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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes

    Harry (Lei) Zhang, together with the CTO of HyperHQ, Xu Wang, will present “CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes” at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU 2018, May 2-4 in Copenhagen, Denmark. The presentation will clarify about more about CRI, container runtimes, KataContainers and where they are going. Please join them if you are interested in learning more.

  • Meet Gloo, the ‘Function Gateway’ That Unifies Legacy APIs, Microservices, and Serverless

    Gloo, a single binary file written in Go, can be deployed as a Kubernetes pod, in a Docker container, and now also on Cloud Foundry. The setup also requires a copy of Envoy, though the installation process can be greatly simplified through additional software developed by the company, TheTool. The user then writes configuration objects to capture the workflow logic.

  • Why is the kernel community replacing iptables with BPF?

    The Linux kernel community recently announced bpfilter, which will replace the long-standing in-kernel implementation of iptables with high-performance network filtering powered by Linux BPF, all while guaranteeing a non-disruptive transition for Linux users.

  • The developer of Helium Rain gave an update on their sales, low overall sales but a high Linux percentage

    Helium Rain [Steam, Official Site], the gorgeous space sim from Deimos Games is really quite good so it's a shame they've seen such low overall sales. In total, they've had around 14,000€ (~$17,000) in sales which is not a lot for a game at all.

    The good news, is that out of the two thousand copies they say they've sold, a huge 14% of them have come from Linux. It's worth noting, that number has actually gone up since we last spoke to them, where they gave us a figure of 11% sales on Linux.

  • Want to try Wild Terra Online? We have another load of keys to give away (update: all gone)

    Wild Terra Online [Steam], the MMO from Juvty Worlds has a small but dedicated following, now is your chance to see if it's for you.

  • Arch Linux Finally Rolling Out Glibc 2.27

    Arch Linux is finally transitioning to glibc 2.27, which may make for a faster system.

    Glibc 2.27 was released at the start of February. This updated GNU C Library shipped with many performance optimizations particularly for Intel/x86_64 but also some ARM tuning and more. Glibc 2.27 also has memory protection keys support and other feature additions, but the performance potential has been most interesting to us.

  • Installed nvidia driver
  • Stephen Smoogen: Fedora Infrastructure Hackathon (day 1-5)
  • Design and Web team summary – 20 April 2018

    The team manages all web projects across Canonical. From www.ubuntu.com to the Juju GUI we help to bring beauty and consistency to all the web projects.

  • Costales: UbuCon Europe 2018 | 1 Week to go!!

    We'll have an awesome weekend of conferences (with 4 parallel talks), podcasts, stands, social events... Most of them are in English, but there will be in Spanish & Asturian too.

  • Tough, modular embedded PCs start at $875

    Advantech has launched two rugged, Linux-ready embedded DIN-rail computers with Intel Bay Trail SoCs and iDoor expansion: an “UNO-1372G-E” with 3x GbE ports and a smaller UNO-1372G-J with only 2x GbE, but with more serial and USB ports.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • KDE Applications 18.04 Brings Dolphin Improvements, JuK Wayland Support

    The KDE community has announced the release today of KDE Applications 18.04 as the first major update to the open-source KDE application set for 2018.

  • Plasma Startup

    Startup is one of the rougher aspects of the Plasma experience and therefore something we’ve put some time into fixing

    [...]

    The most important part of any speed work is correctly analysing it.
    systemd-bootchart is nearly perfect for this job, but it’s filled with a lot of system noise.

  • Announcing Virtlyst – a web interface to manage virtual machines

    Virtlyst is a web tool that allows you to manage virtual machines.

    In essence it’s a clone of webvirtmgr, but using Cutelyst as the backend, the reasoning behind this was that my father in law needs a server for his ASP app on a Win2k server, the server has only 4 GiB of RAM and after a week running webvirtmgr it was eating 300 MiB close to 10% of all available RAM. To get a VNC or SPICE tunnel it spawns websockify which on each new instance around 20 MiB of RAM get’s used.

    I found this unacceptable, a tool that is only going to be used once in a while, like if the win2k freezes or goes BSOD, CPU usage while higher didn’t play a role on this.

