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Misc

Leftovers: New Shows, Screencast and FUD

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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Graft Crosses 1,000 Supernodes on The Mainnet

    GRAFT network team recommends that their supernodes be hosted on virtual private servers using the Ubuntu 18.04 Linux OS with at least 2 GB per core, 2 GB of RAM, and 100 GB of storage space.

  • Plex Media Server (Stable) Available via Snap For Ubuntu 18.04

    The latest STABLE release of Plex media server is finally available to install in Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04, and higher easily via Snap package.

    The official Plex media server snap is available in BETA channel for quite a long period of time. By releasing version 1.15.2.793, the snap package finally goes stable.

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  • ClearlyDefined Update [Ed: OSI Web site now composed by Microsoft staff, salaried by Microsoft. Not good. In Microsoft-composed blog posts OSI now links to Microsoft GiHhub and a project Microsoft is connected to. Had OSI not received money from Microsoft, maybe it would not happen.]

    Having clear license data about open source increases everyone’s confidence. Projects want more adoption of their software, and this is built on confidence in knowing how to use it responsibly. Users of open source projects want to feel confident they know how a project is licensed to properly comply with the terms of that license. Organizations and companies building on open source want to feel confident they understand the compliance obligations of all the open source they use.

    Enter ClearlyDefined. ClearlyDefined is focused on clarifying data about open source components. Specifically, the initial focus is on three key pieces of data about open source: license, source location, and attribution parties. Clarity on these pieces of data helps everyone know what their obligations are and feel more confident in meeting them.

    We have spent the last year as an OSI project building the software to facilitate the project as well as the community around the project.

  • Cyber criminals using tactic to spread to other connected networks, research finds

    Researchers for the security firm Carbon Black said in a new report that 50 percent of cyberattacks experienced by its clients during the first quarter of 2019 included the technique, in which [attackrs] will access one network and then spread out by infiltrating other connected networks.

  • Jelle Van der Waa: Arch signoff

    Since some time Arch has been letting users become testers which can sign off packages in [testing] repository's. The idea behind allowing users and not only the Arch team sign off packages as known good is that packages can be moved earlier or bugs and issues found earlier. To sign off a package you need to login into Arch Linux's website and go to the sign off page to sign off a package. Haavard created a tool to be able to sign off packages from the command line which makes it easier to sign off by doing it interatively.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • OpenBenchmarking.org Crosses 39 Million Test/Suite Downloads & More Tests Coming

    This weekend the Phoronix Test Suite / OpenBenchmarking.org crossed its latest milestone... Serving more than 39 million test profile / test suite downloads to those using our open-source, cross-platform benchmarking software!

  • Wine-Staging 4.5 Comes In Smaller Thanks To More Patches Being Upstreamed

    While Wine-Staging 4.4 was at 770 patches compared to upstream Wine for running Windows programs/games on Linux and elsewhere, this weekend's Wine-Staging 4.5 is down to 759 patches thanks to more of these improvements being deemed ready for upstream.

    Wine-Staging 4.5 was released on Saturday night with 759 patches compared to the latest upstream code. This includes Wine-Staging still reverting the FAudio support for its XAudio2 implementation until more Linux distributions have begun packaging FAudio.

  • RISC-V Foundation Announces Agenda for Free, Half-Day Getting Started with RISC-V Events
  • A Weather Station Fit For A PDP-11

    The Digital Equipment Corp. PDP-11/70 is a masterpiece of Cold War-era industrial design. This microcomputer was the size of one or two modern server racks depending on configuration, and the front panel, loaded up with blinkenlights, was clad in a beautiful rose and magenta color scheme. The switches — the ones you used to toggle bits in memory — were actually custom designed covers made to match the shape of the completely unnecessary bezel. The aesthetic of the 11/70 is the intersection of baroque and modernism on the design Venn diagram.

    [Oscar Vermeulen] built a miniature version of the PDP-11/70 that houses a Raspberry Pi, and [rricharz] has been hard at work bringing an original copy of BSD to this system. The first great project to come out of this effort? It’s a weather station, and it’s exactly as cool as you think it is.

