo Certificate of Origin that requires all contributors to confirm that they are entitled to submit their contributions to Gentoo, and corrects the copyright attribution policy to be viable under more jurisdictions.

  • X by Orange takes cloud-native approach to serving business customers

    Orange Spain subsidiary X by Orange is embracing a cloud-native platform to deliver digital services to its business customers.

    X by Orange is notable because it eschews traditional network infrastructure and legacy hardware by instead creating a separate platform that is software-based. Using Red Hat's OpenShift Container Platform, along with its consulting team, X by Orange is able to put services in a public cloud by using the greenfield, cloud-native platform.

  • Are These Stocks Back Into Fair-Value Territory? Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), BMO Short-Term US Treasury Bond ETF (ZTS)
  • Red Hat: What's Next For Investors?
  • Debian Policy call for participation -- September 2018

    Here’s a summary of some of the bugs against the Debian Policy Manual that are thought to be easy to resolve.

  • My Work on Debian LTS (September 2018)

    In September 2018, I did 10 hours of work on the Debian LTS project as a paid contributor. Thanks to all LTS sponsors for making this possible.

  • IEI spins a Coffee Lake based Mini-ITX board and AI-infused box PC

    IEI announced a “KINO-DH310” Mini-ITX board and a rugged “FLEX-BX200-Q370” box PC, both with 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” CPUs. The box PC ships with optional PCIe cards for AI acceleration.

    We’ve already seen a lot of COM Express modules based on Intel’s 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” CPUs, and now we’re starting to see boards and systems. IEI just launched three Coffee Lake products — the KINO-DH310Mini-ITX board and “FLEX-BX200-Q370” embedded PC, covered below, as well as an IMBA-Q370 ATX board you can check out on your own. The FLEX-BX200-Q370, which provides optional AI accelerator boards, uses neither of the other boards as a mainboard.

  • LG V40 ThinQ Unveiled With Five Camera Setup

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Open Source Challenge: Why One Band Chose Linux To Record Their New Album
  • AMD Publishes Platform QoS Patches For Next-Gen Processors

    This afternoon AMD sent out their first Linux kernel patches for what might end up being a new feature for the "EPYC 2" / Zen 2 processors.

  • Education Ecosystem Joins Enterprise Ethereum Alliance & Linux Foundation

    Education Ecosystem, a blockchain company building the Netflix for professional development has today announced that it is joining two nonprofit organizations. Enterprise Ethereum Alliance (EEA) the world's largest open source blockchain initiative & the Linux Foundation, an organization dedicated to building sustainable ecosystems around open source projects to accelerate technology development and industry adoption.

  • Enterprise Ethereum Alliance & Linux partners with Netflix developer, Education Ecosystem

    The world of blockchain witnessed a new event with Education Ecosystem partnering with Linux Foundation and Enterprise Ethereum Alliance. The notification released on 25th September suggests that the latter two are non-profitable firms. Linux Foundation is one of the prominent technology developers of the world, whereas, Enterprise Ethereum Alliance [EEA] is directed towards promoting applications based on Ethereum blockchain platform.

  • openSUSE Conference 2020: Call for Hosts

    The openSUSE Project is pleased to announce that it is accepting proposals for openSUSE Conference 2020. The Call for Hosts will be open until April 15, 2019.

    The openSUSE Conference Organizational Team will review the submissions with the hopes of having a decision announced about the location of oSC20 at the openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg, Germany. Community members and open-source enthusiasts are encouraged to follow the Conference How To guide on the wiki to submit a proposal on hosting the conference. The guide offers a How to Bid and How to Checklist to help with submitting a proposal.

    The proposals will need to be submitted to the openSUSE Marketing mailing list and the openSUSE Conference Organizational Team will discuss the proposals as it plans this year’s conference.

    While the openSUSE Project intends to move the conference to different worldwide locations in the future, the project has two locations (Nuremberg, Germany, and Prague, Czech Republic) to host the annual community conference if no proposals are submitted during the Call for Hosts.

  • VLC in Debian now can do bittorrent streaming

    Back in February, I got curious to see if VLC now supported Bittorrent streaming. It did not, despite the fact that the idea and code to handle such streaming had been floating around for years. I did however find a standalone plugin for VLC to do it, and half a year later I decided to wrap up the plugin and get it into Debian. I uploaded it to NEW a few days ago, and am very happy to report that it entered Debian a few hours ago, and should be available in Debian/Unstable tomorrow, and Debian/Testing in a few days.

  • macOS Mojave Privacy Bypass Flaw Allows Access to Protected Files
  • macOS Mojave Has A Security Flaw That Lets Hackers Access Your Contacts [Ed: Apple already gives all your contacts to the US government (NSA PRISM and beyond); now it'll give these to anyone...]

