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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • 6 Best CCleaner Alternatives for Ubuntu

    A common category of software you will find on many Windows PCs are system optimizers and cleaners. One such application is CCleaner, a powerful and popular Windows PC cleaner which scans for and deletes unwanted files, private information such as browsing cache and history, freeing up space and guarding your privacy and more.

    Unfortunately, there is no CCleaner release for Linux systems, so if you were using it on Windows and made a switch to Ubuntu Linux (one of the recommended distros for Linux beginners), you are probably wondering which software to use for the same purpose on your new platform.

    Whether you have just made the switch or you have been using Ubuntu before, if you are looking for an alternative to CCleaner, you have landed in the right place. In this article, we will share 6 best CCleaner alternatives for Ubuntu Linux.

  • Mageia Weekly Roundup 2018 – Week 22

    It’s been a busy week, as usual! 378 packages came into Cauldron, 15 into Mga6 testing. Work is still going on to get the Mga5 -> Mga6 upgrade happening and then the Mga6.1 ISOs ready. There are some bugs, and here (already fixed), and here connected with the tray update in the pipeline, if you’re interested…

    Heaps of updates are coming in to the wiki, and there will soon be a look-and-feel update. Keep your eyes on the wiki, it will be worth it!

  • Linux Kernel 4.17, "Merciless Moray," Offers Improved Performance and Security

    Linus Torvalds released version 4.17 of the Linux Kernel on Sunday, nine weeks after the prior version. Although Linus says he is running out "of fingers and toes to keep track of minor releases," he has decided not to call this release "5.0" because he is saving that for 4.20.

    As with the 4.16 cycle, 4.17 has been a relatively smooth, save a few hiccups due to those pesky chip issues. It turns out the shadow of the Spectre vulnerability is still long, and the last two weeks before the release were a busy ones, with patches designed to counteract the effects of Spectre v4 making up a significant portion of all the code submitted. That said, and even though Linus does not like large amounts of changes so late in the release cycle, he skipped an rc8 and released the final version of 4.17 anyway.

  • Upstream Linux support for new NXP i.MX 8
  • Some webdev knowledge gained

    Easlier this year I had to split a Koa/SPA app into two separate apps. As part of that I switched from webpack to Neutrino.

    Through this work I learned a lot about full stack development (frontend, backend and deployments for both). I could write a blog post per item, however, listing it all in here is better than never getting to write a post for any of them.

    Note, I’m pointing to commits that I believe have enough information to understand what I learned.

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #38 – A Beginner’s Guide to Kubernetes

    Kubernetes community now has 10 releases (2.5yrs) of software and experience. We just finished KubeCon Copenhagen, OpenShift Commons Gathering and Red Hat Summit and we heard lots of companies talk about their deployments and journeys. But many of them took a while (12-18) months to get to where they are today. This feels like the “early adopters” and we’re beginning to get to the “crossing the chasm” part of the market. So thought we’d discuss some of the basics, lessons learned and other things people could use to “fast-track” what they need to be successful with Kubernetes.

  • How Alibaba Cloud plans to disrupt AWS, Microsoft and Google in EMEA

     

    Alibaba Cloud has seven availability zones in China alone, seven more across Asia Pacific and Hong Kong, two in the US, one in Dubai, and one in Frankfurt for Europe. It also now has local teams in four EMEA locations: the UK, Germany, France and Dubai.

today's leftovers

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  • The World and Calamares

    The timezone-selection widget in Calamares was borrowed from some distro installer a long time ago, and at some point the images were resized, and some math corrected to map image points to latitude and longitude on the map. The resizing introduced some aliasing artifacts, and then the math moved locations far north — where a typical map projection is “stretched out” to the wrong spot. Some time ago I fixed up things above 65 degrees north or so. Reykjavik is at 64-and-a-bit north, so wasn’t handled then. And it was a bodge anyway.

  • Upstream release notification for package maintainers

    Repology is monitoring package repositories across Linux distributions. By now, Atom feeds of per-maintainer outdated packages that I was waiting for have been implemented.

