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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • DevOps explained in issue #159

    Docker, Puppet, Vagrant, CoreOS, Otto and more inside the new issue. Plus, code a Breakout game in Pygame Zero

  • 3D Printing Under Arch Linux

    3D technology and 3D printing are under quick development at this time. They have big future and can involve all parts of our live. But they are still quite expensive for normal user. BUT …. everything is changing. The 3D printing based on FDM technology is suitable and accessible for everybody.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2015/47
  • Red Hat Cut to “Hold” at Vetr Inc. (RHT)
  • Red Hat Focuses on Containers with Enterprise Linux 7.2

    It's been a week full of container news. Docker, which has driven the trend toward running application code in containers instead of widely used virtual machines, announced new tools that can help companies work with containers without getting rid of existing infrastructure. The Docker Universal Control Plane tool can run in data centers, and can also be useful in public cloud environments.

  • Debian/TeX Live 2015.20151116-1

    One month has passed since the big multiarch update, and not one bug report concerning it did come in, that are good news. So here is a completely boring update with nothing more than the usual checkout from the TeX Live tlnet distribution as of yesterday.

  • Openly Thankful
  • Community Appreciation Day

    Today is Ubuntu Community Appreciation Day, but this year I am going to expand my appreciation beyond the boundaries of the Ubuntu Community to include anyone in open source that has impacted my journey in open source.

  • Raspberry Pi: Simple forms of input

    It’s time to play with some affordable methods of getting input into your tiny Linux machine.

  • Future for Windows in smartphones is grim, Gartner says

    Gartner is predicting a grim future for Microsoft's Windows mobile OS, saying it won't make its mark in consumer smartphones, remaining relegated to enterprise users.

    Microsoft's Windows 10 mobile OS is just now reaching devices, but prior versions didn't fare so well. Windows Mobile was in just 5.87 million handsets shipped during the third quarter this year, declining from 9.03 million in the same quarter a year ago.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Docker Reaches Across Universes at Dockercon EU

    The open-source Docker container project provides tooling that enables application virtualization in a way that is more agile than other traditional approaches.

    The agility of Docker containers is being used by developers in a number of unique and innovative ways to solve challenges big and small. At the Dockercon EU conference in Barcelona, Spain this week, the best and the brightest of those innovative Docker use-cases were on display.

  • Wine Is Now Under A Code Freeze For Wine 1.8

    It was announced today via WWN 402 that last week's Wine 1.7.55 is the last development freeze with now going into a code freeze for version 1.8.

    Wine 1.8 will likely be released by year's end and until then will be weekly release candidates to ensure sufficient test coverage, as noted by the World Wine News.

  • Library versioning

    KDE Frameworks (and, in the past, kdelibs) approached this by defining some arbitrarily high minor version (typically 90+) to indicate pre-releases for the next major release. So the pre-release Frameworks were numbered like 4.90.1.

    So where is all of this going? Well, CMake provides a helpful function to write package version information files that allow find_package() calls to only find compatible versions. So if you use the SameMajorVersion scheme, find_package(Foo 4.3) will find Foo 4.3.0 and Foo 4.5.2, but not Foo 4.2.5 or Foo 5.1.1. However, if project Foo uses the “high minor = next version prerelease” scheme, it will also find Foo 4.90.1, which is not compatible with Foo 4.3.

  • Wireshark 2.0 Open-Source Network Protocol Analyzer Officially Released with New GUI
  • Wireshark 2.0 Released, UI Rewritten In Qt5

    Wireshark, the well known open-source network packet analyzer, has finally reached version 2.0!

    While its user interface was originally written for GTK+, Wireshark 2.0 marks the point that it's been rewritten in Qt! It's been more than two years of work and now this Qt version of Wireshark is out there after going through several development releases.

  • GNOME Shell Browser Plugin Crash in Mozilla Firefox Patched for GNOME 3.18

    The GNOME developers have announced the general availability of a new maintenance release for the GNOME Shell component of the stable GNOME 3.18 desktop environment.

  • systemd 228 Arrives for GNU/Linux Systems with Over 20 Improvements
  • G11n team ends Fedora Activity Day on high note

    On November 1st – 3rd, 2015, the Fedora Globalization (G11n) team held their Fedora Activity Day (FAD) in the Red Hat office in Tokyo, Japan. A Fedora Activity Day is a mini-conference where contributors get together to work on major tasks related to Fedora. The G11n team met with objectives of working on Fedora 24 development plans, brainstorming on a Fedora globalization workflow, and deciding strategy for different Fedora products.

  • Here's What's New In Ubuntu Touch OTA-8 for Ubuntu Phones

    While many of us are still waiting to receive the Ubuntu Touch OTA-8 software update on our Ubuntu Phone devices, the developers have just published the entire changelog with all the juicy details.