  • Daniel Stenberg: curl up 2019 is over

    (I will update this blog post with more links to videos and PDFs to presentations as they get published, so come back later in case your favorite isn’t linked already.)

    The third curl developers conference, curl up 2019, is how history. We gathered in the lovely Charles University in central Prague where we sat down in an excellent class room. After the HTTP symposium on the Friday, we spent the weekend to dive in deeper in protocols and curl details.

    I started off the Saturday by The state of the curl project (youtube). An overview of how we’re doing right now in terms of stats, graphs and numbers from different aspects and then something about what we’ve done the last year and a quick look at what’s not do good and what we could work on going forward.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Destination Linux EP114 - Ryan Fills Your Brains

    On DL114 - Ryan Interviewed, Solus 4, Mate 1.22, Nvidia buys Mellanox, Jetson Nano, Firefox 66, Openshot, OpenXR, Google Stadia, Linux Gaming News plus our Tips, Tricks and Software Spotlight picks!.

  • Arm's Komeda DRM Driver Picking Up Support For The Mali D71

    With the Linux 5.1 kernel there is Arm's new "Komeda" direct rendering manager driver while patched in as new material for Linux 5.2 is support for the Mali D71 display processor with this new driver.

  • De Blob Guide

    I.N.K.T Corporation has taken over Chroma City and removed all color. Nobody goes outside any longer and its up to one blob to save the day. Enter de Blob! Smash I.N.K.T bots to acquire their color and pain-the-streets color again! Use de Blobs abilities to revive Chroma City by mixing colors, completing objectives, freepaint modes and even 4-player split screen modes.

  • Apache Software Foundation's 20th anniversary, 3D-print system for optical cardiography, and more news

    An international research team has developed a multiparametric visual mapping technique that can simultaneously monitor multiple factors affecting heart health while creating 3D models. The method was developed to better understand cardiac arrhythmias. This open source, expandable system is openly available and can potentially save other researchers up to $20,000.

  • Open source is free – yeah, right! [Ed: It's 2019 and this buffoon Martin Banks still doesn't know the difference between freedom and priceless]
  • First Election of the .NET Foundation [Ed: Sellout, backstabber and "traitor" (according to Richard Stallman) helps Microsoft entryism and openwashing still]

    I am stepping down very happy knowing that I achieved my main goal, to turn the .NET Foundation into a more diverse and member-driven foundation.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Gaming Tip: Don't Buy That Game On Steam Without Using This Tool

    Valve has developed an incredible tool for running Windows-only Steam games under Linux.

  • Mesa 18.3.6 Is Coming With Over A Dozen Fixes To End Out The Series

    Mesa 18.3.6 is expected to be officially released this week as the last point release in the Mesa 18.3 series. 

  • Modern USB gadget on Linux & how to integrate it with systemd (Part 2)

    In the previous post I introduced you to the subject of USB gadgets implemented as machines running Linux. We also talked about modern style of USB gadget creation and integrating that with systemd. In this post, we look at how to implement your very own USB function with FunctionFS and how to integrate that with systemd.

  • Standardizing WASI: A system interface to run WebAssembly outside the web

    Today, we announce the start of a new standardization effort — WASI, the WebAssembly system interface.

    Why: Developers are starting to push WebAssembly beyond the browser, because it provides a fast, scalable, secure way to run the same code across all machines.

    But we don’t yet have a solid foundation to build upon. Code outside of a browser needs a way to talk to the system — a system interface. And the WebAssembly platform doesn’t have that yet.

    What: WebAssembly is an assembly language for a conceptual machine, not a physical one. This is why it can be run across a variety of different machine architectures.

    Just as WebAssembly is an assembly language for a conceptual machine, WebAssembly needs a system interface for a conceptual operating system, not any single operating system. This way, it can be run across all different OSs.

    This is what WASI is — a system interface for the WebAssembly platform.

  • PyDev 7.2.0 released

    PyDev 7.2.0 is now available for download.