    So I subscribed to my own Gentoo feed using net-mail/rss2email and now Repology notifies me via e-mail of new upstream releases that other Linux distros have packaged that I still need to bump in Gentoo. In my case, it brought an update of dev-vcs/svn2git to my attention that I would have missed (or heard about later), otherwise.

  • Free software log (May 2018)

    The wonders of a week of vacation that was spent mostly working on free software! The headline releases were remctl 3.15, which fixes a long-standing correctness bug on the server and adds more protocol validation and far better valgrind support, and podlators 4.11, which fixes a buncho f long-standing bugs in Pod::Text and its subclasses.

  • Ted Dabney, a Founder of Atari and a Creator of Pong, Dies at 81

    Samuel F. Dabney, an electrical engineer who laid the groundwork for the modern video game industry as a co-founder of Atari and helped create the hit console game Pong, died on May 26 at his home in Clearlake, Calif. He was 81.

  • ​Security alert: Watch out for password-stealing malware says FBI

    The Department of Homeland Security and the FBI said that North Korean hackers have been using both Joanap, a remote access tool (RAT), and Brambul, a Server Message Blockworm, since at least 2009 to target companies working in the media, aerospace, financial, and critical infrastructure sectors.

    [...]

    The malware gives North Korea's hackers -- which the agencies refer to by the code-name 'Hidden Cobra' -- the ability to steal data, run further malware and initialise proxy communications on a compromised Windows device. Other functions include file management, process management, creation and deletion of directories and node management.

  • Lynis – Automated Security Auditing tool for Linux Servers

today's leftovers

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  • Huawei announces the EROFS Linux file system intended for Android devices

    A file system is a technology that outlines how data is stored and retrieved. There are many different kinds of file systems, each with their own benefits, to pick from. You’ve probably heard of file systems like exFAT, F2FS, ext4. Choosing one file system over another can have profound impacts on storage performance and stability, so the decision isn’t taken lightly by device makers. Most device makers settle with the popular, well-tested file systems like ext4, but that doesn’t mean companies aren’t willing to experiment with alternatives. That’s exactly what Huawei is doing with an open-source Linux file-system called EROFS, which is intended to be used on Android devices at some point.

  • Microsoft’s Windows shakeup continues internally

     

    The organizational changes mean that Joe Belfiore, who has been the face of Windows Phone in the past, is taking on more of the important consumer-facing parts of Windows. Rajesh Jha, previously an Office executive, will be leading the overall experiences and devices team, and in a memo to employees he says the changes will “bring end to end accountability for Edge, Windows experience, and partners together.”

  • Help Celebrate The 14th Birthday Of Phoronix Next Week

    Now at nearly 14 years old, Phoronix.com has provided more than 25,200 original news articles and more than 3,800 featured articles / Linux hardware reviews.

  • Linux Journal June Issue: Do-It-Yourself
  • Free Resources for Open Source Leadership, AI, Networking, and More

    May was the month for learning at Linux.com and The Linux Foundation, and we covered a range of topics and offered an array of free resources to help you expand your knowledge of Linux and open source. Let’s take a look at some of the month’s most popular content.

  • Here’s What You Missed at openSUSE Conference 2018

    The annual openSUSE Conference is always an exciting event for the SUSE Linux community. This year the event took place in Prague from the 25th to the 27th of May. It’s FOSS was the official media partner of the event and I attended the event on behalf of the It’s FOSS team.

    If you did not follow my daily debriefing on Facebook or LinkedIn, here is a summary of the three-day event as I lived it, all condensed in a single article.

  • Debian 7 Long Term Support reaching end-of-life

    The Debian Long Term Support (LTS) Team hereby announces that Debian 7 "Wheezy" support has reached its end-of-life on May 31, 2018, five years after its initial release on May 4, 2013.

    Debian will not provide further security updates for Debian 7. A subset of Wheezy packages will be supported by external parties. Detailed information can be found at Extended LTS.

    The LTS Team will prepare the transition to Debian 8 "Jessie", which is the current oldstable release. The LTS team will take over support from the Security Team on June 17, 2018.