  • Linux Mint 17.3 Beta "Rosa" MATE Edition Is Out and Ready for Testing

    The MATE edition of Linux Mint 17.3 Beta "Rosa" was released along with the Cinnamon one and it's one of the two main flavors of the Linux Mint distribution. There are also Xfce and KDE versions, not to mention edition that are based on Debian, but those are not the main focus of the team.

  • Rugged 3.5-inch SBC runs Linux on Bay Trail, is loaded with I/O

    Arbor Technologies unveiled the “EmCORE-i230G,” a 3.5-inch form factor SBC featuring Intel Atom E3800 CPUs, a wide array of I/O, and -40 to 85°C operation.

    Like many other single-board computers targeting applications such as outdoor kiosks or industrial signage, Arbor’s EmCORE-i230G leverages the high-speed processing and graphics performance of Intel’s E3800 processors, along with their low power consumption. The board’s 3.5-inch form-factor remains one of the most popular SBC formats for embedded and industrial applications, alongside the ever popular Mini-ITX. Other recent Bay Trail-based SBCs in 3.5-inch format have included Aaeon’s GENE-BT06, ADL’s ADLE3800HD, Axiomtek’s CAPA840 and CAPA848, Nexcom’s EBC 355, and the WinSystems SBC35-CC405.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • KNewPasswordWidget lands in KWidgetsAddons

    A new widget called KNewPasswordWidget has been added to the KWidgetsAddons framework, starting from 5.16. I decided to create this widget because sometimes you cannot just use KNewPasswordDialog to ask the users for a new password. This is the case when you need to add further options to the same dialog. This widget is meant to be easily embedded in such a custom password dialog, without having to code it from scratch.

  • Handing over the reins

    As some of you might know, I started the application Cantor in KDEedu a couple of years ago, since I didn’t want to rely on comercial computer algebra systems during my studies, and because all the free alternatives seemed to lack a decent graphical interface. Since then Cantor has grown to support all kinds of different mathematical languages due to numerous contributors from all over the world.

  • fwupd and DFU

    Once all this new code has settled down I’m going to be re-emailing a lot of the vendors who were unwilling to write vendor-specific code in fwupd. I’m trying to make the barrier to automatic updates on Linux as low as possible.

  • PaperTrail - Powered by IBM Watson

    On the final semester of my MSc program at Columbia SEAS, I was lucky enough to be able to attend a seminar course taught by Alfio Gliozzo entitled Q&A with IBM Watson. A significant part of the course is dedicated to learning how to leverage the services and resources available on the Watson Developer Cloud. This post describes the course project my team developed, the PaperTrail application.

  • Google’s new ‘Wallpaper Art’ app puts beautiful artwork on your Chromebook

    Google has many side initiatives, and one of them is the Cultural Institute that digitizes works of art from museums and archives around the world and puts them online.

    Today, their Art Project released an app for Chrome OS that updates the wallpaper of your device to a different piece of art from their collection every day. Expect “masterpieces ranging from Van Gogh and Monet, all the way to contemporary works from street artists around the world,” according to Chrome evangelist François Beaufort in announcement post. If today’s piece doesn’t jive with your artistic taste, you can skip to the next wallpaper in the app.

  • Google Wallpaper Art app turns your Chromebook into an art gallery

    Chromebooks have been red hot sellers on Amazon for some time now. But if you're someone who has had a boring desktop on your Chromebook, you can now spice it up with Google's new Wallpaper Art app. The app will refresh artwork every day and features many different wallpapers from noted artists from the past and present.

  • Calculate 15 Scratch KDE Screenshot Tour
  • Netrunner 2015.11 Rolling Screenshot Tour
  • Blogging, Podcasting, or Video?

    While I was initially attracted to the notion of sharing some of these thoughts in an audio format, I have decided to focus instead more on writing. This was partially informed by my back of the napkin research, but also in thinking about how we best present thoughts.

  • Bad Voltage Episode 54 Has Been Released

    Every two weeks Bad Voltage delivers an amusing take on technology, Open Source, politics, music, and anything else we think is interesting, as well as interviews and reviews.

  • Almost a beta

    Yet another 200+ lines of updates in the ChangeLog.txt of slackware-current. It’s obvious that Pat has been watching the LinuxQuestions threads closely. And we are again very bleeding edge, with the Gnu Compiler Collection 5.2.0!

  • Stock in Motion: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Fil Ltd Decreased Stake in Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) by $10.36 Million as Shares Declined
  • Red Hat, Inc. Price Target Update

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT): 17 Analyst have given the stock of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) a near short term price target of $85.06. The standard deviation reading, which is a measure by which the stock price is expected to swing away from the mean estimate, is at $5.09. The higher price target estimate is at $92 while the lower price estimates are fixed at $72.