    A security flaw has been unearthed in macOS Mojave, Apple’s latest desktop OS update, by a well-known security researcher Patrick Wardle.

    As reported by Bleeping Computer, Wardle has discovered a bypass flaw in macOS Mojave using which hackers can gain access to contacts data from the address book with the help of an app that does not have the required permissions.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • CLVK Is Piping OpenCL On Top Of Vulkan

    The concept has been talked about before and there has been some previous work in this direction while "CLVK" is a newly-established effort for getting OpenCL running on top of Vulkan drivers.

    The challenge of OpenCL on Vulkan might not be as big as it seems to an outside observer considering both modern OpenCL and Vulkan rely on the SPIR-V intermediate representation, etc. There is also a plethora of tooling catering both to these compute and graphics APIs like clspv, which this CLVK project happens to rely upon as its compiler.

  • Guerilla UX Testing, and Other Experiences From Akademy

    It’s about a month now since the end of Akademy 2018 and I’ve finally found the time to write up some of my impressions from my favorite event of every year, and to encourage all of you to embrace both your inner User Experience (UX) Researcher and your inner guerilla.

  • Akademy 2018: I was there! part 2

    As you may know, a little more than a month ago Akademy happened at the beautiful place of Vienna. On my first post, I told you about how I was freaking out before giving my talk about Atelier.

    So, to continue my history, on the following days of Akademy, Tomaz brought his printer from Munich so we could test Atelier and try to dig up what we need to do to improve it.

    [...]

    After that fix, Akademy was happening really fast for me. We had Atelier BoF, and as in my talk, I was amazed at all the people that have shown interest in the project and the willingness to help us. Tomaz and I received a few inputs, and we are working with Chris and Patrick on how to achieve them and the goals of this project.

    Sometimes I don’t believe that I was out there, far from my house and my boyfriend to konquer the world. However, since the internet era, we have all this amazing technology that can record people talking, I had my talk record and it’s alive on youtube. And yes, I still don’t have the courage to watch.

  • I want to talk to the (Font) Manager

    You like fonts, don’t you? Well, we all do. So what happens if you want to install a fresh new font in your Linux distribution, and that distribution happens to be running, say, a Gnome desktop environment? You will have probably noticed that the font management facility available in the system settings tool is rather limited.

    First, there’s the actual issue of how to handle fonts in the first place – Gnome Tweak Tool – and then, you only have the ability to select from the existing range of fonts, but not really install any new ones. At the moment, it would seem, your one option is to manually copy font files into either the system or home directory fonts folder. Well, there’s a better way. Meet GTK+ Font Manager. Manager, meet your new user.

  • Philip Chimento: JavaScript news from GNOME 3.30

    Welcome back to the latest news on GJS, the Javascript engine that powers GNOME Shell, Endless OS, and many GNOME apps.

    I haven’t done one of these posts for several versions now, but I think it’s a good tradition to continue. GNOME 3.30 has been released for several weeks now, and while writing this post I just released the first bugfix update, GJS 1.54.1. Here’s what’s new!

  • My Open-Source Activities from April to August 2018

    Welcome readers, this is a infrequently updated post series that logs my activities within open-source communities. I want my work to be as transparent as possible in order to promote open governance, a policy feared even by some “mighty” nations.

  • Saying Something Suitable in September

    So far the folks in the Ubuntu Podcast Chatter group have seen bits and pieces stating that I have been fussing over a Mythbuntu installation. It has been rough. I have two aerials in place connected to HDHomeRun Duo boxes. There is some reception of local stations. The problem with this is that I've had to put the antennae in the garage. When you understand that my part of northeast Ohio is essentially life in the deciduous forest, you'll also understand that the main Directv dish also is mounted on the garage as it had the only vantage point with a clear shot to the satellite(s). Eventually I will make further progress.

  • OpenCV 4.0 Alpha Released Now As A C++ Library, DNN Improvements, Better Performance

    OpenCV, the popular Open-Source Computer Vision real-time library, is nearing its big "4.0" release with a number of improvements for this widely-used library.

  • Sculpt OS With "Visual Composition" Posted For Latest Genode OS

    The Genode open-source operating system framework written from scratch with a micro-kernel design has been working on Sculpt OS as a general purpose operating system. This week the project reached its latest milestone.

    The third version of Sculpt OS is now available, "Sculpt with Visual Composition", which as part of this latest goal is working on transitioning more of their offerings from text-based user-interfaces to a GUI for administrative tasks. The text-based user interfaces will be maintained for those interested.

  • Chrome Now Logs all Google Users Into the Browser. Should You Care?