  • Call for Proposals: Debconf 19, Curitiba, Brazil

    The DebConf Content team would like to call for proposals in the DebConf 19 conference, which will take place in Curitiba, Brazil, between July 21th and 28th. It will be preceded by DebCamp from July 14th to 19th, and Open Day on the 20th.

  • Kubernetes Day India 2019, Bangalore ee

    I returned to another conference with the jetlag of another conference, FOSSASIA but this conference was something I was very eagerly waiting to attend. Why? Well there are a couple of reasons, but the main reason for which I bought the ticket was to listen to Liz Rice in person.

    The other reason was to see and meet the growing community of Kubernetes in Bangalore.

    23rd March 2019, I woke up early morning and left along with Sayani, and Saptak to this place quite outside of Bangalore. Going to the venue almost felt like a weekend getaway trip.

    Anyways we reached the venue at 8AM, and the Bangalore sun was already killing. CNCF had announced people would be eligible for KubeCon tickets if they came and collected their badges before 8:30AM. This was a nice trick because I could see a huge crowd in-front of me standing and collecting their badges. After collecting the badges, we headed back to the auditorium.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • GSoC 2019 Could Bring Work On A Vulkan GPU Driver Settings Utility, OpenMAX Additions

    The X.Org Foundation is once again participating in the Google Summer of Code where student developers engage with various open-source efforts on a range of projects. If there are interested and capable participants, GSoC 2019 could bring a Vulkan settings/preferences user-interface for the Mesa drivers, new OpenMAX acceleration bits, and other possible initiatives. 

    The student application period began yesterday for Google Summer of Code 2019 and runs through 9 April while the accepted proposals will be announced in early May. The X.Org/Mesa/Wayland developers are currently being solicited for ideas.

  • The Humble Hot Date Bundle is out with a number of Linux games included

    Not quite the bundle I was expecting, although I'm sure there's plenty of people who will enjoy it. The Humble Hot Date Bundle has arrived!

  • Feren OS KDE Experimental with KDE Plasma 5.15

    In this video, we look at Feren OS KDE Experimental with KDE Plasma 5.15.

  • Aurora – A New Dawn in Exascale Computing

    Recently, Argonne National Laboratory and DOE announced the first exascale Cray supercomputer to be built in the U.S.  It will run Cray Linux Environment, a derivative of SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing.

  • Digital Transformation is Hard, Let Global Services Make IT Easy!
  • Anaconda Enterprise 5.3 Release

    The Anaconda Product Team has released Anaconda Enterprise 5.3, an upgrade focused on platform stability and reliability to support our customers’ needs for continuous innovation.

  • Asus Goes Mute As Hackers Covertly Install Backdoors Using Company Software Update

    According to Kaspersky, over 57,000 Kaspersky users have downloaded and installed the backdoored version of ASUS Live Update at some point in time. And while Symantec has confirmed the problem and stated it found 13,000 computers infected with the backdoor, Kaspersky estimates the total number of impacted PC users could be as high as a million.

    For its part, Asus isn't helping matters by going entirely mute on the subject. Motherboard was the first to report on the hack (in turn prompting Kaspersky's acknowledgement). But Asus apparently thought that silence was a better idea than owning the problem, confirming the data discovered by researchers, or quickly and accurately informing the company's subscribers...

  • Apple and Samsung Sued in Italy for Intentionally Slowing Older Devices

    Have you ever been using you’re an older smartphone and thought, man, this phone used to work so much better? Somehow, over the three years you’ve owned your phone, its operating system has slowed significantly, and it won’t work as quickly as it used to. If so, an Italian government regulatory agency may have the answer to your concerns.