  • Atari VCS Finally on Indiegogo, Free Software Directory Meet-up Tomorrow, Minifree Libreboot X200 Tablet Has Been FSF-Certified and More

    Redis 5.0 RC1 is out for testing this week, Phoronix reports. The biggest new feature is the Streams data type implementation, but 5.0 also offers new APIs, better memory reporting and more. See the Redis 5.0 RC1 announcement for all the details.

  • Microsoft Plans To Buy GitHub, Valued At $2 Billion: Report

    If the rumors turn out to be true, web-based code hosting service GitHub could become a part of Microsoft. Business Insider, citing sources, reports that Microsoft is reportedly in talks to buy GitHub.

  • FundRequest launches a marketplace that rewards developers for Open Source contributions

    FundRequest, a new platform for incentivizing open-source development, has officially launched their first product: a blockchain powered integration with GitHub that allows developers to directly solve open source project issues and be rewarded. The platform integrates directly with GitHub, allowing projects to fund ‘issues’ that developers can solve and be rewarded in cryptocurrency.

  • Intel Has Another Developer Working Now Working On FreeBSD Support

    Ben Widawsky, one of the Linux graphics architects at Intel where he has been working on the Mesa driver stack for the past eight years, is now re-tasking to FreeBSD.

  • Photo FOMO: $5 photography insurance, a sleek, open-source 3D-printed camera

    Afraid of missing out on the latest photo industry news while you’re out, well, actually taking pictures? Photo FOMO (you know, Fear Of Missing Out) is all the news you might have missed this week, published on the weekends. Alongside the biggest stories of the week, like the end of Canon’s film camera era, PicsArt’s custom stickers and the availability of DJI’s latest stabilizer, find briefs on the latest in accessories and photo industry news from this week with Photo FOMO.

  • Summer of Code: Command Line OX Client!

    As I stated earlier, I am working on a small XMPP command line test client, which is capable of sending and receiving OpenPGP encrypted messages. I just published a first version Smile

    Creating command line clients with Smack is super easy. You basically just create a connection, instantiate the manager classes of features you want to use and create some kind of read-execute-print-loop.
    Last year I demonstrated how to create an OMEMO-capable client in 200 lines of code. The new client follows pretty much the same scheme.

today's leftovers

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  • Compete in the ACUMOS AI Challenge for a Chance to Win $50,000

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) has quickly evolved over the past few years and is changing the way we interact with the world around us. From digital assistants, to AI apps interpreting MRIs and operating self-driving cars, there has been significant momentum and interest in the potential for machine learning technologies applied to AI.

  • AMDGPU On Linux 4.18 To Offer Greater Vega Power Savings, DisplayPort 1.4 Fixes

    There are more AMDGPU improvements just sent in to DRM-Next for landing in the Linux 4.18 kernel.

    On top of the already queued Vega 20 GPU support, VCN clock/power gating support, Raden Ridge GFXOFF support to turn off the graphics engine when not needed, Vega M GPU support for the Intel Kabylake G hardware, scan-out buffer handling improvements, SR-IOV fixes, and power-related improvements to Vega 10, yet another batch of changes were submitted on Thursday for this next kernel cycle.

  • 15-Way Linux Distribution / Operating System Comparison, Including Windows 10 & WSL

    As part of the large Linux performance tests we have begun and continuing through June with Phoronix celebrating its 14th birthday next week along with the 10th anniversary of the Phoronix Test Suite 1.0 release, for your viewing pleasure today is a 15-way Linux distribution / operating system comparison testing not only the leading and latest Linux distributions but also Windows 10 April 2018 Update and Linux on Windows WSL.

  • Funding Krita: 2017

    We decided at the last sprint to publish a yearly report on Krita’s income and outlay. We did that in 2015 and 2016. 2017 has been over some time now, so let’s discuss last year’s finances a bit. Last year was weird, of course, and that’s clearly visible from the results: we ended the year € 9.211,84 poorer than we started.

