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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Man who allegedly deleted his startup with one line of code is a huge troll

    You might’ve heard the tragic-but-kind-of-funny story of Marco Marsala, who allegedly deleted his entire startup with a single line of code this past week. It was the ultimate case of IT bad luck – or carelessness, as some commenters suggested.

  • What to do with the “rm -rf” hoax question

    It turns out the the recent question regarding the misuse of rm -rf in Ansible was actually just a hoax in some kind of viral marketing effort. It become quite famous on various media and gathered a large number of views.

    Since I don't think we should allow ServerFault to be abused in such way, I deleted the question once I learned about the hoax. However, this will rob the kind people that took the time to answer him of the rep points they earned for this, in particular the Journeyman Geek with 185 upvotes.

  • Party 2 in Review

    Last night (Friday 15th April, 19:00 UTC) we held the second of our Kubuntu packaging parties. Using the new conference server provided by BigBlueButton (BBB), things worked like a dream.

  • This Week in Solus – Install #26

    We now ship locales for Firefox and Thunderbird. This makes it easier to switch to the language you desire / need without having to jump through the hoop of installing addons.

  • Slackware-Based Zenwalk 8.0 Is Coming Soon, First RC Build Released for Testing

    The developers of the Slackware-based Zenwalk GNU/Linux operating system announced this weekend the general availability of the first and probably the last RC (Release Candidate) build of the upcoming Zenwalk 8.0 distro.

    During the past four months, Zenwalk 8.0 has received a total of three Beta releases, and now it has finally reached the RC state, as most of the issues have been fixed by now. Moreover, the development cycle of the Slackware 14.2 operating system is nearing its final stages as the second Release Candidate was announced the other day.

  • Arch Linux Now Uses Kernel 4.5

    As you may know, Arch Linux is among the most popular rolling release Linux systems. On April 14, Arch has received a major kernel upgrade, replacing Kernel 4.4.5 with Kernel 4.5, which has been added to the Testing repositories some time ago.

    The Arch developers have skipped the Kernel 4.4.6 and Kernel 4.4.7 and adopted kernel 4.5 directly. Among others, Kernel 4.5 brings better support for AMD Radeon GPUs, comes with support for the AMD PowerPlay power management technology and brings enhancements to the AMDGPU open-source driver.

  • [OBS] Beta One of Version 2.7 Released

    We are happy to announce the first preview release of the upcoming Open Build Service (OBS) version 2.7. Two highlights that you should check out are the download on demand support which makes it possible to include external software repositories and the new git work flows.

  • UDOO X86 Is Your PC’s Replacement — The Most Powerful Hacker Board Ever Made

    DOO X86 single board computer combines the benefits of a PC and Arduino 101 to become one of the most appealing devices for a maker. This open source board is about 10 times faster than Raspberry Pi 3 and based on Quad-Core 64-bit generation x86 Intel processors.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Teaching New Linux on Old Hardware

    The decision I faced was life-changing either way I went. My inclination was to go back to school and get the certs I needed to work in the Linux administration field. I already had the base knowledge and experience; it was just a matter of jumping through the hoops to get a piece of paper saying I already knew what I was learning. Not that I wouldn’t learn a thing or two along the way.

  • Xfce 4.14 Development Is Focused Around GTK3 Porting

    It will likely be quite some time before the Xfce 4.14 desktop environment is released while the main focus this development cycle is on porting to the GTK+ 3.x tool-kit.

  • Linux Mint 18 will include Cinnamon 3.0 and Mate 1.14 versions

    The Linux Mint developers have been working hard on version 18 of the popular desktop distribution. Linux Mint 18 will offer Cinnamon 3.0 and Mate 1.14 versions when it is released. There are also be some other new goodies that will be included in Linux Mint 18.

  • Little-bitty Ubuntu mini-PC takes quad-core Atom to extremes

    Stealth.com has launched a tiny, Ubuntu-ready “LPC-175F” mini-PC with a quad-core Atom E3845, dual GbE ports, and -20 to 70°C support.

    The 145 x 84 x 35mm LPC-175F is one of the smallest mini-PCs ever built by Stealth.com. By comparison, its 250 x 146 x 42mm and up, Intel 3rd Gen. Core based LPC480x mini-PC series seems more like a maxi-PC series.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Vivaldi Browser Hits Version 1.0, Has Roots in Opera and Chromium
  • Tar vs Rsync
  • Configuring a Raspberry Cluster with MPI
  • A profiler of our own

    So now that you are all aware that I’ve been working to modernize Sysprof, you might not be surprised to read that I decided to push things in a bit more interesting of a direction.