    I understand where Green is coming from, particularly after he clicked no for so long. But if this is the moment that Google leverages its browser in an unseemly way, I’m not seeing it. Sync isn’t enabled by default, meaning there’s not much of a change for users from a practical privacy standpoint. Green disagrees, because he’s seeing settings now that he didn’t have to think about before. But Google isn’t seeing any more or less of his data now than before, and won’t unless users opt in.

  • AI and HPC GPU Acceleration Benefit from Open Source Efforts [Ed: openwashing and AI-washing by AMD]

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • GUADEC 2018 Reminiscences

    This year’s GUADEC in Almería, Spain, was over two months ago, and so here is a long overdue post about it. It was so long ago that I might as well call it a reminiscence! This will be a different kind of post than the ones I’ve done in past years, as plenty of other bloggers have already posted summaries about the talks.

  • Rugged, Linux-ready transportation PC has four SIM slots

    Nexcom’s Apollo Lake based “VTC 6220-BK” in-vehicle PC features triple displays, 2x SATA bays, 3x GbE with optional PoE, Ublox GPS, and 4x mini-PCIe or M.2 slots paired with SIM slots.

    Intel-based in-vehicle computers have been around for a while — here’s a Linux-friendly Kontron model from 2004 -– but over the last year or two the market has picked up considerably. Like many in-vehicle systems, Nexcom’s VTC 6220-BK is not an automotive IVI computer, but like Lanner’s Apollo Lake based V3G and V3S systems, is designed for buses. The rugged VTC 6220-BK straddles the IVI and telematics worlds, offering triple display support for passenger entertainment plus CAN and OBD connections.

  • FreeBSD Desktop – Part 16 – Configuration – Pause Any Application

    After using UNIX for so many years I knew that I could freeze (or pause) any process in the system with kill -17 (SIGSTOP) signal and then unfreeze it with with kill -19 (SIGCONT) signal as I described in the Process Management section of the Ghost in the Shell – Part 2 article. Doing it that way for the desktop applications is PITA to say the least. Can you imagine opening xterm(1) terminal and searching for all Chromium or Firefox processes and then freezing them one by one every time you need it? Me neither.

    Fortunately with introduction of so called X11 helper utilities – like xdotool(1) – it is now possible to implement it in more usable manner.

  • Custom Sustes Malware Infects Linux and IoT Servers Worldwide [Ed: This only impacts poorly-secured and already-cracked servers. The article overstates the risk.]

    The dangerous characteristic is the fact that an estimate of the infected computers cannot be made at this time. The only way to prevent the infiltrations is to strengthen the network security of the Linux and IoT servers exposed in public. It is very possible that further attacks will be carried out with other distribution tactics.

  • C Programming | Introduction | Features – For Beginners

    C is a general-purpose programming language developed by the ultimate god of the programming world, “Mr.Dennis Ritchie” (Creator of C programming ).

    The language is mainly used to create a wide range of applications for operating systems like windows and iOS. The popularity of the language can be clearly seen as this language has made to the list of top 10 programming languages in the world.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 178

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 178.

  • WinWorld – A Large Collection Of Defunct OSs, Software And Games

    The other day, I was testing Dosbox which is used to run MS-DOS games and programs in Linux. While searching for some classic programs like Turbo C++, I stumbled upon a website named WinWorld. I went through a few links in this site and quite surprised. WinWorld has a plenty of good-old and classic OSs, software, applications, development tools, games and a lot of other miscellaneous utilities which are abandoned by the developers a long time ago. It is an online museum run by community members, volunteers and is dedicated to the preservation and sharing of vintage, abandoned, and pre-release software.

    WinWorld was started back in 2003 and its founder claims that the idea to start this site inspired by Yahoo briefcases. The primary purpose of this site is to preserve and share old software. Over the years, many people volunteered to improve this site in numerous ways and the collection of old software in WinWorld has grown exponentially. The entire WinWorld library is free, open and available to everyone.

  • How to Encrypt USB Drive on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS
  • The excellent 2D action RPG 'CrossCode' is now officially out

    CrossCode from Radical Fish Games is a rather great 2D action RPG and today it was officially released across multiple stores.

    It's a fun idea, having you play as a character who is actually in an MMO set in the far future, where your avatar has a physical form. It's 2018 after all, we have films like Ready Player One that follow a guy running around in VR…

    Inspired by some of the classic JRPGs, CrossCode has a lot of familiar RPG elements and anyone who has played an action-RPG will feel right at home. I've been waiting so long for this to be finished and it's absolutely worth the wait.

  • Transhuman Design has removed the Linux version of BUTCHER due to issues in favour of Steam Play

    It seems Transhuman Design have removed the Linux version of BUTCHER after users reported issues, opting instead to ask Steam to add it as an approved Steam Play title.

    [...]