    Because of the troubles, we had to split sales and commercial work off from the Krita Foundation. We did have a “company” ready — Boudewijn Rempt Software, which was created when our maintainer was trying to fund his work on Krita through doing totally unrelated freelance jobs, after KO GmbH went bust. That company is now handling sales of art books, dvd’s and so on, as well as doing commercial support for Krita. So the “Sales” number is only for the first quarter of 2017.

  • NetworkManager 1.11.4 Brings More Linux Networking Improvements

    NetworkManager 1.11.4 is out today as the newest development release for this widely-used Linux network management user-space utility.

  • GNOME 3 Might Be Too Resource Hungry To Ever Run Nicely On The Raspberry Pi

    If you try running the GNOME Shell today on the Raspberry Pi, it's a frustratingly slow experience. While some work is being done in addressing GNOME's GPU, CPU, and memory consumption, it might not ever be in a state to run smoothly on Raspberry Pi hardware.

    Earlier this month was the GNOME 2018 Performance Hackfest and one of those in attendance was Broadcom's Eric Anholt who maintains the VC4 and V3D graphics driver stacks. The former is most notable for being the fully open-source graphics driver solution for the VideoCore hardware found on Raspberry Pi single board computers up to this point.

  • Jolla's Sailfish 2.2 Rolls Out With Fingerprint Unlock, Emoji Keyboard Support

    For those still interested in Jolla's Sailfish OS Linux-based mobile device platform, version 2.2 has rolled out with a variety of enhancements.

    Sailfish OS 2.2 brings support for some long desired features like fingerprint unlock support, an emoji keyboard layout, better VPN support, updated Android support, improvements to the Email / Camera / Gallery applications, and more. Sailfish X also now supports the Xperia X dual-SIM smartphone.

  • Linux for Makers, by Aaron Newcomb

    I've had very little experience with Linux but now that I'm using Raspberry Pis (a cheap single board computer that runs Linux) I need to know how to use Linux. Online how-tos are good, but Linux for Makers, by Aaron Newcomb, is better. In fact, this book is pure gold. It assumes zero prior knowledge of Linux. Everything is clearly explained. I learned how to install Raspbian Linux on an SD Card (Raspberry Pis use SD cards as their hard drive), log the output of a script, schedule jobs with cron, use lots of different commands, write scripts, use PI with IFTTT, and lots more.

today's leftovers

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  • Rocket.Chat, Nitrux Linux and More. It's Cooking with Linux (without a Net)

    Today on "Cooking with Linux without a Net", I cover (and install) @RocketChat , show you another Linux distribution you've never heard of (Nitrux Linux), and hunt rootkits and perform security audits. Oh, and I crash and burn too. Much fun was had, so watch and enjoy.

  • Tracking development of slackware in git

    Something had been nagging me for a long time, and I finally had enough of that itch and decided to deal with it.

    As you know, there’s a private and a public side to Slackware’s development. The discussions and decisions are handled internally among the members of ‘the team’ and are not shared with the public at large until an update is done to the ‘slackware-current’ tree which can be found on every Internet mirror.
    Thus you have access to the latest state of development always. But for some people it is a compelling idea to be able to access the development updates in a public repository like git – where you can track the changes over time.

  • Debian welcomes its GSoC 2018 and Outreachy interns

    We're excited to announce that Debian has selected twenty-six interns to work with us during the next months: one person for Outreachy, and twenty-five for the Google Summer of Code.

today's leftovers

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  • [Podcast] PodCTL #37 – How to Deploy Applications to Kubernetes

    With all of the innovation happening within Kubernetes and around the Kubernetes ecosystem, sometimes it can be difficult to keep up with all the options for deploying applications to Kubernetes clusters. If you’re somewhat confused, you’re not alone. This is because there isn’t one official tool or method, and the right tool often depends on the role of the person (developer, operator) and where the application is being deployed (on-platform, off-platform, etc.). We discuss why the different options exist, walk through many of the options, and try to explain why some tools or frameworks might be a better fit for certain functions within your organization.