  • A Pisi Video!

    This is an animated short video featuring some known characters from Pisi Linux.

  • Fedora nightly image finder

    Finding nightly Fedora builds has always been a bit of a pain. For quite a while we had this page, which just linked to a couple of canned Koji searches. It kinda worked, but it was terribly slow and the results weren’t the nicest thing to look at; it also couldn’t find you installer images, as they don’t come out of Koji. It doesn’t work any more, as the Koji tasks it searches for are no longer correct; it could easily be ‘fixed’ but it’d still be a bad experience.

  • BrickHack 2016 and Fedora: Event Report

    As an event sponsor, the Fedora Ambassadors of North America had a table for the event. The Ambassadors offered mentorship and assistance to BrickHack 2016 programmers, gave away some free Fedora swag, and offered an introduction to Linux, open source, and the community. This report is a recollection of some highlights from the event and also focuses on the impact we made as an event sponsor.

  • Announcing validated Debian packages for Mitaka
  • Finally... power management on Nokia N900

    After long long fight, it seems power management on Nokia N900 works for me for the first time. N900 is very picky about its configuration (you select lockdep, you lose video; you select something else 50mA power consumption... not good). That was the last major piece... I hope. I should have usable phone soon.

  • Dynamsoft’s barcode reader SDK adds PHP support on Linux

    The new PHP barcode reader toolkit for Linux supports PHP x64 version 5.3 to 5.6. Both Thread Safe (TS) and Non Thread Safe (NTS) options are provided. The Dynamsoft toolkit works with Linux Debian, Ubuntu, and CentOS operating systems.

  • Standardizing secure by default

    "Privacy by design" and "security by design" have become common terms to describe the process of building privacy and security into technology at the start, rather than bolting it on after the fact. It may seem perplexing to consider security an afterthought, especially to those of us whose careers are dedicated to information security, but -- based on human nature’s desire for functionality first -- developers have a tendency to wait until a technology has reached maturity before integrating security capabilities. This mentality is changing now that data breaches are making headlines on a regular basis, however. We are finally starting to build security into networks, applications and even chips from the get-go.

  • Sweden Military Servers Hacked, Used in 2013 Attack on US Banks

    The servers were used in a so-called DDoS attack (distributed denial of service) which pounded the websites of US financial institutions, among Citigroup, Capital One and HSBC with overwhelming requests for information.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Download Linux Voice issue 17

    Issue 17 of Linux Voice is nine months old, so we’re releasing it under the Creative Commons BY-SA license. You can share and modify all content from the magazine (apart from adverts), providing you credit Linux Voice as the original source and retain the same license.

  • OpenStack 'Mitaka' materialises

    The next version of OpenStack, Mitaka, has materialised.

    The OpenStack-Announce list went into overdrive on Thursday to deliver news of .0 versions of projects galore.

    This time around the OpenStack's made ease of use and scalability its watchwords.

  • Linus Torvalds On Stage at TED2016
  • Linus Torvalds Speaks Openly about Work and Code at TED2016 [Video]

    Torvalds went on to discuss his belief that “code either works or it doesn’t.” He should know. The current Linux kernel is one of the largest collaborative projects ever attempted, with more than 20 million lines of code and more than 12,000 contributors so far. Additionally, an average of 185 changes are accepted into the kernel every day -- nearly 1,300 per week -- and Torvalds ultimately has the final say on what code is accepted.

  • NVIDIA Releases New Vulkan Linux Driver With Better Multi-Threaded Scaling

    While NVIDIA mainlined their Vulkan driver support in the NVIDIA 364 driver series, they issued another Vulkan-focused driver update yesterday for Linux and Windows for developers and enthusiasts wanting to try out the latest support for this high-performance graphics API.

    The NVIDIA 364.16 driver is this special Vulkan driver release and is available for download from developer.nvidia.com rather than the usual channels.

  • Munich Presentation: From OpenGL To Vulkan
  • GUADEC 2017 call for bids

    The GNOME Foundation would like to invite bids for hosting GUADEC 2017.

    GUADEC is the biggest gathering of GNOME users and developers, which takes place in Europe every year, and you could make it happend next year!

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • KDE Comes Up With A Vision For The Future
  • KDE Wants Users to Be in Control of Their Digital Lives, Enjoy Freedom & Privacy

    Today KDE has published a story like no other. Not an announcement of a new project or the release of an updated version of one of their existing pieces of software, but a story about their vision for the future.