    After digging into the Steam forum, I came across this forum topic started in August, where four users mentioned trouble starting the game. That doesn't seem like a lot of people to make such a big decision, but it's understandable that with a tiny team and little time they're trying to make it so Linux gamers still have a good experience. Probably a good case for Valve to allow people to have a choice between native and Steam Play's Proton.

  • Tumbleweed Gets New Versions of KDE Plasma, Applications

    A total of four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were delivered to users of the rolling release this past week and the snapshot brought new versions of KDE Plasma and KDE Applications.

    The most recent snapshot 20180917 updated three packages. The GNOME package dconf-editor was updated to 3.30.0. Users of the ext2 filesystem will notice the utility package e2fsprogs 1.44.4 will fix the debugs ncheck command to work for files with multiple hard links; the updated package also has new debugfs commands for dumping xattr blocks and i_blocks array. Another GNOME package was updated with the iagno 3.30.0 package for the game reversi, which shows that GNOME 3.30 packages are starting to be integrated into Tumbleweed snapshots.

    Another three packages were updated in the 20180916 snapshot. The GNU Project debugger, gdb 8.2, added several patches and support access to new POWER8 registers. A fix was made for a GNU Compiler Collection 8.1 warning with the perl-DBD-mysql 4.047 updated, which also added options needed for public key based security. The other package that was updated in the snapshot was perl-Glib 1.327.

  • Slim signage player features Radeon E8860 GPU and six HDMI ports

    Ibase’s high-end “SI-626” signage player runs Windows or Linux on 7th or 6th Gen Intel Core CPUs with Radeon E8860 graphics, and offers 6x HDMI 1.4b ports, EDID remote management, and a 30mm profile.

    Ibase’s new SI-626 digital signage and video wall player combines high-end functionality with a slim 30mm height — 1.5mm thinner than its AMD Ryzen V1000 based SI-324 player. Like the SI-324, the SI-626 features hardware based EDID remote management with software setting mode to prevent display issues due to cable disconnection or display identification failures.

  • 15 Best “Lite” Android Go Apps To Save Battery And Storage In 2018
  • Hide your real name in Open Source

    If you’re thinking about contributing to Open Source, please take a moment to think of the negative impact it could have on your career…

  • Thermal Microconference Accepted into 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference

    As the energy density of computer systems has increased, thermal issues have become an increasingly hot topic across the spectrum from hand-held systems to internet datacenters. Because the need for thermal management is relatively new, there is a wide variety of hardware and firmware mechanisms, to say nothing of a wide variety of independently developed software to interact with these mechanisms. This in turn results in complex and almost-duplicate code to manage and control thermal excursions. This microconference will therefore look to see if it is possible to consolidate or at least to better align the Linux kernel’s thermal subsystems.

    This microconference will therefore discuss better handling of low ambient temperatures, userspace thermal control, improvements to thermal zone mode, better support for indirect (virtual) temperature measurement, sensor hierarchy, scheduler interactions with thermal management, and improvements to idle injection as a way to cool a core.

  • Debian: DSA-4298-1: hylafax security update

today's leftovers

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  • NVIDIA 410.57 Linux Beta Released With RTX 2080 Support, OptiX/Vulkan Ray-Tracing

    The Linux driver I've been using today for the just-posted GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Linux benchmarks is now publicly available. This NVIDIA 410 Linux driver is most exciting for Volta and Turing GPU owners, but there are also some EGL and Vulkan updates along with other changes.

  • Multiboot Pinebook KDE neon

    Here’s a picture of my Pinebook running KDE neon — watching Panic! At the Disco’s High Hopes — sitting in front of my monitor that’s hooked up to one of my openSUSE systems. There are still some errata, and watching video sucks up battery, but for hacking on documentation from my hammock in the garden, or doing IRC meetings it’s a really nice machine.

    But one of the neat things about running KDE neon off of an SD card on the Pinebook is that it’s portable — that SD card can move around. So let’s talk about multiboot in the sense of “booting the same OS storage medium in different hardware units” rather than “booting different OS from a medium in a single hardware unit”. On these little ARM boards, u-boot does all the heavy lifting early in the boot process. So to re-use the KDE neon Pinebook image on another ARM board, the u-boot blocks need to be replaced.

  • Glade in Libre Application Summit

    As usual, it was a great opportunity to catch up with old friends and make new ones specially outside the GNOME community.

    This opportunity I talked about the plans I have to integrate Glade with Gnome Builder and other IDEs

  • Linux-ready Apollo Lake mini-PC offers optional Movidius AI

    Aaeon’s rugged “Boxer-6405” mini-PC features an Apollo Lake SoC plus 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, 3x or 4x serial, and an HDMI port. Options including SATA, wireless, and an UP AI Core card with Movidius technology.