  • OPNFV: driving the network towards open source "Tip to Top"

    Heather provides an update on the current status of OPNFV. How is its work continuing and how is it pursuing the overall mission? Heather says much of its work is really ‘devops’ and it's working on a continuous integration basis with the other open source bodies. That work continues as more bodies join forces with the Linux Foundation. Most recently OPNFV has signed a partnership agreement with the open compute project. Heather says the overall OPNFV objective is to work towards open source ‘Tip to top’ and all built by the community in ‘open source’. “When we started, OPNFV was very VM oriented (virtual machine), but now the open source movement is looking more to cloud native and containerisation as the way forward,” she says. The body has also launched a C-RAN project to ensure that NFV will be ready to underpin 5G networks as they emerge.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E07 – Seven Years in Tibet - Ubuntu Podcast
  • Failure to automate: 3 ways it costs you

    When I ask IT leaders what they see as the biggest benefit to automation, “savings” is often the first word out of their mouths. They’re under pressure to make their departments run as efficiently as possible and see automation as a way to help them do so.

    Cost savings are certainly a benefit of automation, but I’d argue that IT leaders who pursue automation for cost-savings alone are missing the bigger picture of how it can help their businesses.

    The true value of automation doesn’t lie in bringing down expenses, but rather in enabling IT teams to scale their businesses.

  • Docker Enterprise Edition 2.0 Launches With Secured Kubernetes

    After months of development effort, Kubernetes is now fully supported in the stable release of the Docker Enterprise Edition.

    Docker Inc. officially announced Docker EE 2.0 on April 17, adding features that have been in development in the Docker Community Edition (CE) as well as enhanced enterprise grade capabilities. Docker first announced its intention to support Kubernetes in October 2017. With Docker EE 2.0, Docker is providing a secured configuration of Kubernetes for container orchestration.

    "Docker EE 2.0 brings the promise of choice," Docker Chief Operating Officer Scott Johnston told eWEEK. "We have been investing heavily in security in the last few years, and you'll see that in our Kubernetes integration as well."

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • simple

    Every now and then, for one reason or another, I am sat in front of a Linux-powered computer with the graphical user interface disabled, instead using an old-school text-only mode.

  • A month with Dell XPS 13 (9370)

    After years of using Thinkpads, I went for a Dell XPS 13 with Ubuntu. Although I had bought devices with Linux pre-installed and laptops for friends as well, this  was going to be my first own laptop coming with Ubuntu straight from the factory.

  • Thin Clients, The Walking Dead Of Computing

     

    Most of us are doing a lot on the web anyway. There’s not much difference between a web-application running on a server somewhere or a desktop application running on a server in the building. Thin clients just won’t die as much as haters wish.

  • logstash 5.6.9 released with logstash-filter-grok 4.0.3
  • Calamares GeoIP

    Calamares is a distribution-independent (Linux) system installer. Outside of the “big five” distro’s, many smaller “boutique” distro’s need an installer, and Calamares is a highly configurable one that they can use. There’s a few dozen distro’s that I know of that use it (although I’ve only actually installed maybe six of them).

  • Cockpit 166

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 166.

  •  

  • KDE’s New Elisa Music Player: So Close, Yet So Far Away

    With the rise of streaming services bringing easy access to media, owning your own music and movies is at a seemingly all-time low. In my case, it wasn’t until recently that I started recollecting local music files again once I started caring more about the quality of music that I was listening to.

  • Atom-based embedded PC supports up to four removable SATA drives

    IEI’s Linux-ready “IBX-660” is a rugged, storage-oriented embedded computer with a Bay Trail Atom, 4x removable SATA bays, 2x GbE ports, 4x USB, HDMI, mini-PCIe, and -40 to 50°C support.

  • Eclipse and Linux Launch Projects to Help IoT Developers

    The Eclipse and Linux foundations are offering new projects for developers working on Internet of Things (IoT) projects.

    Eclipse is introducing Mita, a language for embedded IoT. Linux has announced an open source reference hypervisor project designed for IoT device development.

  • 7 tips from multi-cloud masters
  • Google Kaniko Tool Wrenches on Container Privilege Concern

    Google unveiled an open source tool that targets container security issues tied to the granting of privileged access to a Docker-based container. Docker containers are by default not granted privileged access to root content, though that does limit their agility.

    Analysts have noted that the privileged and root access issues remain a sticking point for securing container deployments.

  •  

  • An Update on Linux Journal

    First, keep the great ideas coming—we all want to continue making Linux Journal 2.0 something special, and we need this community to do it.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Retro-inspired racer Horizon Chase Turbo announced with Linux support

    Aquiris Game Studio, developer of FPS Ballistic Overkill has announced their retro-inspired racing game Horizon Chase Turbo [Official Site].