  • Red Hat & QCT Collaborate On Systems For OpenStack & Ceph

    Today Red Hat Inc. and Quanta Cloud Technology (QCT) announced that they are working together to deliver combined Red Hat offerings (including Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform, Red Hat Ceph Storage, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux) with QCT servers, storage, and networking. These joint solutions will increase private and hybrid cloud deployments, and enable customer success on the combined offerings through joint testing, validations, reference architectures, and more.

  • Thin mini-ITX SBC aims Braswell SoCs at embedded apps

    Adlink announced the “AmITX-BW-I” SBC, featuring Intel’s Braswell SoCs, a slim, embeddable “thin Mini-ITX” profile, dual GbE, and 4K triple-display video.

  • Asphalt 8: Airborne comes to the Tizen store to take over Z1 and Z3 users

    Its a huge news for Samsung Z1 and Z3 users out there who have been dying to play some graphic intensive games on their Tizen smartphone. One of Gameloft’s most popular racing game, Asphalt 8: Airborne that has hit some record number of downloads on Android, iOS and Windows phone platforms is now available on the Tizen Store absolutely FREE! The Game brings in a high flying action filled racing experience where you get to drive a car to win races and accomplish special tasks in each race to win coins and and stars in return.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • ​The Linux Foundation launches Linux-based Civil Infrastructure Project

    There's the Internet of Things -- DVRs, refrigerators, and cars -- and then there's the Internet of civic things -- electrical power grids, oil and gas production facilities, and highway traffic management. Linux has a role to play in both.

  • New Linux-based effort to support global civil infrastructure demands
  • Welcome, 2016, The Year Of The ARMed Everything

    Shucks. I was just getting very comfortable with Linux 4.4.* when news came of delicious new stuff in 4.6 for some of the ARMed SoC’s on motherboards I’m considering here. Having their drivers in the mainline would certainly simplify maintenance. Oh well, at least I can be sure to have software support for years to come.

  • Shell calendar generator

    Html and css made the whole exercise really easy and I have something working now on GitHub in 150 lines of code where half of it is CSS. It’s not perfect, there is plenty of space for optimization, but it is really simple and fast enough. Are you interested? Give it a try and if it doesn’t work well for you, pull requests are welcome

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • April 2016 Issue of Linux Journal
  • Linux.com Login Temporarily Frozen for New Site Launch
  • CoreOS and Intel to Meld Kubernetes, OpenStack into Single Stack

    Kubernetes just keeps heading in new directions. It started as essentially a version of Borg, which harnesses computing power from data centers into a powerful virtual machine. It has made a difference for many cloud computing deployments, and optimizes usage of container technology. Then, last year, Google handed stewardship of Kubernetes over the to Cloud Native Foundation. The CNCF, in partnership with the Linux Foundation, has helped a coalition of partners including Cisco, eBay, Huawei, IBM and Intel, advance Kubernetes' capabilities.

    Now, CoreOS has announced a technical collaboration with Intel to deploy and manage OpenStack, open source software for building clouds, with Kubernetes, which focuses more on automating deployment, scaling, and operations of applications.

  • Cockpit 0.100 Released

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. There’s a new release every week. Here are the highlights from this weeks 0.100 release. Even though 0.100 may seem to be a magical number … it’s really just the number after 0.99 Big Grin

  • Calibre 2.54 eBook Manager and Converter Is Out for Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows

    Calibre developer Kovid Goyal has released a new maintenance version of his widely used ebook library management software for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/12 & 13

    Today I cover again two weeks. Both weeks were ‘shorter’ due to the Easter celebrations, which took some time off from many contributors. And if that’s no excuse, one of the weeks was literally by one hour shorter over here (Switch to DST).

  • Ubuntu 16.04 Mascot Revealed – Available in SVG and XCF Files, Download it Now

    Every release, Ubuntu has own official mascot. For upcoming release Ubuntu 16.04 LTS canonical adopt the animal logo called “Xerus” which is the posh name given to a type of ground squirrel. This new mascot will used to promote Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

    The logo, revealed in an update to the Ubiquity package, appears on the installer slideshow that plays during every Ubuntu installation. As you can see image on above, the design of ubuntu 16.04 mascot inspired from the art of oragmi.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