    Aaeon announced a Boxer-6405 mini-PC that will be unveiled at the 20th China International Industry Fair, held Sep. 19-23 at the Shanghai National Exhibition Center. The compact embedded system will be demonstrated along with the UP AI Vision Kit at Aaeon’s Smart Factory Artificial Intelligence Edge Computing display.

  •  

  • Video: Hackers To The Rescue – Defining Good Hacking

    Noci, the fictional city attacked by malevolent hackers during ICON2018, was saved and the challenge was won by a Swiss team. What is a hacker, how do they define themselves? Two members of ICON, a young non-governmental organisation in Geneva, answered that question for Intellectual Property Watch, with the same affirmation: a hacker is first and foremost a curious mind. View the IP-Watch video interviews below.

    ICON 2018, “The journey to digital trust”  co-organised by ICON, the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP,) and the MCI group, took place on 13-14 September. The event held what the organisers qualified as the “World premiere cyber-attack simulation.”

    Participants came from France, Italy, Norway and Switzerland, selected after a qualifying competition at the global level, according to an ICON press release. In the end, the challenge was won by Swiss participants Team Sw1ss, it said.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Opus 1.3 Codec Library Nears, New Tools Release

    Back in June was the first release candidate of Opus 1.3 (libopus v1.3) with this open-source audio codec allowing to use SILK down to bitrates of about 5kb/s, wideband encoding down to 9kb/s, improved security, improved Ambisonics support, and much more. Libopus 1.3 RC2 is now available along with some tooling updates.

    Libopus 1.3 RC2 was released on Tuesday to fix issues with bandwidth detection, enable Ambisonics support by default, and enables security hardening by default.

  • Akademy 2018

    I had the awesome opportunity to attend Akademy in Vienna this year. First off, a big thank you to the organising team for pulling off this years Akademy without a hitch.

    This Akademy was a bit more special, since it was decided to switch up the format, which in my opinion worked quite well. There were training’s that ran alongside the talk’s and BoF’s, which I think was a great idea. I signed up to the Public Speaking Training and the Non Violent Communication training, which I think were run exceptionally. I hope that these training sessions are run again next Akademy because I found them exceptionally valuable.

  • NetworkManager Merges An Initrd Generator For Early Boot Handling

    Days following the NetworkManager 1.14 release, feature activity on the next release is progressing and the newest addition is nm-initrd-generator.

    The NetworkManager Initrd Generator is used to generate an early-boot NetworkManager configuration. This new utility scans the command line for supported options and from there generates a network configuration and the necessary configuration files to handle an early instance of NetworkManager that runs from the initial ramdisk during the system's early boot stage.

  • Mageia at fête de l’humanité 2018

    The booths were in a different place from previous years, and we had a lot more visitors. We gave out all the flyers we brought by Saturday evening – there was only one left for Sunday – so we gave out Mageia stickers instead. We did not sell any T-shirts, but we sold two USB sticks.

    Many people asked for general information; I spoke so much that I lost my voice! We had strong interest, coming from people already using a Linux distribution as well as from people wishing to turn to free software.

  • Troubleshooting FDB table wrapping in Open vSwitch

    When most people deploy an Open vSwitch configuration for virtual networking using the NORMAL rule, that is, using L2 learning, they do not think about configuring the size of the Forwarding DataBase (FDB).

  • Test Day: Fedora Silverblue

    Fedora Silverblue is a new variant of Fedora Workstation with rpm-ostree at its core to provide fully atomic upgrades. Furthermore, Fedora Silverblue is immutable and upgrades as a whole, providing easy rollbacks from updates if something goes wrong. Fedora Silverblue is great for developers using Fedora with good support for container-focused workflows.

    Additionally, Fedora Silverblue delivers desktop applications as Flatpaks. This provides better isolation/sandboxing of applications, and streamlines updating applications — Flatpaks can be safely updated without reboot.

  • Understand Fedora memory usage with top

    Have you used the top utility in a terminal to see memory usage on your Fedora system? If so, you might be surprised to see some of the numbers there. It might look like a lot more memory is consumed than your system has available. This article will explain a little more about memory usage, and how to read these numbers.

    [...]

    Your system has another facility it uses to store information, which is swap. Typically this is an area of slower storage (like a hard disk). If the physical memory on the system fills up as needs increase, the OS looks for portions of memory that haven’t been needed in a while. It writes them out to the swap area, where they sit until needed later.

    Therefore, prolonged, high swap usage usually means a system is suffering from too little memory for its demands. Sometimes an errant application may be at fault. Or, if you see this often on your system, consider upgrading your machine’s memory, or restricting what you run.

  • Global Open-Source Learning Management Systems Software Market Size, Status and Forecast 2022
  • The Commons Clause vs. Open Source controversy, explained [iophk: "if it has the "Commons Clause" in it then it does not qualify as Open Source"]

    So, what is Commons Clause and why isn’t it the same thing as open source?