    As the BBC News reported in October 2018, Apple and Samsung have been sued in Italy for intentionally slowing their older devices in an apparent move to incentivize customers to buy newer models, according to the regulatory agency, the Italian Competition Authority. Apple got slapped with a $10 million fine, and Samsung was fined $5 million.  Samsung denied the accusations and said it were “disappointed.” According to the BBC, Apple got hit with a higher fine because it didn’t explain to users how to properly prolong their phones’ battery life.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • This Open Source Extension Displays Hidden Google Search Results

    Google receives tonnes of requests from copyright holders daily for removing infringing content. The company then analyzes the received requests and removes the content that violates copyright claims. The number of DMCA notices received by Google has increased manifold over time. As reported by TorrentFreak, content creators have asked Google to remove over four billion pirate links till date.

    Whenever Google removes links from its search results, it displays a notice at the bottom with the number of results removed from a search page. Google also provides links to the DMCA notices on LumenDatabase which led to the removal of links.

  • Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: EU copyright reform: a missed opportunity

    We’ve been engaged in the discussions around the EU Copyright directive since the very beginning. During that time, we deployed various tools, campaigns, and policy assessments to highlight to European lawmakers the importance of an ambitious copyright reform that puts the interests of European internet users and creators at the centre of the process. Sadly, despite our best efforts – as well as the efforts of academics, creator and digital rights organisations, internet luminaries, and over five million citizens – our chances of reversing the EU’s march towards a bad legislative outcome diminished dramatically last September, after the draft law passed a crucial procedural milestone in the European Parliament.

    Over the last several months, we have worked hard to minimise the damage that these proposals would do to the internet in Europe and to Europeans’ rights. Although the draft law is still deeply flawed, we are grateful to those progressive lawmakers who worked with us to improve the text.

  • Mozilla’s Firefox Send File Sharing Service Now Available As Android App

    Mozilla recently introduced its file-sharing service, Firefox Send, which was initially available on the web. As promised previously, the service now has an Android app, currently available in the form of a beta.

    Firefox Send allows users to share files with other users, in a secure and end-to-end encrypted form.

  • Jelmer Vernooij: Breezy evolves

    Last month Martin, Vincent and I finally released version 3.0.0 of Breezy, a little over a year after we originally forked Bazaar.

    When we started working on Breezy, it was mostly as a way to keep Bazaar working going forward - in a world where Python 2 has mostly disappeared in favour of Python 3).

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Updating a group of packages on Gentoo
  • Men Of War Guide
  • Falkon 3.1.0 released

    New Falkon version is now out.

  • Xilinx Moving Ahead With Plans To Upstream Their Alveo PCIe Accelerator Driver

    A few weeks back I wrote about Xilinx looking at contributing their Alveo FPGA accelerator drivers to the mainline Linux kernel. They are continuing to work on that goal and pushed out their latest kernel driver patches this week for these Alveo PCIe accelerator cards. 

    The Xilinx Alveo PCIe accelerator driver for Linux is already used in production by customers albeit now the company is comfortable with the idea of upstreaming the work into the mainline kernel. These accelerators can ultimately run C/C++/OpenCL using their specialty compiler or programmed using RTL. Xilinx Alveo is marketed for machine learning, video transcoding/processing, genomics, financial computations, database searching, and related big data fields.

  • Fabian Affolter: Chemnitzer Linux Tage 2019

    Once again, Robert and I went to Chemnitz. We don’t wanted to break with the tradition of having a Fedora Project booth at the Chemnitzer Linux Tage. Robert is representing the Fedora Project at CLT for over a decade now.

    To show the visitors a running Fedora installation Raphael decided to take a larger screen, mounted it on a stand and placed a Raspberry Pi behind it. Pretty straight-forward setup but there is always an issue with the VESA connection on the back of the screen.

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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Full Circle Weekly News #125
  • Why Open19 Designs Matter for Edge Computing [Ed: Openwashing Microsoft without even any source code]

    On the opening day of this year's Data Center World in Phoenix, Yuval Bachar, LinkedIn's principal engineer of data center architecture, was on hand to explain why the social network's Open19 Project will be an important part of data centers' move to the edge.

  • Course Review: Applied Hardware Attacks: Rapid Prototying & Hardware Implants

    Everyone learns in different ways. While Joe is happy to provide as much help as a student needs, his general approach probably caters most to those who learn by doing. Lecture is light and most of the learning happens during the lab segments. He gives enough space that you will make mistakes and fail, but not so badly that you never accomplish your objective. If you read the lab manual carefully, you will find adequate hints to get you in the right direction.