    It's actually a revamp of an older title of their's named Horizon Chase World Tour, only this time it's not locked to mobile platforms and it will be getting a Linux version too! Honestly, it looks like a really fantastic attempt to bring out a classic-style racing game for a new generation of players.

  • RUINER officially released for Linux on Steam, coming to GOG soon

    RUINER, the absolutely brutal and damn fun action game is now out of beta and officially available on Steam, with a GOG release to follow. I have it confirmed from my GOG contacts it will land soonish, but if you doubt my own word, the developer said so on the Steam forum as well.

    I already wrote some thoughts up on the game here, so I won't reiterate too much. As it stands, it's an excellent action game full of character customisation with tons of perks you can activate and deactivate any time, brutal take-downs and plenty of blood.

  • Red Hat Summit 2018: Learn how other developers are producing cloud-native applications

    Want insights into how other organizations are building cloud-native applications and microservices? At Red Hat Summit 2018, developers from a number of different companies will be sharing their stories in break-out sessions, lightning talks, and birds-of-a-feather discussions. Learn how they solved real business problems using containers, microservices, API management, integration services, and other middleware.

  • Analyst’s Trends to observe: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • TeX Live 2018 for Debian

    TeX Live 2018 has hit Debian/unstable today. The packages are based on what will be (most likely, baring any late desasters) on the TeX Live DVD which is going to press this week. This brings the newest and shiniest version of TeX Live to Debian. There have

  • alioth deprecation - next steps

    As you should be aware, alioth.debian.org will be decommissioned with the EOL of wheezy, which is at the end of May. The replacement for the main part of alioth, git, is alive and out of beta, you know it as salsa.debian.org. If you did not move your git repository yet, hurry up, time is running out.

  • Linux-ready computer monitors condition of industrial equipment

    Adlink’s rugged, Ubuntu-friendly “MCM-100” is a condition monitoring system for industrial machines that offers an Intel Apollo Lake SoC and a 24-bit analog sampling input for up to 128kS/s frequencies.

  • Gear Sport update brings new features with Tizen version 3.0.0.2

    Samsung want you to know that they are serious about their wearable devices, and one way of showing the “Love” is continued development and support. Support can come in many forms and one of the best for end-users software updates.

  • Solaris 11.4 Beta Updated With Spectre V1 Mitigation, Systemd Bit To Make GNOME Happy
  • Chrome 66 rolling out on Mac, Windows, Linux w/ media autoplay restrictions, password export

    Chrome 66 is rolling out today on Mac, Windows, and Linux with a number of user-facing features and policy changes that have been in development for the past several months. This includes new media autoplay behavior, blocking third-party software, and other security changes.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • OLPC’s $100 laptop was going to change the world — then it all went wrong [iophk: "This new article is a bit of revisionism as OLPC was killed by Microsoft and Intel"]
  • DOSBox Part 2: Creating, Handling, and Booting from Floppy Images

    Continuing on from the previous tutorial, we move on to boot DOS systems from floppy images. Many floppies contained games or other software that would have automatically booted once the system started (using the autoexec.bat script). This can be simulated by using a floppy image which is simply a file that represents an entire floppy disk drive.

  • Weekly Roundup 2018 – Weeks 14 & 15

    Many thanks for your patience! This is turning into a bi-weekly roundup lately, but we’ll try to get it back on track very soon.

    Team leader elections are happening: Donald and Filip continue to lead Atelier, Papoteur leads Docteam, Yuri leads i18n and the process is underway for all teams. We’ll know the make-up of the Council in the coming days – thanks to Marja for the updates. After that, we’ll be finding out the new composition of the Board. All should be in place by early May.

    The Great Plasma Update is almost there: it includes updates of the KF5, Plasma, KDE applications, LXQT and the underlying QT stacks. It’s currently waiting for the LXQT stack to be fixed. It’s a massive number of packages. We’re hoping it will be moved into updates within the week. Once that’s done, Mageia 6.1 will happen soon after.

  • Manjaro Download now hosted at OSDN

    After a period of testing in close cooperation with OSDN’s CEO Shuji Sado, Manjaro is proud to announce that all our Official and Community ISOs and torrents have found a new home on OSDN‘s Japan-based servers, using their just recently launched File Storage service.
    Sofar we are extremely happy with transfer rates and stability and, above all, OSDN’s truely outstanding personal, highly competent and friendly support.