  • Robolinux 8.2 Raptor LXDE Edition (Debian Based OS With Support For Windows Apps) Has Been Released
  • Your donations at work

    I’ve just published the most recent Community Donations Report highlighting where donations made to the Ubuntu community have been used by members of that community to promote and improve Ubuntu. In this report I’ve included links to write-ups detailing how those funds were put to use.

  • Linux AIO: Ubuntu 15.10 available

    Linux AIO is a project to package multiple flavours of a distribution in one ISO within a DVD size limit. Users can try each flavour live or install on their systems. In essence the difference lies mostly in the desktop environments. This is an invaluable source of distributions for distro hoppers. Note that there are issues, some of which are unresolved due to distro dependencies. However, for most of it, the stuff works.

  • NAS boxes double as media players, run Linux plus Android

    Qnap’s TAS-168 and dual-bay TAS-268 NAS devices run both Linux and Android on a dual-core ARM SoC, and offers private cloud and media player capabilities.

    Qnap is positioning the single HDD-bay TAS-168 and dual-bay TAS-268 at the bottom of its Home NAS line below the faster, dual-bay TS-231 and the higher-end, dual-bay TS-251 launched in 2014. Like these systems, the new TAS devices are mini-towers and run Qnap’s Linux-based NAS OS. In addition, Qnap claims the devices are the first home network-attached storage devices that also run Android.

  • H3-OLinuXino fresh out of reflow oven – our first quad core OSHW Linux SBC prototypes are ready

    Now these first prototypes will be put on heavy testing before we run the board in production. We want to see if they will be able to run Linux yet or just Android.

  • Dangerous Exploit found in Chrome for Android

    A rather critical Exploit has been uncovered in Google's own 'Chrome for Android' app which allows malicious programs to be installed without user intervention.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Google Offers Enhancements to Container Engine and Registry

    Now, Google has launched many enhancements to its container-focused cloud offerings designed to leverage new open source developments and boost the performance of its products in a hard fought cloud market. As of this week, Google Container Engine, which is based on the Kubernetes open source project that manages clusters and orchestrates Docker containers in Google's cloud, now has the newest updates to Kubernetes.

  • Rackspace Sees OpenStack Public Cloud Demand Slowing

    The key to running a profitable cloud business for Rackspace likely doesn't rely on infrastructure but rather on support for multiple cloud infrastructures, including OpenStack.

  • Do Linux users really need more powerful computers?

    Computers just keep getting more and more powerful as the years roll by, but at what point do Linux computers jump the shark in terms of hardware specs? A writer at Foss Force questions the constant focus on ever more powerful systems.

  • Mutate 2.4 Brings Changes

    As you may know, Mutate is an open-source Linux Launcher developed in Qt 5, similar to Mac’s Alfred. Among others, it allows the users to easily search for their favorite files and applications. If the string you type does not match any file, it has an option for searching that information on Google or other search engine. Also, the launcher can be configured via the preferences menu.

  • Kubuntu 15.10 Receives KDE Plasma 5.4.3, Coming Soon for Kubuntu 15.04 Too

    Well, that was fast! A few hours ago, Softpedia was the first to announce the release of KDE Plasma 5.4.3 desktop environment, which has apparently already landed in the Kubuntu Backports repository of Kubuntu 15.10.

  • KDE Plasma 5.4.3 Is the Last in the Series, KDE Plasma 5.5 Coming Soon

    A few moments ago, KDE, through Jonathan Riddell, had the great pleasure of announcing the general availability of the third and last maintenance release of the KDE Plasma 5.4 desktop environment.

  • RaspArch Live CD Helps You Install Arch Linux On Your Raspberry Pi 2
  • Arch Linux 2015.11.01 Is Now Based On Kernel 4.2.5
  • Red Hat Given Average Recommendation of “Buy” by Brokerages (NYSE:RHT)

    Red Hat (NYSE:RHT) has been assigned a consensus recommendation of “Buy” from the thirty-five analysts that are presently covering the company, AnalystRatingsNetwork.com reports. One investment analyst has rated the stock with a sell rating, seven have assigned a hold rating and twenty-six have assigned a buy rating to the company. The average 12-month price objective among analysts that have updated their coverage on the stock in the last year is $83.07.

  • Finally, Open-Source Model Paying Off For Red Hat

    But the Microsoft deal may have marked a watershed moment for the company, shares of which have struggled to regain past glory. The transaction sent Red Hat shares to a new high above 80 -- a level not seen since those halcyon days a decade and a half ago when it topped 150 -- and seemingly into a new era of prosperity.