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More in Tux Machines

Debian and Derivatives

  • Montreal Bug Squashing Party - Jan 19th & 20th 2019
    We are organising a BSP in Montréal in January! Unlike the one we organised for the Stretch release, this one will be over a whole weekend so hopefully folks from other provinces in Canada and from the USA can come.
  • Debian Cloud Sprint 2018
    Recently we have made progress supporting cloud usage cases; grub and kernel optimised for cloud images help with reducing boot time and required memory footprint. There is also growing interest in non-x86 images, and FAI can now build such images. Discussion of support for LTS images, which started at the sprint, has now moved to the debian-cloud mailing list). We also discussed providing many image variants, which requires a more advanced and automated workflow, especially regarding testing. Further discussion touched upon providing newer kernels and software like cloud-init from backports. As interest in using secure boot is increasing, we might cooperate with other team and use work on UEFI to provide images signed boot loader and kernel.
  • Third Point Release of Univention Corporate Server 4.3-3
    With UCS 4.3-3 the third point release for Univention Corporate Server (UCS) 4.3 is now available, which includes a number of important updates and various new features.
  • Canonical Launches MicroK8s
    Canonical, the parent company of Ubuntu, has announced MicroK8s, a snap package of Kubernetes that supports more than 42 flavors of Linux. MicroK8s further simplifies the deployment of Kubernetes with its small disk and memory footprint. Users can deploy Kubernetes in a few seconds. It can run on the desktop, the server, an edge cloud, or an IoT device. Snap is a self-contained app package solution created by Canonical that competes with Flatpak, which is backed by Red Hat and Fedora. Snap offers macOS and Windows-like packages with all dependencies bundled with it. A snap package of Kubernetes means any Linux distribution that supports Snap can benefit from MicroK8s
  • Compiz: Ubuntu Desktop's little known best friend

OSS Leftovers

  • Android Open Source Project now includes the Fuchsia SDK and a Fuchsia ‘device’
     

    In a new commit posted today to Android’s Gerrit source code management, two Fuchsia-related repos have been added to the primary “manifest” for the Android Open Source Project. For the unfamiliar, this manifest is used to inform Google’s download tool “Repo” of what should be included when you download AOSP.

  • Google Fuchsia: Why This New Operating System Solves a Huge Coding Problem
     

    The mobile layout has been code-named “Armadillo” and the other view has been dubbed “Capybara,” reported 9to5Google. Both sides of Fuchsia will work together using a tab system that will make up a majority of the user experience.

  • Lessons in Vendor Lock-in: Shaving
    The power of open standards extends beyond today into the future. When my son gets old enough to shave, I can pass down one of my all-metal, decades-old antique razors to him, and it will still work. While everyone else in a decade will have to shave with some $20-per-blade disposable razor with three aloe strips, seven blades, and some weird vibrating and rotating motor, he will be able to pick any razor from my collection and find affordable replacement blades. This is the power of open standards and the freedom to avoid vendor lock-in.
  • Help us to make document compatibility even better
    The Document Liberation Project (DLP) is a sister project to LibreOffice, and provides many software libraries for reading and writing a large range of file formats – such as files created by other productivity tools. Thanks to the DLP, LibreOffice (and other programs) can open many legacy, proprietary documents, but there’s always room for improvement! Check out this short video to learn more:
  • GNU Guix: Back from SeaGL 2018
    SeaGL 2018 has concluded. Thank you to everyone in the local Seattle community who came to participate! As previously announced, Chris Marusich gave a talk introducing GNU Guix to people of all experience levels. Some very Guixy swag was handed out, including printed copies of this handy Guix reference card. The room was packed, the audience asked great questions, and overall it was tons of fun! If you weren't able to come to SeaGL this year, that's OK! You can watch a video of the talk below.