GeckoLinux 421 Plasma and SUSE Hack Week

  • GeckoLinux 421 Plasma review - It ain't no dragon
    I heard a lot of good praise about this little distro. My inbox is flooded with requests to take it for a spin, so I decided, hey, so many people are asking. Let us. The thing is, openSUSE derivatives are far and few in between, but the potential and the appeal are definitely there. Something like CentOS on steroids, the way Stella did once, the same noble way Fuduntu tried to emancipate Fedora. Take a somewhat somber distro and pimpify it into submission. GeckoLinux is based on openSUSE Leap, and I chose the Plasma Static edition. There's also a Rolling version, based on Tumbleweed, but that one never worked for me. The test box for this review is Lenovo G50. But wait! Dedoimedo, did you not recently write in your second rejection report that GeckoLinux had failed to boot? Indeed I did. But the combo of yet another firmware update on the laptop and a fresh new download fixed it, allowing for a DVD boot. Somewhat like the painful but successful Fedora exercise back in the day. Tough start, but let's see what gives.
  • La Mapería
    It is Hack Week at SUSE, and I am working on La Mapería (the map store), a little program to generate beautiful printed maps from OpenStreetMap data.
  • HackWeek XIV @SUSE: Tuesday

From Vista 10 to Linux Mint

  • Microsoft Scared into Changes, 5 Reasons to Ditch
    Following a small claims court judgment against them, Microsoft announced they would be making declining their Windows 10 upgrade easier. Why not just switch to Linux as Daniel Robinson highlighted five reasons you should. My Linux Rig spoke to Christine Hall of FOSS Force about her "Linux rig" today and Bryan Lunduke had some thoughts on Canonical's collaboration myth. Dedoimedo reviewed GeckoLinux 421 and Gary Newell tested Peppermint 7 on his new Lenovo Ideapad.
  • After Multi-Month Tone Deaf Shitshow, Microsoft Finally Lets Users Control Obnoxious Windows 10 Upgrade
    Microsoft's decision to offer Windows 10 as a free upgrade to Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 made sense on its surface. It was a nice freebie for users happy to upgrade, and an effective way to herd customers on older Windows iterations onto the latest platform to help consolidate support expense. But Microsoft's upgrade in practice has seen no shortage of criticism from users annoyed by a total lack of control over the update, and Microsoft's violent tone deafness in response to the complaints. For example a Reddit post from an anti-poaching organization made the rounds earlier this year after the 17 GB automatic Windows 10 update resulted in huge per megabyte charges from their satellite broadband ISP. Microsoft's response to these complaints? Ignore them. As complaints grew, Microsoft finally provided a way to fully disable the forced upgrade, but made sure it involved forcing users to modify the registry, something Microsoft knew full well less technical users wouldn't be comfortable attempting to hurdle. [...] Things have been escalating ever since, often to comedic effect. But this week things changed somewhat with the news that Microsoft has struck a $10,000 settlement with a California woman who sued the company after an ill-timed Windows 10 upgrade brought her office computers to a crawl. The woman took Microsoft to court after support failed to help resolve the issue, a spokesman saying Microsoft halted its appeal of the ruling "to avoid the expense of further litigation."
  • Microsoft pays $10,000 to unwilling Windows 10 updater
  • The Linux Setup - Christine Hall, FOSS Force
    On my main desktop, I use Linux Mint 17.1, Rebecca. My main laptop, a 64-bit machine, is running Mint 17.2 Rafaela. The laptop got updated from Rebecca so I could write a review, but the desktop never got upgraded because it’s a 32-bit machine and would require another download, which I haven’t had the time to do. I have another laptop running Bodhi, which might be my favorite distro, but I can be more productive with Mint.
  • Linux Mint 18 Finally Arrives — Download Cinnamon and MATE Edition ISO Files Here
    The wait for the summer’s hottest Linux distro is over and you can finally download the release version of Linux Mint 18 “Sarah”. Often called the best Linux distribution for desktop PCs, Mint 18 comes loaded with new features and Linux 4.4 LTS Kernel.

AMD and Linux

  • The Updated AMD Polaris Firmware Blobs Needed For RX 480 Support Land
    One day ahead of the Radeon RX 480 "Polaris" launch, the necessary firmware updates for the production graphics card support have landed in linux-firmware.git.
  • AMD RX 480 released, AMD will possibly open up Radeon Software
    The next generation of AMD GPU's have launched, and it begins with the AMD RX 480. Benchmarks are now out there along with plenty of info. I don't have the card myself as I have no contacts at AMD, but luckily Phoronix managed to bag a card and he's done plenty of testing as you can imagine. I will be referencing the green site due to other sites obviously focusing on Windows.