  • The Linux Kernel's HID Multi-Touch Driver Gets Rewritten, Microsoft Surface Dial Support

    A major rewrite of the Linux kernel's HID multi-touch input code has been announced in order to support newer input devices and other improvements.

    The rewritten HID multi-touch code now allows supporting system multi-axis devices, which are being pushed by Microsoft now for supporting a new circular style menu while interacting with it from a second hand/tool.

  • Eleventh floor for Linux

    POLAND IT services provider Linux Polska is to move to the Equator IV office building of Karimpol Polska in Warsaw and will take up 570 sqm on the 11th floor starting from August.

  • How to Get Involved with Hyperledger Projects

    Few technology trends have as much momentum as blockchain — which is now impacting industries from banking to healthcare. The Linux Foundation’s Hyperledger Project is helping drive this momentum as well as providing leadership around this complex technology, and many people are interested in getting involved. In fact, Hyperledger nearly doubled its membership in 2017 and recently added Deutsche Bank as a new member.

    A recent webinar, Get Involved: How to Get Started with Hyperledger Projects, focuses particularly on making Hyperledger projects more approachable. The free webinar is now available online and is hosted by David Boswell, Director of Ecosystem at Hyperledger and Tracy Kuhrt, Community Architect.

  • Improved Docker container for Weblate

    The Docker container for Weblate got several improvements in past days and if you're using it, it might be worth reviewing your setup.

    It has been upgraded to Python 3 and Django 2. This should cause no problems as Weblate itself supports both for quite some time, but if you were extending Weblate somehow, you might have to update these extensions to make them compatible.

  • Sega Mega Drive and Genesis Classics is now out for Linux and Mac

    There’s some good news for those who fancy enjoying some retro gaming classics on their Linux PC or Mac, because Sega has made its Mega Drive and Genesis Classics available for those platforms on Steam.

  • KBibTeX 0.7.95 aka 0.8-rc1

    As promised, here comes the one intermediate pre-release between KBibTeX 0.7.90 (0.8-beta1) and the final release of 0.8: KBibTeX 0.7.95 aka 0.8-rc1.

  • openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018 Logo Competition

    Today, we will start a logo competition for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018, which is going to be held in Taipei, Taiwan. A logo is an essential material for the successful summit. As you have seen, the former openSUSE.Asia summits have their unique logos reflecting the communities where the summit took place. Following tradition, we have logo competition to collect great logo for this year’s summit.

  • This 38-inch Curved Monitor from LG has a Ryzen CPU and Supports Ubuntu

    LG has launched a new 38-inch curved monitor with a basic PC built-in side — and, rather awesomely, it supports Ubuntu.

    Although LG pitches the device as a mere monitor it is technically an all-in-one PC. The awkwardly named ‘LG 38CK900G-B’ comes powered by a fanless dual-core AMD Ryzen chip with Vega graphics, and comes backed by 8GB DDR4 RAM.

  • Google’s Pixel 3 XL To Get iPhone X-Like Notch, Leaked Image Reveals

    We are still months away from the release of Google’s next-generation Pixel smartphones, but a couple of rumors about the phone’s design have been doing rounds off lately.

    The most recent one is a leaked picture of tempered glass screen protectors which is supposedly created for the upcoming Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL.

today's leftovers

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  • Dell refreshes Precision laptops with Ubuntu Linux pre-installed

    It's been a little over a year since Dell updated its Precision mobile workstation line, which is notable for its inclusion of the Ubuntu flavor of Linux as an operating system option alongside Windows 10. But last week, the company refreshed the laptop lineup without much fanfare, starting with the entry-level Precision 3530.

  • Linux+ Certification and InfoSec Institute’s Linux-related Training and Courses

    Linux operating system (OS) is used by many users both at home and at the office: it is running on personal computers, mobile devices, and web server systems on-premise, hosted or in the cloud. So, why so many Linux addicts? Free, open-source and with a community of enthusiastic supporters and experts, Linux is the choice of many for private and commercial purposes, as it allows total control and customization capabilities.