Servers: Kubernetes, CNCF, Red Hat and More

  • ​Bitnami Kubernetes Production Runtime released
    If you want to use a safe third-party container, smart people know they should turn to Bitnami. This company packages, deploys, and maintains applications in virtually any format for any platform. Now, at KubeCon in Seattle, Bitnami announced its Kubernetes release: Bitnami Kubernetes Production Runtime (BKPR) 1.0, a production-ready open source project. So, with everyone and their cloud provider offering Kubernetes, why should you care? Well, first, BKPR provides built-in monitoring, alerting, and metrics automatically, thereby enabling developers to avoid reinventing the wheel when they rollout a Kubernetes application.
  • Why the Cloud-Native Market Is Expanding at KubeCon
    The KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America event is a beacon for news, with vendors showcasing their wares and making multiple announcements. KubeCon + CloudNativeCon runs here from Dec. 11-13 and has brought 8,000 attendees and more than 187 vendors into the exhibit hall. Kubernetes itself is part of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), which is also the home now to 31 open-source cloud projects. In this eWEEK Data Points article, we look at the major areas of innovation and new services announced at the conference.
  • Add It Up: Enterprise Adoption of Kubernetes Is Growing
    A recently updated user survey from monitoring software provider Datadog confirms an increase in Kubernetes adoption. We believe this is the result of three factors: 1) more organizations using containers in production; 2) Kubernetes has emerged as the leading orchestration platform; 3) organizations are choosing to adopt Kubernetes earlier in cloud native voyage. There is also some evidence that Kubernetes adoption is more likely among organizations with more containers being deployed. This article highlights findings from several studies released in conjunction with KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America, a Kubernetes user conference being held this week in Seattle. Cloud Foundry’s most recent survey of IT decision makers shows container production usage jumping from 22 percent in early 2016 to 38 percent in late 2018, with these deployments increasingly being described as “broad.” The Cloud Foundry report also found an increase in the number of containers being deployed — in 2016, only 37 percent of cont
  • Oracle Q&A: A Refresher on Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel
    Oracle caused quite a stir in 2010 when it announced its Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for Oracle Linux. We’ve checked in with Sergio Leunissen, Vice President, Linux and VM Development at Oracle, for an update on the ABCs of this important introduction as well as the company’s latest take on Linux.
  • Get the Skills You Need to Monitor Systems and Services with Prometheus
    Open source software isn’t just transforming technology infrastructure around the world, it is also creating profound opportunities for people with relevant skills. From Linux to OpenStack to Kubernetes, employers have called out significant skills gaps that make it hard for them to find people fluent with cutting-edge tools and platforms. The Linux Foundation not only offers self-paced training options for widely known tools and platforms, such as Linux and Git, but also offers options specifically targeting the rapidly growing cloud computing ecosystem. The latest offering in this area is Monitoring Systems and Services with Prometheus (LFS241). Prometheus is an open source monitoring system and time series database that is especially well suited for monitoring dynamic cloud environments. It contains a powerful query language and data model in addition to integrated alerting and service discovery support. The new course is specifically designed for software engineers and systems administrators wanting to learn how to use Prometheus to gain better insights into their systems and services.
  • Red Hat Container Development Kit 3.7 now available
  • CodeReady Workspaces for OpenShift (Beta) – It works on their machines too
    “It works on my machine.” If you write code with, for, or near anybody else, you’ve said those words at least once. Months ago I set up a library or package or environment variable or something on my machine and I haven’t thought about it since. So the code works for me, but it may take a long time to figure out what’s missing on your machine.
  • OpenShift & Kubernetes: Where We’ve Been and Where We’re Going Part 2
    The growth and innovation in the Kubernetes project, since it first launched just over four years ago, has been tremendous to see. In part 1 of my blog, I talked about how Red Hat has been a key contributor to Kubernetes since the launch of the project, detailed where we invested our resources and what drove those decisions. Today, that innovation continues and we are just as excited for what comes next. In this blog, I’d like to talk about where we are going and what we’re focused on, as we continue driving innovation in Kubernetes and the broader cloud native ecosystem and building the next generation of OpenShift.
  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform and making it easier to manage bare metal
    Bare metal is making a comeback. At Red Hat we have been observing an increase of the use of bare metal in general. And we aren’t the only ones. In 2017’s OpenStack User Survey there had been a growth of bare metal in production environments from 9% to 20% of the production deployments. The 2018 survey says that adoption of Ironic is being driven by Kubernetes, with 37% of respondents who use Kubernetes on OpenStack using the bare metal provisioner. And there are many reasons for this growth. A great blog post about Kubernetes on metal with OpenShift by Joe Fernandes described this growth in the context of containers on bare metal with Kubernetes as a driver for this growth. But, it doesn’t stop there - High-Performance Compute (HPC), access to hardware devices or scientific workloads such as AI/ML or data lake management are also contributing to this increase.
  • etcd finds new home at CNCF
    CoreOS has moved to secure the independence of etcd by donating the distributed key-value store to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. The project was started by Core OS – now part of Red Hat – in 2013 to handle coordination between container instances so that a system reboot was possible without affecting the uptime of applications running on top. Its name can be seen as an hint to the management of configuration files, which over the years have grown to be stored in /etc directory in Unix systems.