    Current download links to our install media can of course be found on the Download Page as usual.

  •  

  • 8 Best Android Drawing Apps To Unleash Your Creativity | 2018 Edition
  • An Early Look at Zircon, Google Fuchsia New Microkernel [iophk: "C++"]

     

    Zircon manages the following resources: processor time, memory, I/O, interrupts, and signaling and waiting. Resources are used from user land through handles. Handles have rights associated to them which convey privileges to perform actions such as duplicating, transferring, reading, writing, executing, etc. Drivers in Zircon are implemented as ELF libraries which are loaded into processes. A device manager process, devmgr, keeps track of drivers and devices, manages the discovery of drivers, and administers access to devices. Devices may implement Protocols, using C ABI, such the PCI protocol, the USB protocol and so on.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • MEF launches SDN certification and specs for Presto APIs

    MEF worked with The Linux Foundation and ETSI to develop an NFV and SDN certification to focus on related knowledge and skills. Meantime, MEF published specs for its Presto APIs.

  • Brainstorm – A Note-Taking App with Syntax Highlighting

    Brainstorm is an open source note-taking application with a modern clutter-free UI, live preview, syntax highlighting for all languages supported by highlight.js, and GitHub Flavored Markdown.

    You can use it to make notes, make plans, and create cheat sheets which you can share with your friends and categorize using tags.

    You can further organize your tagged notes into smartly named boards. You can also decide to run host your app data locally (using extra time,) or on a server.

  • Manjaro + Microsoft Office Online - Yup, come over

    I can hear the trumpets of cynicism already blaring loudly. But to deny the reality is to deprive oneself of actual value and advantages that modern technologies can offer. There's no place for ideology in that space, I'm afraid. Ideologies are reserved to true believers and the truly rich, and most people aren't in either group. Microsoft Office makes perfect sense, and having access to this software on Linux is a very good thing. The native integration places Manjaro in a league of its own.

    Of course, I would love to see this project grow and propagate and become "the thing" across all distributions, rather than a point of contention, rivalry and ego-forking for a dozen similar projects. Then, because I always think strategically, long term and end to end, I want to see the integration taken to the pro level. Cloud storage, account sync and backup, and more. Well, this is superb, I like it, I see the potential, and hopefully, the community will embrace the project. It is upon efforts like this that the distinction between obscurity and greatness lies. In the land of Mordor, where the geeks code. Take care.

  • Battle Royale game 'Darwin Project' looks like it might actually be coming to Linux

    Begin warming up the hype machine, as it looks like Battle Royale game 'Darwin Project' [Steam] might be getting a Linux version.

  • Hedge fund Elliott Management wants Micro Focus, which bought HPE Software and SUSE Linux, to go private

    Hedge fund Elliott Management is pushing UK software company Micro Focus, which merged with Hewlett Packard Enterprise's software business last year, to sell to a private equity firm, according to people familiar with the matter.

    Elliott has taken a stake in Micro Focus, said the people, who asked not to be named because the transaction is private. The stake is not quite five percent, which is the automatic disclosure threshold, said the people.

    Micro Focus has already received inbound interest from several private equity companies, said the people.

  • Epiq Solutions unveils highly integrated RF + Linux module to simplify wireless product development cycle

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Streaming the Norwegian ultimate championships

    As the Norwegian indoor frisbee season is coming to a close, the Norwegian ultimate nationals are coming up, too. Much like in Trøndisk 2017, we'll be doing the stream this year, replacing a single-camera Windows/XSplit setup with a multi-camera free software stack based on Nageru.

  • Spaces – uncomplicating your network

    For past 5-6 years I’ve been in business of deploying cloud solutions for our customers. Vast majority of that was some form of OpenStack, either a simple cloud or a complicated one. But when you think about it – what is a simple cloud? It’s easy to say that small amount of machines makes an easy, and large amount of machines makes a complicated cloud. But, that is not true. Complexity of a typical IaaS solution is pretty much determined by network complexity. Network, in all shapes and forms, from the underlay network to the customer’s overlay network requirements. I’ll try to explain how we deal with the underlay part in this blog.

  • System76 Gets On The GNOME Advisory Board

    With Linux PC vendor System76 getting more involved in the open-source software game since they began developing their Ubuntu-derived Pop!_OS operating system last year, their latest step forward is joining the GNOME Advisory Board.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E06 – Six Feet Over It - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we review the Dell XPS 13 (9370) Developer Edition laptop, bring you some command line lurve and go over all your feedback.