  • IBM wins $310 mil. contract with KB Kookmin

    KB Kookmin has decided to continue its controversial partnership with IBM, which offered heavy discounts to supply its mainframe system for use in the bank's banking application system.

    The monetary value of the deal is estimated at 340 billion won ($310 million). KB Kookmin will hold a board meeting later this week to fix the budget for the system renewal, bank officials said Monday.

  • Linux 4.17-rc7 Released: Linux 4.17.0 Might Be Out Next Week

    While this past week for kernel development has been busier than in prior weeks, Linus Torvalds today released Linux 4.17-rc7 and feels the official/stable release might be ready next week.

  • Mageia Blog (English) : Weekly Roundup 2018 – Weeks 20 & 21:
  • Overseas Microsoft staff to have access to servers storing secret Australian data

    Microsoft staff based overseas will have access to servers in Australia where top-secret government data is stored on the company's Azure cloud service.

  • Atari co-founder Ted Dabney dies

    Dabney was destined to work in tech early on. He learned about electronics while in the US Marine Corps, and took on tech roles at Bank of America and HP soon after leaving the military. His most fateful move, though, was when he joined Ampex in 1961. That gave him early experience with display technology and led him to meet Bushnell, who joined in 1969. They envisioned launching a pizza place with a coin-operated computer gaming system, and... well, you know the rest.

  • FBI: Reboot Your Router Now To Fight Malware That Affected 500,000 Routers

    This week only, Cisco reported about the malware called VPNFilter which is assumed to have targeted around 500,000 routers to create a massive botnet. It’s believed that the malware, having a resemblance to BlackEnergy malware, could have its roots originating in Russia.

  • Buggy software could lock a Jeep's cruise control

    Fiat Chrysler America is recalling 4.8 million vehicles in the US to fix a software bug that could lock the vehicle's cruise control.

    Until it's fixed, owners of some Ram pickups, Jeep SUVs, and other Chrysler and Dodge vehicles are being warned against using cruise control.

today's leftovers

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  • Debian XU4 images updated

    I've updated my Debian images for the ODROID XU4; the newest build was done before stretch release, and a lot of minor adjustments have happened since then.

  • Parrot 4.0 Ethical Hacking Linux Distro Released
  • FBI says Russians hacked [sic] hundreds of thousands of home and office routers

    The warning followed a court order Wednesday that allowed the FBI to seize a website that the hackers [sic] planned to use to give instructions to the routers. Though that cut off malicious communications, it still left the routers infected, and Friday’s warning was aimed at cleaning up those machines.

  • FBI tells router users to reboot now to kill malware infecting 500k devices

    Researchers from Cisco’s Talos security team first disclosed the existence of the malware on Wednesday. The detailed report said the malware infected more than 500,000 devices made by Linksys, Mikrotik, Netgear, QNAP, and TP-Link. Known as VPNFilter, the malware allowed attackers to collect communications, launch attacks on others, and permanently destroy the devices with a single command. The report said the malware was developed by hackers [sic] working for an advanced nation, possibly Russia, and advised users of affected router models to perform a factory reset, or at a minimum to reboot.

today's leftovers

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  • 10 Reasons Why Desktop Linux Isn’t Mainstream – For The Record

    10 Reasons Why Desktop Linux Isn’t Mainstream. Yeah, the title is totally link-bait. However, it’s worth noting that I actually deliver what the title describes and then some. Linux is awesome, but sadly, most people haven’t heard of it. Here’s why.

  • Linux Works For You

    Linux allows YOUR computer to work for you, not against you. Wearing this shirt/hoodie demonstrates to all who see it that you are not a slave to your PC. You are in control and Linux is the reason for this.

  • Robin "Roblimo" Miller

    The Linux Journal mourns the passing of Robin Miller, a longtime presence in our community.

  •  

  • Pidgin / Libpurple SkypeWeb Plugin Sees New Stable Release

    SkypeWeb is a plugin that allows using Skype in Pidgin / libpurple chat clients. The plugin can be used to send instant messages and participate in group chats, but it does not yet support voice / video calling.