    On the other hand, if you’re a student that wants to site in a classroom and listen to an instructor lecture for the entire time, you are definitely in the wrong place. If you do not work on the labs, you will get very, very, little out of the course.

    The rapid prototyping course is a good introduction to using the 3D printer and pcb mill for hardware purposes, and would be valuable even for those building hardware instead of breaking it. It really opened my eyes to the possibilities of these technologies. On the other hand, I suspect that the hardware implants course has limited application. It’s useful to learn what is possible, but unless you work in secure hardware design or offensive security that would use hardware implants, it’s probably not something directly applicable to your day to day.

  • Nulloy – Music Player with Waveform Progress Bar

    I’ve written a lot about multimedia software including a wide range of music players, some built with web-technologies, others using popular widget toolkits like Qt and GTK.

    I want to look at another music player today. You may not have heard of this one, as development stalled for a few years. But it’s still under development, and it offers some interesting features. It’s called Nulloy.

    The software is written in the C++ programming language, with the user interface using the Qt widget toolkit. It’s first release was back in 2011.

  • A Complete List of Google Drive Clients for Linux
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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Hardware Review - The ZaReason Virtus 9200 Desktop
  • Chrome OS 76 will disable Crostini Linux backups by default
    Essentially, this is still a work in progress feature. And I shouldn’t be terribly surprised by that, even though in my experience, the functionality hasn’t failed me yet. That’s because we know that the Chromium team is considering on a way to backup and restore Linux containers directly from the Files app on a Chromebook. That proposal is targeted for Chrome OS 78, so this gives the team more time to work that out, as well as any other nits that might not be quite right with the current implementation.
  • Andrei Lisita: Something to show for
    Unfortunately along with the progress that was made we also encountered a bug with the NintendoDS core that causes Games to crash if we attempt to load a savestate. We are not yet 100% sure if the bug is caused by my changes or by the NintendoDS core itself. I hope we are able to fix it by the end of the summer although I am not even sure where to start since savestates are working perfectly fine with other cores. Another confusing matter about this is that the Restart/Resume Dialog works fine with the NintendoDS core and it also uses savestates. This led me to believe that perhaps cores can be used to load savestates only once, but this can’t be the problem since we re-instantiate the core every time we load a savestate. In the worst case we might just have to make a special case for the NintendoDS core and not use savestates with it, except for the Resume/Restart dialog. This would sadden me deeply since there are plenty of NintendoDS games which could benefit from this feature.
  • OSMC's June update is here with Kodi v18.3
    Team Kodi recently announced the 18.3 point release of Kodi Leia. We have now prepared this for all supported OSMC devices and added some improvements and fixes. Here's what's new:

OSS Leftovers

  • A comparison of open source, real-time data streaming platforms
    A variety of open source, real-time data streaming platforms are available today for enterprises looking to drive business insights from data as quickly as possible. The options include Spark Streaming, Kafka Streams, Flink, Hazelcast Jet, Streamlio, Storm, Samza and Flume -- some of which can be used in tandem with each other. Enterprises are adopting these real-time data streaming platforms for tasks such as making sense of a business marketing campaign, improving financial trading or recommending marketing messages to consumers at critical junctures in the customer journey. These are all time-critical areas that can be used for improving business decisions or baked into applications driven by data from a variety of sources.
  • Amphenol’s Jason Ellison on Signal Integrity Careers and His Free, Open Source PCB Design Software
    Ellison, Senior Staff Signal Integrity Engineer at Amphenol ICC, gives his insight on the importance of networking, giving to the EE community, and his open-source signal integrity project. How does signal integrity engineering compare to other EE fields? What are open-source resources worth these days? What makes for a good work life for an engineer? Learn this and more in this Engineer Spotlight! Jason Ellison started down the path to becoming an electrical engineer because someone told him it was "fun and easy if you're good at math." In this interview with AAC's Mark Hughes, Ellison—a Senior Staff Signal Integrity Engineer at Amphenol ICC—describes how his career has grown from these beginnings into the rewarding and diverse work of signal integrity engineering.
  • Cruise open-sources Webviz, a tool for robotics data analysis [Ed: Releasing a little tool that's part of proprietary software so that it 'feels' more "open"]
    Cruise, the self-driving startup that General Motors acquired for nearly $1 billion in 2016, generates an enormous amount of data by any measure. It orchestrates 200,000 hours of driving simulation jobs daily in Google Cloud Platform, spread across 30,000 virtual cars in an environment running on 300,000 processor cores and 5,000 graphics cards. Both those cars and Cruise’s fleet of over 180 real-world autonomous Chevrolet Bolts make thousands of decisions every second, and they base these decisions on observations captured in binary format from cameras, microphones, radar sensors, and lidar sensors.
  • EWF launches world’s first open source blockchain for the energy industry
    The Energy Web Foundation this week announced that it has launched the world’s first public, open-source, enterprise-grade blockchain tailored to the energy sector: the Energy Web Chain (EW Chain). More than ten Energy Web Foundation (EWF) Affiliates — including utilities, grid operators, and blockchain developers — are hosting validator nodes for the live network, according to the company.
  • Pimcore Releases Pimcore 6.0, Amplifying User-Friendly Digital Experiences Through Open Source
    Pimcore, the leading open-source platform for data and customer experience management, has released the most powerful version of the Pimcore platform, Pimcore 6.0. The updated platform includes a new user interface that seamlessly connects MDM/PIM, DAM, WCM, and digital commerce capabilities to create more advanced and user-friendly experiences quickly and efficiently.
  • VCV Rack reaches version 1.0.0: free and open-source modular synth gets a full release
    VCV Rack is a free, open-source modular software synth that’s been gaining ground for a couple of years, but only now has it reached the significant milestone of version 1.0. Designed to replicate the feeling of having a hardware modular synth on your desktop, VCV Rack enables you to add both free and paid-for modules, and now supports polyphony of up to 16 voices. There’s MIDI Output, too with CV-Gate, CV-MIDI and CV-CC modules enabling you to interface with drum machines, desktop synths and Eurorack gear.
  • Flying Above the Shoulders of Giants
    Thanks to open-source platforms, developers can stand on the shoulders of software giants to build bigger and better things. Linux is probably the biggest...
  • MIT Researchers Open-Source AutoML Visualization Tool ATMSeer
    A research team from MIT, Hong Kong University, and Zhejiang University has open-sourced ATMSeer, a tool for visualizing and controlling automated machine-learning processes. Solving a problem with machine learning (ML) requires more than just a dataset and training. For any given ML tasks, there are a variety of algorithms that could be used, and for each algorithm there can be many hyperparameters that can be tweaked. Because different values of hyperparameters will produce models with different accuracies, ML practitioners usually try out several sets of hyperparameter values on a given dataset to try to find hyperparameters that produce the best model. This can be time-consuming, as a separate training job and model evaluation process must be conducted for each set. Of course, they can be run in parallel, but the jobs must be setup and triggered, and the results recorded. Furthermore, choosing the particular values for hyperparameters can involve a bit of guesswork, especially for ones that can take on any numeric value: if 2.5 and 2.6 produce good results, maybe 2.55 would be even better? What about 2.56 or 2.54?
  • Open-Source Cybersecurity Tool to Enhance Grid Protection
    A revolutionary new cybersecurity tool that can help protect the electric power grid has been released to the public on the code-hosting website GitHub.
  • Quick notes for Mozilla Whistler All Hands 2019
  • Deeper into the data fabric with MongoDB
    However, to gain access to rich search functionality, many organisations pair their database with a search engine such as Elasticsearch or Solr, which MongoDB claims can complicate development and operations — because we end up with two entirely separate systems to learn, maintain and scale.

Raspberry Pi 4 is here!