  • A Closer Look At Microsoft And Red Hat Partnership

    Red Hat was conspicuous by its absence to the Azure party. Given that majority of the customers were running Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) for enterprise workloads, there was no direct migration path to Azure. Microsoft recommended CentOS and Oracle Linux – the two distributions that are highly compatible with RHEL – as alternatives. At the same time, RHEL was a first class citizen on Amazon EC2 allowing customers to bring their own license or pay by usage. Though it was possible to technically run RHEL on Azure, the customers didn’t prefer it due to lack of assurance from Red Hat. Microsoft approached Red Hat to bring RHEL to Azure, but it fell through due to the licensing and IP issues. The legal teams at both the ends could never come to a conclusion on the working model, which delayed the partnership by a few years.

  • Fedora Rawhide Enables Wayland By Default, Where Supported
  • Installing Debian – a rock solid Linux distro

    If you are looking for a solid and stable operating system for your server or desktop, look no further Debian is your choice. Interesting fact about Debian is that it usually has 3 releases stable, testing and unstable. Eventually (after many tests) the “testing” release becomes stable and the “Unstable” becomes “testing”. This way Debian ensures its users receive a well tested, stable and reliable environment.

  • An abrupt End to Debian Live

    Before even more of reality is spin-doctored into some distorted view of it, and before my past work is being discredited, I will take the high road and continue my work on Debian Live images on the outside.

  • Ubuntu Make Now Supports Netbeans IDE, Rust, Latest Unity Game Engine

    Didier Roche, the lead developer and creator of Ubuntu Make, has announced the immediate availability for download of Ubuntu Make 15.11.1 for all supported Ubuntu Linux operating systems, including Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf).

  • Nvidia aims Jetson TX1 module at serious AI and robotics

    Nvidia has launched an AI and robotics oriented “Jetson TX1” module and development kit, based on an Nvidia Tegra X1 SoC running Linux.

    For its encore to the popular Jetson TK1 hacker and prototyping SBC based on the Cortex-A15 Tegra K1 SoC, Nvidia’s Jetson TX1 has moved to the 64-bit, Cortex-A57 Tegra X1 SoC. Nvidia has also split the product into separately available computer-on-module and COM/carrier development board products.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
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More in Tux Machines

Linux/Android hacker SBC with hexa-core Rockchip SoC debuts at $75

The Vamrs “RK3399 Sapphire” SBC is on sale for $75, or $349 for a full kit. Vamrs is also prepping an RK3399-based “Rock960” 96Boards SBC. Rockchip’s RK3399 is one of the most powerful ARM-based system-on-chips available on hacker boards, featuring two server-class Cortex-A72 cores clocked to up to 2.0GHz, as well as four Cortex-A53 at up to 1.42GHz and a quad-core Mali-T864 GPU. The hexa-core SoC has appeared on T-Firefly’s Firefly-RK3399 SBC and RK3399 Coreboard computer-on-module, as well as Videostrong’s VS-RD-RK3399 SBC and Theobroma’s RK3399-Q7 Qseven module. Now we have a new contender: Shenzhen based Vamrs, which built the limited edition Rockchip RK3399 Sapphire SBC as the official RK3399 dev board for Rockchip, is now re-launching the board, which features a 40-pin Raspberry Pi compatible connector, with “many in stock” for a discounted price of $75. Read more

With government approval, OpenStack adoption continues apace in China

Deployments of OpenStack cloud are growing faster in China and the APAC region than anywhere else in the world, backed in part by the Chinese government's vocal support for the open source infrastructure. It is China in particular where some of the biggest deployments are running. China UnionPay recently overtook Visa for the largest volume of card payments in the world. The state-operated railway network China Rail oversees billions of passengers every year. By total number of subscribers China Mobile tops the list for biggest mobile phone operator globally. And the massive utility organisation the State Grid Corporation of China employs 1.5 million people. All of these enormous enterprises are running OpenStack clouds. Why? Read more Also:

The Fox Hunt - Firefox and friends compared

So what should you use? Well, it depends. You want extensions, the entire repertoire as it's meant to be? Go with Pale Moon, but be aware of the inconsistencies and problems down the road. However, another piece of penalty is less than optimal looks. If you are more focused on speed and future development, then it's Firefox, as it offers the most complete compromise. The add-ons will make it or break it. Waterfox makes less sense, because the margins of benefit are too small. My take is - Firefox. It's not ideal, but Pale Moon does not solve the problem fully, it combines nostalgia with technicals, and that's a rough patch, even though the project is quite admirable in what it's trying to do. Alas, I'm afraid the old extensions will die, and the new ones won't be compatible, so the browser will be left stranded somewhere in between. But hopefully, this little comparison test gives you a better overview and understanding how things work. Finally, we go back to the question of speed. We've seen how one flavor of Fox stacks against another, but what about Chrome? I will answer that in a follow-up article, which will compare Chrome to Vivaldi, again based on popular demand, and then we will also check how all these different browsers compare using my small, limited and entirely personal corner of the Web. Stay tuned. Read more Also: Firefox Private Browsing vs. Chrome Incognito: Which is Faster?

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