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  • Dropbox plans to drop encrypted Linux filesystems in November

    Linux users are calling on Dropbox to reverse a decision to trim its filesystem support to unencrypted EXT4 only.

    The company's supported file system list, here, is missing some formats – including various encrypted Linux filesystems.

    Until that list was revised, Dropbox said it supported NTFS, HFS, EXT4, and APFS on Linux; as the new requirements makes clear, Linux users will only be able to run unencrypted EXT4.

  • MacBuntu 18.04 Transformation Pack Ready for Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver

    MacBuntu (Macbuntu Mojave/High Sierra/El Capitan/Yosemite) transformation pack is ready for Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver, we were constantly asked for this pack to be available on our site, so here it is for you guys. In this transformation pack we are featuring many themes for almost every desktop, so you don't have to worry about the desktop you are using whether it is Gnome Shell, Mate, Xfce, Cinnamon or any other desktop. You can simply install it in Ubuntu/Linux Mint or any other Ubuntu based distribution and make your desktop look like Mac OS X. The Unity desktop is still supported in case you are using unofficial version of Unity desktop. In this pack you will find plenty of light variants as well as dark versions, which is managed by different creators and I would like to thank all of them for contributing these themes (McOS-themes, macOS High Sierra, macOS 11, macOS High Sierra - ELBULLAZUL).  There are two themes for cursors, for dock we recommend you to install Plank dock and we are providing themes for it as well (credits: KenHarkey and erikdubois. Also we are including themes for Gnome Shell, for Cinnamon, and three icon packs in this transformation pack.

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  • TensorFlow Pi port is latest salvo in battle for edge analytics

    The recent port of TensorFlow to the Raspberry Pi is the latest in a series of chess moves from Google and its chief AI rival Nvidia to win the hearts and keyboards of embedded Linux developers.

    Google’s recent announcement that it had ported its open source TensorFlow machine intelligence (ML) library for neural networking to the Raspberry Pi was the latest in a series of chess moves from Google and its chief AI rival Nvidia to win the hearts and keyboards of embedded Linux developers. The competition is a part of a wider battle with Amazon, Microsoft, Intel, and others to bring cloud analytics to the edge in IoT networks to reduce latency, increase reliability, and improve security.

  • 9 Android Pie Hidden Features: Best Android 9 Tricks You Might Have Missed
  • TicWatch Pro: Reviewing the 30-Day Battery Smartwatch

today's leftover

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Misc
  • Linux 4.18 Arrives With Some Big Changes
  • IBM S/390 Linux 4.19 Kernel Code Sees More Spectre Updates, Boot Code Rework

    The IBM System/390 "s390" architecture code has seen a number of improvements for Linux 4.19.

    Highlights of the s390 code updates sent in today for the just-opened Linux 4.19 kernel merge window include:

  • Hollywood Casts Open Source Software in Starring Role

    Amazing news out of Variety, the entertainment website, this weekend: Hollywood is going open source. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences — best known for ‘The Oscars’ award ceremony — has teamed up with the Linux Foundation to launch the Academy Software Foundation (ASWF).

  • SIGGRAPH 2018: OpenCL-Next Taking Shape, Vulkan Continues Evolving

    It's a busy week folks as besides the AMD Threadripper 2 performance embargo expiring, it is also SIGGRAPH 2018 week in Vancouver and as well the start of the Linux 4.19 kernel cycle... No longer under wraps are the Khronos announcements from this annual graphics conference. Continue reading to learn about the latest happenings for the various Khronos industry-standard APIs and efforts like Vulkan and OpenCL-Next.

  • Dropbox drops any file system but ext4 on Linux

    Come November 7, cloud storage and synchronization provider Dropbox will drop support for any file system on Linux but ext4.

    In fact, Dropbox announced that it will support only four file systems on desktop systems going forward. Company representative Jay revealed as much on the official Dropbox forum.