  • Kubernetes etcd data project joins CNCF
    How do you store data across a Kubernetes container cluster? With etcd. This essential part of Kubernetes has been managed by CoreOS/Red Hat. No longer. Now, the open-source etcd project has been moved from Red Hat to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). What is etcd? No, it's not what happens when a cat tries to type a three-letter acronyms. Etcd (pronounced et-see-dee) was created by the CoreOS team in 2013. It's an open-source, distributed, consistent key-value database for shared configuration, service discovery, and scheduler coordination. It's built on the Raft consensus algorithm for replicated logs.
  • Welcome etcd to CNCF
    Etcd has been written for distributed systems like Kubernetes as a fault-tolerant and reliable data base. Clients can easily watch certain keys and get notified when their values change which allows scaling to a large number of clients that can reconfigure themselves when a value changes.
  • etcd: Current status and future roadmap
    etcd is a distributed key value store that provides a reliable way to manage the coordination state of distributed systems. etcd was first announced in June 2013 by CoreOS (part of Red Hat as of 2018). Since its adoption in Kubernetes in 2014, etcd has become a fundamental part of the Kubernetes cluster management software design, and the etcd community has grown exponentially. etcd is now being used in production environments of multiple companies, including large cloud provider environments such as AWS, Google Cloud Platform, Azure, and other on-premises Kubernetes implementations. CNCF currently has 32 conformant Kubernetes platforms and distributions, all of which use etcd as the datastore. In this blog post, we’ll review some of the milestones achieved in latest etcd releases, and go over the future roadmap for etcd. Share your thoughts and feedback on features you consider important on the mailing list: etcd-dev@googlegroups.com.
  • Red Hat contributes etcd, the cornerstone of Kubernetes, to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation
    Today Red Hat is thrilled to announce our contribution of etcd, an open source project that is a key component of Kubernetes, and its acceptance into the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), a vendor-neutral foundation housed under The Linux Foundation to drive the adoption of cloud native systems. The etcd project’s focus is safely storing critical data of a distributed system and it demonstrated its quality early on. It is most notably the primary datastore of Kubernetes, the de facto standard system for container orchestration. Today we're excited to transfer stewardship of etcd to the same body that cares for the growth and maintenance of Kubernetes. Given that etcd powers every Kubernetes cluster, this move brings etcd to the community that relies on it most at the CNCF.
  • Banks take next steps to digital refinement
    The financial services industry (FSI) has gotten the message: customer expectations have changed radically. They want to experience banking services through multiple digital channels, and they want those services to go well beyond the generic products that traditional banks typically offer. Customers are looking for personalization, are comfortable with service automation, and are eager to get what they need quickly and easily. As the value chain for financial institutions’ services expands along with the need to deliver new and relevant customer offerings, their dexterity is being put to the test, according to an article by The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU). To enable the flexibility and agility they need to support a dynamic environment, they’ve begun to create a culture of continuous delivery (CD). This allows for continuous cross-channel development, may allow deployment of features in hours rather than months, and lends support for performing system upgrades with zero downtime and without disturbing the customer experience.
  • CentOS 7-1810 "Gnome" overview | The community enterprise operating system
  • How to prepare for digital transformation with Red Hat Virtualization and Veeam
    Red Hat has a history of helping organizations reduce the cost of IT, from infrastructure to applications, while also helping to lay the foundation for open source digital transformation. More recently, Red Hat has sought to help organizations reduce the cost of virtualization, aiming to make it easier to accelerate their digital transformation journey through innovative technologies such as Red Hat Ansible Automation or Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, Red Hat’s comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes Platform.
  • Red Hat schedules stockholder meeting to vote on $34B IBM deal
  • INVESTIGATION NOTICE: Kaskela Law LLC Announces Shareholder Investigation of Red Hat, Inc.
  • Red Hat sets date for stockholders to vote on the merger with IBM
  • Arista Works With Red Hat and Tigera on Container Environments for Enterprises
    Arista Networks is working with Red Hat and Tigera to help enterprises adopt containers in both private and public clouds. The three companies are demonstrating a preview of their upcoming offering this week at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2018 in Seattle. The integrated product will include Arista’s containerized Extensible Operating System (cEOS) and CloudVision software along with Red Hat’s OpenShift Container Platform and Tigera’s Secure Enterprise Edition.
  • Knative Meshes Kubernetes with Serverless Workloads
    Google Cloud’s Knative initiative launched in July is expanding to include an updated version of Google’s first commercial Knative offering along with a batch of new distributions based on serverless computing framework. Knative is a Kubernetes-based platform for building and managing serverless workloads in which cloud infrastructure acts as a server for managing the allocation of computing and storage resources. It is being offered as an add-on to Kubernetes Engine used to orchestrate application containers.
  • Red Hat Steps Up with HPC Software Solutions at SC18
    In this video from SC18 in Dallas, Yan Fisher and Dan McGuan from Red Hat describe the company’s powerful software solutions for HPC and Ai workloads.
  • RedHat contributes etcd, a distributed key-value store project, to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon

Microsoft FUD, Openwashing and Entryism