    It’s Season 11 Episode 06 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Of course it runs NetBSD
  • DRM, DRM, oh how I hate DRM...

    After waiting for a couple of weeks, it arrived in a nonexciting little envelope straight from Hong Kong. If you look closely, you can even appreciate there's a line (just below the smaller barcode) that reads "Lenovo"). I soon found how to open this laptop (kudos to Lenovo for a very sensible and easy opening process, great documentation... So far, it's the "openest" computer I have had!) and installed my new card!

  • Entries for the Catalog of Missing Devices, courtesy of EFF supporters like you

    The Catalog of Missing Devices is a tour through some of the legitimate, useful and missing gadgets, tools and services that don't exist but should. They're technologies whose chance to exist was snuffed out by Section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998, which makes tampering with "Digital Rights Management" into a legal no-go zone, scaring off toolsmiths, entrepreneurs, and tinkerers.

    We're still adding our own designs to the Catalog, but we've also been honored by EFF supporters who've come up with their own additions. One such supporter is Dustin Rodriguez, who sends us these five great ideas for future entries. If you have great ideas for additions, send them to me and maybe you'll see them here on Deeplinks!

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • OpenSnitch Is a Host-Based Firewall for Linux Desktops

    Simone Margaritelli, the VP of Research at Zimperium, has created a Linux port of Little Snitch, a wildly popular macOS firewall application.

    Named OpenSnitch, the Linux port works on the same principles of the macOS version, being a host-based firewall that notifies users when local apps are attempting to initiate new outgoing network connections.

    Similar to Little Snitch's normal modus operandi, when this happens, OpenSnitch will display a popup, asking the user for instructions on how to deal with this new process.

    All user decisions are saved as rules in local JSON files. Users can edit these rules later to fine-tune the firewall or import/export rules from/to other systems.

  • You Can Now Run Progressive Web Apps as Native Chrome OS Apps on Your Chromebook

    Google's François Beaufort recently informed the Chrome OS community about the fact that it's now possible to run progressive Web Apps like native apps in Chrome OS on their Chromebooks.

    Live in the Chrome Canary experimental channel for Chrome OS, the new feature promises to let you run progressive Web Apps just like you would run native Chrome OS apps on your Chromebook. The apps will work offline in their own custom window.

  • How to Synchronize Time using NTP Server in Ubuntu
  • Tutorial: Writing your first view from scratch (C++20 / P0789)
  • More GNOME Performance Improvements Are On The Way

    While it unfortunately didn't happen in time for last month's GNOME 3.28 release, there are more performance improvements en route.

    Several performance fixes are inbound on top of an important performance fix covered at the end of March where Clutter's text rendering code was causing frequent spikes in GNOME Shell's frame-time.

  • Plymouth Adds Device Rotation Support

    Commits these days to Plymouth are fairly rare with this Red Hat developed project seeing its first commits of 2018 yesterday.

    Plymouth doesn't seem commits too often since this Linux graphical boot system is largely in great shape, relies upon the stable DRM/KMS kennel APIs, and has largely hit feature completion for a simple graphical boot screen that is far better than the days of RHGB or alternatives. But a fair amount of new code did land yesterday in Plymouth for now supporting device rotation.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linspire 7.0 Service Pack 1 released

    Today we are delivering Linspire 7 SP1 for general release. With this release we have several fixes and changes that we have made to Linspire. With this release we have resolved many of the issues that users had with our first release. Linspire 7 is the only desktop distribution that is supported for 10 years on the desktop. Linspire is deployed by many companies, government agencies and education facilities for their productivity, design and development workstations.

  • Slackware 13.x EOL in July

    Patrick has been supporting older Slackware releases for more than 7 years and it's getting harder to push updates for those releases as their base libraries are too ancient. It will also keep his load high as it might take more time to inspect whether an update affected older releases and trying to build or patch packages to fix those issues.

    Well, in the next few months (exactly one day after USA independency day), the support for all Slackware 13.x (13.0, 13.1, and 13.37) will expires and support will only be given to Slackware 14.x and future releases.

  • Indore: SVVV signs MoU with Red Hat Academy

    Red Hat is an open source, web deployed and managed education program that is designed to provide turnkey curriculum materials to academic institutions to start and sustain an open source and Linux curriculum program. SVVV is a state private university established with a vision to be a leader in shaping better future for mankind through quality education, training and research. Red Hat Academy turns academic institutions into centers for enterprise-ready talent by outfitting them with Red Hat training.