  • How to display data in a human-friendly way on Linux
  • Wine Had A Successful GSoC 2018, Better Direct3D Game Benchmarks

    The Wine project once again participated in Google Summer of Code (GSoC) for furthering their open-source agenda of better support for Windows programs on Linux and other operating systems.

    The projects achieved this year were for better automated game benchmarks and implementing a subset of the concurrency namespace. (There also was a project originally listed for implementing missing bits of the Direct3D API, but that doesn't seen to have panned out and is no longer listed.)

  • Congratulations: Hanno Böck and co-authors win Pwnie!

    Congratulations to security researcher and Gentoo developer Hanno Böck and his co-authors Juraj Somorovsky and Craig Young for winning one of this year’s coveted Pwnie awards!

  • Gentoo booth at the FrOSCon, St. Augustin, Germany

    s last year, there will be a Gentoo booth again at the upcoming FrOSCon “Free and Open Source Conference” in St. Augustin near Bonn! Visitors can meet Gentoo developers to ask any question, get Gentoo swag, and prepare, configure, and compile their own Gentoo buttons.

  • Official Debian testing OpenStack image news

    A few things happened to the testing image, thanks to Steve McIntire, myself, and … some debconf18 foo!

  • Remember Palm? They will be back with a 3.3-inch mini smartphone

    The device is still known as Pepito, but the smartphone seems to be almost ready for commercial debut. However, instead of embracing the modern large-display smartphone phenomenon, the revived Palm will stick to its core principles — smaller and pocketable phones. Therefore, if the leaks are to be believed, then the Palm Pepito will sport a 3.3-inch touchscreen display with 720p picture resolution. It will be powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 435 processor paired with 3GB of RAM and 32GB of internal storage.

  • Android Pie Smartphones List: Will My Phone Get Android 9 Update?

    Now that Android Pie is live, the first thing that comes to our mind is when my Android device will receive the new update. The exciting new features of Android P and the whole gesture navigation thing is not something anyone would want to miss.

  • Huawei Mate 20 Lite To Come With A 2K Display 6GBs Of Ram And Kirin 710 According to Leaks

    The Mate series have generally been Huawei’s flagship phablet series. The Mate 10 did great with consumers and reviewers alike. Infact Huawei also came out with the Mate 10 lite which had Huawei’s own Kirin 659 chip. The Kirin 659 chip at the time performed somewhat similar to the Snapdragon 625.

  • A bit more on privacy respecting health monitor / fitness tracker

    A few days ago, I wondered if there are any privacy respecting health monitors and/or fitness trackers available for sale these days. I would like to buy one, but do not want to share my personal data with strangers, nor be forced to have a mobile phone to get data out of the unit. I've received some ideas, and would like to share them with you. One interesting data point was a pointer to a Free Software app for Android named Gadgetbridge. It provide cloudless collection and storing of data from a variety of trackers. Its list of supported devices is a good indicator for units where the protocol is fairly open, as it is obviously being handled by Free Software. Other units are reportedly encrypting the collected information with their own public key, making sure only the vendor cloud service is able to extract data from the unit. The people contacting me about Gadgetbirde said they were using Amazfit Bip and Xiaomi Band 3.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Apps Are Now Available on More Chromebooks Powered by Intel Braswell CPUs

    It looks like Google is taking support for Linux apps very serious lately by recently enabling its integrated virtualization machine for running Linux apps on Chrome OS to support Chromebooks powered by Intel Braswell CPUs.

  • The Academy launches open-source foundation for media developers

    The idea is to enable them to share resources and collaborate on technologies for image creation, visual effects, animation and sound.

    “We are thrilled to partner with The Linux Foundation for this vital initiative that fosters more innovation, more collaboration, more creativity among artists and engineers in our community,” said Academy CEO Dawn Hudson. “The Academy Software Foundation is core to the mission of our Academy: promoting the arts and sciences of motion pictures.”