The latest version of the Raspberry Pi—Raspberry Pi 4—was released today, earlier than anticipated, featuring a new 1.5GHz Arm chip and VideoCore GPU with some brand new additions: dual-HDMI 4K display output; USB3 ports; Gigabit Ethernet; and multiple RAM options up to 4GB. The Raspberry Pi 4 is a very powerful single-board computer and starts at the usual price of $35. That gets you the standard 1GB RAM, or you can pay $45 for the 2GB model or $55 for the 4GB model—premium-priced models are a first for Raspberry Pi. Read more

Open Data, Open Access and Open Hardware

  • DoD’s Joint AI Center to open-source natural disaster satellite imagery data set
    As climate change escalates, the impact of natural disasters is likely to become less predictable. To encourage the use of machine learning for building damage assessment this week, Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute and CrowdAI — the U.S. Department of Defense’s Joint AI Center (JAIC) and Defense Innovation Unit — open-sourced a labeled data set of some of the largest natural disasters in the past decade. Called xBD, it covers the impact of disasters around the globe, like the 2010 earthquake that hit Haiti. “Although large-scale disasters bring catastrophic damage, they are relatively infrequent, so the availability of relevant satellite imagery is low. Furthermore, building design differs depending on where a structure is located in the world. As a result, damage of the same severity can look different from place to place, and data must exist to reflect this phenomenon,” reads a research paper detailing the creation of xBD. [...]

    xBD includes approximately 700,000 satellite images of buildings before and after eight different kinds of natural disasters, including earthquakes, wildfires, floods, and volcanic eruptions. Covering about 5,000 square kilometers, it contains images of floods in India and Africa, dam collapses in Laos and Brazil, and historic deadly fires in California and Greece.

    The data set will be made available in the coming weeks alongside the xView 2.0 Challenge to unearth additional insights from xBD, coauthor and CrowdAI machine learning lead Jigar Doshi told VentureBeat. The data set collection effort was informed by the California Air National Guard’s approach to damage assessment from wildfires.

  • Open-source textbooks offer free alternative for UC Clermont students
    Some UC Clermont College students are avoiding paying hundreds of dollars for textbooks — and getting the content for free — thanks to online open-source textbooks, a growing trend among faculty at the college and throughout higher education. UC Clermont Dean Jeff Bauer, who is also a professor of business, said the benefits of open textbooks are many. “All students have the book on the first day of class, it saves them a lot of money, and the information can be accessed anywhere, anytime, without carrying around a heavy textbook,” Bauer said. “They don’t need to visit the bookstore before or after each semester to buy or sell back books, either.”
  • Open Source Computer Controlled Loom Knits Pikachu For You
    The origin story of software takes us back past punch card computers and Babbage's Difference Engine to a French weaver called Joseph Marie Jacquard.
  • Successful open-source RISC-V microcontroller launched through crowdfunding
    X-FAB Silicon Foundries, together with crowd-sourcing IC platform partner Efabless Corporation, launched the first-silicon availability of the Efabless RISC-V SoC reference design. This open-source semiconductor project went from start of design to tape-out in less than three months employing the Efabless design flow produced on open-source tools. The mixed-signal SoC, called Raven, is based on the community developed ultra-low power PicoRV32 RISC-V core. Efabless has bench-tested the Raven at 100MHz, and based on simulations, the solution should operate at up to 150MHz.
  • Open Hardware: Open-Source MRI Scanners Could Bring Enormous Cost Savings
    Wulfsberg explore the possibilities of open source MRI scanning. As open-source technology takes its place around the world—everywhere from makerspaces to FabLabs, users on every level have access to design and innovation. In allowing such access to MRI scanning, the researchers realize the potential for ‘technological literacy’ globally—and with MRIs specifically, astronomical sums could be saved in healthcare costs. The authors point out that medical technology is vital to the population of the world for treating not only conditions and illnesses, but also disabilities. As so many others deeply involved in the world of technology and 3D printing realize, with greater availability, accessibility, and affordability, huge strides can be made to improve and save lives. Today, with so many MRI patents expiring, the technology is open for commercialization.