  • Top Badgers of 2017: Alberto Rodriguez Sanchez

    “Top Badgers” is a special series on the Community Blog. In this series, Luis Roca interviewed the top badge earners of 2017 in the Fedora Project. Not familiar with Fedora Badges? No worries, you can read more about them on the Badges website.

    This article features Alberto Rodriguez Sanchez (bt0dotninja), who clocked in at the #4 spot of badges earned in 2017, with 33 badges! As of the writing of this article, Alberto is the #117 all-time badge earner in Fedora.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux all-in-one: Slimbook Curve comes with your distro of choice pre-installed

    Spanish computer maker Slimbook has unveiled the Slimbook Curve, an all-in-one with a 24-inch curved screen made for GNU/Linux.

  • Slimbook Curve All-In-One Linux PC

    Spanish hardware and PC manufacturer Slimbook has created a new all-in-one Linux PC in the form of the aptly named Slimbook Curve, that features a curved 24 inch IPS display offering users a resolution of 1920 x 1080 pixels as well as a matte, anti-glare finish. The Slimbook Curve can by installed with a wide variety of different Linux operating systems including No OS, Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Ubuntu Mate, Debian, Elementary OS, Linux Mint, OpenSUSE, Antergos, Fedora and KDE Neon.

  • AIMS inverter control via GPIO ports

    I recently upgraded my inverter to a AIMS 1500 watt pure sine inverter (PWRI150024S). This is a decent inverter for the price, I hope. It seems reasonably efficient under load compared to other inverters. But when it's fully idle, it still consumes 4 watts of power.

    That's almost as much power as my laptop, and while 96 watt-hours per day may not sound like a lot of power, some days in winter, 100 watt-hours is my entire budget for the day. Adding more batteries just to power an idle inverter would be the normal solution, probably. Instead, I want to have my house computer turn it off when it's not being used.

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More in Tux Machines

Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" Installer Updated with Linux Kernel 4.16 Support

Developed under the Debian Testing umbrella, the forthcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series just received today the third alpha milestone of its installer, which lets people install the Linux-based operating system on their personal computers, servers, and IoT devices, such as the Raspberry Pi. One of the most interesting changes that caught out eyes is the bump of the kernel support from Linux kernel 4.13, which was used in the second alpha build, to Linux kernel 4.16. Of course, this means that there's better hardware support, so chances are you'll be able to install the development version of Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" on newer machines or if you have some exotic components on your PC. Read more

The New Microsoft

  • Microsoft ICE Contract Draws Fire

    “ICE’s decision to accelerate IT modernization using Azure Government will help them innovate faster while reducing the burden of legacy IT. The agency is currently implementing transformative technologies for homeland security and public safety, and we’re proud to support this work with our mission-critical cloud,” he wrote.

  • Microsoft faces outrage for blog post touting ICE contract

    As outrage grew online, a Microsoft employee quietly removed mention of ICE from the January press release this morning. Social media users noticed that, too. The company has since restored the press release's original language, and called its removal a "mistake."

  • Microsoft Removes Mention of ICE Cloud Work After Protests

    Microsoft Corp. scrubbed an online reference to its work for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement as the agency faces criticism for its role in separating families at the U.S.-Mexican border.

  • Microsoft briefly removes blog post mentioning ICE contract after backlash
  • Microsoft's Ethical Reckoning Is Here

    Tech Workers Coalition, a labor group for tech industry employees, urged Microsoft employees to coordinate their opposition. “If you are a worker building these tools or others at Microsoft, decide now that you will not be complicit,” the group tweeted.

Android Leftovers

First Ubuntu Touch OTA-4 Release Candidate Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Is Here

The latest Ubuntu Touch update from UBports, OTA-3, was released last year near the Christmas holidays, but it was still based on Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid Vervet), so if you though Ubuntu Phones are dead, think again, because the UBports team has been hard at work to bring you the OTA-4, which will be the first to rebase the operating system on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus). "The main reason why the arrival of OTA-4 seemed to take so long is because Ubuntu Touch switched its base to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Xenial Xerus. This is a mammoth milestone for the project, because it allowed us to transition from the unsupported Ubuntu 15.04 Vivid Vervet to a Long Term Support (LTS) base," reads today's announcement. Read more Also: UBports' Ubuntu Touch OTA-4 RC Released, Upgrades To Ubuntu 16.04 LTS