  • GSoC’18 Phase-3

    For this phase, I started with implementing Stamps feature in the Drawing activity. This feature allows users to use different stamps images in their beautiful arts. For now, I have added images from solar activity to use as stamps.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 31

    This week we’re all at Akademy–KDE’s yearly gathering of developers, designers, system administrators, and users. I’m giving a presentation later today about how we can make KDE Software irresistible!

    As such, it as a bit of a lighter week for the Usability & Productivity initiative, what with all the preparation and conference-going, but we still managed to get quite a bit done. And all the in-person interactions are setting the stage for many more good things to come.

  • Something Happened to My OpenMandriva Lx OS

    Yesterday I booted my laptop with OpenMandriva Lx and went to look for a book. When I returned to the machine, a kernel panic was waiting for me on the screen.

    Apparently, something went very wrong with the updates that I performed last week, but I did not notice.

    This has happened before, though. As the laptop boots seven OSs (OpenMandriva, Mageia, PCLinuxOS, Pisi, Elive, Fedora, and PicarOS), when I install a system that changes the OMV-controlled GRUB2, OpenMandriva gets a panic.

    I do not have the expertise to rectify things other than by performing a re-install. So, I reinstalled OpenMandriva, updated it (the process did not last more than an hour or so) and, sure enough, the OS was bootable again.

    [...]

    Maybe it is time for me to start experimenting with BSD, Haiku, or something.

  • Google Pixel 3 XL Leak Reveals 6.7-inch Screen With Triple Camera Setup
  • Intel has no chance in servers and they know it

    Intel is flying press to an Analyst day to discuss their impending server meltdown. SemiAccurate has been detailing this impending catastrophe for over a year now, it is now time for the details.

  • Journeys

    This would be a long blog post as I would be sharing a lot of journeys, so have your favorite beverage in your hand and prepare for an evening of musing.

    Before starting the blog post, I have been surprised as the last week and the week before, lot of people have been liking my Debconf 2016 blog post on diaspora which is almost two years old. Almost all the names mean nothing to me but was left unsure as to reason of the spike. Were they debconf newcomers who saw my blog post and their experience was similar to mine or something, don’t know.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • PGP Clean Room 1.0 Release

    After several months of work, I am proud to announce that my GSoC 2018 project, the PGP/PKI Clean Room, has arrived at a stable (1.0) release!

  • Review: The Binary Times Podcast

    I recently authored a detailed review of the Linux podcast scene, grilling 25 podcasts targeted at Linux and open source enthusiasts. Like any roundup of this type, it’s almost inevitable that a few podcasts missed my radar. One of these is The Binary Times Podcast. Apologies to the hosts of the show.

    To rectify matters, here’s my take on The Binary Times Podcast.

    This review is incorporated into my detailed review, so you can see where they rank among their peers.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E22 – Catch-22 - Ubuntu Podcast

    It’s Season 11 Episode 22 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope and Mark Johnson are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Conference Report: Fullstack 2018 London

    I recently attended Fullstack 2018, “The Conference on JavaScript, Node & Internet of Things” with my colleagues from the Canonical Web Team in London. Fullstack attempts to cover the full spectrum of the JS ecosystem – frontend, backend, IoT, machine learning and a number of other topics. While I attended a broad range of talks, I’ll just mention those that I think are most pertinent to the work we are doing currently in the web team.

  • Dropbox Client Will Only Support Ext4 Filesystems On Linux Beginning November 7

    Beginning November 7, 2018, the Dropbox client will only support the Ext4 filesystem on Linux. The news, coming from the Dropbox forums, mentions that the only supported filesystems will be Ext4 for Linux, NTFS for Windows, and HFS+ or APFS for Mac.

  • Opera Wants to Be World's First PC Web Browser with a Built-In Crypto Wallet

    Opera Software announced that it plans to bring its famous crypto wallet used on the Opera for Android mobile web browser to the desktop on Linux, Mac, and Windows platforms, in an upcoming Opera for PC stable release.