  • Feral's GameMode May Soon Have Soft Real-Time Capabilities

    Feral Interactive's Linux system tuning daemon, GameMode since being introduced earlier this year has primarily offered the ability to easily change the CPU scaling governor when gaming but not much more. Though a new feature is now in the works for GameMode.

  • Mini DebConf Hamburg

    Last week I attended the MiniDebConfHamburg. I worked on new releases of dracut and rinse. Dracut is an initramfs-tools replacement which now supports early microcode loading. Rinse is a tool similar to debootstrap for rpm distributions, which now can create Fedora 28 environments aka chroots.

  • Android and Automotive Grade Linux battle, as car becomes a data center

    Volvo’s decision to pick Intel’s Atom automotive system-on-chip (SoC) to run in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) for its new XC40 SUV highlights the intensifying competition among chipmakers in this fast growing sphere. The decision to base the system on Android also illuminates the evolving operating system scene for cars, with Linux the primary alternative in its AGL (Automotive Grade Linux) variant. However, given the complementary strengths of Android and Linux, it looks more likely that both will be deployed by many automobile makers in hybrid packages, so that they can take advantage of Android’s huge app ecosystem, encouraging plenty of third party enhancements, as well as harnessing the independence and enterprise scale of Linux. As cars become mini-data centers or edge compute…

  • Vending machine boardset works with UP or UP Squared boards

    Aaeon’s “AIOT-MSSP01” is a vending machine boardset powered by a PIC32 MCU that’s optimized to work with the UP or UP Squared SBCs. It offers vending-friendly I/O like MDB, EXE, and DEX, as well as motor controllers and 6x USB ports.

    The AIOT-MSSP01 is an industrial-grade vending machine controller (VMC) solution designed to run 24/7 “without a glitch,” says Aaeon. The boardset is optimized for use with the UP or UP Squared SBCs, but works with standard PCs and “most computer boards on the market.” There’s no mention of OS support for the connected computer, but the UP SBCs support Linux, Android, and Windows.

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  • S11E12 – Twelve Years a Slave

    It’s Season 11 Episode 12 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Porting guide from Qt 1.0 to 5.11

    We do try to keep breakages to a minimum, even in the major releases, but the changes do add up. This raises the question: How hard would it be to port a Qt application from Qt 1.0 to 5.11?

  • Thunderbolt Networking on Linux

    Thunderbolt allows for peer-to-peer network connections by connecting two computers directly via a thunderbolt cable. Mika from Intel added support for this to the 4.15 kernel. Recently, Thomas Haller from NetworkManager and I worked together to figure out what needs to be done in userspace to make it work. As it turns out, it was not that hard and the pull-request was merged swiftly.

  • What’s new in openSUSE Leap 15 – part 1

    openSUSE Leap 15 will be released on the 25th of May 2018! A new openSUSE release is always an exciting event. This means that I get to play with all kinds of new and improved software packages.

    I am aware that I can simply install openSUSE Tumbleweed and have a new release 4 or 5 times a week. But when using openSUSE Tumbleweed some time ago, I noticed that I was installing Gigabytes of new software packages multiple times per week. The reason for that is that I have the complete opposite of a minimum install. I always install a lot of applications to play / experiment with (including a lot of open source games). I am using openSUSE since 2009 and it covers all of my needs and then some. I am already happy with the available software, so there is no real reason for me to move with the speed of a rolling release. Therefore I prefer to move with the slower pace of the Leap releases.

  • GNOME Terminal: a little something for Fedora 29

    Can you spot what that is?

  • UBports To Work On Unity 8 / Mir / Wayland After OTA-4

    The UBports team have put out their latest batch of answers to common questions around this project that's still working to maintain the Ubuntu Touch software stack.

    Among the project's recent work has included getting QtWebEngine working on Mir and before their Ubuntu 16.04 LTS based release they still need to figure out Chromium crashes and to resolve that as well as updating the browser. For their first release of UBports derived from Ubuntu 16.04 "Xenial" they are still going to rely upon Oxide while later on should migrate to a new browser.