    Opera was already the world's first web browser to introduce a built-in crypto wallet when Opera Software announced it for its Opera for Android mobile web browser, allowing users to do seamless transactions on the Internet while promoting the adoption of cryptocurrencies by the mainstream.

  • Opera opens its PC browsers to crypto

    - Opera to soon ship crypto wallet access with its PC browser

    - Opera PC browser will give users access to the built-in crypto wallet in Opera for Android

    - After strong interest in the private beta, Opera is opening the crypto wallet to a larger audience for testing.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • What to expect from Tibco Now 2018

    Only Splunk comes forward with a real twist and calls its event .conf as a geeky nod to those that know a CONF file is a configuration or “config” file used on Unix and Linux based systems to stores settings used to configure system processes and applications.

  • Set the date: Qualcomm likely to announce next-gen wearable chipset for Wear OS on September 10

    If you’re curious about the future of Wear OS smartwatches, you’d want to mark this date, September 10, on your calendar. After a full two and a half years, Wear OS is finally getting a new chipset from Qualcomm.

  • Getting to know Grommet, an open source UI dev tool

    While Grommet has been around since 2016, it is not among the best-known open source development tools. The library of reusable UI components helps developers create web applications. This overview explains what Grommet can do, the problems it addresses, and what makes it appealing.

    It is time consuming and difficult to making web applications both beautiful and functional. The skills that make a programmer successful at building an application back end don’t always translate to good user interface (UI) design or creating an ideal user experience (UX). Even when developers get UI help from design specialists, creating the code to control how the software looks—its dialog boxes, information layout, the organization of application features—sometimes seems like a black art. Trying to make a beautiful page work quickly on every device with a consistent appearance seems nearly impossible.

  • Apple Might Ditch Lightning Connector After Pressure From The EU

    Apple might have to part ways with the lightning connector after the EU is planning to launch an investigation against the issue of different types of chargers present in the smartphone industry.

    In 2009, 14 companies including Apple, Samsung, Huawei, and Nokia signed a voluntary memorandum of understanding (MoU) in favor of bringing universal chargers for the smartphones coming into the market from 2011 onwards. The EU clearly directed companies to coordinate and come up with a universal type of charger; micro-USB was the mutually decided type then.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Episode 34 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux: Linus Torvalds gave his opinion on Wireguard, Lubuntu Takes a New Direction, LineageOS launches their annual Summer Survey, and Hiri’s Experience with Selling on Linux. Then we’ll check out some distro news from Slackware, OpenWRT, Ubuntu LTS, and RebeccaBlackOS. Later in the show, we’ll look at the new NetSpectre vulnerability varient, Forbes’ 5 Reasons to Switch to Linux, a really interesting blog post from the KDE Team about Plasma’s Engineering and finally we’ll check out some Linux Gaming news. All that and much more!

  • 14 must-read tech newsletters
  • Building more trustful teams in four steps

    Robin Dreeke's The Code of Trust is a helpful guide to developing trustful relationships, and it's particularly useful to people working in open organizations (where trust is fundamental to any kind of work). As its title implies, Dreeke's book presents a "code" or set of principles people can follow when attempting to establish trust. I explained those in the first installment of this review. In this article, then, I'll outline what Dreeke (a former FBI agent) calls "The Four Steps to Inspiring Trust"—a set of practices for enacting the principles. In other words, the Steps make the Code work in the real world.

  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities July 2018
  • This Week in Lubuntu Development #8

    Here is the eighth issue of This Week in Lubuntu Development. You can read the last issue here.

  • Ikea’s ‘open source’ Delaktig sofa is designed to be built and rebuilt again and again
  • UF/IFAS researchers to develop open-source library for farmers
  • BBC Wants Microsoft to Expose ‘Doctor Who’ Leaker

    New court documents suggest that the BBC has yet to find the source of the leaked 'Doctor Who' footage that previously appeared online. The British company is hoping that Microsoft can help. At a federal court in Washington, the BBC requested a DMCA subpoena targeted at a OneDrive user who shared the infringing material online late June.

  • Surface Go racks up another terrible iFixit repairability score for Microsoft

    But the iFixit team has slightly different criteria. Is it self-repairable? The answer is a big wet sloppy ‘no'.

  • [Older] MDT-9100T

    Several Motorola MDT-9100T "Mobile Data Terminals" came up on eBay and their retro-future design was too neat to pass up. The stylish housing combined with an aperture-less amber CRT looks like something slipped from the Fallout or BladeRunner universe into our own. Some of us at NYC Resistor bought them and are repurposing them.

    [...]

    In order to replace the i386 with a BeagleBone Black it was necessary to build an adapter board that plugs into the ribbon cable, deduce the VGA timings and write a Device Tree overlay (DTBO) to configure the LVDS framing for the special screen, and design a USB HID keyboard interface for the keyboard and function keys.

  • SMS Two-Factor Auth Isn’t Perfect, But You Should Still Use It

    In a quest for perfect security, the perfect is the enemy of the good. People are criticizing SMS-based two-factor authentication in the wake of the Reddit hack, but using SMS-based two factor is still much better than not using two-factor authentication at all.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • On requiring English in a free software project

    This week's issue of LWN has a quote by Linus Torvalds on translating kernel messages to something else than English. He's against it...

  • How to create great panorama photos with Hugin

    If you search online for “Best Panorama Stitching software 2018”, chances are very high that you find an article that mentions Hugin (1, 2, 3). The reason is that this is one of the best programs to stitch photos for Linux, MacOS and Windows. And it is free and open source! The criticism is that its aimed at professional users and that it can be a bit overwhelming for new users. This article will provide you with a rundown on how to use Hugin. I have used openSUSE Leap 15 as my operating system, but this tutorial will work across distributions and operating systems.

  • A new SteamOS beta is out with GPU driver updates and a fresh Linux kernel

    Not to be confused with the upcoming SteamOS 3.0, this beta update is for the current 'Brewmaster' release.

    While it's not technically a major update in terms of the overall system, it's still rather mighty where it counts.

  • SteamOS update 2.164 pushed to brewmaster beta
  • Arch User Magazine

    It's almost 10 years ago that Ghost1227 created the Arch User Magazine and this week I got reminded about it's existence. I found that the original domain where the magazine was hosted was no longer owned by Ghost1227, but by using the way back machine I was able to retrieve two of the three editions of the magazine.

  • The smart button
  • [Older] Tumbleweed Gets Python Setuptools 40.0, New Versions of Frameworks, Applications

    Several packages were updated in openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week and developers will notice the snapshots are reported to be extremely stable.

    Wireshark, sysdig, GNOME’s evolution, KDE’s Frameworks and Applications, Ceph, vim and python-setuptools were just a few of the many packages that arrived in Tumbleweed this week.

  • [Older] GSoC Half Way Through

    As you may already know, openSUSE participates again in GSoC, an international program that awards stipends to university students who contribute to real-world open source projects during three months in summer. Our students started working already two months ago. Ankush, Liana and Matheus have passed the two evaluations successfully and they are busy hacking to finish their projects. Go on reading to find out what they have to say about their experience, their projects and the missing work for the few more weeks.

  • [Older] openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019: Call for Host

    The openSUSE.Asia Summit is the largest annual openSUSE conference in Asia, attended by contributors and enthusiasts from all over Asia. The event focuses primarily on the openSUSE distribution, its applications for personal and enterprise use, and open source culture. It brings together the openSUSE community in Asia, providing a forum for users, developers, foundation leaders, governments and businesses to discuss the present technology and future developments.