  • 8 Best App Locks For Android To Secure Your Device In 2018
  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 39
  • What's Coming in OpenStack Rocky?

    The OpenStack Rocky release is currently scheduled to become generally available on August 30th, and it's expected to add a host of new and enhanced capabilities to the open-source cloud platform.

    At the OpenStack Summit here, Anne Bertucio, marketing manager at the OpenStack Foundation, and Pete Chadwick, director of product management at SUSE, outlined some of the features currently on the Rocky roadmap.

    Bertucio began the session by warning the audience that the roadmap is not prescriptive, but rather is intended to provide a general idea of the direction the next OpenStack release is taking.

  • PostgreSQL 11 Is Continuing With More Performance Improvements, JIT'ing

    PostgreSQL 11 is the next major feature release of this open-source database SQL server due out later in 2018. While it's not out yet, their release notes were recently updated for providing an overview of what's coming as part of this next major update.

    To little surprise, performance improvements remain a big focus for PostgreSQL 11 with various optimizations as well as continued parallelization work and also the recently introduced just-in-time (JIT) compilation support.

  • Tidelift Secures $15M in Series A Funding

    Tidelift, a Boston, MA-based open source software startup, secured $15m in Series A funding.

  • Tesla disclosed some of its autopilot source code after GPL violation

    Tesla, a technology company, and the independent automaker are well known for offering the safest, quickest electric cars. The company uses a lot of open source software to build its operating system and features, such as Linux Kernel, Buildroot, Busybox, QT, etc also they have always been taciturn about the finer details and tech of its popular artefacts, such as Model S, Model X, but now Elon Musk’s company has just released some of its automotive tech source code into the open source community.

  • Open Source Underwater Distributed Sensor Network

    One way to design an underwater monitoring device is to take inspiration from nature and emulate an underwater creature. [Michael Barton-Sweeney] is making devices in the shape of, and functioning somewhat like, clams for his open source underwater distributed sensor network.

  • Security Researchers Discover Two New Variants of the Spectre Vulnerability
  • Security updates for Thursday
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Security Leftovers

  • The Internet of Torts

    Rebecca Crootof at Balkinization has two interesting posts:

    • Introducing the Internet of Torts, in which she describes "how IoT devices empower companies at the expense of consumers and how extant law shields industry from liability."
    • Accountability for the Internet of Torts, in which she discusses "how new products liability law and fiduciary duties could be used to rectify this new power imbalance and ensure that IoT companies are held accountable for the harms they foreseeably cause.

    Below the fold, some commentary on both.

  • Password Analyst Says QAnon’s ‘Codes’ Are Consistent With Random Typing

    “The funny thing about people is that even when we type random stuff we tend to have a signature. This guy, for example, likes to have his hand on the ends of each side of the keyboard (e.g., 1,2,3 and 7,8,9) and alternate,” Burnett wrote in his thread.

  • Uber taps former NSA official to head security team

    Olsen, who served as the counterterrorism head under President Obama until 2014, will replace Joe Sullivan as the ride-hailing company's top security official.

    Sullivan was fired by Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi over his handling of a massive cyber breach last year that happened during former CEO Travis Kalanick’s tenure.

  • Malware has no trouble hiding and bypassing macOS user warnings

    With the ability to generate synthetic clicks, an attack, for example, could dismiss many of Apple's privacy-related security prompts. On recent versions of macOS, Apple has added a confirmation window that requires users to click an OK button before an installed app can access geolocation, contacts, or calendar information stored on the Mac. Apple engineers added the requirement to act as a secondary safeguard. Even if a machine was infected by malware, the thinking went, the malicious app wouldn’t be able to copy this sensitive data without the owner’s explicit permission.

  • Caesars Palace not-so-Praetorian guards intimidate DEF CON goers with searches [Updated]
  • Amazon Echo turned into snooping device by Chinese hackers [sic]

    Cybersecurity boffins from Chinese firm Tencent's Blade security research team exploited various vulnerabilities they found in the Echo smart speaker to eventually coax it into becoming an eavesdropping device.

Android Leftovers