    The Summit’s preference is to find new locations each year as we spread openSUSE throughout Asia, and we are looking for local organizers to rise to the challenge of organizing an excellent openSUSE event. We need individuals and communities to get together and organize a successful openSUSE.Asia Summit. The openSUSE.Asia organization committee assists throughout the process.

today's leftovers

Filed under
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  • Google Might Release Android P Sooner Than Expected
  • Q&A with JD.com: Kubernetes, Cloud Native, and CNCF Projects Driving Big Data and AI

    Haifeng: The goal of our Retail as a Service (RaaS) strategy is to open up our capabilities and resources to empower our partners, suppliers, and other industries. This is very much in line with our commitment to open source technologies. We’ve already benefited tremendously from the CNCF projects we have been a part of and our new commitment to CNCF enables us to build even stronger collaborative relationships with the industry’s top developers, end users, and vendors and ultimately enables us to contribute more to the open source community. Joining CNCF is an important step for us as we develop new container-native technologies towards an open platform to realize our RaaS vision.

  • Bringing Home Automation to Life with Open Source Technology

    Over the course of several generations, automation of the domestic environment has met with a fairly mixed response from homeowners. While appliances, such as washing machines, dishwashers and vacuum cleaners, have been welcomed warmly since their inception, smarter technologies like automatic lighting have received a more tepid reaction. There are several reasons for this. In the past, smart technologies have been relatively expensive and installation has been difficult, usually involving disruptive rewiring. The skills of installers have typically lagged behind the technology, and customer demand has tended to come from small numbers of wealthy homeowners or technophiles.

    The situation could change as the prices of smart devices, like sensors and controllers, continue to fall and as suitable wireless technologies have emerged to make extensive rewiring unnecessary. In addition, the advent of almost universal consumer access to the Internet and smartphones greatly simplifies interactions with smart home equipment. With the emergence of digital home assistants, such as Google’s Alexa, the home automation market may now be gaining real traction. So far, however, major brands have not succeeded in dominating, and opportunities remain for start-ups to find a successful formula and establish a presence.

  • Top web browsers 2018: IE, Edge and Firefox return to the road of ruin

    It's increasingly becoming a Google Chrome online world, even for Mac users.

  • Open source DBMS software gains foothold in enterprise IT

    Adrian: Although open source RDBMS [relational database management system] options have typically been aimed at providing good enough functionality for a reduced total cost of ownership, they have matured and gained ground. Sometimes, though not always, open source databases can be used for significant, mission-critical applications.

  • Shojinmeat Scores Grant for Open Source Clean Meat Initiative

    If you’re not familiar, Chris Albrecht covered Tokyo-based Shojinmeat a few months ago for the Spoon:

    “Shojinmeat is now an active Slack channel that connects roughly 30 DIY citizen scientists from across Japan. They gather to talk about their homegrown meat experiments and related topics such as tissue engineering, animal welfare, and regenerative medicine. Shojinmeat has also put out ‘zines with articles and pictures about their work, and recently made a move to the West by creating an English-speaking Slack channel.”

    Essentially, Shojinmeat is an informational platform for DIY clean meat enthusiasts — more like a club than an actual company. So it’s easy to see why the Shuttleworth Foundation, who supports open knowledge resources, would want to support them.

    Shojinmeat isn’t founder Yuki Hanyu’s only project. He also created Integriculture; a startup which is making clean meat infrastructure for B2B sale. On our call Hanyu said that Integriculture is gearing up for their first product launch this fall: a food-grade culture media, which is the “food” which clean meat needs to grow. This plant-based media is composed of sugars, amino acids, and vitamins, and Hanyu said he anticipates customers will range from companies to biohackers.

  • Uber launches open-source web framework Fusion.js

    Ride-sharing company Uber is launching Fusion.js, an open-source web framework designed to make it easier to build lightweight and high-performing apps.

    According to the company, it creates a lot of web applications for both internal and public uses, but recognized that keeping up with the changing web technologies was a challenge. The company set out to create a web framework that would address the challenges associated with overcoming a multi-year accrual of technical debt.

  • SSD Advisory – Infiniband Linux Driver UAF
  • Heads Up: Your Ancient Reddit Password is Compromised
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More in Tux Machines

Proprietary: Lightworks 14.5 Released, Carnegie Mellon is Saving Old Software from Oblivion

  • Lightworks 14.5 Video Editor Released With Same-Day Linux Support But Still No Source
    Lightworks, the long-standing non-linear video editing system that has offered a native Linux build the past few years after being challenged by delays for a few years, is out today with version 14.5 and comes with Linux, macOS, and Windows support. Lightworks 14.5 succeeds the Lightworks 14.0 release from a year and a half ago as the latest major update for this cross-platform software owned by EditShare. This new release has user-interface improvements, variable frame-rate media support, higher GPU precision settings, Reaper export support, AC-3 audio support in various formats, support for Blackmagic RAW files, and a variety of other enhancements.
  • Carnegie Mellon is Saving Old Software from Oblivion
    In early 2010, Harvard economists Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff published an analysis of economic data from many countries and concluded that when debt levels exceed 90 percent of gross national product, a nation’s economic growth is threatened. With debt that high, expect growth to become negative, they argued. This analysis was done shortly after the 2008 recession, so it had enormous relevance to policymakers, many of whom were promoting high levels of debt spending in the interest of stimulating their nations’ economies. At the same time, conservative politicians, such as Olli Rehn, then an EU commissioner, and U.S. congressman Paul Ryan, used Reinhart and Rogoff’s findings to argue for fiscal austerity.

Themes With Emphasis on GTK/GNOME

  • Stylish Gtk Themes Makes Your Linux Desktop Look Stylish
    There are plenty of nice themes available for Gnome desktop and many of them are in active development. Stylish theme pack is one of the great looking pack around since 2014 and constantly evolving. It offers stylish clean and flat design themes for Gtk-3 and Gtk-2, including Gnome shell themes. Stylish theme pack is based Materia theme and support almost every desktop environment such as Gnome, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce, Mate, Budgie, Panteon, etc. We are offering Stylish themes via our PPA for Ubuntu/Linux Mint. If you are using distribution other than Ubuntu/Linux Mint then download this pack directly from its page and install it in this location "~/.themes" or "/usr/share/themes". Since Stylish theme pack is in active development that means if you encounter any kind of bug or issue with it then report it to get fixed in the next update.
  • Delft: Another Great Icon Pack In Town Forked From Faenza Icons
    In past, you may have used Faenza icon theme or you still have it set on your desktop. Delft icons are revived version of Faenza and forked from Faenza icon theme, maybe it is not right to say 'revived' because it looks little different from Faenza theme and at the same time it stays close to the original Faenza icons, it is released under license GNU General Public License V3. The theme was named after a dutch city, which is known for its history, its beauty, and Faenza in Italy. The author who is maintaining Delft icons saw that Faenza icons haven't been updated from some years and thought to carry this project. There are some icons adopted from the Obsidian icon theme. Delft icon pack offer many variants (Delft, Delft-Amber, Delft-Aqua, Delft-Blue, Delft-Dark, Delft-Gray, Delft-Green, Delft-Mint, Delft-Purple, Delft-Red, Delft-Teal) including light and dark versions for light/dark themes, you can choose appropriate one according to your desktop theme. These icons are compatible with most of the Linux desktop environments such as Gnome, Unity, Cinnamon, Mate, Lxde, Xfce and others. Many application icons available in this icons pack and if you find any missing icon or want to include something in this icon pack or face any kind of bug then report it to creator.
  • Give Your Desktop A Sweet Outlook With Sweet Themes Give Your Desktop A Sweet Outlook With Sweet Themes
    It is feels bit difficult to describe this theme we are going to introduce here today. Sweet theme pack looks and feel very different on the desktop but at the same time make the Linux desktop elegant and eye catching. Maybe these are not perfect looking themes available but it lineup in the perfect theme queue. You may say, I don't like it in screenshots, let me tell you that you should install it on your system and if you don't like then you already have option to remove it. So there is no harm to try a new thing, maybe this is next best theme pack for your Linux desktop.

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